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This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

This historical recipe was recreated courtesy of Roel Mulder.

In 1627, someone at the headquarters of the Flemish province of the Jesuits in Brussels thought it was a good idea to investigate the brewing methods of their subsidiary monasteries. The result was a recipe for “good beer” that was recommended as the standard for the Jesuits. The Belgian historians Erik Aerts and Eddy Put who rediscovered this recipe, tried to compare it to today’s abbey beers but had to admit that, to our modern palates, the 17th-century original must have been a “quite mushy drink.”

In any case, the recipe states that the beer is at its healthiest if its color is not white, not brown, but, “of middle colour, that is orange.” In other words, it’s a three-grain amber beer. Roel added some roasted barley to get to that color. Unfortunately, there is no mention of the quantity of hops involved, so that is at your own discretion.

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Homebrew Recipes

Jesuit Beer, 1627

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

The following homebrew recipe was provided by Seung Yob Nah, the winner of the 2019 Daegu Stout Smackdown in Daegu, Korea. Seung Yob was the first two-time best of show champion of this competition. His recipe was brewed by the Daedo Brewing Company and released in November 2019. It’s a classic take on the sweet stout style!

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Homebrew Recipes

Toto Stout

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

The following homebrew recipe comes courtesy of Jared Hatch. Hatch designed this IPA to make use of some of the citrus fruits native to Korea.

As an avid cook, Hatch enjoys applying things he learns from the culinary world to his brewing. To extract the citrus flavors from the fruit without adding unwanted astringency and vegetal matter, he peeled 20 green tangerines from Jeju (an island off the south coast of Korea), put them in a zip-top bag with dextrose, and removed the air to keep the peels in close contact with the sugar to produce an “oleo-saccharum.” The peels dissolve the sugar and lend their essential oils in the process to yield a syrup that can be added to the boil kettle at knockout.

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Homebrew Recipes

Double White IPA

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

This historical recipe was provided courtesy of Roel Mulder.

A wonderful find was a little black book full of handwritten brewing notes in the archives of the Franciscans in Holland. The booklet dates from ca. 1840 and may have been used by someone connected to Franciscan monks in the region of Rotterdam. Dialect words, however, suggest the anonymous author was probably from Flanders, the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium. In any case, it contains one of the weirdest recipes Roel has seen so far. It provides a glimpse into the hidden world of brewing of the past.

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Homebrew Recipes

Wit Bier ca. 1840

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

This classic American Pilsner recipe is courtesy of Jack Horzempa.

The recipe as written will gain body and a mild sweetness from the use of flaked maize (corn). For a lighter, crisper take on the style, replace the corn with flaked rice. And for a more modern interpretation, replace the six-row malt with your favorite North American two-row Pilsner malt. Any way you brew it, this classic American lager is sure to refresh!

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Homebrew Recipes

Jack’s Classic American Pilsner

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

This recipe comes courtesy of Mark Rocheleau and Andrew Orr. There are options for homebrewers who live in states where marijuana and/or industrial hemp is legal and want to combine their craft beer with marijuana or hemp for personal enjoyment. This tripel-style, THC infusion combines the golden strong ale mild spice with a pleasing THC tincture.

THC-infused beer can—and very likely will—induce psychoactive effects, which can vary from person to person. Consume these beers responsibly and at your own risk. If you are unsure of what to expect, start with a very small sample and wait a few hours before consuming more.

Editor's Note: Despite legalization and/or decriminalization of cannabis and cannabis-derived products by many states and the District of Columbia, marijuana remains classified as a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 and, thus, federally illegal. The American Homebrewers Association neither endorses nor discourages brewing with cannabis-related products, however homebrewers who do so should remember that such beers are not permitted in the National Homebrew Competition. Most local and regional competitions also do not allow cannabis beers at this time.

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Homebrew Recipes

THC-Infused Tripel Royal Stag

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

This unique recipe comes courtesy of Dan Heil. Sometimes finishing all the doughnuts can be difficult. Just as you shouldn't finish all your homebrew in one sitting, kicking a whole box of donuts is not generally recommended! If you find yourself in a predicament like Dan, this recipe can reduce food waste and yield a delicious doughnut Belgian-style pale ale in the process.

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Homebrew Recipes

Stale Doughnut Belgian Pale Ale

This beer recipe is featured in the March/April 2020 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

The follow homebrew recipe comes courtesy of Jared Hatch. Variations of this recipe have won the Korean National Homebrewing Championship twice.

The citrus flavors from the kumquats pair beautifully with the Citra hop character. Hatch likes to use Cryo Hops when dry hopping to reduce absorption losses. He does a clean primary fermentation before racking to secondary, where he adds the Roeselare culture. Once the gravity is stable and the beer has the desired Brett aromatics and sourness, the beer is racked onto the kumquats.

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Homebrew Recipes

Kumquat Citra Sour

This beer recipe is featured in the January/February 2016 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

This big barleywine from Mike Froehlich won a silver medal in the Great American Beer Festival's 2015 Pro-Am Competition. With the help of brewers from Colorado's Odd13 Brewing, Froehlich was able to approach this big grain bill with finesse and created a wood-aged beer very similar to Sierra Nevada's Bigfoot barleywine.

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Homebrew Recipes

Atahsaia Barleywine

This beer recipe is featured in the May/June 2014 issue of Zymurgy magazine. Join the American Homebrewers Association or start your 30-day free trial to access the Zymurgy online archive and other exclusive member benefits!

A London porter benefits from the proper water: alkaline with a dose of sodium and chloride. Thames water was revered as producing better porters and that character is evidenced in the water profile. The somewhat elevated alkalinity of the London porter profile helps keep the mash pH slightly higher than in typical pale beer brewing, enhancing the flavor quality of the dark malts.

A London porter would likely be characterized as a brown porter using BJCP style guidelines. The malt bill for a brown porter is largely 2-row pale malt with modest percentages of roast and crystal malts. According to Brewing Classic Styles, the secret to a great brown porter recipe is the inclusion of brown malt. English hops are preferred to meld with the malt bill.

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Homebrew Recipes

Thames Porter