Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: pinnah on March 12, 2012, 11:08:25 PM

Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 12, 2012, 11:08:25 PM
My fingernails are filled with soil for the first time this year.

How about a garden thread?

I would love to learn from you brewers
that spend time in the garden.

Watcha got?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 13, 2012, 12:48:27 AM
I got onions (white and red), leeks and mustard greens in. My tomatoes are nearly ready to transplant into the ground.

Will triple the size of my growing area this week. Will also have 6 yards of garden soil delivered on Thursday.

Then it will be chiles and cucumbers. Might try some zucchini squash.

Cheaper to buy beans than grow them. Pics will follow.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on March 13, 2012, 01:12:17 AM
I've been building boxes for my garden this year.   I have 3 that are made from 2X12 sides and bottoms, 3 are 2 X12 bottom with 2 X10 sides.  The have beets, spinach, radishes, green onions,and carrots planted already.  I'll do 3 more boxes for tomatoes, cukes/melons and squash.  I also have garlic, shallots, asparagus, red potatoes, and russsets planted in the ground,
The weeds are so bad out here, especially the uncontrollable bermuda grass.  I was either going to give up or go to containers of some sort to keep the grass out.
My Cascades are also up so I'll be mixing hop shoots with asparagus next weekend I hope.











m
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2012, 01:40:45 AM
Great timing!

I just cleared the garden of some leftover debris from the 2011 garden yesterday.
I also planted most of my seeds in a greenhouse planter last weekend. Tomatoes, cucumbers, assorted varieties of peppers, watermelon, squash, zuchini, tomatillos, etc...
I planted two rhizhomes of Centennial hops in a large planter as well. I'll eventually replant them outside when they get big enough.

My work is cutout for me this year.  ::)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on March 13, 2012, 03:34:52 AM
I got onions (white and red), leeks and mustard greens in. My tomatoes are nearly ready to transplant into the ground.

Will triple the size of my growing area this week. Will also have 6 yards of garden soil delivered on Thursday.

Then it will be chiles and cucumbers. Might try some zucchini squash.

Cheaper to buy beans than grow them. Pics will follow.
for me it's much cheaper and easier to buy chiles, but I may grow a few jalapenos for pico de gallo.
I figure we have one more freeze so I'm at least a couple of weeks from planting tomatoes.  I just have the cold weather stuff planted now.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 13, 2012, 03:41:29 AM
I just started hardening off my plants today. They'll be in the cold frame next week and in the ground by the end of the month. Onions are already planted.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2012, 03:43:50 AM
For annuals, we just have the garlic in (and coming up).  I've got a couple of bhut jolokia in pots, and I think they'll stay there.  Everything else will need to wait, we'll start some of it in early April - carrots, peppers, tomatoes at least, we're still planning. 

The rest is perennial stuff - kiwis, sour cherry, sweet cherry, apple, plum, pears, currant, blueberries, rhubarb, four kinds of grapes, fig, kumquat, aronia, strawberries, parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, savory, oregano, mint, chives . . . I'm probably forgetting some stuff. :)
Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 13, 2012, 03:44:51 AM
We've go lettuce that overwintered and the shallots, garlic and onions that went in last fall, but it's been too cold and wet to get anything done this year.  My wife is planning and starting seeds, though.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 13, 2012, 03:50:26 AM
For annuals, we just have the garlic in (and coming up).  I've got a couple of bhut jolokia in pots, and I think they'll stay there.  Everything else will need to wait, we'll start some of it in early April - carrots, peppers, tomatoes at least, we're still planning. 

The rest is perennial stuff - kiwis, sour cherry, sweet cherry, apple, plum, pears, currant, blueberries, rhubarb, four kinds of grapes, fig, kumquat, aronia, strawberries, parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, savory, oregano, mint, chives . . . I'm probably forgetting some stuff. :)

"parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme"

I thought you were about to break into a song. :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2012, 03:51:52 AM
For annuals, we just have the garlic in (and coming up).  I've got a couple of bhut jolokia in pots, and I think they'll stay there.  Everything else will need to wait, we'll start some of it in early April - carrots, peppers, tomatoes at least, we're still planning. 

The rest is perennial stuff - kiwis, sour cherry, sweet cherry, apple, plum, pears, currant, blueberries, rhubarb, four kinds of grapes, fig, kumquat, aronia, strawberries, parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, savory, oregano, mint, chives . . . I'm probably forgetting some stuff. :)

"parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme"

I thought you were about to break into a song. :D
I almost did, but if you ever heard me sing you'd be glad I didn't :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2012, 05:19:12 AM
still picking the last of the winter brocolli. The mustard greens are all bolted, just waiting to be turned under. The artichokes I put in last fall are doing nicely, don't see any buds yet but hopeful. I have hills built for the melons and cukes. There are two surviving pea vines getting a good start now.

built a hugelkultur (http://www.richsoil.com/hugelkultur/ (http://www.richsoil.com/hugelkultur/)) for some blueberries that a friends gifted to me. got some rhubarb in the ground a couple weeks ago.

have all the seeds but havn't finished getting the soil turned over and planted.

planning

corn/beans/squash in the front yard (luckily most of the neighbors are wierdos as well)

greens, more beans, strawberry spinach... gosh can't even remember everything right now. Also going to get some tomato and pepper starts from a friend.

I have a dozen assorted hop rhyzomes to go in as well, 1 sterling, a handful of cascade and a bunch of centennial (those things spread like anyones business)
Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 13, 2012, 05:30:21 AM
A dozen rhizomes?  Wow.....


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2012, 05:44:04 AM
A dozen rhizomes?  Wow.....


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

yeah I helped a friend prune his patch and the centennial were going crazy.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2012, 07:19:10 AM
built a hugelkultur (http://www.richsoil.com/hugelkultur/ (http://www.richsoil.com/hugelkultur/)) for some blueberries that a friends gifted to me. got some rhubarb in the ground a couple weeks ago.
i have some beds that are similar - wood on the bottom, a couple of layers of wood around the side, filled in with dirt.  At this point they definitely seem to be sucking a lot of nitrogen, but we supplement with some organic N source. 

re: blueberries in this kind of thing - I was told by a master gardener that the blueberries we planted around a ground out stump were getting too many nutrients from the decaying wood and that's why they were poor at fruiting and why they sent up huge shoots.  He hadn't seen them though, so who knows if he was right.  I followed his advice (added peat moss and did not fertilize) and got better fruit the next year, but it was an uncontrolled experiment so it may have been fine if I hadn't changed what I was doing.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on March 13, 2012, 08:05:48 AM
My coffee is loaded with blossoms.  My citrus, mango, macadamia, and avacado are winding down from major blooms.

My bees have been working their wings off.  Major nectar flows at this time of year.  I live near tens of thousands of acres of macadamia orchards.  The mac tree bloom is winding down, but the lehua bloom is nearing it's peak.  Once the lehua ends rhe albizias get to blooming...

Oh yeah, my son and I counted 47 pineapples in our pineapple patch today (he's on spring break).  Three or four will be ready in the next few days.  The rest will come in between now and the end of August.  The white pineapples (Kona Sugar Loaf) come in in July-August.  They are ambrosia!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on March 13, 2012, 12:14:43 PM
Euge, them poblanos still ain't sprouting. Any tricks you can recommend? Should I just drop the whole packet's worth and hope for the best? I've been doing a couple seeds at a time in a wet paper towel in a plastic bag but nothing doing...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 13, 2012, 12:20:51 PM
Euge, them poblanos still ain't sprouting. Any tricks you can recommend? Should I just drop the whole packet's worth and hope for the best? I've been doing a couple seeds at a time in a wet paper towel in a plastic bag but nothing doing...

If they haven't sprouted in the wet paper towel, they may just be bad seeds. However, of all the seeds I plant, peppers are the slowest, with the exception of some herbs. I'd give them at least a week to 10 days.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on March 13, 2012, 12:54:27 PM
I planted seeds about a month ago. I have already transplanted tomatoes to new containers and am working on the peppers. Going to be a good year for peppers!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on March 13, 2012, 01:00:21 PM
Euge, them poblanos still ain't sprouting. Any tricks you can recommend? Should I just drop the whole packet's worth and hope for the best? I've been doing a couple seeds at a time in a wet paper towel in a plastic bag but nothing doing...

If they haven't sprouted in the wet paper towel, they may just be bad seeds. However, of all the seeds I plant, peppers are the slowest, with the exception of some herbs. I'd give them at least a week to 10 days.

Yeah, I'm guessing it's just bad luck. Wife says up to 50% of seeds in a packet can be non-viable. I've found this site:  http://www.tradewindsfruitstore.com and they ship to France, so I ordered a bunch of stuff, including some coffee tree seeds. I have a grow light (that I use for LEGAL purposes thankyouverymuchofficer) that should be able to help them out no problem.

Puna, if you're reading this, PM me, I've got a q for you about certain chemical processes involving corn.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 13, 2012, 01:06:23 PM
Just started my first set of seeds this past weekend (cabbage, broccoli, celery and trying kohlrabi for the first time this year). Garlic I planted in the fall is all starting to pop up now.

Going to rototill and lay out my beds this weekend (as long as the weather holds out). I'm bummed that the vetch and oats I planted this fall didn't take where I was planning on expanding the garden, but I guess ill just till in some topsoil and compost and hope for the best.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 13, 2012, 01:34:44 PM
re: blueberries in this kind of thing - I was told by a master gardener that the blueberries we planted around a ground out stump were getting too many nutrients from the decaying wood and that's why they were poor at fruiting and why they sent up huge shoots.  He hadn't seen them though, so who knows if he was right.  I followed his advice (added peat moss and did not fertilize) and got better fruit the next year, but it was an uncontrolled experiment so it may have been fine if I hadn't changed what I was doing.

Best thing I ever did for our blueberries is to get the soil pH down, way down.  Original had them in beds along the foundation and just being that close to the concrete must have been keeping the pH too high.  Transplanted to raised beds away from the house and acidified the heck out of the soil and we got bumper crops.  Most ends up eaten by the birds, though :(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2012, 02:26:10 PM
re: blueberries in this kind of thing - I was told by a master gardener that the blueberries we planted around a ground out stump were getting too many nutrients from the decaying wood and that's why they were poor at fruiting and why they sent up huge shoots.  He hadn't seen them though, so who knows if he was right.  I followed his advice (added peat moss and did not fertilize) and got better fruit the next year, but it was an uncontrolled experiment so it may have been fine if I hadn't changed what I was doing.

Best thing I ever did for our blueberries is to get the soil pH down, way down.  Original had them in beds along the foundation and just being that close to the concrete must have been keeping the pH too high.  Transplanted to raised beds away from the house and acidified the heck out of the soil and we got bumper crops.  Most ends up eaten by the birds, though :(

yeah I have begun to segregate my compost and put all the coffee grounds on the future blue berry hill. stripped the old christmas tree down and put the bits and pieces on the hill as well. I will add some peat moss when I plant them as well.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Mark G on March 13, 2012, 03:14:31 PM
I'm digging up a 20'x10' area of lawn to expand the garden this year. Starting that work today actually. I need to get some seeds started too, but haven't decided what quite yet.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2012, 04:25:37 PM
Euge, them poblanos still ain't sprouting. Any tricks you can recommend? Should I just drop the whole packet's worth and hope for the best? I've been doing a couple seeds at a time in a wet paper towel in a plastic bag but nothing doing...
How warm are you keeping them?  Try to get them up to a pretty constant 85F, and it may take 2-4 weeks (and sometimes up to 6) for them to sprout.  It really depends on the pepper variety and quality of the seeds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 13, 2012, 05:44:11 PM
How warm are you keeping them?  Try to get them up to a pretty constant 85F, and it may take 2-4 weeks (and sometimes up to 6) for them to sprout.  It really depends on the pepper variety and quality of the seeds.

Yep, I've always had fits trying to get any kind of pepper seeds to start.  Warm 'em up
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 13, 2012, 06:03:15 PM
How warm are you keeping them?  Try to get them up to a pretty constant 85F, and it may take 2-4 weeks (and sometimes up to 6) for them to sprout.  It really depends on the pepper variety and quality of the seeds.

Yep, I've always had fits trying to get any kind of pepper seeds to start.  Warm 'em up

I put my seeds in little peat pots with coir and seal them up in a plastic container. Then it goes in a warm place- like the top of the TV.

Chiles take a long time to sprout. It certainly is possible that the seeds are duds- I didn't dry the pods for the poblano's so who knows what temps they were exposed to. If you'd like I can send you some more seeds from fresh pods.

Conversely, my tomatoes sprout in a couple days in a warm container.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 13, 2012, 06:05:17 PM
Conversely, my tomatoes sprout in a couple days in a warm container.

Yep, 'maters are a piece of cake
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2012, 06:30:28 PM
Conversely, my tomatoes sprout in a couple days in a warm container.

Yep, 'maters are a piece of cake

I planted most of my seeds over a week ago and have cucumbers about an inch high so far. It's amazing how fast they sprout.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on March 13, 2012, 07:50:12 PM
Nah, no worries Euge, I found a shop that'll ship to me, so we're set. I got the following:

   1 #508 - Jalapeno Pepper - Capsicum annuum
       1 #2250 - Poblano L Pepper - Capsicum annuum
       1 #2734 - California Wonder Pepper, Golden - Capsicum annuum
       1 #150 - Coffea arabica - Coffee
       1 #2364 - San Marzano 2 Tomato - Solanum lycopersicum
       1 #1131 - Bloody Butcher Corn - Zea mays
       1 #1932 - Kleckly's Sweet Watermelon - Citrullus lanatus
       1 #2627 - Perpetual Swiss Chard - Beta vulgaris
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2012, 08:12:18 PM
There is one thing I forgot to get...and that's Poblano pepper seeds. It's not too late to get them started. I'll be on the lookout for some seeds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 13, 2012, 08:49:44 PM
I'm trying some Mucho Nacho jalapenos this year. It's a hybrid monster perfect for stuffed peppers. I also saved seeds from some good sized peppers I bought at the supermarket, but I don't know if they are hybrids or not. They germinated just fine.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2012, 08:58:41 PM
I'm trying some Mucho Nacho jalapenos this year. It's a hybrid monster perfect for stuffed peppers. I also saved seeds from some good sized peppers I bought at the supermarket, but I don't know if they are hybrids or not. They germinated just fine.

they are probably hybrids but hey, what's the worst case scenerio? you end up with unappatizeing peppers (well I guess the WORST case is that monsanto sends a PI to your garden and sues you for theft of intellectual property but that's not likely). best case scenerio you find some amazing stabile variety and get famous selling it!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 13, 2012, 09:01:58 PM
I'm trying some Mucho Nacho jalapenos this year. It's a hybrid monster perfect for stuffed peppers. I also saved seeds from some good sized peppers I bought at the supermarket, but I don't know if they are hybrids or not. They germinated just fine.

I planted some Mucho Nacho's a couple of years ago, and thought it was a great pepper. You have the right idea to use those as stuffed peppers, one of my favorites to put on the grill!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 13, 2012, 09:19:06 PM
I'm trying some Mucho Nacho jalapenos this year. It's a hybrid monster perfect for stuffed peppers. I also saved seeds from some good sized peppers I bought at the supermarket, but I don't know if they are hybrids or not. They germinated just fine.

they are probably hybrids but hey, what's the worst case scenerio? you end up with unappatizeing peppers (well I guess the WORST case is that monsanto sends a PI to your garden and sues you for theft of intellectual property but that's not likely). best case scenerio you find some amazing stabile variety and get famous selling it!

After reading about what Monsanto does to farmers and others, I'll do my best to never buy their products again and I happen to like Roundup.

If they are hybrids, I think I'll just end up getting a small jalapeno, but I may get nothing at all. They'll be well marked in the garden. It's cheap fun. I bought Mucho Nacho seeds, so that's my back-up.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2012, 09:52:26 PM
I'm trying some Mucho Nacho jalapenos this year. It's a hybrid monster perfect for stuffed peppers. I also saved seeds from some good sized peppers I bought at the supermarket, but I don't know if they are hybrids or not. They germinated just fine.

they are probably hybrids but hey, what's the worst case scenerio? you end up with unappatizeing peppers (well I guess the WORST case is that monsanto sends a PI to your garden and sues you for theft of intellectual property but that's not likely). best case scenerio you find some amazing stabile variety and get famous selling it!

After reading about what Monsanto does to farmers and others, I'll do my best to never buy their products again and I happen to like Roundup.

If they are hybrids, I think I'll just end up getting a small jalapeno, but I may get nothing at all. They'll be well marked in the garden. It's cheap fun. I bought Mucho Nacho seeds, so that's my back-up.

Yup monsanto is the devil.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on March 14, 2012, 03:19:31 PM
Well I started a good  asparagus bed last year and they may
produce this year because they were 3 y.o. crowns. But may
let them be just to get good and established. 
The rest of it is prolly still 60 days away we have frost danger
until 1st of june.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 14, 2012, 09:04:11 PM
 8).  Wow, I am impressed most of you folks start your seeds.

I am a bit lame in that arena still.  Other than stuff that sprouts in place, I buy plants at the local greenhouse.  Maybe because my garden tends on the small side, and I cannot use a whole packet of certain seeds.  Like, I might plant one sungold cherry tomato, a couple of brandywine, 4 poblano and 4 jalapeno, etc.  I guess the greenhouse has a good selection, but probably more $pendy. ::)

I have been screening and packing compost.  Trimmed back the raspberries, planted some spinach, lettuce and cilantro.  Garlic just came up this week.


So onions.  I want to get onions right this year, and be able to stick a bunch away for use all winter.
My success with them in the past has been spotty, which seems odd to me because they seem simple enough.
I start with the little bulbs; is that what most of you do?  Most come up, but a lot went to flower right off the bat last year, which looks cool but does not make a large, storable onion.  Any thoughts on that?

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 14, 2012, 09:26:33 PM
Good fertilizer will help your onions develop, but I've had the same problem in that they turn out too small.


Once you get started with a good insulated, heated seed bed, grow light, etc., you can save a bunch of money. It's actually one of my favorite parts of gardening.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 14, 2012, 09:36:21 PM
8).  Wow, I am impressed most of you folks start your seeds.

I am a bit lame in that arena still.  Other than stuff that sprouts in place, I buy plants at the local greenhouse.  Maybe because my garden tends on the small side, and I cannot use a whole packet of certain seeds.  Like, I might plant one sungold cherry tomato, a couple of brandywine, 4 poblano and 4 jalapeno, etc.  I guess the greenhouse has a good selection, but probably more $pendy. ::)

I have been screening and packing compost.  Trimmed back the raspberries, planted some spinach, lettuce and cilantro.  Garlic just came up this week.


So onions.  I want to get onions right this year, and be able to stick a bunch away for use all winter.
My success with them in the past has been spotty, which seems odd to me because they seem simple enough.
I start with the little bulbs; is that what most of you do?  Most come up, but a lot went to flower right off the bat last year, which looks cool but does not make a large, storable onion.  Any thoughts on that?

for storage purposes it's a good idea to start onions from seed. They store better than way and are less likely to bolt on you.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 15, 2012, 01:06:21 AM
I started my onions from sets this year. Next year I will do my own and separate them come planting time.

Aren't onions cool a weather crop? And my understanding is that they are heavy feeders and drinkers.

Anyway hope mine turn out as they are what I use the most.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 15, 2012, 01:10:45 AM
Nice euge!

I bought some asparagas root, horseradish root, and shallots today. I'm expanding the garden by 30% this year. I need to remove sod and backfill with some premium topsoil and mushroom soil blend. Looks like my work is going to be cut out for me in the coming weeks.

We should definitely include photos for our viewing pleasure.  8)
Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 15, 2012, 01:33:24 AM
I started my onions from sets this year. Next year I will do my own and separate them come planting time.

Aren't onions cool a weather crop? And my understanding is that they are heavy feeders and drinkers.

Anyway hope mine turn out as they are what I use the most.

We plant onions in the fall to overwinter and again in the spring for fall harvest.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: greatplainsbrewer on March 15, 2012, 01:45:47 AM
Sort of off topic but. . .

I homebrew, make my own BBQ, raise a garden, preserve food, etc.  I used to think that was out of the ordinary but the more homebrewers I meet. . .

It seems to be more of a "If I want it right, I'll do it myself" mentality than a strictly beer mentality.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 15, 2012, 02:14:34 AM
Here are pics of phase one and two:
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-2I3MRlxEqUw/T1-Zyxe7ixI/AAAAAAAAAYA/7mYjRgzWsjY/s640/2012-02-28%252012.17.15.jpg)
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-3XQ_5bNH7kU/T1-ZkJqpoiI/AAAAAAAAAXw/EuWKl7N4upQ/s640/2012-03-13%252013.55.28.jpg)
Need to get some dirt delivered tomorrow or by Sunday the latest! Also, I need to set up some sort of drip system.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 15, 2012, 02:50:56 AM
The big thing with onions IMO is to make sure you weed them like mad. They really don't do well with competition from weeds. I planted from sets last year and they stored just fine, but I couldn't keep up on the weeding as well as I would have liked and a lot of them were smaller than I had hoped. This year I preordered some bunches of starter onions so I'll see how they do compared to the sets.

Up here in New England I plant my onions around last frost (late April) and harvest in early fall.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 15, 2012, 11:48:00 AM
8) .  Wow, I am impressed most of you folks start your seeds.

I am a bit lame in that arena still.  Other than stuff that sprouts in place, I buy plants at the local greenhouse.  Maybe because my garden tends on the small side, and I cannot use a whole packet of certain seeds.  Like, I might plant one sungold cherry tomato, a couple of brandywine, 4 poblano and 4 jalapeno, etc.  I guess the greenhouse has a good selection, but probably more $pendy. ::)

I have been screening and packing compost.  Trimmed back the raspberries, planted some spinach, lettuce and cilantro.  Garlic just came up this week.


So onions.  I want to get onions right this year, and be able to stick a bunch away for use all winter.
My success with them in the past has been spotty, which seems odd to me because they seem simple enough.
I start with the little bulbs; is that what most of you do?  Most come up, but a lot went to flower right off the bat last year, which looks cool but does not make a large, storable onion.  Any thoughts on that?

for storage purposes it's a good idea to start onions from seed. They store better than way and are less likely to bolt on you.


Don't you have to start seeds in the summer for sets to be ready the following spring? I know there's something strange about growing onions from seeds and that's why most people don't do it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 15, 2012, 12:31:28 PM
The only onions I have grown from seed are the little green onions.
I bet they do take a long time.

I did get some wallawalla starts last year, and they worked great.
It was the little dormant bulbs (red and yellow) that many sent up a flower.


Nice expansion Euge!  Those words are wishful music to my ears "getting soil delivered".  Dreamy. ;D
You going to just smother that grass?

Rhubarb.  Definitely my favorite edible landscape plant.  Where else can you get tropical sized leaves like that?  Awesome.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on March 15, 2012, 01:43:52 PM
I did not know this, but apparently Swiss Chard and Rhubarb are relatives! Except while you eat the leaves on chard, the leaves on rhubarb are toxic. The more you know.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 02:31:57 PM
I did not know this, but apparently Swiss Chard and Rhubarb are relatives! Except while you eat the leaves on chard, the leaves on rhubarb are toxic. The more you know.

and they are both a type of beet.

**EDIT**

and as I discovered, in some places chard is perennial. I've been fighting with giant three foot chard plants that the prior resident of my house let go wild all over the lawn.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 15, 2012, 03:19:02 PM
I no longer have place for a garden but back when I did I'd plan my onions very shallow and cover them in a thick layer of grass clippings.  We have very heavy soil and it doesn't work well for bulbs, tubers or anything harvested from under ground.  By the end of the growing season the onions were all above ground but under 5-6" of grass clippings.  Worked great for many years.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 03:20:20 PM
I no longer have place for a garden but back when I did I'd plan my onions very shallow and cover them in a thick layer of grass clippings.  We have very heavy soil and it doesn't work well for bulbs, tubers or anything harvested from under ground.  By the end of the growing season the onions were all above ground but under 5-6" of grass clippings.  Worked great for many years.

Paul

My mother in law was telling me that this is how she used to do potatoes. in hay or straw.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 15, 2012, 04:26:32 PM
Need to get some dirt delivered tomorrow or by Sunday the latest! Also, I need to set up some sort of drip system.

Looking good so far euge.  :)

Are you planning to mix any organic materials into the soil. I am building a new compost bin in the coming weeks. I want to compost my spent grains and grass clippings for use on the garden.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 04:35:11 PM
Don't you have to start seeds in the summer for sets to be ready the following spring? I know there's something strange about growing onions from seeds and that's why most people don't do it.

You can start onion seeds indoors in early spring and plant the sets but no, they don't have to overwinter or anything. You do have to select your varieties correctly as they require varying day lengths to set bulbs. It is easier to plant sets because you don't have to thin and you don't have to start quite as early.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 15, 2012, 04:38:10 PM
Don't you have to start seeds in the summer for sets to be ready the following spring? I know there's something strange about growing onions from seeds and that's why most people don't do it.

You can start onion seeds indoors in early spring and plant the sets but no, they don't have to overwinter or anything. You do have to select your varieties correctly as they require varying day lengths to set bulbs. It is easier to plant sets because you don't have to thin and you don't have to start quite as early.


Any idea how long it takes, indoors, to get seeds to sets? Something like a yellow onion.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 04:50:51 PM
Don't you have to start seeds in the summer for sets to be ready the following spring? I know there's something strange about growing onions from seeds and that's why most people don't do it.

You can start onion seeds indoors in early spring and plant the sets but no, they don't have to overwinter or anything. You do have to select your varieties correctly as they require varying day lengths to set bulbs. It is easier to plant sets because you don't have to thin and you don't have to start quite as early.


Any idea how long it takes, indoors, to get seeds to sets? Something like a yellow onion.

don't know how long it would take, but you can start your seeds indoors 4 weeks before last frost. If you want to grow sets for the next year you can transplant them outside after frost danger and basically harvest as you normally would but do it when the stalks are only about 8-10 inches high and the bulbs have just begun to swell. cure just like normal and store till next spring (cool dark airy place) or layer them in straw in late fall for early spring onions, if your climate allows.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 15, 2012, 04:52:48 PM
Don't you have to start seeds in the summer for sets to be ready the following spring? I know there's something strange about growing onions from seeds and that's why most people don't do it.

You can start onion seeds indoors in early spring and plant the sets but no, they don't have to overwinter or anything. You do have to select your varieties correctly as they require varying day lengths to set bulbs. It is easier to plant sets because you don't have to thin and you don't have to start quite as early.


Any idea how long it takes, indoors, to get seeds to sets? Something like a yellow onion.

don't know how long it would take, but you can start your seeds indoors 4 weeks before last frost. If you want to grow sets for the next year you can transplant them outside after frost danger and basically harvest as you normally would but do it when the stalks are only about 8-10 inches high and the bulbs have just begun to swell. cure just like normal and store till next spring (cool dark airy place) or layer them in straw in late fall for early spring onions, if your climate allows.


I gotta try this. Now I wonder if I can even buy seeds locally.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 15, 2012, 05:30:08 PM
I just asked my wife (the REAL gardener around here) about her schedule for starting onions from seeds.  She said it takes a couple months for them to be ready to set out, but they'll keep in the pot a long time.  She's planted sets started from seeds 6 months earlier.  Often she'll plant the seeds in the spring, but plant the sets from them in the fall to overwinter.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 15, 2012, 05:37:40 PM
This is where I got most of my onion info.

 http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html  (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html)

I plan to spray some herbicide down to kill the grass, then turn it after a couple of days. Then the raised beds will be filled. I will lay mulch and perhaps gravel around the planters to keep the grass at bay. It will grow up the inside and is a real PITA to eradicate.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 05:50:11 PM
This is where I got most of my onion info.

 http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html  (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html)

I plan to spray some herbicide down to kill the grass, then turn it after a couple of days. Then the raised beds will be filled. I will lay mulch and perhaps gravel around the planters to keep the grass at bay. It will grow up the inside and is a real PITA to eradicate.

man, don't use herbicides! why spend the money to get healthy soil trucked in and then poison it? That stuff is bad for works, soil bacteria and therefore long term health of your soil. mulch with 6 or 8 inches of compost or even plastic or cardboard around the planters to keep the grass down. remember those grass roots, although annoying will break down and add structure to your soil!

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 15, 2012, 05:54:46 PM
This is where I got most of my onion info.

 http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html  (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html)

I plan to spray some herbicide down to kill the grass, then turn it after a couple of days. Then the raised beds will be filled. I will lay mulch and perhaps gravel around the planters to keep the grass at bay. It will grow up the inside and is a real PITA to eradicate.

man, don't use herbicides! why spend the money to get healthy soil trucked in and then poison it? That stuff is bad for works, soil bacteria and therefore long term health of your soil. mulch with 6 or 8 inches of compost or even plastic or cardboard around the planters to keep the grass down. remember those grass roots, although annoying will break down and add structure to your soil!

+ a bazillion.  No need to spray, just cut it short and cover it with many many layers of old newspaper and put your fill on top.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 15, 2012, 05:58:40 PM
This is where I got most of my onion info.

 http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html  (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html)

I plan to spray some herbicide down to kill the grass, then turn it after a couple of days. Then the raised beds will be filled. I will lay mulch and perhaps gravel around the planters to keep the grass at bay. It will grow up the inside and is a real PITA to eradicate.

man, don't use herbicides! why spend the money to get healthy soil trucked in and then poison it? That stuff is bad for works, soil bacteria and therefore long term health of your soil. mulch with 6 or 8 inches of compost or even plastic or cardboard around the planters to keep the grass down. remember those grass roots, although annoying will break down and add structure to your soil!

+ a bazillion.  No need to spray, just cut it short and cover it with many many layers of old newspaper and put your fill on top.


Not to promote a Monsanto product, but Roundup goes pretty much inert when it hits the soil. I wouldn't have a problem using it as long as it's some I already have around. I won't give those a-holes any more money.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 15, 2012, 06:03:34 PM
+ a bazillion.  No need to spray, just cut it short and cover it with many many layers of old newspaper and put your fill on top.

Not to promote a Monsanto product, but Roundup goes pretty much inert when it hits the soil. I wouldn't have a problem using it as long as it's some I already have around. I won't give those a-holes any more money.

If you just really, really, absolutely feel the need to kill that grass, boiling water would be 100% safe.  Just redirect the output of your chiller from your next batch into the bed and voila!  (and no $$ to Monsanto either :) )
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 15, 2012, 06:04:02 PM
+ a bazillion.  No need to spray, just cut it short and cover it with many many layers of old newspaper and put your fill on top.

+ a bazillion and one!  We've been doing that for years and it works great!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 06:08:57 PM
If anyone is interested in lots more info on how to avoid a)using chem/supporting monsanto and b) working less hard in the garden this guy Sepp Holtzer is something of a luminary in the permaculture world.

He grown citrus...in Austria.

http://www.richsoil.com/sepp-holzer/sepp-holzer-permaculture.jsp (http://www.richsoil.com/sepp-holzer/sepp-holzer-permaculture.jsp)

now back to your regularly schedule programming
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 15, 2012, 06:14:29 PM
I have the Round-up! Anyway it has caused me some concern especially with my projected timeline so maybe the newspaper approach would be more appropriate. 8)

I also have the Ortho Southern lawn concentrate. Knocks out the weeds and leaves the grass alone! Works badass. It's been a long war against the weeds over the years since my lawn died from the drought- I won't let that happen again no matter what water restrictions are placed on the community. Best to hope for rain!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 15, 2012, 06:19:35 PM
It's been a long war against the weeds over the years since my lawn died from the drought- I won't let that happen again no matter what water restrictions are placed on the community. Best to hope for rain!

Or just learn to live with the weeds.  It's all green :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 06:22:23 PM
I have the Round-up! Anyway it has caused me some concern especially with my projected timeline so maybe the newspaper approach would be more appropriate. 8)

I also have the Ortho Southern lawn concentrate. Knocks out the weeds and leaves the grass alone! Works badass. It's been a long war against the weeds over the years since my lawn died from the drought- I won't let that happen again no matter what water restrictions are placed on the community. Best to hope for rain!

or figure out how to work with native species to create a 'lawn' that doesn't require as much water, chem etc.

Sorry Euge, you hit a sore spot for me. You do what you think is right and what you want to do. If you are at all interested/curious check out that permaculture link. You would be amazed what those folks are doing and after a couple of years of hard work the amount of continued work goes WAY down.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 15, 2012, 06:39:54 PM
It's been a long war against the weeds over the years since my lawn died from the drought- I won't let that happen again no matter what water restrictions are placed on the community. Best to hope for rain!

Or just learn to live with the weeds.  It's all green :)

That's my philosophy!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 15, 2012, 06:43:33 PM
I have the Round-up! Anyway it has caused me some concern especially with my projected timeline so maybe the newspaper approach would be more appropriate. 8)

I also have the Ortho Southern lawn concentrate. Knocks out the weeds and leaves the grass alone! Works badass. It's been a long war against the weeds over the years since my lawn died from the drought- I won't let that happen again no matter what water restrictions are placed on the community. Best to hope for rain!


I would never advocate the use of herbicides or pesticides unless you're losing the war. I've been there, so I feel your pain.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 15, 2012, 07:06:27 PM
Well I live in a city that has laws about how things look and neighbors as well. So it's a catch-22 situation and looking at the devastation after I let my yard die (being a good citizen) I swore never again. Then the losing war against the weeds... :( I couldn't keep up. Other than the odd spray with the Southern lawn at the beginning of each particular weed season my yard is back and healthy and grows a bunch of edible dandelions. I just mow it and spot-water when it needs it. The weeds can't compete with my grass very well because I cut it at the mower's tallest setting.

Anyway the hugelkultur speaks to me. I'm revamping my plan to see if it can be modified cause I got some old prime hugelkultur wood laying around. I can't do anything on the scale I'd like to- seven feet tall? My yard ain't that big. :D

I'll bore you with my reasoning for my approach. When I moved in to this house in 08 we were under the same drought conditions- except things are worse now. I had now idea how badly it floods back there until we had one of those incredible but typical Texas thunderstorm systems come through.
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-0bQM_xMsIAo/TDYIh0owHaI/AAAAAAAAAMI/4V84otQlTVs/s640/img_0175.jpg)
It gets as much as a foot deep back there spanning about 6 backyards with the deepest part in mine. I installed a sub-pump to drain the thousands of gallons of water. The soil is a rich but heavy clay so it only absorbs so much. I can't have a lake back there for weeks as it evaporates. My neighbors love me for that pump!

The "garden" is a project to raise the level of the yard so I can more easily divert the water to the pump. However I like the garden so it'll rise as the dirt does.

 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 15, 2012, 07:14:58 PM
Forget the pump, stock Lake Euge with some fish.  :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2012, 07:21:54 PM
Forget the pump, stock Lake Euge with some fish.  :D

seriously, it's something to think about. when you get a super wet spot like that it can be an opportunity to build yourself a pond, This would also probably help drain the neighboring yards as well. course that kind of depends on what's underneath your lawn. pond/sewer line, not so good.

On the hugelkultur beds, Mine is only about 3 feet tall. I don't know how well it will work yet but I have read that you can do shorter beds, they just don't last quite as long. Youc an also dig a trench a couple feet deep and then build the mound in that so 7' become 5' above grade.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 15, 2012, 07:38:32 PM
Forget the pump, stock Lake Euge with some fish.  :D

seriously, it's something to think about. when you get a super wet spot like that it can be an opportunity to build yourself a pond, This would also probably help drain the neighboring yards as well. course that kind of depends on what's underneath your lawn. pond/sewer line, not so good.

On the hugelkultur beds, Mine is only about 3 feet tall. I don't know how well it will work yet but I have read that you can do shorter beds, they just don't last quite as long. Youc an also dig a trench a couple feet deep and then build the mound in that so 7' become 5' above grade.

Mosquitoes. No likey standing water and the grackles ate all the fish out of my neighbors pond. LOL

Yup digging a trench loaded with wood with a raised bed on top! I like the idea. Oh I see some back-breaking digging in my future...

Damn heavy clay is like glue.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 16, 2012, 01:39:10 AM
Hella cool. all the responses on how the heck to get nice fat onions.  Thanks.

Sorry to put the euge on the spot for grass killin.
the Devil Monsanto Roundup works well, and is easy
yet you have your imprint defined by the pine box.
I might go for the elbow grease and spade the footprint
then smother with the Morticai Layer...and soil. 
Still wow on teh import. 8)


Yes the perennial rhubarb not dissimilar to the chard.
Me likes a little Bright Lights strategically placed at traveling nodes within the garden. :o

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 16, 2012, 06:09:31 PM
Another trick for converting lawn to beds is to cut an outline around the bed by pressing straight down with a spade all around. Then you just treat it like sod and flip the whole section over like a carpet. The grass breaks down real quick and becomes good earthworm food.

As far as your pond goes, if you can't do fish maybe invest in some ducks instead. They're great bug control for the garden, and you get tasty eggs as a bonus.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on March 16, 2012, 06:25:41 PM
Another trick for converting lawn to beds is to cut an outline around the bed by pressing straight down with a spade all around. Then you just treat it like sod and flip the whole section over like a carpet. The grass breaks down real quick and becomes good earthworm food.

As far as your pond goes, if you can't do fish maybe invest in some ducks instead. They're great bug control for the garden, and you get tasty eggs as a bonus.


And coyotes and other varmints love them.  :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 17, 2012, 12:31:28 AM
As far as your pond goes, if you can't do fish maybe invest in some ducks instead. They're great bug control for the garden, and you get tasty eggs as a bonus.

And coyotes and other varmints love them.  :D

Yeah, that's the main reason why I haven't sprung for some birds myself. As cute as the 5 red fox kits were that were playing in the lot next door all summer last year, they won't be so cute if I start raising poultry. And the 3 red-tailed hawks that were circling my yard in the air yesterday would be a whole lot less awesome too :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 17, 2012, 12:59:08 AM
I always thought those upright runner ducks would be comedy cruising about the yard. ;D

The chickens have been in my garden.
I thought it was cute when the newborn chicks started scratching around in there.
Now they think they own the place
and really have nearly destroyed my fall spinach that overwintered as rosettes and is supposed to be first greens!

They do some good rototiller and fertilizer work, but it is about time for them to be excluded.

I might get some peas in tomorrow.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 18, 2012, 04:16:39 AM
Ordered honey bees!!!, Onion seeds start 6 weeks at least before replanting. In the north part of the US look for day neutral onions.

Euge just order fill and let the water  be someone elses problem, JK.

Sad but we are 80 days away from last frost, sucks seeing it was 75 today. We do have some lettuce started though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on March 18, 2012, 09:01:45 PM
This is where I got most of my onion info.

 http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html  (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/onions/oniongro.html)

I plan to spray some herbicide down to kill the grass, then turn it after a couple of days. Then the raised beds will be filled. I will lay mulch and perhaps gravel around the planters to keep the grass at bay. It will grow up the inside and is a real PITA to eradicate.

. remember those grass roots, although annoying will break down and add structure to your soil!
That all depends on what kind of grass you have.  Bermuda grass sends underground runners to the slightest hint of moisture, and no amount of mulch, black plastic, newspaper, etc will affect it.
That's why this year I built boxes-sides, bottoms and ends to keep the grass out.  So far I have spinach, radishes, carrots, beets, onions and potatoes coming up.
I've been picking asparagus for a week now and it's just getting started.  Shallots and garlic volunteers are coming up looking great, and next week I'll plant squash and tomatoes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 19, 2012, 06:06:55 PM
Wow, things are way ahead in sunny Carlsbad!  You plant your shallots in the fall?


I spent the weekend in the yard,
tearing down last years hops, hauling compost, doing some cultivation with my favorite hoe....
and harvesting some carrots:  yum




There are house carrots and there are horse carrots. 
Not sure why some go wild with the laterals  ::)


(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo357.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 19, 2012, 08:06:32 PM
There are house carrots and there are horse carrots. 
Not sure why some go wild with the laterals  ::)

Check out Root Knot Nematodes.  As in...

http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.org/landingpage.cfm?article=ca.v059n02p63&fulltext=yes (http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.org/landingpage.cfm?article=ca.v059n02p63&fulltext=yes)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 19, 2012, 10:52:49 PM
Wow, that's an ugly carrot! Nothing compared to yours, but here's an inappropriate carrot I harvested last summer:
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-GpggD04wxtE/TsVf832nZfI/AAAAAAAAAmE/ezMRQNcmy8o/s871/2011_09_14_10_00_24_234.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 26, 2012, 02:45:00 PM
I stood up some beds this weekend.


Here are the onions I planted.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo133.jpg)


The thing about those that went to flower last year, is that they all came up again this spring!
I hacked one with the hoe, it looked like this

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo224.jpg)

I split it into 6, and planted as individual starts.  Will see how that goes.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo229-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 26, 2012, 02:48:33 PM
Finally got the rest of the garden turned over and desodded (it's a new garden for us) now to dig paths and decide where everything is going. Got the potatoes in the mail this week so, aside from the shock of discovering I just paid 13 bucks for 2.5 lbs of french fingerlings, I am ready to plant my potato patch. anyone know why I can't just buy potatoes at 2.50 a lb or whatever for planting? I used to think it had something to do with the age of the spud and perhaps I am right but gosh!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 26, 2012, 04:33:09 PM
It may be a little late to plant potatoes or is that too early? ;)

I understand you can plant those from the store- just cut up each tuber so that each piece has an "eye".
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on March 26, 2012, 05:56:46 PM
Wow, we're waiting for the last of the snow we had last week to melt off the garden!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 26, 2012, 06:22:11 PM
It may be a little late to plant potatoes or is that too early? ;)

I understand you can plant those from the store- just cut up each tuber so that each piece has an "eye".
I hope it's not to late! I got the earliest shipping date i could from seed savers exchange. It's still pretty cold and wet here. There is even a touch of frost on my car some mornings.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on March 26, 2012, 09:19:38 PM
Finally got the rest of the garden turned over and desodded (it's a new garden for us) now to dig paths and decide where everything is going. Got the potatoes in the mail this week so, aside from the shock of discovering I just paid 13 bucks for 2.5 lbs of french fingerlings, I am ready to plant my potato patch. anyone know why I can't just buy potatoes at 2.50 a lb or whatever for planting? I used to think it had something to do with the age of the spud and perhaps I am right but gosh!
Walmart was selling seed potatoes -$4 for 6 spuds.  I went to the veggie aisle and got a 10 pound bag for $3, put them in a cardboard box in the garage for a month until they sprouted.  I planted them 2 weeks ago and the plants are already about 4" high.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 26, 2012, 09:23:05 PM
The old farmers rules I grew up with were:

1)  Plant potatoes on Good Friday (not till next week this year)
2)  Don't plant if you sit on the ground and you rear end gets cold

We always got plenty of spuds every year so you should be fine with your current planting schedule.  Even if this year has been been a bit warmer than usual.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 26, 2012, 09:27:38 PM
Finally got the rest of the garden turned over and desodded (it's a new garden for us) now to dig paths and decide where everything is going. Got the potatoes in the mail this week so, aside from the shock of discovering I just paid 13 bucks for 2.5 lbs of french fingerlings, I am ready to plant my potato patch. anyone know why I can't just buy potatoes at 2.50 a lb or whatever for planting? I used to think it had something to do with the age of the spud and perhaps I am right but gosh!
Walmart was selling seed potatoes -$4 for 6 spuds.  I went to the veggie aisle and got a 10 pound bag for $3, put them in a cardboard box in the garage for a month until they sprouted.  I planted them 2 weeks ago and the plants are already about 4" high.

Ahh but were they organic heirloom varieties?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 26, 2012, 10:19:23 PM
I pay extra NOT to support Walmart.  I guess I am rich.
I support the local potato farm  (http://www.potatogarden.com/) in the area, although I still pay shipping ::) 
This year I think I have enough left over from last years harvest to replant.

Not to early to start potatoes; especially in central California. 
The sprouts can frost back a bit but no worries, they will rebound.

My favorite fingerling..the Rose Finn.  Yum.  What kind do you have?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 26, 2012, 10:52:36 PM
I pay extra NOT to support Walmart.  I guess I am rich.
I support the local potato farm  (http://www.potatogarden.com/) in the area, although I still pay shipping ::) 
This year I think I have enough left over from last years harvest to replant.

Not to early to start potatoes; especially in central California. 
The sprouts can frost back a bit but no worries, they will rebound.

My favorite fingerling..the Rose Finn.  Yum.  What kind do you have?

I've got all blue for my storage potato and La Ratte for fingerlings. It's my first year having a potato patch so I am starting slow. I do like the rose finn though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on March 27, 2012, 01:04:02 PM
Mort, I was looking at the SSE potatoes. How much will 2.5 lbs of potatoes get you? I'm only looking to do 4-6 plants. It might end up being too much.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 27, 2012, 02:35:08 PM
Mort, I was looking at the SSE potatoes. How much will 2.5 lbs of potatoes get you? I'm only looking to do 4-6 plants. It might end up being too much.

yeah, 2.5 lbs is about 10-15 spuds with the smaller potatoes like fingerlings and all blue. each one with a couple eyes on. I am planning for a pretty big crop maybe 20-30 plants of each variety. We like potatoes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on March 27, 2012, 03:10:04 PM
Me and the wife planted potatoes in mid Feb and they are about 4 to 8 inches tall which ones came up. We have had a lot of rain so far this year and we are about a foot above normal so about ¼ of the seed potatoes just rotted. Had a few other things that needed to be replanted as well like green beans, but most of garden is growing fine if the birds would just leave it alone. I finally put a net over the strawberries since I had been losing about 90%. I don’t mind sharing but that is a bit excessive. My hops are up and I already have small blood oranges, lemons, and blue berries.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 28, 2012, 03:48:12 AM
Sometimes the store potatoes are sprayed to prevent them from sprouting. If they sprout go for it!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on March 28, 2012, 08:27:18 AM
Harvested and carved the first pineapples this evening.  Celebrated by making mai tais topped with pineapple slices skewered with sugar cane spears. Homemade/homegrown everything... Hawaii!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 01, 2012, 12:08:17 AM
Harvested and carved the first pineapples this evening.  Celebrated by making mai tais topped with pineapple slices skewered with sugar cane spears. Homemade/homegrown everything... Hawaii!
And White dog for the kick?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on April 01, 2012, 01:55:44 AM
Rum
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on April 01, 2012, 03:53:55 AM
Wow, pineapples! what can't you grow in the islands?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 01, 2012, 07:11:34 AM
Wow, pineapples! what can't you grow in the islands?
Hops
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on April 01, 2012, 10:08:23 AM
Wow, pineapples! what can't you grow in the islands?

Bored
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 02, 2012, 02:25:56 PM
Well, I got the potatoes in, there are alot of la Ratte fingerlings in 2.5 lbs. two 15'x3' beds with a little room left over for interplanting, and two smaller patches and still had to send some home with a friend as I ran out of potato room. Got the rest of my beds dug for beans and maters. Got another 6 hop rhysomes in the dirt, 5 cascade, 1 sterling. Add those to the 6 centenial I planted last week (which have started to poke their little heads above ground) and it makes an even dozen. Got my blue berries in the hugel bed and topped it off with a little flowering heather my wife (Heather) got me for valentines. got some lettuce and chard seed in. and some strawberry spinach (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1217 (http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1217)). Got lots of seeds in starter mix in peat pots; beans, flowers, onions. Pulled one bulb of green garlic for pasta sauce. yum. I really like gardening. Next up is digging the three sisters plot (oaxacan green corn, pole beans and acorn squash) in the front yard. (luckily most of my neighbors are hippies)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 02, 2012, 06:34:06 PM
Wow, nice work morticai! 
You could interplant with fast growing spring things, bc it will take a while for the tater plants to fill out.

I have heard that when you cut potatoes in parts for planting, you need to let them dry out.  Any truth to that?

Apricot is in full bloom, so it snowed this morning. ::)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 02, 2012, 07:27:23 PM
Apricot is in full bloom, so it snowed this morning. ::)

I got back from Florida on friday night to see my nectarine tree in full bloom. Then got wet, heavy snow overnight that night lol.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 02, 2012, 07:28:11 PM
Wow, nice work morticai! 
You could interplant with fast growing spring things, bc it will take a while for the tater plants to fill out.

I have heard that when you cut potatoes in parts for planting, you need to let them dry out.  Any truth to that?

Apricot is in full bloom, so it snowed this morning. ::)

Yeah, My friend who was helping out and has a lot more knowledge about gardening than I said the same thing so we didn't botter cutting them up. still had plenty. probably about 15-20 purple and maybe twice that for the La Ratte.

on the snowy apricot thing, I hear that. I don't have any fruit trees myself (yet) but several other folks around here are gonna be hurting come july. We had a really warm couple of weeks back in february and all the trees started to bloom, then like 3 weeks of cold rainy weather. My friends plum tree got wiped out. every single flower got knocked off  >:( Ahh well mother nature will do what she does.
might put a few onions between the potatoes, not to many but a few. not sure what else. We already have a lettuce patch planted and we can only eat so much lettuce. Maybe some herbs. still gotta score some strawberries to share the mound with the blue berries. mmmm. berry mound.

Oh we also planted cukes (parisian pickling), watermelon (golden midget), and canteloup (petit gris). It's so mice to have a proper garden plot. My 16 month old is loving getting all muddy.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on April 02, 2012, 08:33:27 PM
Wow, nice work morticai! 
You could interplant with fast growing spring things, bc it will take a while for the tater plants to fill out.

I have heard that when you cut potatoes in parts for planting, you need to let them dry out.  Any truth to that?

Apricot is in full bloom, so it snowed this morning. ::)

It's so mice to have a proper garden plot. My 16 month old is loving getting all muddy.
This is why you should have a garden-for the kids.  My kids grew up eating fresh veggies straight from the garden(muddy carrots, immature sweet peas, etc) and we never had eating issues with either of them.  I cringe every time I see a relative or friend's kid refuse to eat veggies.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on April 02, 2012, 08:41:32 PM
Wow, nice work morticai! 
You could interplant with fast growing spring things, bc it will take a while for the tater plants to fill out.

I have heard that when you cut potatoes in parts for planting, you need to let them dry out.  Any truth to that?

Apricot is in full bloom, so it snowed this morning. ::)

It's so mice to have a proper garden plot. My 16 month old is loving getting all muddy.
This is why you should have a garden-for the kids.  My kids grew up eating fresh veggies straight from the garden(muddy carrots, immature sweet peas, etc) and we never had eating issues with either of them.  I cringe every time I see a relative or friend's kid refuse to eat veggies.

On top of not being picky eaters the dirt makes them smarter.  If you can believe the study my oldest daughter read.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 02, 2012, 09:50:23 PM
Not only does dirt make them smarter,
tending a garden teaches kids how to work.  Go weed the peas please.  But ma, I am on facebook.  Go weed.

Dang, I wish I had a few weeders.

might put a few onions between the potatoes, not to many but a few. not sure what else. We already have a lettuce patch planted and we can only eat so much lettuce. Maybe some herbs.

Like radishes any?  basil can get tall in there.  a few carrots? 
I love the interplant community concept.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 02, 2012, 10:53:02 PM
Not only does dirt make them smarter,
tending a garden teaches kids how to work.  Go weed the peas please.  But ma, I am on facebook.  Go weed.

Dang, I wish I had a few weeders.

might put a few onions between the potatoes, not to many but a few. not sure what else. We already have a lettuce patch planted and we can only eat so much lettuce. Maybe some herbs.

Like radishes any?  basil can get tall in there.  a few carrots? 
I love the interplant community concept.

good call on teh radishes. we could eat some. also some calendula and marigolds for the bug attractant/repellent qualities. so much to try... it's almost too much fun to handle.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 02, 2012, 11:12:47 PM
Not only does dirt make them smarter,
tending a garden teaches kids how to work.  Go weed the peas please.  But ma, I am on facebook.  Go weed.

Dang, I wish I had a few weeders.

might put a few onions between the potatoes, not to many but a few. not sure what else. We already have a lettuce patch planted and we can only eat so much lettuce. Maybe some herbs.

Like radishes any?  basil can get tall in there.  a few carrots? 
I love the interplant community concept.

good call on teh radishes. we could eat some. also some calendula and marigolds for the bug attractant/repellent qualities. so much to try... it's almost too much fun to handle.

+1 on the radishes. I was always told that some bugs didn't like the way radishes smell, and have always interplanted them around my squashes/pumpkins, with Marigolds around the tomatoes (although it's been getting harder for me to find marigolds that actually have the classic marigold smell). I'm not even a big fan of radishes myself, but you can plant a ton of them and eat the shoots, which are wonderful on grilled food! Other than that, I think they produce lovely flowers...eventually.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 03, 2012, 03:16:36 AM
Another bonus with radishes is that they're a good decoy crop for flea beetles. They grow so fast that the beetles won't do any serious damage (unless you want the greens) and it minimizes the damage to your nearby beets/cole crops/etc.

Spinach is another nice early fill-in plant for succession planting, too.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 03, 2012, 07:25:44 AM
I hear leeks are good to plant around as filler. But you guys are advanced for me. Mine's always a work in progress.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 03, 2012, 01:59:41 PM
Mine's always a work in progress.

That is one of the great joys of growing food.  Always a work in progress.
I try new things each year.  Last year it was leeks.  They took a long time to mature, and I did not harvest until after the first frost.  They were awesome with potatoes in soup in winter.  Stored well in fridge as well.

My spinach is getting first set of true leaves.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 13, 2012, 05:23:03 PM
Ground is as dry as rock and dirt like baby powder.  Hope we get rain soon.  This year early will be lettuce, spinach, radishes, beets, maybe brussel sprouts and broccoli.  Our asparagus are doing well so far, we've gotten a few meals out of them.  Tomatoes (usually Brandywine, Black Crim, Roma, Arkansas Traveler, Early Girl, beefsteak), spaghetti squash, green, wax, and purple beans, snap peas, hot peppers (habaneros, lemon hot, jalapenos, maybe some sweets as well).  Okra, of course.  No Zuchini (please god, no!).
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on April 13, 2012, 05:29:12 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 13, 2012, 07:40:31 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 13, 2012, 09:38:05 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.

Going to be growing Zukes for the first time this year. Anyone have any tips? Do they grow like cucumbers or do they sprawl out further like winter squash? Do tomato cages work well for them? Don't know the exact variety of seeds I have, but it's one of the typical straight green varieties from Burpee.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on April 13, 2012, 09:40:18 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.

I like to mix 'em with egg, onion, bread crumbs, whatever and make zucchini cakes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 13, 2012, 10:16:27 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.

I like to mix 'em with egg, onion, bread crumbs, whatever and make zucchini cakes.
mmmmmmmmm :)

Going to be growing Zukes for the first time this year. Anyone have any tips? Do they grow like cucumbers or do they sprawl out further like winter squash? Do tomato cages work well for them? Don't know the exact variety of seeds I have, but it's one of the typical straight green varieties from Burpee.
Pick them young, the fruit grow fast!

The ones we grow are like other squash, sprawling all over.  I've never tried them with tomato cages, but I'm not sure it would work.  They grow on the ground, not up on a structure - which isn't to say they won't, but it doesn't seem to be their inclination.  Maybe someone else has tried it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on April 14, 2012, 02:29:19 PM
Going to be growing Zukes for the first time this year. Anyone have any tips? Do they grow like cucumbers or do they sprawl out further like winter squash? Do tomato cages work well for them? Don't know the exact variety of seeds I have, but it's one of the typical straight green varieties from Burpee.

Main thing to know about growing Zukes is to not overdo it.  If you plant a whole row of them, you'll have enough Zukes to feed an army..
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 14, 2012, 05:32:51 PM
If zucchini is anything like cukes you won't need more than two plants to be overwhelmed.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on April 14, 2012, 09:56:42 PM
I grow mirlitons.  They grow on my fences like weeds.  Sliced, battered and fried - they ROCK!

You probably know them as chayote, euge.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 15, 2012, 12:34:30 AM
If zucchini is anything like cukes you won't need more than two plants to be overwhelmed.

Well, I eat at least a whole cuke a day myself when I have them fresh from the garden. 2 plants doesn't quite cut it at my house, but I get where you're coming from there. I've heard that zucchinis are insanely prolific, so I'll probably keep it to 3 plants each planted a week or two apart.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Alewyfe on April 15, 2012, 03:56:23 AM
I got onions (white and red), leeks and mustard greens in. My tomatoes are nearly ready to transplant into the ground.

Will triple the size of my growing area this week. Will also have 6 yards of garden soil delivered on Thursday.

Then it will be chiles and cucumbers. Might try some zucchini squash.

Cheaper to buy beans than grow them. Pics will follow.

Not cheaper to buy beans if you love the tiny French filet variety like we do. Blanched al dente and dressed with some shallot, balsamic vinaigrette while still warm...mm, mmm, mmm. So wonderful on a salad plate.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Alewyfe on April 15, 2012, 04:00:53 AM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.

Going to be growing Zukes for the first time this year. Anyone have any tips? Do they grow like cucumbers or do they sprawl out further like winter squash? Do tomato cages work well for them? Don't know the exact variety of seeds I have, but it's one of the typical straight green varieties from Burpee.

If you make the mistake of planting too many Zuc's like we did, you can sneak over to your neighbor's at night and just leave them on the doorstep. Or......pick the blossoms and stuff them.....Or......dip the blossoms in batter and deep fry them. They are delicious. Picking the blossoms and eating them this way is not only a decadent gourmet delight, but it keeps you from having too many fruits mature.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on April 15, 2012, 04:49:13 AM
If you go with a Zucchini, you could go with one that doesn't need polination (perfect pick) you should be fine with 2 plants 3 would be plenty, don't let them grow longer than yourself. Don't let the neighbors see you checking them! They start upwards but begin to sprawl, 6-8 foot square you should be good.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: roguejim on April 16, 2012, 06:44:59 PM
About a month ago, I received a packet of Trinidad Scorpion Butch T Strain chile seeds from this
outfit:http://www.thehippyseedcompany.com/.  I have no intention of ever eating these chiles myself, but for some of my more daring friends, I will provide! 

  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy-KZ1XuxpY&feature=player_embedded 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 17, 2012, 01:46:57 AM
About a month ago, I received a packet of Trinidad Scorpion Butch T Strain chile seeds from this
outfit:http://www.thehippyseedcompany.com/.  I have no intention of ever eating these chiles myself, but for some of my more daring friends, I will provide! 

  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy-KZ1XuxpY&feature=player_embedded

Send 'em my way! I love eating really hot peppers. I remember when I was 16 or so, and some coworkers brought in some habaneros, and all the guys ate them to see who could handle it. I was a bit more like the gentleman in the video, talking about the flavor, and how wonderful the heat was, but everyone else was huddled around the water color. To be fair to them, I was indeed in a lot of pain (I don't know what variety they were), but they were also very tasty. FWIW, I think habaneros taste much better than other hot peppers, and they are also quite lovely to grow.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: roguejim on April 17, 2012, 02:24:36 AM
At the end of Summer/harvest, I'll post again.  Remind me then.  Maybe you could post a video of yourself eating one!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 17, 2012, 06:49:04 AM
That would be awesome :)

I love hot peppers too - I've got some bhut jolokia going, but I would never try to eat one like this guy did.  If I ever get fruit I'll send some to anyone who promises to post a video of themselves eating one :)

I ate some really hot wings recently - apparently made with habeneros.  Usually my face starts to sweat, forehead, under my eyes, that kind of thing.  This time the tears just started rolling down my face but I didn't sweat much at all.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on April 17, 2012, 08:17:13 AM
Just wanted to share the latest news - the jalapenos, poblanos, cali golden bell peppers and san marzano tomatoes have gone gangbusters and went from just having the two seedling leaves to 6-8 regular leaves in about four days. A GroLamp for 14 hours a day will do wonders, it seems. I've transplanted the tomatoes and jalapenos into 2" x 4" peat pots and will be breaking them in outside starting in a few days. I've already planted bloody butcher corn and Crimson Sweet Watermelon in their place, and I'll have the kale in soon after that, along with squash etc.

I think next year I will raise the lamp up a bit to spread the light around, and double the size of my container. It's really nice having these in the 'guest bedroom' (aka junk room) right now, because I can take care of the plants after I put the kids to bed.

I would love any suggestions you guys have for my poblanos once they're out and producing... I know I can do stuffed poblanos with chorizo and queso but other than that?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 17, 2012, 10:31:49 AM
Anybody grow pumpkins?

I started some seedlings and will try again this year.  Last year I had a tough go with them, but when at first I don't succeed...try...try...again.  8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 17, 2012, 01:08:34 PM
Anybody grow pumpkins?

I started some seedlings and will try again this year.  Last year I had a tough go with them, but when at first I don't succeed...try...try...again.  8)

Give them a LOT of room. They will take over your whole garden if you let them. I was set to have a pretty nice crop of them last year, but I got hit with squash beetles (which in turn brought a fungal infection) real bad so they never made it past august where they were mostly bowling ball size.

I haven't decided yet whether I'm going to try for one giant pumpkin this year or several jack-o-lantern sized ones.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 17, 2012, 03:52:04 PM
We haven't had much luck with pumpkins, but I'm not sure why.  Mostly they fail to set fruit, even when I pollinate by hand.  But we don't have a lot of them going at once, so there aren't as many male flowers so the timing sometimes isn't right.  We have some seeds to try again this year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 17, 2012, 04:51:27 PM
At the end of Summer/harvest, I'll post again.  Remind me then.  Maybe you could post a video of yourself eating one!

I'll change my avatar to a picture of me eating them if you do!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 17, 2012, 04:56:28 PM
Anybody grow pumpkins?

I started some seedlings and will try again this year.  Last year I had a tough go with them, but when at first I don't succeed...try...try...again.  8)

I grow pumpkins and squash all the time. My tip would be to try and grow them vertically. Set up a couple of poles, and build a trellis of netting (kind of like a soccer goal). They will grow up the netting, and once they start to set fruit you can tie a bandana around the fruit to relieve the pressure on the plant. This will prevent the pumpkins from taking up so much room, and has the added benefit of preventing the fruit from scarring as it grows on the ground. I've also grown them up our chain link fence with no problems. I think the heaviest I've done where 8-9 lbs.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 17, 2012, 04:59:28 PM
Anybody grow pumpkins?

I started some seedlings and will try again this year.  Last year I had a tough go with them, but when at first I don't succeed...try...try...again.  8)

Give them a LOT of room. They will take over your whole garden if you let them. I was set to have a pretty nice crop of them last year, but I got hit with squash beetles (which in turn brought a fungal infection) real bad so they never made it past august where they were mostly bowling ball size.

I haven't decided yet whether I'm going to try for one giant pumpkin this year or several jack-o-lantern sized ones.

I also got hit with squash beetles the last two years in a row.  Do you know of a good way to rid of those little devils?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 17, 2012, 06:56:03 PM
I also got hit with squash beetles the last two years in a row.  Do you know of a good way to rid of those little devils?

I'm trying to keep things organic, so I gave Neem a try last year. It worked OK, but it doesn't last very long. I also planted my squash too close together, so I had a hard time reaching the undersides of all my leaves. The squash bugs were bad, but my plants would have made it if they didn't get hit with a fungal infection of top of the beetles.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 17, 2012, 07:10:08 PM
do some research on companion planting. there may be a plant that repels the beasties that you can plant with the squash or one that attracts the beasties that you can plant a little bit away from them. There are also probably some predators that you could either buy and release or encourage with the right companion planting.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 17, 2012, 09:01:15 PM
Anybody grow pumpkins?



I also got hit with squash beetles the last two years in a row.  Do you know of a good way to rid of those little devils?

I would recommend a combination of what erockph and morticaixavier say. Use a good organic pesticide, spray the base of the plant, and hit the underside of the leaves. Also, interplant some radishes. Squash beetles are a lot of work if you get them. I look for the little colonies of red dots (their eggs) on the underside of the leaves, and scrape them off and crush them. For the adults, I lay out some out pieces of wood. They like to hide underneath them, so in the morning I go out and look under the wood, and crush them. Have I mentioned I hate squash beetles. I've had a lot of success doing this, but it is also a lot of work.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 18, 2012, 01:30:14 AM
I also got hit with squash beetles the last two years in a row.  Do you know of a good way to rid of those little devils?

I would recommend a combination of what erockph and morticaixavier say. Use a good organic pesticide, spray the base of the plant, and hit the underside of the leaves. Also, interplant some radishes. Squash beetles are a lot of work if you get them. I look for the little colonies of red dots (their eggs) on the underside of the leaves, and scrape them off and crush them. For the adults, I lay out some out pieces of wood. They like to hide underneath them, so in the morning I go out and look under the wood, and crush them. Have I mentioned I hate squash beetles. I've had a lot of success doing this, but it is also a lot of work.

Thanks for the tips.  I'll try the wood idea this year.  I had them really bad last year.  I'm expecting them back again this year so I'll be ready for them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on April 18, 2012, 01:36:35 AM
I also got hit with squash beetles the last two years in a row.  Do you know of a good way to rid of those little devils?

I would recommend a combination of what erockph and morticaixavier say. Use a good organic pesticide, spray the base of the plant, and hit the underside of the leaves. Also, interplant some radishes. Squash beetles are a lot of work if you get them. I look for the little colonies of red dots (their eggs) on the underside of the leaves, and scrape them off and crush them. For the adults, I lay out some out pieces of wood. They like to hide underneath them, so in the morning I go out and look under the wood, and crush them. Have I mentioned I hate squash beetles. I've had a lot of success doing this, but it is also a lot of work.

Thanks for the tips.  I'll try the wood idea this year.  I had them really bad last year.  I'm expecting them back again this year so I'll be ready for them.

Good luck with all of those ideas. I tried them all.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 18, 2012, 02:02:52 AM
I also got hit with squash beetles the last two years in a row.  Do you know of a good way to rid of those little devils?

I would recommend a combination of what erockph and morticaixavier say. Use a good organic pesticide, spray the base of the plant, and hit the underside of the leaves. Also, interplant some radishes. Squash beetles are a lot of work if you get them. I look for the little colonies of red dots (their eggs) on the underside of the leaves, and scrape them off and crush them. For the adults, I lay out some out pieces of wood. They like to hide underneath them, so in the morning I go out and look under the wood, and crush them. Have I mentioned I hate squash beetles. I've had a lot of success doing this, but it is also a lot of work.

Thanks for the tips.  I'll try the wood idea this year.  I had them really bad last year.  I'm expecting them back again this year so I'll be ready for them.

Good luck with all of those ideas. I tried them all.

Did you have any luck with them?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on April 18, 2012, 02:07:39 AM
I wished I could say yes, but  I'd be lying. I ended up going to pesticides, lightly and carefully controlled.

It was that or no squash.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 18, 2012, 02:13:49 AM
I wished I could say yes, but  I'd be lying. I ended up going to pesticides, lightly and carefully controlled.

It was that or no squash.

I'm afraid that I may have to resort to that as well.  I know it will be a battle.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on April 18, 2012, 02:52:28 AM
I wished I could say yes, but  I'd be lying. I ended up going to pesticides, lightly and carefully controlled.

It was that or no squash.

I'm afraid that I may have to resort to that as well.  I know it will be a battle.

If you figure out another way, please let me know. I hate spraying. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 18, 2012, 01:33:05 PM
I wished I could say yes, but  I'd be lying. I ended up going to pesticides, lightly and carefully controlled.

It was that or no squash.

I'm afraid that I may have to resort to that as well.  I know it will be a battle.

If you figure out another way, please let me know. I hate spraying.

Will do.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 18, 2012, 03:40:15 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.

I like to mix 'em with egg, onion, bread crumbs, whatever and make zucchini cakes.
mmmmmmmmm :)

Going to be growing Zukes for the first time this year. Anyone have any tips? Do they grow like cucumbers or do they sprawl out further like winter squash? Do tomato cages work well for them? Don't know the exact variety of seeds I have, but it's one of the typical straight green varieties from Burpee.
Pick them young, the fruit grow fast!

The ones we grow are like other squash, sprawling all over.  I've never tried them with tomato cages, but I'm not sure it would work.  They grow on the ground, not up on a structure - which isn't to say they won't, but it doesn't seem to be their inclination.  Maybe someone else has tried it.

All this sounds wonderful, but the last time we grew zuchini, we had one plant, and it produced a minimum of two per day, yes that's 14 a week, at least, the plant was a monster.  Real easy to get burnt out, man.  We ran out of people to give them to.  Cucumbers are a different story, I make pickles so none go to waste.  Okra grow like madness too, but we roast 'em or pickle them too and they go fast.  We will be growing eggplant again this year.  I like them roasted on the grill or in the oven, fried, or in baba ghanouj.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 18, 2012, 03:59:24 PM
I think a good DIY organic pesticide is a glass/can of beer, equal amount water, a handful of chewing tobacco and some dishsoap. You mix the beer, water and tobacco and make a tea at room temp, strain it when ready and add the soap. Mix then store/add to spray bottle.

The little bastards don't like it and the spray will wash off come picking time.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on April 18, 2012, 04:12:04 PM
No zucchini????  Man, zucchini on the grill is one of my favorite things to eat.
Yeah, we love zukes.  Grilled is awesome, but I even like to grate it and mix it in with taco meat.

I like to mix 'em with egg, onion, bread crumbs, whatever and make zucchini cakes.
mmmmmmmmm :)

Going to be growing Zukes for the first time this year. Anyone have any tips? Do they grow like cucumbers or do they sprawl out further like winter squash? Do tomato cages work well for them? Don't know the exact variety of seeds I have, but it's one of the typical straight green varieties from Burpee.
Pick them young, the fruit grow fast!

The ones we grow are like other squash, sprawling all over.  I've never tried them with tomato cages, but I'm not sure it would work.  They grow on the ground, not up on a structure - which isn't to say they won't, but it doesn't seem to be their inclination.  Maybe someone else has tried it.

All this sounds wonderful, but the last time we grew zuchini, we had one plant, and it produced a minimum of two per day, yes that's 14 a week, at least, the plant was a monster.  Real easy to get burnt out, man.  We ran out of people to give them to.  Cucumbers are a different story, I make pickles so none go to waste.  Okra grow like madness too, but we roast 'em or pickle them too and they go fast.  We will be growing eggplant again this year.  I like them roasted on the grill or in the oven, fried, or in baba ghanouj.

Zucchini has always been feast or famine in my gardens.  I've planted 6 hills and harvested no fruit and I've planted one hill and had more than I could give away and everything in between the 2 extremes.  They are also elusive little devils, you can swear you've looked under every leaf, everyday and still find one two feet long and 6 inches in diameter.   :o

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 18, 2012, 05:04:01 PM
I think a good DIY organic pesticide is a glass/can of beer, equal amount water, a handful of chewing tobacco and some dishsoap. You mix the beer, water and tobacco and make a tea at room temp, strain it when ready and add the soap. Mix then store/add to spray bottle.

The little bastards don't like it and the spray will wash off come picking time.

That is the most manly thing I've heard as far as gardening goes. I'll have to try it. The only question is whether to use stout or IPA and whether to use Skoal or Red Man.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 18, 2012, 05:07:30 PM
All this sounds wonderful, but the last time we grew zuchini, we had one plant, and it produced a minimum of two per day, yes that's 14 a week, at least, the plant was a monster.  Real easy to get burnt out, man.  We ran out of people to give them to.  Cucumbers are a different story, I make pickles so none go to waste.  Okra grow like madness too, but we roast 'em or pickle them too and they go fast.  We will be growing eggplant again this year.  I like them roasted on the grill or in the oven, fried, or in baba ghanouj.
Have you tried pickled zucchini? :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: hoser on April 18, 2012, 05:43:54 PM
I think a good DIY organic pesticide is a glass/can of beer, equal amount water, a handful of chewing tobacco and some dishsoap. You mix the beer, water and tobacco and make a tea at room temp, strain it when ready and add the soap. Mix then store/add to spray bottle.

The little bastards don't like it and the spray will wash off come picking time.

I don't know if I would call a pesticide "organic" if it includes a handful of chewing tobacco.  As someone who used to chew and knows what is in chewing tobacco, I certainly would not call it organic! There may be as many chemicals if not more in a can of chew than a bottle of pestide. But, I haven't chewed in years, so maybe they have chewing tobacco that is organic now since everything these days seems to be "organic"
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 18, 2012, 06:24:02 PM
I think a good DIY organic pesticide is a glass/can of beer, equal amount water, a handful of chewing tobacco and some dishsoap. You mix the beer, water and tobacco and make a tea at room temp, strain it when ready and add the soap. Mix then store/add to spray bottle.

The little bastards don't like it and the spray will wash off come picking time.

I don't know if I would call a pesticide "organic" if it includes a handful of chewing tobacco.  As someone who used to chew and knows what is in chewing tobacco, I certainly would not call it organic! There may be as many chemicals if not more in a can of chew than a bottle of pestide. But, I haven't chewed in years, so maybe they have chewing tobacco that is organic now since everything these days seems to be "organic"

don't know about chaw but you can get organic rolling tobacco that would work as well. It's pretty expensive but if you are trying hard. alternatly you could grow some tobacco you self and make your own. Actually tobacco makes a good companion plant for a lot of other plants to help discourage the bugs in the first place.

The other thing to try, depending on how much space you have, is crop rotation. If you plant the squash in the same place, or close to the same place every year the bugs know where to find it, if you can plant it some distance away from any place a susceptible crop has been grown in the last 4 years or so it can really help reduce pests.

When you are trying to reduce your spraying it's important to remember that 'organic' or 'sustainable' or 'natural' pest control is about control not elimination. You will still have bugs but you try to reduce the numbers while encouraging the plants to grow so fast they can stand up to the bugs. This is accomplished by slowely building your soil health and your little mini ecosystem so that you have balance and the predator/prey relationships in the soil, the air and on the plants are more in balance. Bat boxes can help control insects over time, raptor habitat can help control bird theft and rodent theft. Chickens or ducks can help control slugs and bugs as well as fertlizing the area in which they live and aerating the soil some.

There really isn't a good quick organic way to control bugs except maybe BT, pyrethrum (sp?) copper sulfate (this is actually for mildew I believe), and a few other 'approved' organic pesticides. I have had some luck with a soap, oil, garlic, pepper mix and adding some tobacco to that would help as well. also Diatomaceous Earth can be used to control ants which tend to encourage other unwanted creatures and should work against any hard bodied insect problem. But you have to reapply any time it gets wet. And make sure to get food grade DE as the other stuff (like for pool filters) is not good for your lungs or your pets.

DE can also be dusted on dogs and cats to control fleas, around the perimiter of your house to keep ants out, etc.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 19, 2012, 04:21:53 PM
All this sounds wonderful, but the last time we grew zuchini, we had one plant, and it produced a minimum of two per day, yes that's 14 a week, at least, the plant was a monster.  Real easy to get burnt out, man.  We ran out of people to give them to.  Cucumbers are a different story, I make pickles so none go to waste.  Okra grow like madness too, but we roast 'em or pickle them too and they go fast.  We will be growing eggplant again this year.  I like them roasted on the grill or in the oven, fried, or in baba ghanouj.
Have you tried pickled zucchini? :)

Honestly Tom, I may have had a sweet/sour zuchini pickle before that was pretty good, but most of what I have made at home was dill or hot/sour.  i don't think zukes have the snap that cukes have either, although pickling lime may improve that.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on April 26, 2012, 10:10:11 AM
Things are going nicely at Le Ferme de la ferme des petits agneaux.

We canned some grocery store cucs to try to do our very own dill pickles. Success. Next time I won't use the pre-mixed stuff and will do it myself with fresh dill, etc.

(https://p.twimg.com/ArZkVdvCAAAgS5q.jpg)

We also have corn growing quite nicely

(https://p.twimg.com/ArZkD8qCQAAOyey.jpg)

And a metric ton of jalapenos, poblanos, sweet peppers and san marzano tomatoes:

(https://p.twimg.com/ArZkMSRCIAAPvYD.jpg)

Can't wait.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on April 26, 2012, 03:40:54 PM
Phil,
Do any of your neighbors have a good recipe for something like Amora or Maille cornichons?  I've got about 40 cuke vines growing and my goal is to be able to pick the cukes when they're less than 2 inches long and make a similar pickle.  My daughter can eat a 500g jar of those pickles in an afternoon so I'd like to have lots of jars of them on hand, but I need a good close recipe for them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on April 26, 2012, 04:01:11 PM
Phil,
Do any of your neighbors have a good recipe for something like Amora or Maille cornichons?  I've got about 40 cuke vines growing and my goal is to be able to pick the cukes when they're less than 2 inches long and make a similar pickle.  My daughter can eat a 500g jar of those pickles in an afternoon so I'd like to have lots of jars of them on hand, but I need a good close recipe for them.

Oh jeez, now that I do not know. I will ask around!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 26, 2012, 05:36:07 PM
Things are going nicely at Le Ferme de la ferme des petits agneaux.

The Farm of the farm of the small lambs? cute.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on April 26, 2012, 05:50:32 PM
Things are going nicely at Le Ferme de la ferme des petits agneaux.

The Farm of the farm of the small lambs? cute.

That reminds me, I haven't watched Silence of the Lambs lately.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 26, 2012, 05:59:39 PM
Things are going nicely at Le Ferme de la ferme des petits agneaux.

The Farm of the farm of the small lambs? cute.

That reminds me, I haven't watched Silence of the Lambs lately.

"Le silence des Agneaux"

Or better: L'agneau silencieux la ferme...?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on April 27, 2012, 06:41:05 AM
Il frotte la lotion sur sa peau, sinon elle obtient le tuyau encore.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on April 27, 2012, 09:33:47 AM
I hate typos!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on May 02, 2012, 04:27:57 AM
Zucchini has always been feast or famine in my gardens.  I've planted 6 hills and harvested no fruit and I've planted one hill and had more than I could give away and everything in between the 2 extremes.  They are also elusive little devils, you can swear you've looked under every leaf, everyday and still find one two feet long and 6 inches in diameter.   :o

Paul
 If you have no polinators, go with a zucc that doesn't need a polinator the most popular one I know is called Perfect Pick, you get them with out polination. Cheaper than getting bees. Trust me about this. ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 02, 2012, 05:41:06 PM
My onions are about ready as some tops are beginning to fall over. I'm picking these but am wondering if I should continue to water the entire crop? It hasn't rained in quite a while and I've been watering them about every other day.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 07, 2012, 08:34:06 PM
Wow...harvesting onions?   8)

Here, the ones that came up from last year are sending flowers. ???


I planted some things this weekend.  Tomatoes, cabbage, broccoli, leeks, cukes, couple melon plants.
The garden is fresh and beautiful this time of year.

Anybody grow bok-choy?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 07, 2012, 11:38:16 PM
It was 26 Deg. f this morning. I cannot really plant till the last few days of may if the forecase
is favorable....otherwise, its June.....grrrrrr....got a couple snow peas coming up they will be ok
and some tiny lettuce trying to survive....I will start some stuff indoors in the next couple weeks.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 08, 2012, 12:39:39 PM
heh, whyomin.  but summer is coming early this year.

"feels like" 32 degreesF here this morning, but the sun is going to be strong.
Looks like the tomatoes did fine.

Cheers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 08, 2012, 12:59:14 PM
Well mebbe so but that temp was at 24 degrees with frost this mornin.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 08, 2012, 04:24:08 PM
Wow...harvesting onions?   8)

Here, the ones that came up from last year are sending flowers. ???


I planted some things this weekend.  Tomatoes, cabbage, broccoli, leeks, cukes, couple melon plants.
The garden is fresh and beautiful this time of year.

Anybody grow bok-choy?

We are trying bok choy for the first time this year.  Just put them in a few weeks ago, they seem to be doing fine.

This year we ended up with asian radishes, spicy mesclun mix, spinach, green, wax, and purple beans, beets, lemon peepers, jalapenos, red, orange, green, and yellow bells, poblanos, black crim, early girl, Arkansas traveler, cherry, sammich mater, black beauty and Italian eggplant, spaghetti squash, okra, corn and peas.  We've been eating asparagus for about five weeks now.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 08, 2012, 11:46:36 PM
Dang, nice work redbeerman!  Did you plant bok-choy from seed?  Mine have taken a ton of time germinating.  I hear they like cool weather.

sammich mater is my new favorite term.  I am going to try an use that in a conversation soon. ;D
but I don't think "go make me a sammich" is going to be in the mix.

My garlic has 9 leaves already.  I am thinking it might be scape season early this year.

Cheers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 09, 2012, 05:08:37 PM
Dang, nice work redbeerman!  Did you plant bok-choy from seed?  Mine have taken a ton of time germinating.  I hear they like cool weather.

sammich mater is my new favorite term.  I am going to try an use that in a conversation soon. ;D
but I don't think "go make me a sammich" is going to be in the mix.

My garlic has 9 leaves already.  I am thinking it might be scape season early this year.

Cheers.

We got the bok choy as plants from one of our local greenhouses.  These folks have all kinds of neat stuff, from annuals to trees and everthing in-between.  Started some green onions from seed last week.  We'll see how they do.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 17, 2012, 02:33:07 AM
Had the first few strawberries today!   Looking forward to those.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on May 17, 2012, 12:47:50 PM
I planted Tomatoes last week. I think I messed with them too much because they're in shock. I've never had plants go into shock like this before. Is there anything I need to do to help or do I just keep on going and hope they pull through?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 17, 2012, 02:16:16 PM
I planted Tomatoes last week. I think I messed with them too much because they're in shock. I've never had plants go into shock like this before. Is there anything I need to do to help or do I just keep on going and hope they pull through?

Wow still in shock? Did you mess with the roots or not water them directly after transplanting?

Did you go into a radically different soil. Or, did you harden them off before transplanting? They are tough plants but even I lost one this year after transplanting too deep.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on May 17, 2012, 02:35:27 PM
Zucchini has always been feast or famine in my gardens.  I've planted 6 hills and harvested no fruit and I've planted one hill and had more than I could give away and everything in between the 2 extremes.  They are also elusive little devils, you can swear you've looked under every leaf, everyday and still find one two feet long and 6 inches in diameter.   :o

Paul
 If you have no polinators, go with a zucc that doesn't need a polinator the most popular one I know is called Perfect Pick, you get them with out polination. Cheaper than getting bees. Trust me about this. ;)

Thanks for the advice on pollinators.

Sadly, it's all mute now since we gave up on the garden two years ago and planted a shed instead.  8^)  Our yard doesn't get any sun anywhere on our current property so we finally just gave up planting one.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 17, 2012, 02:41:42 PM
We munched our first 4 artichokes the other night. with melted butter and grapefruit (we were out of lemons). They were small and some of the stems were a little bitter but there is something magical about eating artichokes you grew your self.

still got to get the last of the tomatoes transplanted.

corn is sprouted and we are ready to plant our beans in with them. then squash a week or two later. vacation is coming up in just over a week so lots of time to putter in the garden.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 17, 2012, 03:41:18 PM
My backyard is a mosquito infested swamp. The subpump broke while I was out of town and evidently there was a tremendous thunderstorm. I have a backup draining it now but eewee! It stinks back there.

The onions are still ok in their raised beds. They'll get pulled in a few days I think.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on May 17, 2012, 03:48:59 PM
I planted Tomatoes last week. I think I messed with them too much because they're in shock. I've never had plants go into shock like this before. Is there anything I need to do to help or do I just keep on going and hope they pull through?

Wow still in shock? Did you mess with the roots or not water them directly after transplanting?

Did you go into a radically different soil. Or, did you harden them off before transplanting? They are tough plants but even I lost one this year after transplanting too deep.

I messed with the roots too much. I've been watering every day since the transplant and the soil is nice and moist but all but the very top leaves turned white and some fell off. I don't think I planted too deep. I didn't harden very well either. They spent a few hours outside but not much. I have others that have been outside all week and are ready to plant. They look good.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 17, 2012, 03:54:14 PM
We munched our first 4 artichokes the other night. with melted butter and grapefruit (we were out of lemons). They were small and some of the stems were a little bitter but there is something magical about eating artichokes you grew your self.

still got to get the last of the tomatoes transplanted.

corn is sprouted and we are ready to plant our beans in with them. then squash a week or two later. vacation is coming up in just over a week so lots of time to putter in the garden.

Awesome on the artichokes.  We tried growing them a few years ago, but they just didn't do well for some reason.  i think the growing season here may be too short.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on May 17, 2012, 04:45:34 PM
I finally got the garden in last weekend.  I have Napa grape hybrid, large cherry, early girl, big boy, better boy, Roma, and Tomatillo tomatoes, California Wonder, Cajun Bell, Sweet Cherry hybrid, jalapeno, Sweet Golden Cali Wonder Peppers, Yellow Crookneck Squash, Zucchini, Straight 8 and Bush Pickling Cucumbers, Rhubarb, Hybrid Eggplant, Kentucky Wonder pole beans, Dill, Italian Oregeno, Purple Sage, Thyme, an Parsley.  I'm sure I forgot something but this is to the best of my memory.

I started some asparagas root this year but won't get a harvest from that until next year.

Of course my hops but that's a different thread.

I'll post some pics soon.  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 17, 2012, 05:11:54 PM
I finally got the garden in last weekend.  I have Napa grape hybrid, large cherry, early girl, big boy, better boy, Roma, and Tomatillo tomatoes, California Wonder, Cajun Bell, Sweet Cherry hybrid, jalapeno, Sweet Golden Cali Wonder Peppers, Yellow Crookneck Squash, Zucchini, Straight 8 and Bush Pickling Cucumbers, Rhubarb, Hybrid Eggplant, Kentucky Wonder pole beans, Dill, Italian Oregeno, Purple Sage, Thyme, an Parsley.  I'm sure I forgot something but this is to the best of my memory.

I started some asparagas root this year but won't get a harvest from that until next year.

Of course my hops but that's a different thread.

I'll post some pics soon.  :)

Don't forget Rosemary ;)  Sorry, couldn't resist.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on May 17, 2012, 06:16:55 PM
I've been eating handfuls of radishes every day for 2 weeks and I still can't keep up with them.  We got 4 inches of actual rain last week(twice what we got the past 2 years) and everything is really taking off.  My russets are flowering, the red potatoes are looking good, starting to eat some spinach an my tomato plants are full of green tomatoes.  I've got 4' yellow squash and a few little zukes, beets are getting some roots, and my cucumber vines are taking off.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on May 17, 2012, 06:42:23 PM
I finally got the garden in last weekend.  I have Napa grape hybrid, large cherry, early girl, big boy, better boy, Roma, and Tomatillo tomatoes, California Wonder, Cajun Bell, Sweet Cherry hybrid, jalapeno, Sweet Golden Cali Wonder Peppers, Yellow Crookneck Squash, Zucchini, Straight 8 and Bush Pickling Cucumbers, Rhubarb, Hybrid Eggplant, Kentucky Wonder pole beans, Dill, Italian Oregeno, Purple Sage, Thyme, an Parsley.  I'm sure I forgot something but this is to the best of my memory.

I started some asparagas root this year but won't get a harvest from that until next year.

Of course my hops but that's a different thread.

I'll post some pics soon.  :)

Don't forget Rosemary ;)  Sorry, couldn't resist.

funny Jim... :P

for everyone else here...Rosemary is actually my wife's name.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on May 18, 2012, 05:26:58 AM
Almost planting time here, onions are in and the broilers are here, the veggies are in their pots waiting for warm soil.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 23, 2012, 04:18:01 AM
My newest garden addition (well okay, it's not going in the ground but it will live in the garden for the summer at least.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7238/7253604744_c36186bf10.jpg)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 23, 2012, 08:06:20 AM
Jeeze, dats a cute little buggah...  kinda looks like a pineapple, only tiny.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 23, 2012, 02:19:44 PM
So what do I do to make it get bigger (giggles girlishly)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 23, 2012, 02:58:40 PM
Time sir.  That's what it takes. And a little TLC.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 23, 2012, 04:33:30 PM
No, that little one is as big as it's gonna get.  It will be changing color soon.  Look at the size and number of flower sections.  It is destined to be a baseball sized pineapple.

Pineapples are waaaay easy to grow.  Buy a whole one at the store, twist the leafy top off like opening a bottle of soda (cut and eat the bottom part)  let the top dry for a few days,  peel away about 10 rows or so of smaller leaves from the bottom part to expose about an inch of the trunk, and stick it into some potting soil.  It will take two years to fruit from a top cut this way.  Once the plant has fruited it will send out suckers from the roots.   These suckers are the best way to plant pineapples.  They fruit in one year and make the biggest fruit.

Once a plant has produced fruit it will produce more fruit each year, but each successive fruit will be smaller.

I fertilize my pineapple patch with 16-16-16 at Halloween and New Years.  They love that and grow very big and tasty.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 23, 2012, 04:46:05 PM
No, that little one is as big as it's gonna get.  It will be changing color soon.  Look at the size and number of flower sections.  It is destined to be a baseball sized pineapple.

Pineapples are waaaay easy to grow.  Buy a whole one at the store, twist the leafy top off like opening a bottle of soda (cut and eat the bottom part)  let the top dry for a few days,  peel away about 10 rows or so of smaller leaves from the bottom part to expose about an inch of the trunk, and stick it into some potting soil.  It will take two years to fruit from a top cut this way.  Once the plant has fruited it will send out suckers from the roots.   These suckers are the best way to plant pineapples.  They fruit in one year and make the biggest fruit.

Once a plant has produced fruit it will produce more fruit each year, but each successive fruit will be smaller.

I fertilize my pineapple patch with 16-16-16 at Halloween and New Years.  They love that and grow very big and tasty.

I thnk this might spawn another thread but...

I figured the little one was as big as it's going to get. I have started a top once before but I was living in VT and it couldn't cope with the winter lack of light. so it never really did much. So are you saying that this plant will never make a bigger fruit than this one? even if I repot in a bigger pot and give it food? Will compost work for feeding?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 23, 2012, 07:45:31 PM
Here are some photos I took back at the end of February:

Each one of the spikes on the fruit is a flower.  After the fruit flowers the fruit grows bigger and the spike transforms into a hexagon shape on the side of the fruit about the size of a quarter.  Once the hexagons are flat the fruit is as big as it's going to get.

The flower spikes follow a curving row from top to bottom of the fruit kinda like a barber pole spiral.  In the top photo you can see that there are seven flower spikes in a row.  That pineapple (was very yummy) ended up being about the size of a 2 liter soda bottle.

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_1914.jpg)


This second photo shows the flowers better.  It was a white pineapple (Kona Sugarloaf variety), a bit smaller than the one in the top photo.

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_1909.jpg)



Your pineapple has three hexagons per row.  The hexagons are pretty much flattened out.  It's as big as it's going to get.  I suspect it is more of an ornamental than an eating pineapple.  It will probably change colors sometime in July-August.

Your plant will probably not produce fruit any bigger that the one you have.  If you are patient you can start a top and get a big fruit in two years.  A (what they call) 5 gallon pot (actually closer to 3.5 gallons) is the perfect size to grow a pineapple in.  Fertilize a couple of times a year and it will GROW.  Do not fertilize after you see the center part of the plant turn red and the baby pineapple appears.

You can probably by a yearling sucker at a garden shop or online if you are not the patient type.

 
Click on the photos to zoom in.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 23, 2012, 10:23:58 PM
Wow, piña in the garden must be awesome.

I will never forget having a fresh one from the field, slain with machete.
Amazing.





Starting to get some goods here for burrito makings. 8)


(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo415.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 24, 2012, 12:33:23 AM
And my first stab at onions in this evening's light:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-AAQVG47DdMY/T72AuxNKI4I/AAAAAAAAAcI/UD0oCkeMsXw/s640/2012-05-23%252019.23.06.jpg)

Maybe 10 pounds or so. Next crop will be different story.

Nice job on the leeks pinnah. I failed my first try at them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: theoman on May 24, 2012, 11:17:18 AM
I haven't started growing stuff on purpose yet, but there's a good crop of nettles growing on the property where we're building a house. I picked a bunch a couple weeks ago and made enchiladas.

Phil, I saw a few pages back that you're wondering what to do with poblanos. I wish I could get poblanos (I did find something similar from a middle-eastern market). I used to roast them and use them as a base with tomatillos for veggie green chili. Works alright without the tomatillos, too.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 24, 2012, 12:50:45 PM
I haven't started growing stuff on purpose yet, but there's a good crop of nettles growing on the property where we're building a house. I picked a bunch a couple weeks ago and made enchiladas.

Phil, I saw a few pages back that you're wondering what to do with poblanos. I wish I could get poblanos (I did find something similar from a middle-eastern market). I used to roast them and use them as a base with tomatillos for veggie green chili. Works alright without the tomatillos, too.

www.tradewindsfruitstore.com/ will ship to europe!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 24, 2012, 01:46:55 PM
Pablano = Cheese Chili Relleno with Verde sauce.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on May 24, 2012, 01:58:49 PM
Here are some photos I took back at the end of February:

Each one of the spikes on the fruit is a flower.  After the fruit flowers the fruit grows bigger and the spike transforms into a hexagon shape on the side of the fruit about the size of a quarter.  Once the hexagons are flat the fruit is as big as it's going to get.

The flower spikes follow a curving row from top to bottom of the fruit kinda like a barber pole spiral.  In the top photo you can see that there are seven flower spikes in a row.  That pineapple (was very yummy) ended up being about the size of a 2 liter soda bottle.

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_1914.jpg)


This second photo shows the flowers better.  It was a white pineapple (Kona Sugarloaf variety), a bit smaller than the one in the top photo.

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_1909.jpg)



Your pineapple has three hexagons per row.  The hexagons are pretty much flattened out.  It's as big as it's going to get.  I suspect it is more of an ornamental than an eating pineapple.  It will probably change colors sometime in July-August.

Your plant will probably not produce fruit any bigger that the one you have.  If you are patient you can start a top and get a big fruit in two years.  A (what they call) 5 gallon pot (actually closer to 3.5 gallons) is the perfect size to grow a pineapple in.  Fertilize a couple of times a year and it will GROW.  Do not fertilize after you see the center part of the plant turn red and the baby pineapple appears.

You can probably by a yearling sucker at a garden shop or online if you are not the patient type.

 
Click on the photos to zoom in.

Took those in February????

I'm moving...

Read through the whole thread, and now I'm inspired! We've picked out a good spot for the garden, just have to fence it off from the pooches. Hops are already in the ground, they just need a trellis!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 24, 2012, 05:00:24 PM
Once your pineapples get established (pretty quickly) they will be able to take care of themsevles.  Their leaves are long and spike-like.  I wear eye protection when I work on my pineapple patch.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 24, 2012, 07:29:41 PM
  I wear eye protection when I work on my pineapple patch.

Better safe than never, I always say ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 24, 2012, 07:50:27 PM
  I wear eye protection when I work on my pineapple patch.

Better safe than never, I always say ;)

or as the burning man motto goes 'Safety Third!'
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 24, 2012, 11:11:04 PM
I haven't started growing stuff on purpose yet, but there's a good crop of nettles growing on the property where we're building a house. I picked a bunch a couple weeks ago and made enchiladas.

Nettle enchiladas?  wow, interesting.  Kind of like spinach enchiladas?  Do tell. 8)

Phil, you might read the poblano thread (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=9044.0), some good stuff in there.

Picked a bowl of strawberries last night.  fun to eat them by the handful.

Cheers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 25, 2012, 12:11:13 AM
We actually have enough cherries this year where we're not competing at a loss with the birds!  Too lazy to net this year, maybe next year. ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 25, 2012, 03:58:57 AM
We actually have enough cherries this year where we're not competing at a loss with the birds!  Too lazy to net this year, maybe next year. ;D

Ditto, except it's lychees here.  Bumper crop of lychees this year, even with the birds taking a share. 

Can you say lychee melomel -> and lychee eau de vie?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on May 25, 2012, 04:18:21 AM
We actually have enough cherries this year where we're not competing at a loss with the birds!  Too lazy to net this year, maybe next year. ;D

Ditto, except it's lychees here.  Bumper crop of lychees this year, even with the birds taking a share. 

Can you say lychee melomel -> and lychee eau de vie?

Lychee melomel sounds interesting. Lychee pyment with Gewurztraminer grapes sounds even more interesting.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 25, 2012, 04:45:00 AM
I like my lychees straight up. 

However, I am a big fan of riesling pyment from kiawe (Hawaiian mesquite) honey.  Subtle and complex... yum!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: theoman on May 25, 2012, 07:24:33 AM
Nettle enchiladas?  wow, interesting.  Kind of like spinach enchiladas?  Do tell. 8)

Yep, exactly like spinach enchiladas. The texture was a little different, but partially because I think I squeezed too much liquid out of the nettles after I cooked them. I could've told you they were spinach enchiladas and you wouldn't have know the difference. You could easily use nettles anywhere you use spinach. Some picking advice: pluck the section of the top 3 leaves. The stem is soft enough there to use it all. Don't pick plants that have flowered. Supposedly they create some chemical after flowering that can irritate the urinary tract. Oh, of course, use gloves. To cook, dunk in boiling water for at least 30 seconds. I did about 1.5 minutes to soften enough for the enchiladas. Want a quick little adrenaline rush? That first bite of nettles after cooking. It's hard to believe that a little boiling water will get rid of the sting.  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 25, 2012, 08:21:21 AM
@$!(*&% birds ate all the ripe blueberries! I never even got to see them!  :'( :'( :'( :'(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 25, 2012, 09:01:18 AM
Nettle enchiladas?  wow, interesting.  Kind of like spinach enchiladas?  Do tell. 8)

Yep, exactly like spinach enchiladas. The texture was a little different, but partially because I think I squeezed too much liquid out of the nettles after I cooked them. I could've told you they were spinach enchiladas and you wouldn't have know the difference. You could easily use nettles anywhere you use spinach. Some picking advice: pluck the section of the top 3 leaves. The stem is soft enough there to use it all. Don't pick plants that have flowered. Supposedly they create some chemical after flowering that can irritate the urinary tract. Oh, of course, use gloves. To cook, dunk in boiling water for at least 30 seconds. I did about 1.5 minutes to soften enough for the enchiladas. Want a quick little adrenaline rush? That first bite of nettles after cooking. It's hard to believe that a little boiling water will get rid of the sting.  :)

We have a metric ton of nettles growing. Apparently they're actually a sign of good soil, so I'm happy to see them, but cooking them, I've never tried it. We have some huge ones, though - ~15 cm across for some leaves - maybe not tasty for the bigger ones?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 25, 2012, 02:13:04 PM
Nettle enchiladas?  wow, interesting.  Kind of like spinach enchiladas?  Do tell. 8)

Yep, exactly like spinach enchiladas. The texture was a little different, but partially because I think I squeezed too much liquid out of the nettles after I cooked them. I could've told you they were spinach enchiladas and you wouldn't have know the difference. You could easily use nettles anywhere you use spinach. Some picking advice: pluck the section of the top 3 leaves. The stem is soft enough there to use it all. Don't pick plants that have flowered. Supposedly they create some chemical after flowering that can irritate the urinary tract. Oh, of course, use gloves. To cook, dunk in boiling water for at least 30 seconds. I did about 1.5 minutes to soften enough for the enchiladas. Want a quick little adrenaline rush? That first bite of nettles after cooking. It's hard to believe that a little boiling water will get rid of the sting.  :)

We have a metric ton of nettles growing. Apparently they're actually a sign of good soil, so I'm happy to see them, but cooking them, I've never tried it. We have some huge ones, though - ~15 cm across for some leaves - maybe not tasty for the bigger ones?

try putting one i the microwave! but stay close and be ready to open the door.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 25, 2012, 03:14:50 PM
Are you talking about stinging nettle?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 25, 2012, 03:16:16 PM
Are you talking about stinging nettle?

yup,

nettles are delicious, try creamed on toast. boil first then saute with onions, add some cream, salt and pepper serve... on toast... duh
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 25, 2012, 03:39:50 PM
try putting one i the microwave! but stay close and be ready to open the door.

We don't use microwaves in France, only the warmth of our love for our fellow man.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 25, 2012, 04:20:06 PM
I hit about an acre of those with Roundup a few years ago. Are you sure these are the same things? What I have will sprout white flowers and has prickly thrones on the leaves and the stalks. How could you even eat them? You'd never be able to scrape all of that off and what about the poison?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: theoman on May 25, 2012, 05:48:05 PM
I hit about an acre of those with Roundup a few years ago. Are you sure these are the same things? What I have will sprout white flowers and has prickly thrones on the leaves and the stalks. How could you even eat them? You'd never be able to scrape all of that off and what about the poison?

Yep, stinging nettles. They have tiny little hairs that make it miserable to grab the things. Hence, use gloves to pick. Cooking them makes them harmless. Not only are they delicious, they're super-crazy-good for you.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 25, 2012, 05:59:29 PM
I hit about an acre of those with Roundup a few years ago. Are you sure these are the same things? What I have will sprout white flowers and has prickly thrones on the leaves and the stalks. How could you even eat them? You'd never be able to scrape all of that off and what about the poison?

Yep, stinging nettles. They have tiny little hairs that make it miserable to grab the things. Hence, use gloves to pick. Cooking them makes them harmless. Not only are they delicious, they're super-crazy-good for you.

Is there any part of it that you can't eat or need to be careful with. Stalks or just the leaves. Sorry, but this seems really strange to me. If I touch one of them I get a really bad rash, but I'm willing to try anything once.

How would you suggest cooking them for the first time?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 25, 2012, 06:17:57 PM
I hit about an acre of those with Roundup a few years ago. Are you sure these are the same things? What I have will sprout white flowers and has prickly thrones on the leaves and the stalks. How could you even eat them? You'd never be able to scrape all of that off and what about the poison?

Yep, stinging nettles. They have tiny little hairs that make it miserable to grab the things. Hence, use gloves to pick. Cooking them makes them harmless. Not only are they delicious, they're super-crazy-good for you.

Is there any part of it that you can't eat or need to be careful with. Stalks or just the leaves. Sorry, but this seems really strange to me. If I touch one of them I get a really bad rash, but I'm willing to try anything once.

How would you suggest cooking them for the first time?

earlier in the thread someone mentioned that they might not be good after they flower but you can eat the whole plant otherwise. the tops are more tender. boil them lightly the first time and then try the creamed nettles on toast. other than that you can eat them just like spinach. They are in my Big Three of really wonderful wild edibles, Nettles, Lambs quarters, and purslane. These three are also super high in omega 3 and antioxidents. Wild lettuce is nice to but it's a really strong flavour and super bitter if at all bolty. never had corn salat although I hear it's nice.

I know a few gardeners that don't bother growing any greens because they have good nettle and/or lambs quarter patches

some pics to aid in identification
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=stinging+nettle+pictures&id=BB6D08780771A48F3CF99AAA5614DD622E7FAB29&FORM=IQFRBA (http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=stinging+nettle+pictures&id=BB6D08780771A48F3CF99AAA5614DD622E7FAB29&FORM=IQFRBA)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 25, 2012, 06:33:34 PM
hey morticai, tell me about the purslane!  do you know how to eat/prepare that?
Creamed and on toast I guess? ;)

They enter my garden by the nton, super tiny seeds that I am convinced travel around in the irrigation water and get broadcast in my garden like hydromulch.

They form a nice succulent groundcover.  While I am sure I can't eat them all, eating a few might make it more acceptable to leave them be.



Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 25, 2012, 06:59:50 PM
hey morticai, tell me about the purslane!  do you know how to eat/prepare that?
Creamed and on toast I guess? ;)

They enter my garden by the nton, super tiny seeds that I am convinced travel around in the irrigation water and get broadcast in my garden like hydromulch.

They form a nice succulent groundcover.  While I am sure I can't eat them all, eating a few might make it more acceptable to leave them be.

purslane is tricky, you can actually get cultivated varieties that spread a little less but if you've already got the other kind you can eat that to.

when young and tender you can eat them raw in salads. as they get older the get tougher so you might want to cook them. I like them in stir fry. the young tips are amazing in spring rolls. they have kind of a peppery/lemony intense flavour.

If they are anywhere near mature and you pull them out to try to rid your garden be aware that they will mature seed within hours of being pulled up and drop them whereever. it's really hard to get rid of once established.

different varieties have different flavour profiles so pinch a bit off and taste it to see if you like your variety.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 25, 2012, 08:12:49 PM
I forgot that there are 2 things I try to stay away from, stinging nettle and bull nettle. I have the later.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 25, 2012, 09:24:22 PM
I forgot that there are 2 things I try to stay away from, stinging nettle and bull nettle. I have the later.

ahh, I hadn't heard of bull nettle but according to this random guy on the internet the seeds and roots are edible
http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/07/bull-nettle.html (http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/07/bull-nettle.html)

(and if you can't trust some random guy on the internet what can you trust? Disclaimer: before consuming any wild plant, check with a knowlegable person to ensure the edibility of said plant or plant part)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 25, 2012, 09:31:52 PM
I forgot that there are 2 things I try to stay away from, stinging nettle and bull nettle. I have the later.

ahh, I hadn't heard of bull nettle but according to this random guy on the internet the seeds and roots are edible
http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/07/bull-nettle.html (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/2008/07/bull-nettle.html)

(and if you can't trust some random guy on the internet what can you trust? Disclaimer: before consuming any wild plant, check with a knowlegable person to ensure the edibility of said plant or plant part)

I think I'll be saving this stuff for Roundup.

Thanks for all the input. Sorry for the mixup.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on May 25, 2012, 10:21:55 PM
the garden is clipping along. Most of the potatoes have been dug, beets pickled, tomatoes and green beans are being their prolific selves, and the corn is in the process of being picked over the next week or two. The fruit trees (plums, pears, citrus, and figs) are growing good too.

(http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/550909_10150901839782719_593324862_n.jpg)

My pineapple that has taken a beating of the past several months with lack of water and frost burn is still growing fruit. It will be its 2nd fruit in the past 5-6 years that I've had it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 26, 2012, 12:11:01 AM
(http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/550909_10150901839782719_593324862_n.jpg)


Awesome looking corn there AT!  and tomatoes and pepahs...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on May 26, 2012, 12:26:32 AM
thanks, and yep cherry tomatoes. Only takes a couple plants of those to get more than enough!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 26, 2012, 04:49:39 AM
That is some awesome looking corn. Any tips on how to get the ears that big?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 26, 2012, 04:59:39 AM
Only speak to them in whispers...   ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 26, 2012, 05:37:20 AM
Only speak to them in whispers...   ;)

LOL  ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 26, 2012, 12:40:18 PM
That is some awesome looking corn. Any tips on how to get the ears that big?

Shoot all the crows and coons that eat them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on May 26, 2012, 12:50:15 PM
That is some awesome looking corn. Any tips on how to get the ears that big?

Shoot all the crows and coons that eat them.

Last year was my first time planting corn and I didn't get to pick a single ear. I don't know if it was crows or coons, but it is my intention to go postal this year. (I plan to keep the postage organic, of course...)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on May 26, 2012, 01:10:16 PM
That is some awesome looking corn. Any tips on how to get the ears that big?

Shoot all the crows and coons that eat them.

Last year was my first time planting corn and I didn't get to pick a single ear. I don't know if it was crows or coons, but it is my intention to go postal this year. (I plan to keep the postage organic, of course...)

Organic shotgun shells? ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on May 26, 2012, 01:53:56 PM
That is some awesome looking corn. Any tips on how to get the ears that big?


Lots of water and fertilizer. I had mixed in some manure before planting, but corn is such a heavy feeder I added some 16-16-16 slow release fertilizer as well. I would also like to keep most of the pesticides out, but with corn a little sevin dust on the silks keeps the worms away. I still had to cut the end of about 25% of the ears anyway because my sevin dusting wasn't good. As far as coons goes a shotgun or electric fence, but I havent any problem... Fingers crossed.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on May 26, 2012, 01:55:03 PM
Only speak to them in whispers...   ;)

 :D. U know my secret!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 27, 2012, 02:22:07 AM
Holy crap Andrew.

Corn around these parts is about 3 inches tall
and the area is regionally famous for sweet corn.

What the heck do Louisianan folks do for the rest of the "summer"?



Today I watched a magpie stealing strawberries.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on May 27, 2012, 02:38:42 AM
Holy crap Andrew.

Corn around these parts is about 3 inches tall
and the area is regionally famous for sweet corn.

What the heck do Louisianan folks do for the rest of the "summer"?



Today I watched a magpie stealing strawberries.

Till it up and plant again!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 28, 2012, 03:06:47 AM
Till it up and plant again!
Nice.

Frost here.  Topped my potatoes. 
and the alfalfa.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on May 28, 2012, 03:59:35 AM
Till it up and plant again!
Nice.

Frost here.  Topped my potatoes. 
and the alfalfa.

Kind of hard to grow summer crops if you get frost this late! At least potatoes come back without a problem.

Won't have any frost here in South LA until mid Oct at the earliest. Just hot.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 28, 2012, 04:59:38 AM
We only get frost at elevations above 9000 ft.  Mostly what grows up there are telescopes (Mauna Kea) and volcanic eruptions (Mauna Loa).

They latest crop on Mauna Kea:

(http://delargy.com/images/2005_2_Hawaii/VT_mauna_kea.JPG)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: jeffy on May 29, 2012, 10:59:20 PM
I've got some small avocados growing this year, about 20 on this tree, the most ever.
(http://i875.photobucket.com/albums/ab318/jeffyspictures/IMG_0185.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 30, 2012, 12:31:51 AM
That's pretty cool. Are they good to eat?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: jeffy on May 30, 2012, 01:05:24 AM
We had the first one tonight, one that had fallen a bit prematurely.  It was very nice.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 30, 2012, 01:29:38 AM
wow, that is fantastic Jeffy!   

Avocado in the yard is just dreamy
although I have had a yard with mango and avocado tree......
the thunderstorms were epic,
but the humidity and and general equatorial madness basically drove me insane on the mem
brain.  :o

Cheers to food production in the yard.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 30, 2012, 01:58:42 AM
Nice looking avocadoes Jeff!

If the avocadoes reach the ground here you've gotta fight the mongooses for them.  I've seen them climb out and gnaw the branch to get the avocadoes to fall.  Beady-eyed little buggahs!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on May 30, 2012, 02:05:25 AM
Nice looking avocadoes Jeff!

If the avocadoes reach the ground here you've gotta fight the mongooses for them.  I've seen them climb out and gnaw the branch to get the avocadoes to fall.  Beady-eyed little buggahs!

+1

I see some guacamole in your future.  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 30, 2012, 11:58:56 AM
never had corn salat although I hear it's nice.

You mean poke sallet?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 30, 2012, 06:17:42 PM
Naw, poke is made with raw fish, not corn salad.  Corn does make awesome chowder though.



Sent from the middle of the Pacific Ocean using electromagnetic radiation.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 30, 2012, 08:57:38 PM
Hey Phil, do you know anything about "blue garlic"?  Seems my favorite aunt, who lives over there, raves about what she calls blue garlic, which I gather is just fresh and unripe (immature) garlic bulbs.

They eat tons of the stuff.  Just wondering if you are familiar, or if it a common thing in France.


I harvested a few second year bulbils last night.  crunchy, mild and beautiful!

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 30, 2012, 09:03:37 PM
never had corn salat although I hear it's nice.

You mean poke sallet?

no I meant corn salad

(https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSi9OYtdimxD94PtZBR8mwUS6dL3i8XfztR5OUDitz4CYasdu_v)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on May 30, 2012, 11:52:55 PM
I'm working on my first garden. I have peppers, basil, and cherry tomatoes. My basil plants were pretty healthy-looking before I planted them in the ground, now they're kinda wilting and turning yellow/brown. My tomato and pepper plants are doing well though. Any idea what's going on with the basil?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 31, 2012, 01:23:26 AM
I'm working on my first garden. I have peppers, basil, and cherry tomatoes. My basil plants were pretty healthy-looking before I planted them in the ground, now they're kinda wilting and turning yellow/brown. My tomato and pepper plants are doing well though. Any idea what's going on with the basil?

so did they start to wilt before turning colors or after?

what did you do for feeding when you transplanted?

If they are turning yellow from the outside in (and I could have this backwards so buyer beware) it could be a nitrogen deficiency but that shouldn't cause wilting. It could actually be fertilizer burn if you gave them too much harsh chemical fertilizer or really hot organic stuff, like straight fish emulsion.

Lack of water is a possibility as is too much water. generally basil and tomatoes do well in the same soil types and the same treatment though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 31, 2012, 08:55:22 AM
Naw, poke is made with raw fish, not corn salad.  Corn does make awesome chowder though.

Whatchew talkin bout willis?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 31, 2012, 08:57:58 AM
Hey Phil, do you know anything about "blue garlic"?  Seems my favorite aunt, who lives over there, raves about what she calls blue garlic, which I gather is just fresh and unripe (immature) garlic bulbs.

They eat tons of the stuff.  Just wondering if you are familiar, or if it a common thing in France.


I harvested a few second year bulbils last night.  crunchy, mild and beautiful!

Hrm. Well that could either be Ramps, which are also called 'ail des ours' (bear garlic) in French, or it could be 'fresh garlic' which to me looks like regular garlic except with the stems on/not dried.

There's also purple garlic, which is just garlic, but purple. Do you know what the French is for it?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on May 31, 2012, 10:26:28 AM
so did they start to wilt before turning colors or after?

I was out of town for a week, so I'm not sure. I asked my neighbor to water the plants while I was gone, but I'm not sure how well she did.

what did you do for feeding when you transplanted?

Nothing. Should I have?

If they are turning yellow from the outside in (and I could have this backwards so buyer beware) it could be a nitrogen deficiency but that shouldn't cause wilting. It could actually be fertilizer burn if you gave them too much harsh chemical fertilizer or really hot organic stuff, like straight fish emulsion.

I have a soil test kit, I haven't had a chance to use it yet.

Lack of water is a possibility as is too much water. generally basil and tomatoes do well in the same soil types and the same treatment though.

The soil wasn't bone dry, but it wasn't that wet either. I watered them pretty well, so hopefully they'll perk up.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 31, 2012, 12:48:13 PM
http://www.vegetablecorner.com/gardening-tips/signs-of-over-watering-plants.php

I bet your neighbor overwatered.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on May 31, 2012, 01:33:28 PM
I have some tomatillos planted I started as seeds. They're about 1" tall right now. Is there any chance they'll get big enough to bear fruit this year, or should I give up on them and plant something bigger from the local nursery?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on May 31, 2012, 04:16:02 PM
I have some tomatillos planted I started as seeds. They're about 1" tall right now. Is there any chance they'll get big enough to bear fruit this year, or should I give up on them and plant something bigger from the local nursery?
Here, I wouldn't worry about it.  Where you are - I have no idea if you have enough time.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on May 31, 2012, 04:24:39 PM
I have some tomatillos planted I started as seeds. They're about 1" tall right now. Is there any chance they'll get big enough to bear fruit this year, or should I give up on them and plant something bigger from the local nursery?

Plenty of time. Expect a harvest by September. Keep them watered and bug free.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 31, 2012, 06:03:02 PM

what did you do for feeding when you transplanted?

Nothing. Should I have?


I like to work a couple of cups of sifted compost into the soil when I put a plant in the ground. It helps loosen up the soil so the roots can spread out and gives them a little boost energy wise. It also helps hold moisture so they are less likely to dry out before they are established and go into shock.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on May 31, 2012, 06:08:30 PM
Checked the soil. Assuming I did the test correctly, I'm high in Potash, and low in phosphorous and nitrogen. PH is somewhere between 6 and 7 (6.5?). I guess I'll pick up some fertilizer next time I head to town.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 31, 2012, 06:15:39 PM
Checked the soil. Assuming I did the test correctly, I'm high in Potash, and low in phosphorous and nitrogen. PH is somewhere between 6 and 7 (6.5?). I guess I'll pick up some fertilizer next time I head to town.

seriously just grab a couple sacks (or a yard or two, if you have access to a truck) of compost. It's really balanced and over time it will improve the soil so you won't need to worry about test kits, except perhaps for pH for specific crops.

If you can set up your own compost bin and save all your food scraps (except meat/dairy). Between kitchen scraps and spent grain and hops you can turn over some good compost pretty quickly. The grain attracts black soldier flies which, while horrifically disgusting to find in your compost pile, are really good at making compost.

all the scraps and detritus from putting your garden to bed in the winter can be chopped up and either put in the compost pile or gently turned into the soil right in the garden. You could also sow some barley or alfalfa in the late fall as a cover crop that will prevent weeds in the spring and can be turned under to increase the fertility of the soil over time.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on May 31, 2012, 06:21:36 PM
My neighbor gave me a book on soil-less gardening, so the mix I'm using is about 1/2 compost, 1/4 rice hulls, 1/4 peat moss. I guess It's possible my mix isn't homogenous enough to get proper results from the test kit. I assumed with as much compost as I used, I'd have plenty of nitrogen. But, I also don't know what I'm doing, and just following my neighbor's advice. (different neighbor than the one who possibly over/under watered.) 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 31, 2012, 10:27:46 PM
Naw, poke is made with raw fish, not corn salad.  Corn does make awesome chowder though.

Whatchew talkin bout willis?

Ahi poke:
(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff57/barefootplumies/AhiPoke.jpg)


Corn chowder:
(http://img.foodnetwork.com/FOOD/2007/02/14/ie0104_cornchowder_lg.jpg)



Ah, well...  Different strokes...   ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on June 01, 2012, 11:29:36 AM
Naw, poke is made with raw fish, not corn salad.  Corn does make awesome chowder though.

Whatchew talkin bout willis?

Ahi poke:
(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff57/barefootplumies/AhiPoke.jpg)


Corn chowder:
(http://img.foodnetwork.com/FOOD/2007/02/14/ie0104_cornchowder_lg.jpg)



Ah, well...  Different strokes...   ;)

And both lookin' yummy!  ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on June 01, 2012, 12:44:14 PM
Ahi poke:
(http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff57/barefootplumies/AhiPoke.jpg)

So poke is just a fancy word for ceviche
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 01, 2012, 01:05:19 PM
I think that my be the first time fancy and poke have ever been used in the same sentence.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on June 04, 2012, 10:42:59 PM
Not food but in the garden and for your enjoyment.  This one made it
most the others got frost bitten.
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Iris2012.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on June 04, 2012, 11:12:46 PM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on June 05, 2012, 12:54:38 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

At least they have good taste!

I believe a pyrethrin based spray would work well and be food-safe. Available everywhere.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 05, 2012, 01:53:57 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

DDT is an organic molecule.   :o
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on June 05, 2012, 01:55:45 AM
DDT is an organic molecule.   :o

No organochlorides, please. I'm thinking more like lemongrass extract or something.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on June 05, 2012, 02:44:55 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

At least they have good taste!

I believe a pyrethrin based spray would work well and be food-safe. Available everywhere.

Pyrethrins are indeed allowable in an OMRI-listed organic pesticide, but I personally try to keep away from them because they do pose some toxicity concerns that I'm trying to avoid. But everyone has to make that call for themselves, and it sure beats the non-organic options.

I use Neem oil on my fruits and veggies. It works OK, but not great. It also needs to be reapplied every 4 or 5 days (or after a rain), so YMMV. I haven't had much of an issue with grasshoppers, so I don't know how effective Neem is on them specifically, but it's pretty much an all-piurpose insect treatment so it should work just as well on them as things like bean beetles, Japanese beetles, etc.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 05, 2012, 03:30:55 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

chickens

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on June 05, 2012, 04:29:26 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

chickens

 ;D, my chickens are not crazy about basil, but love the lettuce. ???
But true, not many hoppers survive in my yard, except on the hops where they can get above the chickens.

Wow vert, that is one stunning iris color!  My garden is getting taken over by flowers actually.  I am bad about eliminating volunteers. :-[

Had the first garden stir fry last night.  Totally pure home grown 2012 except for that one red bell pepper the wife made me add.  The bok choy was nice.  First scapes as well.

Maybe you could just plant some more basil and have enough for everyone?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 05, 2012, 04:48:33 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

chickens

 ;D, my chickens are not crazy about basil, but love the lettuce. ???
But true, not many hoppers survive in my yard, except on the hops where they can get above the chickens.

Wow vert, that is one stunning iris color!  My garden is getting taken over by flowers actually.  I am bad about eliminating volunteers. :-[

Had the first garden stir fry last night.  Totally pure home grown 2012 except for that one red bell pepper the wife made me add.  The bok choy was nice.  First scapes as well.

Maybe you could just plant some more basil and have enough for everyone?

I like this answer the best.

I gotta get some pictures of my garden going.

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year. the surprise is that we didn't plant any. talk about not eliminating volnuteers well. I feel like it's a shame to remove edible food plants from a food garden just because it wasn't what I expected.

we have four or five nice looking cantelopes swelling up and the potatoes are like three feet high.

The corn has exceeded 12 inches and the beans we planted around them just started to break ground this weekend so we put in the acorn squash seeds and crossed our fingers. looks like we've got a nice second round of artichokes on the way. and we have started snacking on green beans. and melons melons melons. well also squash and, with luck some cukes for pickles. Looks like 5 or 6 of the loofah seedlings are going to make it to so that should take care of our sponge needs for a while.

the last 25 tomatoes went in the ground yesterday and we just got a couple yards of compost delivered so we can top dress everything.

gardening in California is almost embarrassing the hardest part is stopping the plants you don't want from growing.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on June 05, 2012, 11:58:08 AM
Our biggest probelm had been lack of rain, but not this week. :o
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tubercle on June 05, 2012, 10:48:25 PM

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year.

Pickles
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on June 05, 2012, 10:58:35 PM

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year.

  Pickles  Relish

There I fixed it for ya
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 05, 2012, 10:59:38 PM

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year.

Pickles

yes, also squash blossoms stuffed with cheese, and zucchini chocolate chip cookies. And my wife found a recipe for zucchini cheese bread as well. I wish we had chickens we could turn some of those zukes into eggs.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on June 05, 2012, 11:11:20 PM
Have you thought about lacto-fermenting the zukes? 

My neighbor bought a bushel of cayenne peppers (he gets bored and like to go to the produce auction and buy bushels of things he doesn't really need), so last year I made naturally fermented hot sauce. It was pretty easy, thought a couple jars got a nasty mold infection. I still have more hot sauce than I can handle.

 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on June 05, 2012, 11:43:27 PM
Part of my garden.  Some hops growing in the foreground.  Not the best shot but shows some peppers, tomatoes, squash and cucumbers.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/7dfdfc7f.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 06, 2012, 12:12:51 AM
Very nice layout Ron.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tubercle on June 06, 2012, 12:24:43 AM

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year.

  Pickles  Relish

There I fixed it for ya

I stand corrected ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on June 06, 2012, 12:30:38 AM
Very nice layout Ron.

Thanks...I've learned over the years to give plenty of space for the plants to grow.  It will look like a jungle a month from now.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on June 06, 2012, 01:33:08 AM
Very nice layout Ron.

Thanks...I've learned over the years to give plenty of space for the plants to grow.  It will look like a jungle a month from now.

They will produce more as well. Though, some like to grow close together like beans, peppers and corn.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on June 06, 2012, 04:15:49 AM
Does anyone know of effective organic means to keep grasshoppers away? Some jerk-bug has been munching on my already-sad-looking basil.

chickens

Guineas as a first choice then ducks and chickens, the later need fences to keep them out of the garden so you don't lose your plants. Guineas need to be train so they don't fly away but it is worth the work.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on June 06, 2012, 04:32:51 AM

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year.

Pickles

yes, also squash blossoms stuffed with cheese, and zucchini chocolate chip cookies. And my wife found a recipe for zucchini cheese bread as well. I wish we had chickens we could turn some of those zukes into eggs.

Can send you some fertile eggs if you want.
Pickles are my choice for zucchini, dill them with some hot pepper. Nothing better than hot pickles, they make a good tatar sauce to boot!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 06, 2012, 05:00:22 AM

Looks like we are going to have too many zuccini this year.

Pickles

yes, also squash blossoms stuffed with cheese, and zucchini chocolate chip cookies. And my wife found a recipe for zucchini cheese bread as well. I wish we had chickens we could turn some of those zukes into eggs.

Can send you some fertile eggs if you want.
Pickles are my choice for zucchini, dill them with some hot pepper. Nothing better than hot pickles, they make a good tatar sauce to boot!

plenty of chickens around to be had. Just not ready for the urban chicken farmer thing just yet. gotta figure out the coop and where we want them running.

No way in god's nastiest hell are you going to get me to raise guinea foul. I get goose bumps when I hear them. the peacocks that used to live around when I was out in the country were bad enough.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on June 06, 2012, 03:16:41 PM
Corn is doing nicely. It's about 15 inches now, need to feed it. I've got some liquid manure I was thinking of using.. Too many nitrates?

My hops are doing quite nicely, or at least the EKG are, there are some leaves that are (no kidding) the size of my head.

We finally got some watermelon hardened off so I'll be transplanting them to somewhere with more room.

Our roses are gangbusters, and we harvested (meaning cut off a bunch of branches) cherries the other day, luckily we got to pretty much all of them before the birds did.

Slugs... M*therf*cking slugs... They have absolutely chowed down on our basil, cilantro, and rhubarb. The pepper and chile plants were looking like they were going to be next, but luckily they got a nice growth spurt.

Speaking of which, what fertilizer for chiles? 5/5/5? Potassium?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on June 06, 2012, 04:46:46 PM
Very nice layout Ron.

Thanks...I've learned over the years to give plenty of space for the plants to grow.  It will look like a jungle a month from now.

They will produce more as well. Though, some like to grow close together like beans, peppers and corn.

Yes.  I have my beans and peppers about 12-18" apart. I've had success with that spacing but squash is another story. :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on June 06, 2012, 05:31:49 PM
Slugs... M*therf*cking slugs... They have absolutely chowed down on our basil, cilantro, and rhubarb. The pepper and chile plants were looking like they were going to be next, but luckily they got a nice growth spurt.


Funny you should mention that on this forum...Phil, google it....Kill Slugs with BEER
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 06, 2012, 05:34:01 PM
Slugs... M*therf*cking slugs... They have absolutely chowed down on our basil, cilantro, and rhubarb. The pepper and chile plants were looking like they were going to be next, but luckily they got a nice growth spurt.


Funny you should mention that on this forum...Phil, google it....Kill Slugs with BEER

I always thought that was what genesee cream ale was for growing up. it works okay, but only if you can get the edge of the container at grade so the slugs don't have to climb in. they are lazy drunks.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 06, 2012, 06:43:25 PM
I think Genesee Cream Ale IS on the federal registry for pesticides...  If not, it should be.   8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on June 06, 2012, 07:47:23 PM
Nest best thing might be a bag of rock salt in a ring on an impermeable plastic moat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on June 06, 2012, 08:37:08 PM
Nest best thing might be a bag of rock salt in a ring on an impermeable plastic moat.

And train up an army of ants to man it. :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 06, 2012, 08:48:38 PM
earwigs will also help control slugs. course, then you have earwigs, but they are fairly harmless.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on June 06, 2012, 08:51:07 PM
earwigs will also help control slugs. course, then you have earwigs, but they are fairly harmless.

Except they drive my wife bonkers - calls 'em wigwams
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 06, 2012, 09:11:34 PM
earwigs will also help control slugs. course, then you have earwigs, but they are fairly harmless.

Not according to Rod Serling on my favorite episode of Night Gallery (http://www.hulu.com/watch/58794/night-gallery-the-caterpillarlittle-girl-lost)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on June 07, 2012, 03:49:53 AM
earwigs will also help control slugs. course, then you have earwigs, but they are fairly harmless.
Can you point to a reference?  i tried googling around, but everything I find talks about how to control both, not one to control the other.  My google-fu has failed me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 07, 2012, 04:46:58 AM
earwigs will also help control slugs. course, then you have earwigs, but they are fairly harmless.
Can you point to a reference?  i tried googling around, but everything I find talks about how to control both, not one to control the other.  My google-fu has failed me.

Click on Night Gallery (it is a hyper link) in reply #298 above.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 07, 2012, 07:08:40 AM
earwigs will also help control slugs. course, then you have earwigs, but they are fairly harmless.
Can you point to a reference?  i tried googling around, but everything I find talks about how to control both, not one to control the other.  My google-fu has failed me.

well okay, to be fair it is knowledge from another forum so it is suspect, however here is the link to decide for yourself

so here is the link that I originally found

http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/organic/msg051520163415.html (http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/organic/msg051520163415.html)

and here is further reading leading from that forum post

http://www.insectguide.net/earwigs.html (http://www.insectguide.net/earwigs.html) which has a somewhat quaint olde tyme writing style and speaks in more detail.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on June 07, 2012, 07:54:55 AM
Interesting, thanks.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on June 24, 2012, 02:06:27 AM
new potatoes! 

add some chopped
bulbous scapes, onion, chard, broccoli for a light garden stir fry.

Dinner from the garden season is here. 8)
Cheers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on June 24, 2012, 08:41:37 AM
new potatoes! 

add some chopped
bulbous scapes, onion, chard, broccoli for a light garden stir fry.

Dinner from the garden season is here. 8)
Cheers.
Ahhhh man you are livin right!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on June 26, 2012, 01:44:28 PM
Lettuce and spinach have been on the table for a few weeks now.  Radishes are about done.  Starting to get beets in (roasted a few this weekend) and got our first tomatoes (Early Girls) and peppers (bells and poblanos) this weekend.  Jalapenos are coming on strong and ready to pick.  Lemon peppers (yellow thai) are coming on , but not turning yet.  Peas are starting to pod.  Corn is about chest high.  Eggplant is flowering, cucumbers seem to be a little slow, but the plants are healthy.  Spaghetti, yellow, and zuchini squash are looking good as well.  The celery is fine too.  The okra and string bean plants are about 6 - 12 inches tall.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on June 26, 2012, 02:28:58 PM
Question about "compost":

I don't really have much space for compost, but I have a corner of the house that we have not yet landscaped. It was just dirt (no plants, weeds, etc), so I started piling up and burying my spent grain, trub, dryhops, grass clippings and burying it (it gets a bit funky otherwise).

Will this produce dirt worth using or am I more harm than good?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on June 26, 2012, 02:43:11 PM
Question about "compost":

I don't really have much space for compost, but I have a corner of the house that we have not yet landscaped. It was just dirt (no plants, weeds, etc), so I started piling up and burying my spent grain, trub, dryhops, grass clippings and burying it (it gets a bit funky otherwise).

Will this produce dirt worth using or am I more harm than good?

I think this is sometimes called "trench composting". The usual method is to have a dedicated spot or spots in the garden for this each year, creating new pockets of rich soil. You should get some nice soil from this, but it may take a year or so since the composting will happen a lot more slowly underground.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 26, 2012, 02:50:16 PM
Question about "compost":

I don't really have much space for compost, but I have a corner of the house that we have not yet landscaped. It was just dirt (no plants, weeds, etc), so I started piling up and burying my spent grain, trub, dryhops, grass clippings and burying it (it gets a bit funky otherwise).

Will this produce dirt worth using or am I more harm than good?

that will work. it'll take a while (like a couple years) but it will work. some folks with stronger stomachs than I will do what they call 'sheet composting' where they just spread the compostables in an even sheet across the whole area to be enriched. but it is messy.

the idea situation is to build a pile, if you mix grass clippings with the food scraps, spent grain, etc it will hold down the smell somewhat, make sure it stays moist but not wet, and turn it every couple days you can have good dirt in a few months. if you get some worms or black soldier flies http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_soldier_fly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_soldier_fly) they can turn gunk into goods in a short time indeed. Our compost system is two bins made of cinder blocks next to each other. each one is about 2.5 feet square. We add our scraps and clippings to the left side and when it starts to get full (about 3-6 weeks for us) we clear out the dirt from the right side and flip the whole pile from the left into the right where it gets turned.

By doing it this way we allow a good amount of mass to build up and it can maintain heat while it works. The worms go nuts in there. when you turn the right side it's crawling with worms and bugs and stuff.

They also make various composting 'machines' that are big bins or one description or another that allow easy turning and thourough aeration of the 'pile'. aeration is vital to controling the smell as there are two kinds of composting process aerobic and anaerobic (sound familiar?) the anaerobic process makes nasty smells and the aerobic one makes less nasty smells.
hope this helps!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on June 26, 2012, 03:41:04 PM
I have a pile that moves around the back of the backyard in the low spots. I have remediated some poor areas and now they are vibrant indeed- just from having a pile there. Actually you don't even have to turn the pile if you don't feel like it. It will work its magic quicker if you do but just dumping on top and flipping the pile to a new spot a couple times a year is enough to break everything down.

When I had weeds real bad I would use a bag on the mower and have a separate pile for these clippings. I would pile it up high to get the heat going. This keeps any potential seeds out of my regular compost and the heat hopefully kills and break them down. The pile will melt away and you will have a nice fertile spot.

Spent grain needs to be mixed in or spread out to dry in order to keep the flies and that gawd awful smell down. That's the only thing I've had stinking from the compost pile and if you mix it in the flies won;t be a bother. And surprisingly I've found that the feral cats like to eat spent grain!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on June 26, 2012, 03:52:56 PM
I feed em Lead  >:(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on June 26, 2012, 04:31:21 PM
I have one of these that I got from my parents years ago.  It works very well.  They are a bit pricey though.

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/9a0c88d8-cc03-459e-9c1c-537a1a4ddb21_300.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on June 26, 2012, 04:37:09 PM
I have seen one of these types of machines that is just a big sphere with a hatch on one side that you roll around the yard to turn the 'heap'. looks kind of fun
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Delo on June 26, 2012, 04:53:34 PM
I live in an urban area and dont have a lot of room either. I have two of these kind side by side.
(http://rockinthestove.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/compost-bin.jpg)
The entire top opens to allow for easy turning with a pitchfork.  I bury fresh stuff in the right one and transfer the broken down stuff to finish off and use from the left.  I usually turn the stuff up at least once a week, depending on how much and often I add to it.  They were free or really cheap from a County program.  If your compost starts to smell there may not be enough "brown material", wood, paper, etc. After a brew session with all the grain and hops I usually add a lot of wood chips to keep the pile from going anaerobic.   

I have one of these that I got from my parents years ago.  It works very well.  They are a bit pricey though.
These are supposed to break everything down faster than normal bins. They are nice, but pricey. I know Costco sometimes sells them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on June 26, 2012, 05:48:25 PM
Compost heaps don't need to be fancy at all.  Just a place where you dump organic matter.  I've found that grass cuttings thatch and need to be turned often to prevent thatching.  Dead leaves deteriorate quickly and are very good for compost.  Throwing your coffee grounds on the compost heap attracts eartworms and accelerates composting.  Spreading fish emulsion on the compost heap accelerates composting. 

Healthy compost heaps smell earthy, like wet dirt, not stinky.  You should be able to begin harvesting compost in a few months of warm weather, not a couple of years.

And anyone who is a fan of Fraggle Rock can tell you,  The Compost Heap is very wise and a dispenser of sage advice. 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on June 26, 2012, 09:39:29 PM
I have seen one of these types of machines that is just a big sphere with a hatch on one side that you roll around the yard to turn the 'heap'. looks kind of fun

We had one of those at my elementary school when I was a kid. We would take out some vegetable scrapes from lunch, and occasionally some cardboard, and put it in there. Then roll it a little. It was a great way to get us involved in gardening, and it made beautiful soil.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on June 27, 2012, 03:44:26 PM
I have one of these that I got from my parents years ago.  It works very well.  They are a bit pricey though.

Betcha I could make one of these. I'll ponder (and possibly Google) this afternoon...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bo on June 28, 2012, 03:33:04 AM
Get yourself a black, 55 gallon plastic barrel and make a door in the side of it. I shoved a piece of 2" PVC through the ends and supported it by those so I can spin it. I reattached the plastic door with hinges and a latch. Be sure and leave the bungs out for air and you might want to drill some more holes around the sides for additional ventilation.

The only problem I have is that I get golf ball sized clumps of compost sometimes. Maybe I'm not turning it enough.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 04, 2012, 02:30:56 AM
Heh.  Compost.

My neighbor asked if I was "rotating" the other day.
I said what?  He says.... smells like something died.

I love a steaming pile
but I confess
I turn mine with diesel and hydraulics. :-[



Wife says she forgot to take out meat for dinner,
I know that is a hint, wink wink.
So I head down to get this for a quick stir fry.

Yum.  A little thinning for the wok.

Cheers green heads.


(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/dinner.jpg)

I only left that east coast beer in there for Ron. ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: ccfoo242 on July 04, 2012, 06:00:00 AM

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/dinner.jpg)

I only left that east coast beer in there for Ron. ;)

That looks nice! I wish I had the yard to do something like that.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 05, 2012, 02:23:07 AM
Looking good, man!  Had fresh peas today and made chimichurri sauce for the BBQ from fresh herbs.  And a tomato salad.  Garden is really starting to produce, don't need to buy many veggies.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on July 05, 2012, 03:08:07 AM
I can't wait till I start getting some veggies. Cukes, zukes and beans are all starting to flower. Got a bunch of green tomatoes that I'm waiting to ripen, plus a couple of Anchos almost ready to pick. Been picking at the raspberries a bit and waiting for the blackberries, currants and boysenberries to finish ripening up.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on July 05, 2012, 03:12:37 AM
Anyone want some lettuce before it bolts?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on July 05, 2012, 05:53:18 PM
From my garden....(except the shrimp dang it)

 ;)
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/NasturtiumSaladFace.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 05, 2012, 07:27:45 PM
What, no shrimp in the garden?  Slacker!   ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on July 06, 2012, 01:34:22 AM
(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/dinner.jpg)

I only left that east coast beer in there for Ron. ;)

Man...oh...man...that looks awesome.  8)

Thanks!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on July 06, 2012, 01:56:38 AM
My Cascade hops are looking great!

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/9a143b42.jpg)

The garden is getting ready to shift into second gear.  :)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/23fb59f8.jpg)

The blackberries are also doing well.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/ac2dc624.jpg)

The tomatoes are just starting to turn.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/42233f28.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 08, 2012, 04:29:10 PM
Lookin' good!  Sweet corn is taller than me and little cobs are starting to grow.  Got peppers and tomatoes already to the point of having to can.  My daughter is making Italian wedding soup with escarole fresh picked from the garden.  Yum!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 08, 2012, 08:15:43 PM
Stll picking pineapples, avocados, guavas, mangos, lychee, and lilikoi (passion fruit) here.  White pineapple (Kona Sugarloaf) season is just starting.  Bananas and papayas year-round.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 09, 2012, 02:39:59 PM
Sauce tomatoes are blossoming. Tallest flint corn has some tassles. Been eating on the 'weeds' (purslane) for a couple weeks. taters are still just little. we have a pupmkinish squash that looks close to ready. been eating the volunteer zukes for a while as well. artichokes are starting to blossom which is not edible but sure is pretty.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 23, 2012, 05:03:22 PM
Hey Ron, those black berries look great! 

Do your plants have thorns?
Mine are absolutely wicked and I swear reach out to grab you!
Just getting berries now.





On another front, it is pesto time around here:

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/pestofixins.jpg)

I am a bit trashy and have no pine nuts. ???  Is that critical?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 23, 2012, 05:11:09 PM
Nice basil and garlic!!

IMO it's critical to include a nut.

You can use pecans, almonds or walnuts. Macadamia nuts would be nice. Maybe even cashews. What I wouldn't use is peanuts.

The not quite pesto will be good without nuts but more like a chimchurri sauce. Nice on meat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 23, 2012, 07:03:31 PM
pine nuts
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 23, 2012, 07:18:31 PM
IMO it's critical to include a nut.

I might be able to steal some cashews out of the backpacking gorp bag... ???

Probably don't need too many aye?  I always end up overloading with the garlic.
easy-peel hardneck is just way too easy. 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 23, 2012, 07:41:30 PM
volume wise, I like to have about as much nuts as packed basil leaves. I use walnuts cause they are cheap and pine nuts are really pretty neutral flavour wise.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 23, 2012, 09:26:53 PM
volume wise, I like to have about as much nuts as packed basil leaves. I use walnuts cause they are cheap and pine nuts are really pretty neutral flavour wise.

I disagree.  The flavor of the pine nuts are subtle but distinct.  They make the difference between a good pesto and a GREAT pesto.  They cost me $17.95/3lbs at Costco.  Three pounds makes a lot of pesto.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 23, 2012, 09:34:28 PM
Probably don't need too many aye?  I always end up overloading with the garlic.
easy-peel hardneck is just way too easy. 8)

Eh?  Overloading garlic?  What means overloading garlic?  Fare non capirne.   ;)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 23, 2012, 11:38:37 PM
volume wise, I like to have about as much nuts as packed basil leaves. I use walnuts cause they are cheap and pine nuts are really pretty neutral flavour wise.

Holy crap.  1 to 1 with basil?  geez.  i might be screwed and be on the way to euges chimchurri!
I did confess that I was trashy. :-[

Eh?  Overloading garlic?  What means overloading garlic?  Fare non capirne.   ;)

 ;D, basically, when all you taste is garlic....that means garlic overload.
Heh, not saying that is a bad thing... ;) Man would you love some of the heads I have from this harvest.

Cheers to growing your own. 
Maybe next year will be a pinyon pine nut year here. 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on July 24, 2012, 01:15:33 AM
My favorite pesto I've ever made used pistachios. I made it plenty thick too. It was fantastic as a crust on grilled chicken. If you're looking for something different to try with your pesto I highly recommend it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 24, 2012, 01:45:24 AM
A food Nazi friend of mine insists it isn't pesto unless it has pine nuts in it. I disagree. Maybe it isn't classic pesto but the Italians are famous for cooking with what is available or in season. A very pragmatic way of cooking.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 24, 2012, 04:16:44 AM
A food Nazi friend of mine insists it isn't pesto unless it has pine nuts in it. I disagree. Maybe it isn't classic pesto but the Italians are famous for cooking with what is available or in season. A very pragmatic way of cooking.

thanks euge.  Italians don't need any food Nazis. :D

I love me some pragmatic design and cooking with what is available and in season. 
Imma find some kinda nuts.

I hate to actually spend any coin on this.
Costco man?  I thought for sure you might be using some kinda palm nut?
Come on man.
Subtle regionalism is cool. ;)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 24, 2012, 05:05:21 AM
I think macadamia nuts would help make an awesome pesto. I have a pecan tree in my backyard and my neighbor grows a butt-load of cilantro in the cool months. Guess what I use to make pesto...?

I've grown onion successfully and will try garlic this fall? Keep looking at the pinnah's garlic and now must include this in my efforts!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 24, 2012, 02:49:40 PM
It's not REALLY pesto unless you use a pestle and morter to make it. I don't use a pestle and morter to make mine anymore. I love mixing it up with pesto. I also like cilantro pesto. bitter greens like arugala, sorrel, mustard, even mixed leaf salad makes a really nice pesto. I like the pistachio idea. might have to try that next time I get the little green guys in my CSA.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 24, 2012, 06:59:40 PM
It's not really beer unless you use saliva enzymes to convert the grain starches.   ::)
Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on July 24, 2012, 11:05:50 PM
Hey Ron, those black berries look great! 

Do your plants have thorns?
Mine are absolutely wicked and I swear reach out to grab you!
Just getting berries now.

No...my blackberry canes don't have thorns.  Good thing though. :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 25, 2012, 02:32:03 PM
Beets

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0249.jpg)

Pickled

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0254.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 25, 2012, 02:33:36 PM
Hot pickled okra

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0250.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 25, 2012, 03:16:40 PM
Okra!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on July 25, 2012, 07:53:15 PM
Well I have Tomatillos!

I planted about four different tomato plants that I received from my CSA and one of them turned out to be a tomatillo. I didn't know what any of them where and I was wondering why this tomato plant looked so funny. Then I was wondering why the plant was producing all these small paper husk things that tomatillos grow inside. Well duh... because it's a tomatillo plant.

By the looks of it, I'll have more tomatillos than I know what to do with at the end of the year. Salsa Verde is one the menu along with some other soups and salsas. What do I do with the rest? Do they freeze well? Anybody have some staple recipes that tomatillos will shine in?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 25, 2012, 08:16:58 PM
I did not grow tomatillos this year because I got way more than I needed last year.  Still have salsa verde left from last year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 25, 2012, 08:22:27 PM
You can prepare them and portion out and freeze. Then pop them out of the containers and vacuum seal. Keep forever like that in the freezer.

You'll cook them with garlic primarily and puree in the blender.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 25, 2012, 10:59:19 PM
Dang Red!  I love pickled beets.

I can grow stuff, but man I suck at preservation.   :-[
I need to work on that.



I found this guy hunting in my garden last night!



(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/lfrog.jpg)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tubercle on July 26, 2012, 01:39:16 AM

I can grow stuff, but man I suck at preservation.   :-[

A few things you need to know and their effects on plant and animal matter and the things that make them spoil.

Cold, moisture, pH, heat, oxygen. Most of these can be elimainated or accomplished by freezing, salt (and nitrite), vinegar, vaccum or heat under pressure. The rest is just details.

 If you can make beer you are way ahead of the curve in preserving food. Preservation is much easier.

Apply your knowlege ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 26, 2012, 05:37:05 AM
Dang Red!  I love pickled beets.

I can grow stuff, but man I suck at preservation.   :-[
I need to work on that.

Well then you're gonna love this.  It is awesome:

USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning, 2009 revision (http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html)

Cool frog BTW.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 26, 2012, 06:04:12 AM
Is that a frog or a bufo?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 26, 2012, 01:06:59 PM
 ;D, I love a good pep talk from the Tubercle,
and that is an awesome link Puna!

Thanks.

Is that a frog or a bufo?

true frog.  A fat and apparently well fed example of Rana pipiens
I hope he likes earwigs. ::)



I am about ready to plant some fall crops, now that we are getting some cooler weather.
Peas, more lettuce and spinach, bok choy, carrots....



Pictures make these threads fun...so
how about a little polyculture.

I have about 10 things in here to eat,
and one to make beer with. ;)


Cheers to the harvest.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/polyculture2012.jpg)



Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 26, 2012, 02:34:16 PM
Wow. What can I say? Beautiful.  Just have to get some more dirt brought in and polyculture is right in the direction I want to go.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: nateo on July 26, 2012, 06:19:57 PM
This drought has been hard on my tomatoes, but my basil has been going nuts. My tomatoes got a spider mite infestation. I didn't realize what was going on until it was too late. I've been using pyrethrin daily since I realized, but I think I'm gonna end up losing most of my tomato plants.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on July 26, 2012, 07:21:57 PM
Wow. What can I say? Beautiful.  Just have to get some more dirt brought in and polyculture is right in the direction I want to go.

With that backyard of yours, maybe you can try aquaponics?   ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 30, 2012, 04:57:47 PM
Some of this weekends take:

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0282.jpg)

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0283.jpg)

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0285.jpg)

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0286.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on August 02, 2012, 05:20:17 AM
Okra ....hated it....now i LOVE it.  split in half length wise,
spritzed with aerosol olive oil and lightly sprinkled with cajun blackenin spice.
Mebe a little salty rub....

Then put in the broiler until some minor charring occurs....chit man gud stuff!!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on August 02, 2012, 11:31:07 AM
Okra ....hated it....now i LOVE it.  split in half length wise,
spritzed with aerosol olive oil and lightly sprinkled with cajun blackenin spice.
Mebe a little salty rub....

Then put in the broiler until some minor charring occurs....chit man gud stuff!!

What doesn't get pickled or frozen for soup gets roasted, and yes, it is quite good......and a bit better for you than frying it. 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on August 02, 2012, 04:15:14 PM
What doesn't get pickled or frozen for soup gets roasted, and yes, it is quite good......and a bit better for you than frying it. 8)

Yeah, but fried Okra tastes sooooooooooo good
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on August 02, 2012, 04:52:25 PM
What doesn't get pickled or frozen for soup gets roasted, and yes, it is quite good......and a bit better for you than frying it. 8)

Yeah, but fried Okra tastes sooooooooooo good

And it's vegan! ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tubercle on August 02, 2012, 10:15:14 PM
What doesn't get pickled or frozen for soup gets roasted, and yes, it is quite good......and a bit better for you than frying it. 8)

Yeah, but fried Okra tastes sooooooooooo good

And it's vegan! ;)

Unless its fryed in bacon grease ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on August 04, 2012, 04:38:40 AM
mmmmm fresh pineapple.

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/427521_10151059003362719_86741200_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on August 04, 2012, 03:30:28 PM
I just harvested a tiny pineapple from the ornamental I got at the co-op. It was tasty
mmmmm fresh pineapple.

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/427521_10151059003362719_86741200_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on August 04, 2012, 06:53:32 PM
I've got so many pineapples ripening now that I can't keep up with them. I'd give them to friends, but everybody has lots from their own gardens.  Kinda like citrus season was back in Florida.

Been making pineapple candy by drying pineapple pieces in the dehydrator.  Yum!

Gonna juice up several gallons and make some spike.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on August 04, 2012, 07:00:38 PM
I've got so many pineapples ripening now that I can't keep up with them. I'd give them to friends, but everybody has lots from their own gardens.  Kinda like citrus season was back in Florida.

Been making pineapple candy by drying pineapple pieces in the dehydrator.  Yum!

Gonna juice up several gallons and make some spike.

I have determined that I would die in a diabetic coma my first pineapple season if I ever lived in Hawai'i. I would just end up drinking pineapple juice instead of water all day long...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on August 04, 2012, 07:36:43 PM
You'd have to put the mug and pitcher in the loo.  Pineapples are self-limiting  ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on August 04, 2012, 07:49:04 PM
I've got so many pineapples ripening now that I can't keep up with them. I'd give them to friends, but everybody has lots from their own gardens.  Kinda like citrus season was back in Florida.

Been making pineapple candy by drying pineapple pieces in the dehydrator.  Yum!

Gonna juice up several gallons and make some spike.

If I had more than just a couple of plants I would do the same, but when one does get ripe it doesn't last long between me and the wife. Unlike HI my climate is just cool enough in the winter that I have to keep them in pots and cart them inside a few nights a year so my plant numbers are limited.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on August 14, 2012, 01:43:35 AM
Not exactky "food", but consumable none-the-less:

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4835.jpg)


(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4838.jpg)


(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4837.jpg)



These are food:

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4786.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: fatdogale on August 14, 2012, 02:14:07 AM
I've got so many pineapples ripening now that I can't keep up with them. I'd give them to friends, but everybody has lots from their own gardens.  Kinda like citrus season was back in Florida

Sounds like zucchini here in the NW.  Everybody grows 'em, everybody has lots of them...if you leave your car unlocked, someone might leave a bag of 'em in there.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on August 14, 2012, 04:51:22 AM
Not exactky "food", but consumable none-the-less:

(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4835.jpg)


(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4838.jpg)


(http://i1098.photobucket.com/albums/g380/joebrewski/For%20AHA%20Forum/IMG_4837.jpg)



Coffee!!!!!!!

Better than solid food just like beer!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on August 14, 2012, 11:33:35 AM
I've got so many pineapples ripening now that I can't keep up with them. I'd give them to friends, but everybody has lots from their own gardens.  Kinda like citrus season was back in Florida

Sounds like zucchini here in the NW.  Everybody grows 'em, everybody has lots of them...if you leave your car unlocked, someone might leave a bag of 'em in there.

One reason I don't grow them any more.  I'm so burnt out on squash. :o
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on August 14, 2012, 02:16:30 PM
Hey!  Finally some pictures from the Puna tic!   ;D Awesome.  Do you process your own coffee?  Floor dry?



Just got back from a week in the alpine...all of a sudden there are green beans coming out the ears, had my first lemon cuke and the raspberries are starting. 8)

My gal packed in some dried pineapple,
that stuff was amazing!!  Talk about a backcountry treat.

I don't feel bad about zucchini on the compost pile anymore. ;)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on August 15, 2012, 02:22:17 PM
Salad with a little salt dressing.

First brandywine and some lemon boy. 8)


(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/salad.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on August 15, 2012, 02:33:43 PM
Looking good!  Our tomatoes have developed some kind of disease since the plants have been weakend by all the smoking hot weather we have been having.  Our yield is down this year.  Hot peppers on the other hand are going gangbusters.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on August 15, 2012, 05:53:18 PM
Looking good!  Our tomatoes have developed some kind of disease since the plants have been weakend by all the smoking hot weather we have been having.  Our yield is down this year.  Hot peppers on the other hand are going gangbusters.

Similar story here. My cherry and grape tomatoes are doing fine, but my bigger tomatoes all have a bad case of what I think is blossom end rot. My serranos are putting out fruit like crazy, but my jalapenos and anaheims are pretty slow going.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on September 13, 2012, 08:41:17 AM
Wow, what a time in the garden. 

Mountians have first snow, which means my monster tomatoes are finally throwing ripe fruit. 

Got home and picked about 2 gallons of raspberries, a pound of Crystal, dug some fresh carrots, picked all the red jalapenos; broccoli is all flowers and bees, cucumbers look like orange melons, and taters look ready to dig.

Had my first watermelon, crenshaw and muskmelon.  Chard and kale to ornamental beauty, birds flocking on seedy sunflowers, rhubarb in fall colors.....I love me some senescence.

Cheers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 13, 2012, 12:39:49 PM
I missed you pinnah dang it.... my garden is this year, timed very nicely.
It is on the laggard side of production and if we get anything else off the plants
before killing frost, it will be a bonus.  Stuff is mostly done producing. I got
the squash put up for winter. A good thing!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on September 13, 2012, 02:57:05 PM
We started digging potatoes last week. had our first cantelope yummy. sauce tomatoes are starting to turn red. the neighbors grapes that hopped the fence are ripe so we started juicing those. and of course greens, squash (that we didn't plant), and daikon are gonig gangbusters.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: denny on September 13, 2012, 03:59:30 PM
We've been harvesting green beans and potatoes recently.  It's also albacore tuna season, so I've been grilling and smoking tuna and making a lot of Nicoise salads.  Tomatoes and peppers are just starting to come in.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on September 13, 2012, 04:32:53 PM
We've been harvesting green beans and potatoes recently.  It's also albacore tuna season, so I've been grilling and smoking tuna and making a lot of Nicoise salads.  Tomatoes and peppers are just starting to come in.

you have a tuna fish tree Denny? that's awesome!  ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: jeffy on September 13, 2012, 04:48:15 PM
We've been harvesting green beans and potatoes recently.  It's also albacore tuna season, so I've been grilling and smoking tuna and making a lot of Nicoise salads.  Tomatoes and peppers are just starting to come in.

you have a tuna fish tree Denny? that's awesome!  ;D

I guess the northwest tree octopi are not ripe yet.
http://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on September 14, 2012, 05:01:34 AM
Frost coming, took in 2 buckets of ripe tomatoes to can, already got  24 quarts of beans both dilly and regular, oh got 30 quarts of pickles already, not to mention doing chicken broth tomorrow. You guys should be canning! Froze 50+ ears of corn not to mention the broccoli and califlower that is in the freezer. I hope you guys are doing this too!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on November 10, 2012, 12:17:07 AM
Finally got a little bugger off the plant that has been flowering since September. Luckily I see more forming!

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-2fTKVTFvSjk/UJ2Z57ZHQaI/AAAAAAAAAmc/oZwP0yePpSU/s814/20121109_141116.jpg)

Think I should have stuffed zucchini? ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on November 10, 2012, 01:14:33 AM
Think I should have stuffed zucchini? ;D

Left yourself wide open there....but, I will behave  :-X
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 10, 2012, 03:06:03 AM
Crazy talk.

I had a little zuc survive the frost under canopy of some red winter kale.
Hella cool discovery at a time when fresh was gone.

I slid her into a stir fry with reverence,
a bit ironic after hacking poundage in season with machete on compost pile.


I need to get the leeks out tomorrow.  Headed to 10 degrees.

Cheers to growing your own. 
Imma gonna read a little Elliot Coleman in front of the fire.
Later.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on November 10, 2012, 03:50:08 AM
I almost shed a tear at that. Almost. :'(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on November 10, 2012, 05:47:38 AM
oaxacan green dent corn. destined for tamales

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7261/8163115538_be089c640e.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8482/8163085877_d14b93d5df.jpg)

a couple ears had suspiciously large numbers of yellow kernels but what are you going to do.
Title: Re: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on November 11, 2012, 03:03:31 PM
a couple ears had suspiciously large numbers of yellow kernels but what are you going to do.

Damn Monsanto bastards...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on November 20, 2012, 08:42:09 PM
oaxacan green dent corn. destined for tamales

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7261/8163115538_be089c640e.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8482/8163085877_d14b93d5df.jpg)

a couple ears had suspiciously large numbers of yellow kernels but what are you going to do.

And the final product

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8340/8203119513_27d6d0037e.jpg)

Black beans, sweet potato and avacado on homegrown green corn tortilla's

Made the masa according to Alton Browns instructions. I probably should have boiled a bit longer as the kernals were still really dry in the middle. it worked out in the end though, just had to add a little more water to get it to move in the food processor and then had to add a little whole wheat flour to soak up the extra water. they were really good, texture was firm but still a bit tender. flavour was fresh and complex. not just 'corn' but more complimentary flavours.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on November 20, 2012, 11:36:00 PM
My "Better Boys". Some big ones too. There's a lot more on the vine than can be seen here. Can't wait to start eating them!

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-OMnhE3oDNIA/UKwSVnVm2eI/AAAAAAAAAno/8ypS_rBtECU/s800/20121119_150705.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on November 20, 2012, 11:38:09 PM
Careful, as soon as they start showing some ripe color the birds will star pecking at them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tubercle on November 21, 2012, 12:36:40 AM
Those green ones make great relish.
Good fried too. Especially with a fried slice in a biscuit with a piece of fatback.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: thebigbaker on November 21, 2012, 12:55:32 AM
Those green ones make great relish.
Good fried too. Especially with a fried slice in a biscuit with a piece of fatback.

Love Fried Green Tomatoes.  I like to top my fried green tomatoes w/ sauteed garlic butter shrimp and remoulade (although on a biscuit w/ fatback sounds good too!).  Wish ya lived close Euge as I would be happy to take some of those off your hands. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on November 21, 2012, 12:59:28 AM
Careful, as soon as they start showing some ripe color the birds will star pecking at them.

As soon as I see a hint of them changing color it's picking time! The Grackles will get them if I don't! The tomatoes do just fine ripening on the counter or in a bowl.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on November 21, 2012, 01:00:02 PM
Careful, as soon as they start showing some ripe color the birds will star pecking at them.

As soon as I see a hint of them changing color it's picking time! The Grackles will get them if I don't! The tomatoes do just fine ripening on the counter or in a bowl.

Can't do that here, the fruit flies would have a field day!  Season's well past over here anyway.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on December 15, 2012, 09:45:38 AM
Had my first freeze of the season with 29 Degrees at my place this past Thursday morning which killed off my last few summer/warm season holdovers in the garden. Dug up about 50 pounds of red potatoes since the plants were toast and composted the tomatoes and basil.

After tending to that picked a few things to make a salad for lunch...

(http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/31565_10151284437272719_9710162_n.jpg)

Not exactly gardening but it grows on my yard... Frog legs anyone? or some pot roasted duck?

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/531161_10151116653897719_1394198157_n.jpg)

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/553839_10151119506437719_80665471_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on December 15, 2012, 02:49:48 PM
We had three nights of freezing temps. I covered my two tomato plants with three sheets and lit a fire right next to the raised bed each night before going to bed. My neighbor just covered his. They died. Mine survived virtually unscathed and even popped out a few flowers. ;
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on December 15, 2012, 05:14:11 PM
Not exactly gardening but it grows on my yard... Frog legs anyone? or some pot roasted duck?


I like turtles AND frogs AND ducks
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on December 15, 2012, 07:39:36 PM
We had three nights of freezing temps. I covered my two tomato plants with three sheets and lit a fire right next to the raised bed each night before going to bed. My neighbor just covered his. They died. Mine survived virtually unscathed and even popped out a few flowers. ;
That's hilarious, I don't think we've had three nights of freezing temps this fall.  Although it is snowing right now, at 35.6F.  First snow of the season.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on December 16, 2012, 06:55:23 AM
We had three nights of freezing temps. I covered my two tomato plants with three sheets and lit a fire right next to the raised bed each night before going to bed. My neighbor just covered his. They died. Mine survived virtually unscathed and even popped out a few flowers. ;

I didnt cover mine so I may have been able to prevent their death too, but they looked rough anyway and were past their prime. Looks like you may have to cover again by the end of the week with freezing temps possible in Central TX Fri morning.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on December 16, 2012, 07:01:13 AM
Not exactly gardening but it grows on my yard... Frog legs anyone? or some pot roasted duck?


I like turtles AND frogs AND ducks

I have plenty of turtles too. I had one lay in the garden in the spring and I transplanted the eggs into a bucket so my tilling or weeding or a passing critter wouldnt kill them. They hatched in mid August and me and the kiddo let them go after a couple of weeks in a bayou.

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/579961_10151087031622719_1664197723_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on December 21, 2012, 02:01:30 AM
After tending to that picked a few things to make a salad for lunch...

(http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/31565_10151284437272719_9710162_n.jpg)


WOW/.

Very beautiful. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 12, 2013, 11:57:36 AM
Anybody care to take on another year in the growing food thread?

Pretty cold yet here, but the garden is now snow free and I am starting to dream.
Still have some leeks in the ground.  Should lift those and see how they wintered.

Anything new planned?  Seeds started?
Shoot... Andrew is probably already eating corn. ;)

I have been wondering if I can keep planting potatoes in the same spot year after year.
Do you folks rotate certain crops around?

Cheers to spring!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 12, 2013, 12:45:15 PM
Started cleaning it out last weekend.  Looking forward to the asparagus coming up in a few weeks.  Will probably put the cold weather seed and plants down the second week of April.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 12, 2013, 12:55:28 PM
I've had tomatoes and chiles in the ground for at least three weeks. Have onions garlic and broccoli in. Well the broccoli has been mostly harvested but the leaves are delicious.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 12, 2013, 01:01:15 PM
I have been wondering if I can keep planting potatoes in the same spot year after year.
Do you folks rotate certain crops around?

I rotate everything each year.  Got four raised beds of which I plant three every season and leave one fallow.  Next season, shift everything one bed over.  Lather, rinse, repeat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on March 12, 2013, 01:30:35 PM
we finally got rid of this annoying yucca, and last weekend I started framing out a 6x3x5 chicken coop. We also got some more lavender to plant on the last side of the deck that doesn't have anything growing. Other than that it'll be a while before we can really start growing anything - it's gonna be cold and rainy for another month or two.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 12, 2013, 01:38:26 PM
I went to the local farm market last Saturday to pick up some seed potatoes. I got Yukon Gold variety. I also want to get some horseradish root and shallots, but they weren't in yet. They said they should have been in by now, but for some reason they haven't arrived as of yet. I'll give them a call this weekend.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on March 12, 2013, 01:41:36 PM
I just started seeds this last weekend. Won't go in the ground until mid-late May. Did the standard tomatoes, Roma, Beefsteak. I also did a gold medal tomato that I love. Also peppers and I'll get some potatoes when the nursery opens. I'm also going to plant beans and carrots and cucumbers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 12, 2013, 02:16:41 PM
The peas are doing well. Brocolli and other mustards are all pretty much got to seed but there are stil a few lose florets here and there. Artichokes are starting to think about growing.

tons of calendula and other scattered stuff popping up from last years seeds as well as a couple of potatoes that overwintered.

Onions are big and green but no real bulbs to speak of. that bed isn't quite soft enough yet and it's been kind of a dry spring so far.

the tree collard is taking off, I think we can start eating off of that now so that's cool.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=tree+collard&id=A88A8153AB79309008B736B1E1B74F8964F95A67&FORM=IQFRBA# (http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=tree+collard&id=A88A8153AB79309008B736B1E1B74F8964F95A67&FORM=IQFRBA#)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on March 12, 2013, 02:38:16 PM
Pinnah, methinks potatoes year after year in same spot would be asking for troubles.
I tried them one year and found my soil contaminated with the potato wart fungus
we got a few taters and then the fungus got the rest.  Now I do not believe I can
grow them at all without a problem.  You could However, ammend the soil with fresh
organic material and perhaps be good to go....

Had discussions with a family whose daughter in Indiana came up with parasites from
eating the garden food they had grown in rich organics....washie washie washie in the
new blue cheer....

OTOH, I am looking forward to my 1st year of the harvestable asparagus bed....oh yeah!!! ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 12, 2013, 04:10:24 PM
We haven't started planning yet, unless my wife planted peas while I was gone this weekend.  We've got some potted ghost peppers I tried to overwinter in the garage, we'll see how they did.  I'm sure we'll plant the usual, peppers, onions, tomatoes, corn (which never grows well enough, but the kids like to plant), squash, green beans, etc.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 12, 2013, 04:25:08 PM
I have the weekend off, so I'm hoping the snow will be melted in the garden by then. I still haven't planned everything out, but I know where the peas are going to go and I can work the rest out later.

I've given up on starting seeds indoors. I don't have any south-facing windows in my house, and my work schedule doesn't really allow for me to harden-off seedlings properly anyways. My success rate from seedlings has been abyssmal since I started the garden. I'm going to stick to buying plants at the local garden shops, as well as veggies that I can direct-sow. I might experiment with fabric to raise the soil temps this year for certain plants as well. Especially since I finally found a small canteloupe that will mature early enough for my garden.

My son turns 3 in June, so I'm going to build him a 4x4 raised bed to use as his own garden. He's already pretty excited. Any time someone starts talking about spring he says "I plant flowers in the garden in the spring". This should be a fun year for him.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Hokerer on March 12, 2013, 07:01:33 PM
I also want to get some horseradish root and shallots, but they weren't in yet. They said they should have been in by now, but for some reason they haven't arrived as of yet. I'll give them a call this weekend.

Make sure you contain that horseradish - invasive as crap
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 12, 2013, 07:09:12 PM
I also want to get some horseradish root and shallots, but they weren't in yet. They said they should have been in by now, but for some reason they haven't arrived as of yet. I'll give them a call this weekend.

Make sure you contain that horseradish - invasive as crap

Once it's established it can really take over.  My Mom's garden was fine example of that.  We would dig bushels of roots every year and could still barely keep up.  I'm hoping to finally be able to harvest some decent roots this year after having had to move the hill for the third time, 3 years ago.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kramerog on March 12, 2013, 09:42:07 PM
I'm building a hoop house this year from PVC pipe.  I'm looking forward to kale, spinach, brussel sprouts this spring and more in the late fall from the hoop house.  I may keep rosemary and other perennial herbs year round in the hoop house.  I will plant leeks in a trench this year (didn't do a trench last year so I got almost no white parts) and Numex chilis.  Also I'm looking to improve my rain barrel irrigation system for the hops and the rest of the garden. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: reverseapachemaster on March 12, 2013, 10:33:54 PM
I'm a pretty bad gardener so I'm still struggling to get some hops to grow well. I have a very vibrant rosemary bush because it's extremely hardy. I'm going to grow a few peppers, a squash plant and a couple tomatoes outside with some low maintenance herbs inside the house in front of a window. I planted a couple tomato plants prematurely and killed one entirely and almost killed the other but it is growing back slowly. We'll see how much more I can kill before the growing season ends in the fall.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 13, 2013, 01:17:15 AM
Horseradish is invasive? I better move the two plants out of the beds they are in to a spot where they can thrive... and multiply.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2013, 01:49:51 AM
Horseradish is invasive? I better move the two plants out of the beds they are in to a spot where they can thrive... and multiply.
Horseradish might be worse than hops, at least in our area.  I would move them ASAP and then keep a sharp eye out for any growth where you moved them from.  I kept mine in a pot, it eventually died one summer when it didn't get enough water.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on March 13, 2013, 12:27:21 PM
Its depressing to read The Garden Thread when we're currently getting 2"-3" of snow  :'(

I actually just like the pictures - the wife and I have a hard enough time growing grass and shrubs.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2013, 01:32:21 PM
I also want to get some horseradish root and shallots, but they weren't in yet. They said they should have been in by now, but for some reason they haven't arrived as of yet. I'll give them a call this weekend.

Make sure you contain that horseradish - invasive as crap

Good to know...thanks!  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2013, 01:37:29 PM
More horseradish for your liking.  :)

http://www.horseradish.org/history.html

http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/horseradish

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_prepare_horseradish/

I think I'm going to plant these guys away from the main garden.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 13, 2013, 02:13:06 PM
This from the recipe link:

 "A ground up fresh horseradish is many times as potent as freshly chopped onions and can really hurt your eyes if you get too close. Keep at arms length away, and work in a well ventilated room."

My experience says do it outside.  I really can't reiterate how potent this stuff can be.  It basically chased us out of our little apartment kitchen the first time we made it. :o
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 14, 2013, 03:37:09 AM
Seeds ordered and we will do the tunnnel this year to get a couple months extra.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 14, 2013, 02:45:00 PM
potatos started poking up above ground, this years potatos that is, last years started poking out about a month ago.

Got corn seed in the ground and a few strawberry starts planted.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 17, 2013, 02:47:55 PM
last years started poking out about a month ago.

Wooee!  Volunteer potatoes are excellent; always the first new potatoes to be harvested here.
 
I caught the first yellow rhubarb leaf poking up yesterday, as well as a few garlic shoots.

Made the mistake of deciding on a new spot for peas and cucumbers
right where a Centennial crown has been living for a few years.
Holy crap, removing an established hop plant by hand is no fun. ???

Also got the fruit trees trimmed. 
I love to prune, but am bad about picking up the branches.

Yea, hear ya Vert on the potato rotation. 
Wish I had some raised beds I could swap out!  Making new potato beds is a chore.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 17, 2013, 03:17:06 PM
Picked up onion and garlic sets yesterday.  Too cold to play in the garden today (it may snow, where the heck is spring?)  Oh, that's right, not until Wednesday.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 17, 2013, 09:54:17 PM
I rotate my beds never growing the same plants consecutively. Not sure, but is it 2-3 years before one can replant in a prior bed?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 18, 2013, 03:18:34 PM
This is only my second year on this garden. and we are rotating some but mostly we just plant a big ol' hodgepodge anyway with lots of stuff growing every which where.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 18, 2013, 09:52:16 PM
I rotate my beds never growing the same plants consecutively. Not sure, but is it 2-3 years before one can replant in a prior bed?

The old rule of thumb I'm familiar with is a 4-year rotation of Legumes > Leaves (i.e., Brassicas) > Fruits (Tomatoes, Squash, etc.) > Roots. Now, within my home garden I definitely don't grow an even enough assortment from each of these categories to be able to do this, nor is my garden large enough to do a strict rotation like this. Since I keep my vegetable garden organic, I'm mainly concerned with soil nutrients and pest control. I try to follow legumes with veggies that can use the extra nutrients (brassicas or corn, generally), and I try not to plant veggies that get hit by the same problem insects following each other. If I can keep my rotation to at least 3 years, then that's good enough for me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on April 04, 2013, 08:38:33 PM
Anybody care to take on another year in the growing food thread?

Pretty cold yet here, but the garden is now snow free and I am starting to dream.
Still have some leeks in the ground.  Should lift those and see how they wintered.

Anything new planned?  Seeds started?
Shoot... Andrew is probably already eating corn. ;)

I have been wondering if I can keep planting potatoes in the same spot year after year.
Do you folks rotate certain crops around?

Cheers to spring!


Nope not eating any corn yet!... although me and the wife finished off what was left from last year's frozen harvest a few weeks back.          However, I do have popcorn planted that is several inches high!

Always gardening here, but it took a beating a few days before Easter with a heavy late frost while I was out of town. Had to replant squash, cucumbers, and a couple of peppers. Most everything else will make it although it got burned. Potatoes and tomatoes are over 1 foot tall, ate asparagus through mid March, just starting to harvest strawberries, picked most of the carrots already, and already pickled beets this year.

My hops are up already and have been for a few weeks, but they also were a little burned at the end of March.

Most of my fruit trees are leafing out or blooming except for just a few, and I had a newly planted apple tree blown over in a thunderstorm yesterday morning. It was staked, but not good enough for 50 MPH winds.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: andrew on April 04, 2013, 09:09:29 PM
a partial view of the garden in Jan. The wife drinking a stout and picking peas.

(http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc1/385227_10151204325741036_1451605261_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 04, 2013, 09:25:52 PM
At N 45.5 and 2,000' I'm lucky to have mine tilled. We plant garlic in November, peas potatoes onion on Mom' s day, the rest of it on Dad's day.

I guess I have cascade, centennial, and Willamette showing up today. So I'll be putting that in as soon as its safe to.

"Freedom is temporary unless you are also Brave!" - Patriot

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 05, 2013, 12:55:25 PM
Wow. Very nice Andrew!

I need to plant peas.  Today maybe. Anyone soak peas prior to planting, or just dry to the hole?
 
Vert!  I see an asparagus poking up.  Nice and white.  ever tried keeping them buried eurostyle?

Apricot looks to pop today.  Hoping for a nice harvest this year. No snow on the horizon yet.

Cheers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 05, 2013, 07:21:54 PM
I just plant my peas dry, but I do use an inocculant. I've only been at this house a few years and I'm still adding topsoil in a few areas. Once the garden is pretty well established and I've gotten a full rotation in I might stop the legume innoculant.

The cold start to the spring means I haven't been able to start prepping my garden. I did get 2 new apple trees and 6 more raspberry plants in the ground last weekend. I'm hoping to start my peas soon, but free time is at a premium for me right now and my next free weekend will be spent recovering from having my wisdom teeth out.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: dbarber on April 05, 2013, 07:49:32 PM
I soak my peas for 30 minutes in compost tea.  Just planted them last week.

No asparagus up yet, but the rhubarb plant is starting to pop.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 07, 2013, 12:35:23 PM
Onions and garlic are in.  Asparagus are just starting to peek through the ground.  Peas will be next week.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 08, 2013, 02:50:19 AM
Did teh first pea harvest last week. Another on the way. Artichokes are getting big, starting to stretch out. Corn is about 4 or 5 inches high, although the three plants my son started in a cup and put out in early march are almost 2 feet tall at this point.

Winter onions are almost done. Garlic started popping up last week.

Just had to chop down the above ground growth on the three perennial chard plants cause they were shading out other beds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 09, 2013, 10:16:03 PM
Apricot looks to pop today.  Hoping for a nice harvest this year. No snow on the horizon yet.

I knew I should not have typed that, or even thought about it out loud. ::)
Yep, snow and hard freeze tonight. 

I plucked my 3 spears of asparagus out of the garden this morning. 
Good thing I was able to stalk a couple pounds at my secret spot.  8)
Seems you need a n-ton of asparagus plants in the garden to get a meaningful harvest?

Got those peas in finally.  They had been soaking in a water glass for a week; germinated and had a nice little root poking.

Morticai:  Perennial chard? That sounds fantastic. Is it perennial because of where you live, or is it actually perennial?   The stuff I have here might be a bi-annual here if I let it.

Cheers.


 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 10, 2013, 12:07:11 AM
The mosquitoes just drove me inside from the garden! >:( What an awful experience this early in the year...

This cilantro bush is a single plant. Or is it coriander now?

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-boV1zdi7X-0/UWSrWZlXRgI/AAAAAAAAAuY/LnPajju1IS0/s892/20130409_185029.jpg)

Hugelkultur...

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 10, 2013, 02:59:38 PM
Apricot looks to pop today.  Hoping for a nice harvest this year. No snow on the horizon yet.

I knew I should not have typed that, or even thought about it out loud. ::)
Yep, snow and hard freeze tonight. 

I plucked my 3 spears of asparagus out of the garden this morning. 
Good thing I was able to stalk a couple pounds at my secret spot.  8)
Seems you need a n-ton of asparagus plants in the garden to get a meaningful harvest?

Got those peas in finally.  They had been soaking in a water glass for a week; germinated and had a nice little root poking.

Morticai:  Perennial chard? That sounds fantastic. Is it perennial because of where you live, or is it actually perennial?   The stuff I have here might be a bi-annual here if I let it.

Cheers.

mostlly just where I live I think. maybe twice a year I chop them down when they start to get so big that the leaves don't taste good raw. There were 4 or 5 chard plants around my yard when I moved in two years ago and I managed to get rid of one or two. the rest just grow back every year. they can get pretty massive. Altough I have one that is in a shady spot that produces nice small tender leaves pretty much year round unless we get a hard frost.

I do have a tree collard which is a kind of perennial collard/kale thing. it's new last season and is only about 2 feet tall now but will likely get up around 5 or 6 feet.

The mosquitoes just drove me inside from the garden! >:( What an awful experience this early in the year...

This cilantro bush is a single plant. Or is it coriander now?

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-boV1zdi7X-0/UWSrWZlXRgI/AAAAAAAAAuY/LnPajju1IS0/s892/20130409_185029.jpg)

Hugelkultur...


Euge,

We just rebuilt our hugel bed this spring. got amaranth, strawberries, kale and a bunch of mixed flowering bee attractors planted in there now. It's starting to fill in nicely.

We made another mini hugel bed out of a log that was laying on the yard. buried it in compost and planted blackberries and raspberries on it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on April 10, 2013, 03:11:51 PM
I envy you folks with the long growing seasons.  Our grass turned green this week.  It might snow on Friday.  The trees will start getting a green hue in a few days.

Iowa is having a very cold Spring this year.

Enjoy your gardens!!

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: udubdawg on April 10, 2013, 03:44:43 PM
our grass just turned green this week too, and tree blossoms popped in the last couple days. 
it was 76 here yesterday but now 31 and everything is now covered with a quarter inch of ice.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: reverseapachemaster on April 12, 2013, 04:19:04 AM
The weeds are definitely the winning grower in my yard. I chopped down some weeds that were close to three feet tall.

In the actual garden I have a lone jalapeno that has flowered and started growing. The squash and one tomato plant have some blooms. Planted two nugget rhizomes last week, already have several inches of bine. My sterling is taking its time growing but mt. hood has about ten six inch bines. Planted two cascade rhizomes today so I am hopeful I'll see bines in a week or two.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 12, 2013, 04:03:26 PM
Asparagus are just starting to peek through the ground. 

My asparagus (1yr old) is up and raring to go.  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 12, 2013, 04:33:45 PM
Asparagus are just starting to peek through the ground. 

My asparagus (1yr old) is up and raring to go.  :)

We are ready to start the harvest this weekend.  Enjoy, Ron.  How many crowns did you end up putting in?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 12, 2013, 05:36:04 PM
Asparagus are just starting to peek through the ground. 

My asparagus (1yr old) is up and raring to go.  :)

We are ready to start the harvest this weekend.  Enjoy, Ron.  How many crowns did you end up putting in?

I think it was about 10.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 15, 2013, 04:31:35 PM
Peas, lettuces, and spinach are in.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on April 15, 2013, 04:38:22 PM
I just added a 200 s.f. section to my existing garden, making room for onions, garlic, strawberries and maybe some peas. I also plan to add some mushroom soil to the ground for nutrient replenishment. Looks like I have a busy weekend ahead of me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 16, 2013, 11:34:03 AM
I just added a 200 s.f. section to my existing garden, making room for onions, garlic, strawberries and maybe some peas. I also plan to add some mushroom soil to the ground for nutrient replenishment. Looks like I have a busy weekend ahead of me.

I'll bet you do!  I'm going to try to brew this weekend.  The garden is done for the next few weeks except for picking asparagus.  Will be putting in the next round of veggies the first week of May.  Unless I get a wild hair and decide to put in some cabbage.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 16, 2013, 11:16:45 PM
That's a nice increase Ron. Are you trying to supply all of your own veg like me? I'm eying several more spots in the backyard and even the front might not be exempt.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 29, 2013, 04:02:42 AM
+ ungabagady on the mushroom compost!  It was the primary component
of my contrived soil mixture for the raised garden. You will love it.
I also added sand and bags of potting soil and some floorsweep (clay).
The attempt to keep the garden soil seperated from the field bind weed
has been a profound success and the reason for building the raised garden.
We are challenged with frost until june....at this time I am going to plant
some Snow Peas maybe a few carrots.  Wait wait wait wait....june....plant squash
and other frost intolerant short season plants.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 06, 2013, 11:55:03 AM
This years garden is in.  Here's what we have: Zucchini, yellow squash (crook neck), okra, kohlrabi, wax beans, green beans, tomatoes (4 kinds), anchos, jalapenos, hot long red roasting peppers, eggplant, kale, red cabbage, red chard, beets, peas, garlic, onions, lettuce, spinach, cucumbers, asparagus (going on 8 years).  Herbs: basil, lavender, dill, rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage, bay leaf (okay, technically it's a tree).
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on May 06, 2013, 01:02:02 PM
Got the first wave in over the past few days. Built a 3x9 raised bed for my 2-year old's own garden and planted some carrots, marigolds and nasturtiums. Also got my first wave of veggies in - peas, a few short rows of root veggies (radish, carrot, beet & parsnip), some beans, corn and 2 hills of zucchini to get them started. Hoping to finish the beans and root veggies over the next week or two, then soybeans, cukes, tomatoes and peppers are up next.

As usual, I think I'm going to run out of space. No clue where pumpkins and melons are going to go. I might have to plant them in the middle of the peas and hope the peas finish up by the time the pumpkins and melons get too big.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on May 07, 2013, 04:43:56 PM
This years garden is in.  Here's what we have: Zucchini, yellow squash (crook neck), okra, kohlrabi, wax beans, green beans, tomatoes (4 kinds), anchos, jalapenos, hot long red roasting peppers, eggplant, kale, red cabbage, red chard, beets, peas, garlic, onions, lettuce, spinach, cucumbers, asparagus (going on 8 years).  Herbs: basil, lavender, dill, rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage, bay leaf (okay, technically it's a tree).

Nice work Jim...I'm planning to plant tomatoes, assorted peppers, squash, zhuchini, cukes, etc... this weekend.

I also added 6 yards of enriched/screened topsoil to my gardens a couple weeks ago...so I'm anticipating a good crop this year. That's the hope anyway.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on May 08, 2013, 02:34:32 AM
I also added 6 yards of enriched/screened topsoil to my gardens a couple weeks ago...so I'm anticipating a good crop this year. That's the hope anyway.

When I decided I was going to get serious about a garden I had a truckload of topsoil/compost mix dropped off. I am so glad I did. My soil is so bad I can barely get weeds to grow in it, but the garden soil is so rich everything grows like crazy (even the weeds, unfortunately).
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 08, 2013, 05:23:32 AM
Got my calabasita seeds...do you hear that EUGE? they are great and you are in primo location
for them....
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 08, 2013, 03:57:27 PM
I should get some then! My attempt at zucchini wasn't very successful last year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: james on May 08, 2013, 06:47:58 PM
I should get some then! My attempt at zucchini wasn't very successful last year.

a small or non-existent zucchini crop is a blessing to have compared to a normal crop
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 09, 2013, 04:51:29 AM
 
Squash Summer Tatuma (Calabacita) HEIRLOOM Seeds
Cucurbita pepo
50 days. This fabulous summer squash may not be well-known, but that is soon to change! With wonderful, creamy texture and buttery flavor, squash lovers will be happily pleased, and even squash skeptics may soon be won over. Also called tatume or calabacita, the Latin word referring to any small cucurbit, this squash is a favorite in Mexico and southern Texas.
 Fruits are best when picked at about 3" long. Vigorous vines to 12 feet thrive in heat, and are more drought toleratant than most squash; practically immune to squash borer insect.

This packet plants 5-6 mounds.
Days to Emerge:
5-10 days
 
Seed Depth:
1/2"-1”
 
Seed Spacing:
2-3 seeds
per mound
 
Mound Spacing:
3’-4'
 
Thinning:
When several leaves
thin to 2 plants
per mound
 

 

When to sow outside: RECOMMENDED. 2 to 4 weeks after average last frost and when soil temperatures have risen above 60° F.

When to start inside: Not recommended except in very short season climates, 2 to 4 weeks before average last frost. Sow in individual pulp pots that can be planted directly in the ground.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 09, 2013, 11:45:38 AM
I should get some then! My attempt at zucchini wasn't very successful last year.

a small or non-existent zucchini crop is a blessing to have compared to a normal crop

Amen to that, brother! 8)  One plant usually yields enough to feed my whole neighborhood for the whole summer.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 09, 2013, 01:43:08 PM
Speargrass is starting to come on.  This will be the 1st year of good harvest from the now 4 yr. old crowns.
I will be making cheese sauce soon!
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Asparagus2013_zps5c15ee4c.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 09, 2013, 02:09:52 PM
We're at about a month now for asparagus.  Getting enough for two to three meals a week from eight crowns.  We usually harvest up to the middle of June and then let them grow out.  We've had them I for about eight or nine years.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: scottgott01 on May 09, 2013, 02:18:40 PM
Where are you at on the susquehanna? I'm in Northeast PA (Hazleton) a little off the banks but close enough, and I planted my peppers and totmatoes last week because our nights have been in the mid forties for the past month. Now they are saying mid thirties this coming week. Guess I'm going to have to pull the sheets out. Any suggestion on covering? Should I lay the sheet right over the veggies or put it over the fence post? Never ran into this problem before.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 09, 2013, 02:28:24 PM
Where are you at on the susquehanna? I'm in Northeast PA (Hazleton) a little off the banks but close enough, and I planted my peppers and totmatoes last week because our nights have been in the mid forties for the past month. Now they are saying mid thirties this coming week. Guess I'm going to have to pull the sheets out. Any suggestion on covering? Should I lay the sheet right over the veggies or put it over the fence post? Never ran into this problem before.

About two miles from the Chesapeake in MD.  Don't lay the sheet on the veggies, the stalks won't be strong enough.  If they are not too tall yet you could put straw around them.  If you have cages around them you could wrap the cages with the plastic sheet.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: scottgott01 on May 09, 2013, 02:30:40 PM
I have posts in the ground for my garden fence. Can I lay the sheet on the posts?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 09, 2013, 02:44:02 PM
How tall are they?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: scottgott01 on May 09, 2013, 02:46:56 PM
about 2.5' - 3'
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 09, 2013, 04:28:05 PM
Should be OK.  Make sure the plants are covered well. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 09, 2013, 05:42:01 PM
We always cover with plastic sheets
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 09, 2013, 05:54:38 PM
I use plastic buckets to cover smaller plants. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 11, 2013, 06:57:01 AM
Simple but so dang good!
Baked Chicken Thigh
Mashed taters w/ brown mushroom gravy
My garden asparagus drizzled with cheese sauce.

That was a fantastic lunch IMO

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Lunchmmmm_zpsb9bdf13b.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on May 11, 2013, 03:15:30 PM
I waited until May 1 to plant my meager garden-this year it's only tomatoes, squash and Japanese eggplants.  And of course 2 days later it froze killing 3 of my 8 tomatoes and all three eggplants.  Or so I thought until today.  All the dead plants have new growth so I now have 6 eggplants, 4 more than I really need.  Amazingly I had asparagus this year, and some onions and garlic are back even though it really hasn't rained since 1 time in October.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 18, 2013, 08:08:45 AM
Next four days are forecast to be soggy. I broadcast 10 lbs of alfalfa seed on some
of the less productive zones in my pasture.  I have the mindset that if I keep puttin
seed out there eventually it may take hold and I will get a good stand of alfalfa.
What I planted last year is seeming to be pretty happy. That little experiment was a
success.... ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 18, 2013, 10:02:21 AM
Next four days are forecast to be soggy. I broadcast 10 lbs of alfalfa seed on some
of the less productive zones in my pasture.  I have the mindset that if I keep puttin
seed out there eventually it may take hold and I will get a good stand of alfalfa.
What I planted last year is seeming to be pretty happy. That little experiment was a
success.... ;D

Even if the alfalfa doesn't make it you're a hit with the birds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 23, 2013, 02:10:28 AM
Food for the hay burners....but spring has finally sprung!
My HUGE yard.....at least seems huge when I have to water!
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Green2013_zpsac02d573.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 23, 2013, 11:47:35 AM
Food for the hay burners....but spring has finally sprung!
My HUGE yard.....at least seems huge when I have to water!
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Green2013_zpsac02d573.jpg)

?  Where I come from, you don't water what you don't eat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 23, 2013, 01:52:01 PM
If I did not water that field and keep that grass/alfalfa alive, it would migrate to
cheet grass and become a Huge fire liability.  AND the state would rescind my
water right issuing it to someone else. Part of the water right language is that
you must show "beneficial use".
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 23, 2013, 04:40:43 PM
Makes sense to me.  Most places in the east (not all), that is not an issue.  It depends on where your water comes from and whether irrigation is necessary, etc.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on May 23, 2013, 09:01:38 PM
I would still plant something edible :)   Assuming it grows there of course.  Some fruit trees would be nice.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 23, 2013, 09:23:32 PM
I would still plant something edible :)   Assuming it grows there of course.  Some fruit trees would be nice.

Alfalfa is edible.  Cows love it.

As a professional hydrologist, I can tell you, riparian water rights involve some of the most convoluted and contested laws out there.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2013, 04:51:33 AM
I would still plant something edible :)   Assuming it grows there of course.  Some fruit trees would be nice.

Alfalfa is edible.  Cows love it.

As a professional hydrologist, I can tell you, riparian water rights involve some of the most convoluted and contested laws out there.
Cows are edible, so it counts . . . if he has a cow. :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 24, 2013, 06:27:32 AM
Alfalfa sprouts!  hellllooooo?   ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2013, 09:01:16 AM
Alfalfa sprouts!  hellllooooo?   ;D
we were talking about food . . .
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on May 24, 2013, 12:11:03 PM
I would still plant something edible :)   Assuming it grows there of course.  Some fruit trees would be nice.

If you grow it, you have to take care of it.  I grew up in dairy country and we had a one acre garden for the family when I was a kid.  We pretty much grew all the vegetables we ate.  I remember it being a lot of work to keep up with and my mom didn't work.  These days things are quite different.  My garden is still pretty big, but not so big it takes up all our spare time (gotta brew, bro!).  You can't beat fresh, for sure.  I guess you could grow something less labor intensive, like barley or wheat, but it's still a b**** to plant and harvest if you have a crapload and you don't have the right equipment. ;)  I really appreciate the hard work that farmers do, having helped when I was a kid.  That's probably why I am an engineer now (farming is way too hard ;)).  Of course, this is kind of off subject for this thread.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2013, 04:00:46 PM
That's why I suggested fruit trees - pretty low maintenance. ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 24, 2013, 11:40:55 PM
That's why I suggested fruit trees - pretty low maintenance. ;)

+1
I learned that lesson in Florida.  I had a garden full of annuals that required daily attention.  Way too labor intensive.  Now I grow fruit trees, coffee, pineapples, papayas...  Throw a little fertilizer at them every once in a while and they're good to go.

And alfalfa sprouts!   :-*

(I grow my own sprouts in jars - easy, speasy, 1, 2, threesy!)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 29, 2013, 04:28:15 AM
Hey!  It has been a long cold spring in this country.

I saw euge post hugleculture and man the google images that come out of that will drive a gardener keeerazy.
Excellent!

Wow, it has been a while.  I ate the first strawberry yestern.  Good because the rhubarb is rockin.
Peas still retarded at 5 inches tall.  duh.
first lettuces and spinach ready.  Ate some first onion from last years regen.
garlic tall at 10 leaves
potatoes sprouting in new rehashed beds per vertical1
hops crazy prolific in early spring moisture and coolness; I hacked away over a hundred pounds of veg matter.

Might try and get some pics for the garden thread.

For now, I will leave you with the bliss of irrigating pasture in the west.
I loves me my headgate
the horses love the pasture,
and the compost loves the horses,
the garden loves the compost.

Umm yea, that is how I justify my hayburners as food. ::).....but I did get 6 plum trees in the ground this spring ;)

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/2013irrigationhelp_zpsd1f1226f.jpg)

Who knows about orange irrigation dams?  Good times.
Cheers!


Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 29, 2013, 05:07:20 AM
I got an olde irrigation dam like that up in the rafters of the barn. It has
faded from age and prolly dry rot.  Never used the thing so other than
spider hang out you are not getting help from me....lol I suspect
that you just don the hip? waders and forge ahead.

Hopefully I led you down a good potato patch.... ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on May 29, 2013, 09:17:33 AM
Pfff. Rain, rain, rain, rain, cold, cold, cold, cold. Nothing's growing. I usually try to grow from seed but this year we've had to do almost all our stuff from the garden center.

One cool thing about the garden center though is that they're carrying "ludique," i.e., 'fun/silly' plants like corn and peanuts (!). So now I have a peanut plant. Any ideas on how to best grow them?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on May 29, 2013, 09:51:59 AM
When my garden gets irrigated there is usually a rainbow nearby.  Guess I must be doing it right.

Not sure about these three growing seasons a year here though... Weird huh? Sh!t grows all year round here!  Wots up widdat?!

Cold?  You usin' fancy French words on us Phil?  What means cold? 

I suggest that you grow peanuts in dirt.  The flowers dive into the ground and the seeds (peanuts) grow underground. Hydroponic peanuts taste watery.   :o
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 29, 2013, 01:42:13 PM
I got an olde irrigation dam like that up in the rafters of the barn. It has
faded from age and prolly dry rot.  Never used the thing so other than
spider hang out you are not getting help from me....lol I suspect
that you just don the hip? waders and forge ahead.

Hopefully I led you down a good potato patch path.... ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 29, 2013, 01:56:29 PM
I got an olde irrigation dam like that up in the rafters of the barn. It has
faded from age and prolly dry rot.  Never used the thing so other than
spider hang out you are not getting help from me....lol I suspect
that you just don the hip? waders and forge ahead.

Hopefully I led you down a good potato patch path.... ;)

Quoting himself again I see...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 29, 2013, 02:33:25 PM
I got an olde irrigation dam like that up in the rafters of the barn. It has
faded from age and prolly dry rot.  Never used the thing so other than
spider hang out you are not getting help from me....lol I suspect
that you just don the hip? waders and forge ahead.

Hopefully I led you down a good potato patch path.... ;)

Quoting himself again I see...
Once more for luck!
 :-[
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 29, 2013, 03:14:29 PM
I got an olde irrigation dam like that up in the rafters of the barn. It has
faded from age and prolly dry rot.  Never used the thing so other than
spider hang out you are not getting help from me....lol I suspect
that you just don the hip? waders and forge ahead.

Hopefully I led you down a good potato patch path.... ;)

Quoting himself again I see...

 ;D


Nah, my place is not big enough for hip waders.  I have some calf slappers.
I do keep a shovel on the wheeler though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 29, 2013, 03:28:22 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-osCRf6f-zAg/UaYdsLKQ1dI/AAAAAAAAAvo/i6JDxMA4qQM/w892-h502-no/20130526_124317.jpg)

First attempt at carrots. Picked on Memorial Day.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on May 29, 2013, 03:49:57 PM
My drip system is up and running so I planted japanese egg plants, squash, tomatoes and more hops.  They should survive my vacation this year.  My asparagus came back despite not being watered for 6 months.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on June 21, 2013, 07:25:09 PM
Dumped spent grains on the compost pile last night. Today: holy lacto! Gotta get some dirt on that before the neighbors complain!
Fresh kohl rabi: whadda treat!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on June 21, 2013, 07:54:37 PM
Dumped spent grains on the compost pile last night. Today: holy lacto! Gotta get some dirt on that before the neighbors complain!
Fresh kohl rabi: whadda treat!

I have a couple of rows of kohlrabi in too.  I am looking forward to it.  We've been getting a ton of rain this year (7.5" just this month) and the temps have been in the high 70s and low 80s for the most part.  The garden is loving it!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on July 26, 2013, 03:30:31 PM
 First fruits.  Not, we been eating lettuce and sno peas for a month now.
Euge, here is a shot of a calabacita just for you man.
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Calabacita2013_zps45d029a1.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 26, 2013, 03:54:06 PM
First fruits.  Not, we been eating lettuce and sno peas for a month now.
Euge, here is a shot of a calabacita just for you man.
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Calabacita2013_zps45d029a1.jpg)

those calabacitas look like the strange mystery volunteer squashes that grow all over my garden. they are kind of bland dry and immature pumpkin like in my case though.

I should get some pics up here. I have a nice one of an artichoke that didn't get eaten in time.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on July 26, 2013, 05:00:34 PM
My morning harvest from the garden last Sunday. My first ever crop of potatoes!

Tomatoes are starting their bumper session. :)

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1000216_10200731101894422_1872144510_n.jpg)[/URL]
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 26, 2013, 07:08:10 PM
Beautiful guys! The only thing thats going well for me are my onions and peppers. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on July 27, 2013, 12:45:24 AM
Weeds, weeds weeds, that's pretty much all I have.  Peppers and Tomatoes will survive and I've got some potatoes that will probably yield a crop but that's about all.  Cucumbers started strong and are wilting.  First garden in the new house so the tillage was lousy and last minute, we weeded multiple times but the boys don't pull the roots up so when we got back from vacation it was nothing but foxtail and lambsquarters.  Next year I will have to do something different. 

Did eat a lot of green beans out of the garden for supper though, guess I should count my blessings.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on July 27, 2013, 01:13:14 AM
So far the squash haven't overwhelmed us, the tomatoes haven't really started producing and the japonese eggplants are making about 6 fruits per week so the ratatouille garden is doing alright.  With an actual monsoon season for the first time in 4 years we've gotten rain and the summer hasn't been very hot so my tomatoes should really kick butt the rest of the year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on July 27, 2013, 04:10:03 AM
It's been a strange season for the garden for me. First we got a late frost that wiped out my first tomato and pepper plants. Then we had a really wet spring for a while that led to a slow start for some veggies and a fast start for others, followed by a dry snap in June.

Peas were slow to start (I actually picked my first Jalapeno before I picked my first pea), then they gave up the ghost about a week after I picked the first pod. I tried a low variety that doesn't need a trellis, but it's a pain compared to a normal trellised variety.

Everything that actually took hold and didn't get overrun by weeds is doing fantastic right now. Our heat wave the last 2 weeks really kicked everything into high gear up here. The "beer crisper" drawer in my fridge is full of zucchini, and that's just my first plant - the second one I started from seed is just getting ready to set fruit. I've gotten a few eggplant already and have about 7 or 8 to pick over the next 3 or 4 days. Chili peppers are starting to kick into gear, and I just got my first 4 ripe cherry tomatoes this week. The Romas are starting to ripen and the beefsteaks are getting fat.

I'm barely able to keep up with the cukes, but I'm about to be overrun. I had every intention of running them up tomato cages this year, but I had a few days where I couldn't get out in the garden and now they have carpeted that whole section of the garden. The good thing is that the bunnies won't go past the cukes to the other side of the garden.

My biggest surprise is that it looks like I'm going to actually get some ripe watermelons this year. In years past even the icebox varieties haven't started setting fruit until August and never ripened in time before fall hit. Right now I already have a few that are getting close thanks to the heatwave.

This is also my first season where I got a harvest from my currants and gooseberries. I have enough red and pink currants in the freezer to add to a couple of gallons of saison. Some of the black currants found their way into a strawberry melomel, and the rest will probably hang out in the freezer until next year when my sours start to come online.

Next up is trying to get some kale, carrots and beets going for the fall garden. My root veggie patch got overrun by weeds this spring, so I'm hoping I can keep it under control until the crops start going strong.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on July 27, 2013, 05:26:50 PM
Jonathan,
Those volunteer "squash" mnay be gourds.  The calabacita have mild and soft flesh like a zuchinni
only slightly different.....They should be harvested when at the size of your fist....
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 27, 2013, 07:39:10 PM
Weeds, weeds weeds, that's pretty much all I have.  Peppers and Tomatoes will survive and I've got some potatoes that will probably yield a crop but that's about all.  Cucumbers started strong and are wilting.  First garden in the new house so the tillage was lousy and last minute, we weeded multiple times but the boys don't pull the roots up so when we got back from vacation it was nothing but foxtail and lambsquarters.  Next year I will have to do something different. 

Did eat a lot of green beans out of the garden for supper though, guess I should count my blessings.

lambs quarters aren't weeds. They are gourmet greens man. delicious. If I could get lambs quarters to grow in my garden I would never ever plant spinach.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 27, 2013, 07:41:26 PM
Jonathan,
Those volunteer "squash" mnay be gourds.  The calabacita have mild and soft flesh like a zuchinni
only slightly different.....They should be harvested when at the size of your fist....

yeah, they aren't terribly pleasent. Ive got one out there right now that is about the size you describe. Maybe I'll go pick it now and see how it is. Are they tasty raw like zukes?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on July 27, 2013, 07:47:41 PM
It's difficult to tell them apart when chopped....
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on July 27, 2013, 08:51:29 PM
When is the best time to harvest eggplant. I've been hearing its before they turn purple. Anyone know if that is correct or have better advice? Thanks !
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on July 27, 2013, 09:02:41 PM
They are all purple in the store.  I have never tried one that wasn't.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 27, 2013, 09:12:24 PM
When is the best time to harvest eggplant. I've been hearing its before they turn purple. Anyone know if that is correct or have better advice? Thanks !

some eggplants don't turn purple. if they get to old they will get seedy and tough. other than that it doesn't matter all that much.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 27, 2013, 10:39:36 PM
Eggplants grow more bitter the older/larger they are. So it is best to enjoy them on the smaller side.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on July 29, 2013, 12:36:07 PM
Eggplants grow more bitter the older/larger they are. So it is best to enjoy them on the smaller side.

+1  A little bit bigger than a softball tastes good.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 29, 2013, 02:37:01 PM
Eggplants grow more bitter the older/larger they are. So it is best to enjoy them on the smaller side.

+1  A little bit bigger than a softball tastes good.

unless it's one of those tiny Asian varieties that only get as big as eggs, you know the ones that are white? and look like eggs? I have always assumed that that is what EGGPLANTS were supposed to look like and the giant purple ones are a mutation.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on July 29, 2013, 03:26:52 PM
Weeds, weeds weeds, that's pretty much all I have.  Peppers and Tomatoes will survive and I've got some potatoes that will probably yield a crop but that's about all.  Cucumbers started strong and are wilting.  First garden in the new house so the tillage was lousy and last minute, we weeded multiple times but the boys don't pull the roots up so when we got back from vacation it was nothing but foxtail and lambsquarters.  Next year I will have to do something different. 

Did eat a lot of green beans out of the garden for supper though, guess I should count my blessings.

lambs quarters aren't weeds. They are gourmet greens man. delicious. If I could get lambs quarters to grow in my garden I would never ever plant spinach.

I don't think I've ever heard of someone eating lambs-quarter.  Interesting.  It's a native plant in Iowa (I think) and grows everywhere.  It would rapidly take over 2 acres of cattle lot, if we didn't have cattle, when I was kid.  Oh well, another possible fortune we threw away.  8^)

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on July 29, 2013, 03:56:29 PM
Eggplants grow more bitter the older/larger they are. So it is best to enjoy them on the smaller side.

+1  A little bit bigger than a softball tastes good.

unless it's one of those tiny Asian varieties that only get as big as eggs, you know the ones that are white? and look like eggs? I have always assumed that that is what EGGPLANTS were supposed to look like and the giant purple ones are a mutation.

Hmm, the ones I have are more like skinny footballs that have no sign of purple color yet.  I guess I'll just let them ride a while longer and see what happens. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 29, 2013, 04:06:44 PM
The calabacita in my garden are rangy, and seem to like a lot of room.  Easily the first producing squash here; really have been enjoying them.  Thanks for the recommend.

I have a feeling they might turn into calabasota pretty quick. ;)

They do look like the volunteer squash that appear from my compost. 



Harvested the garlic this weekend, just in time.

My volunteer potatoes are fantastic.  Wondering why we can't plant them in the fall and just act like they are volunteer?




(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo020_zpsc92bfb81.jpg)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 29, 2013, 04:17:49 PM
The calabacita in my garden are rangy, and seem to like a lot of room.  Easily the first producing squash here; really have been enjoying them.  Thanks for the recommend.

I have a feeling they might turn into calabasota pretty quick. ;)

They do look like the volunteer squash that appear from my compost. 



Harvested the garlic this weekend, just in time.

My volunteer potatoes are fantastic.  Wondering why we can't plant them in the fall and just act like they are volunteer?




(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo020_zpsc92bfb81.jpg)

That's a nice looking pile of garlic pinnah. jealous. our garlic is okay, but the heads were really small and we only got about 10 bulbs and I have to use 1 per batch of pesto so it's going quickly as I can barely keep ahead of the basil. It's been hot here and they want to bolt so badly.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on July 29, 2013, 04:35:34 PM
The calabacita in my garden are rangy, and seem to like a lot of room.  Easily the first producing squash here; really have been enjoying them.  Thanks for the recommend.

I have a feeling they might turn into calabasota pretty quick. ;)

They do look like the volunteer squash that appear from my compost. 



Harvested the garlic this weekend, just in time.

My volunteer potatoes are fantastic.  Wondering why we can't plant them in the fall and just act like they are volunteer?




(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo020_zpsc92bfb81.jpg)

That's a nice looking pile of garlic pinnah. jealous. our garlic is okay, but the heads were really small and we only got about 10 bulbs and I have to use 1 per batch of pesto so it's going quickly as I can barely keep ahead of the basil. It's been hot here and they want to bolt so badly.

+1

Beautious!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on July 29, 2013, 04:39:04 PM
I don't know if this was already mentioned, but has anyone noticed the increased size of tomatoes this year. We've had an ever increasing amount of rainfall in the Mid-Atlantic region, which I believe to be the cause. The last several years have been somewhat dry, eventhough I watered regularly, the tomatoes were significantly smaller in years past. Just an observation.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on July 29, 2013, 04:51:36 PM
I don't know if this was already mentioned, but has anyone noticed the increased size of tomatoes this year. We've had an ever increasing amount of rainfall in the Mid-Atlantic region, which I believe to be the cause. The last several years have been somewhat dry, eventhough I watered regularly, the tomatoes were significantly smaller in years past. Just an observation.

Water all you want, but nothing seems to make stuff grow like a good soaking rain!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on July 29, 2013, 05:03:41 PM
Rain is the best! The plants love it- something about the water being deionized...

However, too much rain or rain at the wrong time such as before harvest can cause cracking with the tomatoes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 29, 2013, 05:13:24 PM
Rain is the best! The plants love it- something about the water being deionized...

However, too much rain or rain at the wrong time such as before harvest can cause cracking with the tomatoes.

as well as sub-optimal flavor development. I was reading about Italian tomato farms. There is a whole regimen they follow to maximize flavor development. You water during the initial growth phase, then as the plants begin to set flowers you restrict water which will cause them to set more flowers. Once the fruit begins to set you can give them more water but then, as the fruit is getting ready to ripen you restrict water again or even water with salt water to stress the plants.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on July 29, 2013, 07:24:07 PM
Rain is the best! The plants love it- something about the water being deionized...

However, too much rain or rain at the wrong time such as before harvest can cause cracking with the tomatoes.

as well as sub-optimal flavor development. I was reading about Italian tomato farms. There is a whole regimen they follow to maximize flavor development. You water during the initial growth phase, then as the plants begin to set flowers you restrict water which will cause them to set more flowers. Once the fruit begins to set you can give them more water but then, as the fruit is getting ready to ripen you restrict water again or even water with salt water to stress the plants.

I always restrict water to ripening tomatoes when possible. But salt water? It may improve the current crop but salt in the soil can't be good for future crops.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on July 29, 2013, 07:49:39 PM
Rain is the best! The plants love it- something about the water being deionized...

However, too much rain or rain at the wrong time such as before harvest can cause cracking with the tomatoes.

as well as sub-optimal flavor development. I was reading about Italian tomato farms. There is a whole regimen they follow to maximize flavor development. You water during the initial growth phase, then as the plants begin to set flowers you restrict water which will cause them to set more flowers. Once the fruit begins to set you can give them more water but then, as the fruit is getting ready to ripen you restrict water again or even water with salt water to stress the plants.

I always restrict water to ripening tomatoes when possible. But salt water? It may improve the current crop but salt in the soil can't be good for future crops.

that is a concern.  I suspect you have to sow a winter crop that will either take the salt up or require so much water that the soil will be flushed.

**EDIT**

Not sure if this is where I originally heard it. But given how much NPR I listen to it's possible.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=90135252 (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=90135252)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on July 29, 2013, 07:57:00 PM
Rain is the best! The plants love it- something about the water being deionized...
Seeds won't even germinate here with the water from our taps.  I have to buy potted veggie plants and hope for the best each year.  But I'm going to go ahead and plant my winter garden soon while we're having a good monsoon flow dumping water on us.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on July 31, 2013, 12:13:29 AM
Now it's hornworms.  They've defoliated most of my tomatoes.  I'm picking them off and squishing them but man they have done some damage. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 31, 2013, 02:43:00 AM

That's a nice looking pile of garlic pinnah.

Thanks.
I am a believer that garlic can become accustomed to your site, and if you replant the same stock every year, your yields will improve.  You might try planting some of your biggest cloves this fall, and see how they improve next year.

buko basil, always a good thing.  I am a bit disappointed in the yield off the Botanical Interests assorted basil packet. ::) 



I'm going to go ahead and plant my winter garden soon while we're having a good monsoon flow dumping water on us.

I will give a hearty yodel to the awesome goodness of monsoonal flow. 8) 
It saved us this year in SW Colorado.  We were on serious fire.

Cheers. 


gmac, thanks for the reminder to look for tomato worms. They are really amazing wicked looking aren't they? 
Who knows what they turn into?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on July 31, 2013, 12:19:16 PM
gmac, thanks for the reminder to look for tomato worms. They are really amazing wicked looking aren't they? 
Who knows what they turn into?

Hawkmoth - equally wicked looking, but pretty badass at the same time:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Manduca_quinquemaculata_adult_female.JPG/800px-Manduca_quinquemaculata_adult_female.JPG)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on July 31, 2013, 02:13:09 PM

Who knows what they turn into?
They turn into green goo under my shoe.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on August 01, 2013, 11:40:52 AM

Who knows what they turn into?
They turn into green goo under my shoe.

 ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on August 06, 2013, 11:46:03 AM
Kohlrabi pickles and pickled cherry peppers

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_06591_zpsf0ce4831.jpg) (http://s276.photobucket.com/user/redbeerman/media/IMG_06591_zpsf0ce4831.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on August 06, 2013, 02:59:57 PM
owwee, I always get jealous over your pickles! Those look excellent.
 I am just starting to get cukes here, and plucked my first two tomatoes last night. 

Morticai, you might like these:  second year bulbuils off hard neck garlic. 

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/036_zps3a8e3ebe.jpg)

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/041_zpsf7b5de48.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on August 06, 2013, 03:12:56 PM
nice.

Here is the promised artichoke photo

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2860/9435414475_1d202fc2ac.jpg)

they sure are pretty when the go by.

and some coriander. You can't quite make it out in this picture but they are sort of pearlescent before the are all the way dried.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3702/9435423345_ba0078b892.jpg)

and finally my wonderful, ever lasting perennial tree collard

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2828/9438219454_1cde46178e.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2013, 04:24:59 PM
Great shots gentlemen!

This is one of the most colorful threads on the forum. :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2013, 04:27:29 PM
Speaking of colorful vegetables. I think I might brew a pumpkin beer this year. My pumkins are really small right now. Hope they get a lot bigger. If they do, I'll post some pics AND brew a pumpkin ale. ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on August 21, 2013, 01:23:20 AM
Knowing that tomato vines, if buried, will root, I shoveled some soil on top of the bottom 16-18" of some of my tomato vines this spring after they got too tall and laid down, just for an experiment. I thought that more roots=increased nutrient uptake and might mean larger yield. They were still in their vegetative state and were not blooming nor had they set fruit. Today I noticed some red peeking from the soil where I had buried the vines. Subterranean tomatoes! Dug'em up and tasted a few next to above ground tomatoes from the same plant with the same apparent ripeness, based on color . The subterranean tomatoes seemed to be less acidic and more umami. The tomatoes were Oxheart.
This is really weird! But true! There will be more experimenting next year.
Just thought I'd share.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on August 21, 2013, 09:31:56 AM
I gotta post some pics of our pumpkins. I, too, will be doing a pumpkin ale. But with added lactose for that Southern Tier taste ;-)

We found some surprise acorn squash growing the other day. That was one of the better surprises I've had all year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on August 21, 2013, 02:48:53 PM
Knowing that tomato vines, if buried, will root, I shoveled some soil on top of the bottom 16-18" of some of my tomato vines this spring after they got too tall and laid down, just for an experiment. I thought that more roots=increased nutrient uptake and might mean larger yield. They were still in their vegetative state and were not blooming nor had they set fruit. Today I noticed some red peeking from the soil where I had buried the vines. Subterranean tomatoes! Dug'em up and tasted a few next to above ground tomatoes from the same plant with the same apparent ripeness, based on color . The subterranean tomatoes seemed to be less acidic and more umami. The tomatoes were Oxheart.
This is really weird! But true! There will be more experimenting next year.
Just thought I'd share.

That's really interesting! I love Oxhearts but they take forever to ripen. Would love to hear back on the experiment.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on August 27, 2013, 04:57:16 PM
Whoa Big Al!  That is a crazy story.  :D I thought it possible if you had buried fruit that had been pollinated and set, but I re-read and you say it had not yet!  Very curious.  You will have to let us know if you can repeat!



Speaking of pumpkins....

I thought I had bought some pickling cukes to grow up the garden fence...but after a few leaves popped out, I decided it was something else...

The plant turned into this:  ???







(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/bigmax_zpsa854c0e3.jpg)



Oh, and Vert1, that calabacita is one wild squash plant.  I was picking raspberries a full 25 feet away and discovered a nice little squash on a runner heading off across the landscape.  I can't keep track of the buggers. :o

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on August 28, 2013, 04:33:17 AM
Yeah pinnah...he he, the dang thing has runners everywhere and I found a bowling ball sized escapee
that was in among the zuchini.  I like the squash...not so much the plant. the thing is a real traveler.
This was the first year I ever tried to grow em....hop trellis???
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: phillamb168 on August 28, 2013, 09:45:42 AM
Pretty cool about the tomatoes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on August 31, 2013, 09:27:53 PM
(food for critters)  Pinnah, the 2nd cutting is in the windrows this afternoon.  Pretty sparce
because I did not put much water to the field.....economics.  Just keepn it alive.
Howd your hay crop do??
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on September 03, 2013, 12:47:31 PM
(food for critters)  Pinnah, the 2nd cutting is in the windrows this afternoon.  Pretty sparce
because I did not put much water to the field.....economics.  Just keepn it alive.
Howd your hay crop do??

Since Tom ain't here to badger us into planting an orchard instead of hay... :P

First crop is all in the barn, 330 bales.  More than I need for the year, which feels good given the price of hay around here.  $7-9/bale! Can't get my cutting guy to come, he is way behind.  So still irrigating the second stand.  Alfalfa a little far gone, but I don't care. 

The monsoon has been great, but tough to get hay up. 
I would venture a guess on an EPIC mushroom year.  Heard a report of chanterelles en mass on the mountain.


Garden is in full harvest mode.  Digging potatoes. Raspberries just kicking in.  Hops mostly harvested.

Starting to feel like fall around here.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 08, 2013, 04:59:51 PM
Pinnah.... I am almost skeert to go lookin for calabasitas b/c I always find more than
I can carry and lots of em are escapees...and man...that thing is WILD man Wild....
Is yours an adventure?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on September 08, 2013, 11:47:45 PM
Has anyone else tried BBQ roasted cherry tomatoes? They fully rock! In fact a lasagna is in my future which will incorporate roasted cherry tomatoes in lieu of sauce. Ours are chocolate cherries
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 09, 2013, 12:47:57 AM
Has anyone else tried BBQ roasted cherry tomatoes? They fully rock! In fact a lasagna is in my future which will incorporate roasted cherry tomatoes in lieu of sauce. Ours are chocolate cherries
Love em grilled...little olive oil...even grilled in foil. MMM mmm
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on September 09, 2013, 12:51:18 AM
Fire roasted tomatoes make killer salsa too.  Roast the chiles and onions too. Getting hungry now !
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on September 09, 2013, 03:16:27 AM
I bought a stainless grilling pan and we discovered the joy of garden grilling
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on September 10, 2013, 05:07:11 PM
Pinnah.... I am almost skeert to go lookin for calabasitas b/c I always find more than
I can carry and lots of em are escapees...and man...that thing is WILD man Wild....
Is yours an adventure?

ROFL.
I was deep back in picking raspberries amongst the hollyhocks and booted something...
dang thing was jack-o-lantern sized! 
I left it in honor of the Calabasón..or would it be Calabsota?
Anyway, yea, they are wild; only fruiting on the end of the growing vine.  Good early season squashcita.

On another note, thumbs up to the Ozette fingerling tater.  Wow is it good roasted.

I bought a stainless grilling pan and we discovered the joy of garden grilling
I need one of those! Did some stuffed poblanos ala euge yesterday; I am always losing stuff down through the grill. ::)

 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 19, 2013, 05:21:14 PM
My salad bowl today.  Spicy good
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Nasturtium2013_zpsa4c35890.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on September 20, 2013, 04:42:20 PM
Grew those a few years ago.  Ended up I was the only one who would eat them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Alewyfe on September 20, 2013, 05:38:21 PM
goods from the woods....
(http://i964.photobucket.com/albums/ae127/alewyfe/P1050576_zps6b9a5f85.jpg?t=1379611564)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 20, 2013, 06:25:05 PM
1vert>>>>green with envy  :'(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on September 20, 2013, 07:59:44 PM
1vert>>>>green with envy  :'(

+ 1.100
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on September 23, 2013, 01:46:25 PM
 8) With the monsoon this season, it is an epic year for fungi freaks around here. 
I probably saw 200lbs of Chantys last week in the spruce fir. :o

Goods from the woods are the best!


First day of fall, first real snow on the peaks....first yellow brandywine. ::)

Had some great mini pizzas last night...pestoish sauce, maters, zucchini, broccoli, peppers.  Pretty good.
Harvesting raspberries every other day now and stocking the freezer.

Cheers to the spoils of gardening!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on September 26, 2013, 03:27:36 AM
My salad bowl today.  Spicy good
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Nasturtium2013_zpsa4c35890.jpg)
What are they?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on September 26, 2013, 04:14:04 AM
My salad bowl today.  Spicy good
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Nasturtium2013_zpsa4c35890.jpg)
What are they?

Them is nasturtiums. They are flowers and have a really nice peppery flavor. nice colorful addition to salad... or just colorful salad I guess. If you pick the flower buds you can pickly them and make faux capers
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on September 26, 2013, 05:03:27 AM
My salad bowl today.  Spicy good
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Nasturtium2013_zpsa4c35890.jpg)
What are they?

Them is nasturtiums. They are flowers and have a really nice peppery flavor. nice colorful addition to salad... or just colorful salad I guess. If you pick the flower buds you can pickly them and make faux capers
I thought so but then the spicy comment got me wondering if they were something else. I think of them as peppery, not quite the same way as I think of spicy. Thanks for confirming.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on September 26, 2013, 07:48:00 AM
Coffee cherry is starting to come in.  As are macnuts.  Pineapples are winding down.  Early season tangerines are starting to show some color.  Scorpion peppers have set some fruit.

Avocados and ghost peppers are going ape-sh!t.  As someone here one said in reference to zucchini season up north - you gotta keep your car doors locked, or someone will put avocados in there.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: jeffy on September 26, 2013, 11:35:34 AM
I had a good crop of avocados this year, the best ever.  They were all gone about a month ago.  Grapefruits are getting bigger and the oranges are about half size right now.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on September 27, 2013, 02:16:47 AM
Coffee cherry is starting to come in.  As are macnuts.  Pineapples are winding down.  Early season tangerines are starting to show some color.  Scorpion peppers have set some fruit.

Avocados and ghost peppers are going ape-sh!t.  As someone here one said in reference to zucchini season up north - you gotta keep your car doors locked, or someone will put avocados in there.

Snowed last week. Hate you  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on September 27, 2013, 02:23:07 AM
Snows here too.  We just make it stay up above 9,000 ft. on Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on September 27, 2013, 10:56:20 PM
Freeze warning here. ???  Guess I am off to cover stuff up and collect a nton of peppers.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 08, 2013, 05:03:00 AM
RIP garden.   Prairie is starting to get green again ....its confused   :o
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on October 08, 2013, 11:42:11 AM
Still have peppers, some tomatoes, kale and Swiss chard.  Everything else is six feet under, OK 1 foot under.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 08, 2013, 02:17:24 PM
ahh northern California.

The peas are starting to come up gangbusters, still got a couple eggplants, peppers and tomatoes hanging around. greens, greens, and more greens. A couple potatoes starting to poke their heads up, a few intentional and a few we missed earlier.

Chickens are eating up the excess greens, and scraps and making 4 eggs a day. so my cholesterol is doing well  ::). (nah they mostly forage so it's healthy cholesterol)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on October 08, 2013, 02:50:35 PM
I've still got tomatoes, peppers, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohl rabi, carrots, beets, potatoes, kale, leeks, apples, and raspberries.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on October 08, 2013, 08:39:47 PM
I'm getting a random late bumper crop of cherry tomatoes, and some spinach in one of deck boxes. Need to think about picking my cranberries soon too. Otherwise no fall plantings for me this year. Time to break it all down and add some more mulch for the winter.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on October 20, 2013, 04:09:20 PM
Took the rest of the garden out yesterday.  Got about a bushel of poblanos and a bunch of jalapenos and chile grandes.  Spent this morning blanching the poblanos and packing them for the freezer.  Pickled the chile grandes and jalapenos.  I'm glad we're done for the year. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on October 21, 2013, 06:50:38 PM
I'm glad we're done for the year.
:P, Dang, a whole bushel of poblanos!  Wow.

I too am glad to be about done.  I hauled out the frozen and dead tomato plants this weekend.
Eating some delicata squash.  I like it; not too sweet which is how I find most squash.

Need to get the garlic in the ground.

RIP garden.   Prairie is starting to get green again ....its confused   :o

Crazy year with the intense monsoon here.  All kinds of stuff is re-blooming on the desert.
Got my hay cut. :o 18 October. Amazing, but this is the first dry stretch we have had. Now or never.

Anyone garden 4 season style?  Hothouse, greenhouse?  Not you Punatic. ;D
I got some lettuce last night and thought I should have a greenhouse setup.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 21, 2013, 08:16:08 PM
I'm glad we're done for the year.
:P, Dang, a whole bushel of poblanos!  Wow.

I too am glad to be about done.  I hauled out the frozen and dead tomato plants this weekend.
Eating some delicata squash.  I like it; not too sweet which is how I find most squash.

Need to get the garlic in the ground.

RIP garden.   Prairie is starting to get green again ....its confused   :o

Crazy year with the intense monsoon here.  All kinds of stuff is re-blooming on the desert.
Got my hay cut. :o 18 October. Amazing, but this is the first dry stretch we have had. Now or never.

Anyone garden 4 season style?  Hothouse, greenhouse?  Not you Punatic. ;D
I got some lettuce last night and thought I should have a greenhouse setup.

I don't have Carl's advantages but I can get a few hardy things through the winter here in northern cali without any assistance, hearty greens like collards, kale, and chard, broccoli, peas. Lettuces are sort of a risk but not a very big one. I'm going to try to get some winter barley in this year if I can get ahold of some seed in the next couple weeks.

Back east in Vermont where I grew up there are a lot of folks getting cold season crops to grow even in the early/late winter months using cold frames and insulated greenhouses.

I did a lot of research at one point on insulating the ground under a greenhouse. You sink that rigid foam insulation board at the perimeter of your green house sloping slightly out. Then put a moisture barrier around the outside of the greenhouse. If you can keep the ground dry (moisture barrier) and reflect some of the heat lost through the soil itself (insulation) you are supposed to be able to keep the ground from freezing even in sub zero weather. With some solar gain during the day you can even keep the ambient temp out of death range for some hearty crops.

Add some active compost inside the greenhouse and your cooking with gas.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on October 22, 2013, 03:22:32 AM
Just dismissed out of hand for where I live... :-[

Yall are a bunch of regionalists!   ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on October 22, 2013, 04:12:16 PM
Add some active compost inside the greenhouse and your cooking with gas.
;D I steamed my sunglasses the other morning turning the pile.

I would love to have a greenhouse/chicken coop combo!
Since I am dreaming, I need a root cellar as well. ::)
 

Whatcha planning for that winter barley?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 22, 2013, 04:35:29 PM
Add some active compost inside the greenhouse and your cooking with gas.
;D I steamed my sunglasses the other morning turning the pile.

I would love to have a greenhouse/chicken coop combo!
Since I am dreaming, I need a root cellar as well. ::)
 

Whatcha planning for that winter barley?

probably mostly get wasted as I try to figure out malting. that's assuming it actually grows and produces grain  ::) I've got plot about 15X20 to plant ready and waiting so with lots and lots of luck I might see 10 lbs of grain, maybe 20 but I'm really not holding my breath.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 23, 2013, 05:04:24 AM
Yall are a bunch of regionalists!   ;)

That made me laff....and you said "y'all"  LOL!!!!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 23, 2013, 05:13:06 AM
probably mostly get wasted as I try to figure out malting. that's assuming it actually grows and produces grain  ::) I've got plot about 15X20 to plant ready and waiting so with lots and lots of luck I might see 10 lbs of grain, maybe 20 but I'm really not holding my breath.

OK you plant one "seed" it grows a plant that produces several 2row heads per plant...at 16-20 grains per head....so per grain multiplication of (say 60% survival) times 17 grains per head is 10 times increase per surviving plant.... is that much times your seed weight? some AG farmer please chime in....plant 5 lbs get
50 yeild  at 60% viability ???
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on October 23, 2013, 07:37:18 AM
Would it make you feel better if I said yous guys, or you-uns?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on October 23, 2013, 12:14:56 PM
Personally I like yous.  As in... Yous a bunch a bioregionalists! :P

Coool on the barley trials.  If it does not work out, you can always turn the chickens out on it. ;)


Anyone know if you can eat those giant pumpkins?  They are cool for decor, but dumping them seems like a big waste.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 23, 2013, 02:32:21 PM
Personally I like yous.  As in... Yous a bunch a bioregionalists! :P

Coool on the barley trials.  If it does not work out, you can always turn the chickens out on it. ;)


Anyone know if you can eat those giant pumpkins?  They are cool for decor, but dumping them seems like a big waste.

you can probably chop them up and feed them to the chickens.  ;D

I had a realization the other day that most of the stuff on earth is actually made of chicken food.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 23, 2013, 10:37:01 PM
You can eat them but they are mostly water. As far as taste I like the pumpkins that look like the one in the movie Cinderella.

We harvested and got the garlic planted just in time for the snow to arrive not to mention the chicken butchering, We froze 12# of brussel sprouts not bad for 4 plants, canned 36 qts of tomatoes and more ripening every day. Lotsa potatoes and onions too.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on October 27, 2013, 02:08:55 PM
I had a realization the other day that most of the stuff on earth is actually made of chicken food.
;D. With the amazing daily conversion of said food into an egg!  Yesterday mine got into a nearly dead vole the cat had abandoned...like a flock of Velociraptors they descended..



Leeks.  Anyone grow them? How do you store them?  Dig and refrigerate?  Leave them in the ground?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 27, 2013, 04:39:30 PM
I had a realization the other day that most of the stuff on earth is actually made of chicken food.
;D. With the amazing daily conversion of said food into an egg!  Yesterday mine got into a nearly dead vole the cat had abandoned...like a flock of Velociraptors they descended..



Leeks.  Anyone grow them? How do you store them?  Dig and refrigerate?  Leave them in the ground?

I think I have heard of storing them in a box of moist sand in a root cellar type situation.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on October 27, 2013, 05:08:24 PM
I do my best to get them plugged before everything drains out.   ::)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 28, 2013, 02:09:33 AM
I humbly suggest that you par cook them and then freeze them.  Just my $.02
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on October 28, 2013, 10:13:50 PM
I humbly suggest that you par cook them and then freeze them.  Just my $.02

That sounds like a good idea Vert...there really is a lot of waste material on a whole leek.
If I was to "par cook" them, would you just stir fry them a bit quick?  Would adding olive oil be a bad idea?  Thanks.

I do my best to get them plugged before everything drains out.   ::)
;D, it seriously took me a while to comprehend.  Heh.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 29, 2013, 04:48:15 AM
I would slice them in about 1/4 in thick rounds...sautee LIGHTLY in a little olive oil
until they "sweat" then pack em in ziplocks removing as much of the air as possible (vac).
Note: this is not a proven method it is just what we do with other similiar fresh produce....
it seems to work. 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on October 29, 2013, 11:36:52 AM
Bob Hope or Alfred Hitchcock?  Last eggplant from our garden.

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0696_zps2afeb5ae.jpg) (http://s276.photobucket.com/user/redbeerman/media/IMG_0696_zps2afeb5ae.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 29, 2013, 02:36:42 PM
Bob Hope or Alfred Hitchcock?  Last eggplant from our garden.

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/IMG_0696_zps2afeb5ae.jpg) (http://s276.photobucket.com/user/redbeerman/media/IMG_0696_zps2afeb5ae.jpg.html)

nice
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: punatic on October 29, 2013, 05:57:43 PM
Archie (the comic book character).

Or, perhaps, the headless horseman on viagra... 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on November 05, 2013, 12:36:05 AM
Hitchcock for sure.
Vegan dinner tonight. Roasted fresh-picked Brussels sprouts and garlic. Roasted purple potatoes and leeks, both fresh-picked. Organic black rice. Organic blonde ale with homegrown Cascades. Finally got the garlic in the ground, 100 cloves from garlic grown in my garden for up to 7 generations. Love the late garden season! Still have Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kale, taters, carrots, leeks, kohl rabi, raspberries. A few light frosts seem to make the brassicas sweeter.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 05, 2013, 09:45:20 PM
Nice Big Al! 
You ever try parsnips?  They roast up sweet after a frost with the things you mention.

Thanks for the reminder on the garlic...still have not got it in the ground. ::)
An inch of snow on the scene this morning and the coldest night of the season to come.
I should mulch those carrots.

Cheers to the fall garden!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: cornershot on November 05, 2013, 10:58:12 PM
Never tried growing parsnips. Maybe next year...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 03, 2014, 05:18:12 PM
Alrighty folks, I put seeds in dirt this weekend so it must be time to revive the garden thread.

What's plannin? what's poppin?

I started two kinds of tomatoes this weekend and put up 100' of chicken wire to keep the ladies out of the garden although they have already helped themselves to a sizable portion of our kale (it's alright, I can't eat that much kale anyway).

Barley is doing well, peas are going nuts. should have rutabagas on the table any day now. artichokes are dressed and thinned (only kept three this year as a bunch went to flower last year when we had 5).

I've got some lettuce, brocolli raab, and parsnips to sow, and some more tomatoes and fish peppers to start.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: udubdawg on March 03, 2014, 05:32:37 PM
-3F here; might be another day or two.   ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 03, 2014, 05:35:44 PM
-3F here; might be another day or two.   ;D

perfect time to get those seeds started! isn't that what march is for? looking at seed catalogs, getting your fingers dirty with little trays of soil? hanging out under the full spectrum lamps until the sun decides it will grace you with it's presence for more than 15 minutes each day?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 03, 2014, 05:38:23 PM
Winter storm Titan dropped about 6 inches of frozen debris in our area last night. It'll be a few more weeks before I start planting seeds, but it's time to start planning this years' crop. Seeds are first on the list of things to do. I'm ready for spring!  8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 03, 2014, 05:41:24 PM
Harvested a bunch of broccoli volunteers. Got red and white sweet onions in. Supposedly as sweet as an apple! Cilantro did squat this year.

My trash can composter is making short work of all the scraps and spent grain I've been putting in there. Tomatoes and maybe beans this spring will benefit.   
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on March 03, 2014, 05:44:10 PM
Alrighty folks, I put seeds in dirt this weekend so it must be time to revive the garden thread.

What's plannin? what's poppin?

I started two kinds of tomatoes this weekend and put up 100' of chicken wire to keep the ladies out of the garden although they have already helped themselves to a sizable portion of our kale (it's alright, I can't eat that much kale anyway).

Barley is doing well, peas are going nuts. should have rutabagas on the table any day now. artichokes are dressed and thinned (only kept three this year as a bunch went to flower last year when we had 5).

I've got some lettuce, brocolli raab, and parsnips to sow, and some more tomatoes and fish peppers to start.

What's a fish pepper?

I'm going to build a third 4'x8' raised bed this year. That's all I know for sure at the moment.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 03, 2014, 05:45:23 PM
It's been so cold for so long that it's hard to imagine a garden even growing. However, it has been bringing me a lot of comfort to think about the garden lately. So, I'm planning a big spring garden: lots of Kale and lettuce, radishes and beets (just discovered Borscht this year), snow peas, green beans,  and broccoli. Looking forward to trying some new herbs this year if anyone has any recommendations. I always plant a few varieties of thyme and oregano, and some rosemary and lavender. I may move in late July, so will probably put some tomatoes and peppers in containers. I would also like to get better at planning companion plants this.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 03, 2014, 05:48:03 PM
Alrighty folks, I put seeds in dirt this weekend so it must be time to revive the garden thread.

What's plannin? what's poppin?

I started two kinds of tomatoes this weekend and put up 100' of chicken wire to keep the ladies out of the garden although they have already helped themselves to a sizable portion of our kale (it's alright, I can't eat that much kale anyway).

Barley is doing well, peas are going nuts. should have rutabagas on the table any day now. artichokes are dressed and thinned (only kept three this year as a bunch went to flower last year when we had 5).

I've got some lettuce, brocolli raab, and parsnips to sow, and some more tomatoes and fish peppers to start.

What's a fish pepper?

I'm going to build a third 4'x8' raised bed this year. That's all I know for sure at the moment.

it's new to me. they are apparently an heirloom variety that was traditionally used as a seasoning for sea food. verigated leaves and peppers, medium heat with a smokey quality.

My wife also wants to plant some jalapenos to make jelly with this year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: theDarkSide on March 03, 2014, 05:50:44 PM
-3F here; might be another day or two.   ;D

perfect time to get those seeds started! isn't that what march is for? looking at seed catalogs, getting your fingers dirty with little trays of soil? hanging out under the full spectrum lamps until the sun decides it will grace you with it's presence for more than 15 minutes each day?
I usually don't start my seedlings until April.  There's too much of a chance of frost until mid-May.  The past couple years, I've just planted from seed or picked up seedlings at the local nursery.

Oh and by the way.. :P for rubbing it in  ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 03, 2014, 05:58:23 PM
Want to add that the leaves off the broccoli are far superior to collards and mustard. My appreciation for greens has deepened. I want to try kale but it may be too hot here.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 03, 2014, 06:03:06 PM
+1 to broccoli rabe. Great stuff.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 03, 2014, 06:18:01 PM
Want to add that the leaves off the broccoli are far superior to collards and mustard. My appreciation for greens has deepened. I want to try kale but it may be too hot here.

mmmm, I love broccoli greens. in fact, growers are allowed by labeling laws to label as 'Collards' greens including UP TO 100% broccoli greens.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: udubdawg on March 03, 2014, 06:26:47 PM
-3F here; might be another day or two.   ;D

perfect time to get those seeds started! isn't that what march is for? looking at seed catalogs, getting your fingers dirty with little trays of soil? hanging out under the full spectrum lamps until the sun decides it will grace you with it's presence for more than 15 minutes each day?

you're right, of course, but I started Feb28th last year and winter just kept going and going into mid May, so I'm going to wait a little longer.

on a plus side though, I've got some new neighbors so I've got an entire new group who are going to see the glow from my reef tank/grow lights and think I've got a major ganja grow operation going.   ::) 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on March 03, 2014, 06:38:01 PM
the grip of this winter has been long cold and brutal....& it ain't over yet
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 03, 2014, 06:45:32 PM
-3F here; might be another day or two.   ;D

perfect time to get those seeds started! isn't that what march is for? looking at seed catalogs, getting your fingers dirty with little trays of soil? hanging out under the full spectrum lamps until the sun decides it will grace you with it's presence for more than 15 minutes each day?

you're right, of course, but I started Feb28th last year and winter just kept going and going into mid May, so I'm going to wait a little longer.

on a plus side though, I've got some new neighbors so I've got an entire new group who are going to see the glow from my reef tank/grow lights and think I've got a major ganja grow operation going.   ::)

Ha!

I used to get regular visits from the police when I lived in Vermont because I had a 600 watt metal halide grow lamp in the front room with veggies under it all winter. They were 'checking up on the neighbors'  ::)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 03, 2014, 06:53:13 PM
-3F here; might be another day or two.   ;D

perfect time to get those seeds started! isn't that what march is for? looking at seed catalogs, getting your fingers dirty with little trays of soil? hanging out under the full spectrum lamps until the sun decides it will grace you with it's presence for more than 15 minutes each day?

you're right, of course, but I started Feb28th last year and winter just kept going and going into mid May, so I'm going to wait a little longer.

on a plus side though, I've got some new neighbors so I've got an entire new group who are going to see the glow from my reef tank/grow lights and think I've got a major ganja grow operation going.   ::)

Ha!

I used to get regular visits from the police when I lived in Vermont because I had a 600 watt metal halide grow lamp in the front room with veggies under it all winter. They were 'checking up on the neighbors'  ::)

Funny !  Probably wouldn't help to crank up the Bob Marley tunes during those times.      :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 03, 2014, 07:43:15 PM
Here in the Central Plains you should have started your flowers early last month and be starting the vegie (tomatoes, peppers, cauliflower, broccoli and such) right now.  According to Rich Joran (ISU Horticulturist) on the Friday Hort-Day call in show.   ;)

I don't have a garden anymore so it's all lost on me.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 03, 2014, 10:54:51 PM
The troops:

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-TDlPJOANRBY/UxUGeJ9_PuI/AAAAAAAAA08/RTa6uu_TJGk/w935-h526-no/20140303_164412.jpg)

Lot of good eating there still though the florets get a bit fibrous at this stage.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 03, 2014, 11:13:35 PM
The troops:

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-TDlPJOANRBY/UxUGeJ9_PuI/AAAAAAAAA08/RTa6uu_TJGk/w935-h526-no/20140303_164412.jpg)

Lot of good eating there still though the florets get a bit fibrous at this stage.

yup that's more or less what my broccolies look like. the chickens go nuts for the overgrown florets and flowers though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on March 04, 2014, 01:37:08 AM
My only plan is to dramatically increase my hot pepper patch for making hot sauce.  Other than that, no big garden plans for this year (besides the usual corn, tomatoes, etc).  Should be planting something in about 4 months when the 3.5 feet of snow finally melt.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 04, 2014, 02:44:40 PM
Oh yea. I was looking at morticai's green yard and I got a little antsy, so I build a cold frame hot box this weekend.
It is a little overbuilt ::), but hey, I did not have to buy anything to make it.

Seeded in some greens, cilantro, a few carrots and beets chucked in.




(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo062_zps365fa670.jpg)



I ordered some new potato seed last week.

Thinking of expanding the "orchard"...giving another attempt at hugelculture...and perhaps caving and buying some actual soil.  I should probably try and grow and make that salsa roja they sell in bulk at the store.  Man I can go through that stuff!

Cheers to spring.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 04, 2014, 03:34:01 PM
nice looking cold frame. you're gonna have to open that thing up midday to keep from cooking your seeds!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 04, 2014, 05:32:45 PM
Oh yea. I was looking at morticai's green yard and I got a little antsy, so I build a cold frame hot box this weekend.
It is a little overbuilt ::), but hey, I did not have to buy anything to make it.

Seeded in some greens, cilantro, a few carrots and beets chucked in.




(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo062_zps365fa670.jpg)



I ordered some new potato seed last week.

Thinking of expanding the "orchard"...giving another attempt at hugelculture...and perhaps caving and buying some actual soil.  I should probably try and grow and make that salsa roja they sell in bulk at the store.  Man I can go through that stuff!

Cheers to spring.

Sweet looking Grow Box!  8)

Another thing now on my list of projects.  ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 04, 2014, 06:02:02 PM
Ahhh. This would do for herbs in the winter I think. And a head start with the peppers and tomatoes.

Overbuilt? I say quality and craftsmanship took place.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 04, 2014, 06:36:31 PM
I'm excited to finally start a garden this year!

Too bad I'm like udubdawg and it's freezing cold with snow on the ground. But we are trying to encourage spring to come. We bought a lawnmower and started planning out the layout of the backyard/garden/orchard. C'mon spring!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 04, 2014, 07:04:07 PM
nice looking cold frame. you're gonna have to open that thing up midday to keep from cooking your seeds!

He just needs a temp controller and a fan.   :D

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 05, 2014, 01:55:46 AM
Bummed that its 4 degrees F in March but generally psyched about this year. I will get my soil tested for the first time, should have done that years ago, and am going to remineralize it. On the other hand my bees didn't make it so Will be buying two packages this year. Started leek and celeriac seedlings 1.5 weeks ago. Leeks are mostly sprouted. Going to start a couple new hops vines, which will make 5. So far in central mass most luck with cascade and galena. Willamette surviving but not thriving, bad luck with hallertau :(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 05, 2014, 01:57:26 AM
Bummed that its 4 degrees F in March but generally psyched about this year. I will get my soil tested for the first time, should have done that years ago, and am going to remineralize it. On the other hand my bees didn't make it so Will be buying two packages this year. Started leek and celeriac seedlings 1.5 weeks ago. Leeks are mostly sprouted. Going to start a couple new hops vines, which will make 5. So far in central mass most luck with cascade and galena. Willamette surviving but not thriving, bad luck with hallertau :(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 05, 2014, 01:51:04 PM
Heading to HD to pick up materials for the wife's new greenhouse. Going to be 12x12 with a gambrel roof, polycarbonate panels. She's stoked. I get a new compound miter saw out of the deal. Maybe a tomato or two
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: brewmichigan on March 05, 2014, 02:19:25 PM
I've decided I'm going to take it easy this year and only buy plants and not start from seed. I get too busy and forget to water or transplant so they aren't as healthy as I would like come may. I also have 3 feet of snow over my garden right now so it'll be a little bit before I plant.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on March 05, 2014, 02:46:15 PM
Heading to HD to pick up materials for the wife's new greenhouse. Going to be 12x12 with a gambrel roof, polycarbonate panels. She's stoked. I get a new compound miter saw out of the deal. Maybe a tomato or two

Jim, checkout wranglerstar on YouTube. He has a great series of videos on building a greenhouse.

Edit - Here is a link to the playlist --- http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu9l40IymKw_o62bLf6kkAiEVqRBKy03u
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 05, 2014, 06:45:07 PM
Too late. I'm committed but thanks
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 06, 2014, 07:14:45 PM
Sweet Steve,  I am going to check out those green house vids.  I have been collecting glass for years.

Klickitat. You are going to have to post up some pics of that new greenhouse..err maybe that saw with the greenhouse in the background. :D



Ahhh. This would do for herbs in the winter I think. And a head start with the peppers and tomatoes.

Thanks.  I was thinking about starting potted plants like herbs and such as well.
I made that box so she will stand up as well and has a shelf. ;) Little less surface area for growing, but I like the upright style.
Depending on how the trials go, I might stand it up in spring for potted plants, and then lay it down and fill with soil to go through the winter.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/Photo061_zps39f069af.jpg)





Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 06, 2014, 07:21:23 PM
Yes, no photos? It didn't happen
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 06, 2014, 11:34:56 PM
I've decided I'm going to take it easy this year and only buy plants and not start from seed. I get too busy and forget to water or transplant so they aren't as healthy as I would like come may. I also have 3 feet of snow over my garden right now so it'll be a little bit before I plant.

I'm in the same boat. I have no south-facing windows in my house so getting seedlings going is a PITA. Plus, I can't really harden them off properly because of my work schedule. Ordered a few plants from Cooks Garden already and may snap up a few more online. But the bulk of the plants will come from local nurseries this year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on March 08, 2014, 09:03:10 PM
(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/09/ajy5uvaq.jpg)

Just planted my veggies and herbs.

We live in an apartment with horrible sun on the balcony, so I had to get creative with a bit of space near our garage. Planters are based on the global bucket which is an earth box style self watering planter. www.globalbuckets.org

There are plenty of videos on YouTube that show how to build them. Some call for net pots used for aquatic plants, but I didn't feel like tracking them down and used red keg cups with 8 razor slits cut vertically.

Built the first two in August or September last year when my balcony plants failed event though I moved them to a better spot. Basil took off like crazy and tomatoes didn't quite have enough time to fruit well. What fruit I did get was discovered by the birds before I could get to them.

I used white food grade buckets last year and decided to use the orange homer buckets this year. No real reason other than the Home Depot by me doesn't sell five gallon food grade and I didn't care enough to try to source them from a bakery or grocery store.

I built simple boxes to make them more attractive and to prevent the apartment managers from getting pissy. I used the cheapest fence boards I could find and Home Depot cut them for free.

We should be past our last frost, but I can always move them into the garage if any fluke storms come through.

I haven't decided on cages or bamboo stakes for the tomatoes. What do others prefer?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 08, 2014, 10:22:28 PM
Stakes as the plant can pull the cage out of the soil as it grows taller. Then it flops over in my experience. A real PITA.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on March 09, 2014, 03:28:00 AM
Another quick question. I have only ever grown large slicing tomatoes, never cherry or grape size. Do I want to pinch suckers as I do with large tomatoes? The point of the small tomatoes is a high yield, not large fruits. I know i don't want to pinch suckers on determinant tomato plants, this cherry is indeterminate.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 09, 2014, 05:17:22 AM
That is a great question. One I'd like to know the answer to as well.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 13, 2014, 02:06:55 AM
Got the greenhouse started. Will be building the gambrel rafters tomorrow (http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/13/raryzy6e.jpg)(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/13/patasuru.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2014, 03:19:40 AM
looking good jim. winter tomatoes?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 13, 2014, 04:56:08 AM
I think my bride is hoping for that. My job is just to build it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on March 13, 2014, 04:58:04 AM
Man Jim, you have a hell of a life up there. I need to live in the Pacific Northwest.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 13, 2014, 05:36:10 AM
Thanks. Its great over here on the east side of the cascades. Four seasons and a third the rain of the wet side. While I was building I had about 40 mule deer in the wheat south of me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 13, 2014, 01:04:32 PM
I'm waiting for the finished structure but looks interesting. Wondering if I can adapt one of my raised beds for winter and still have my tomatoes and peppers.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kramerog on March 13, 2014, 01:50:34 PM
I'm waiting for the finished structure but looks interesting. Wondering if I can adapt one of my raised beds for winter and still have my tomatoes and peppers.

I think you could do a hoop house out of PVC pipe for a raised bed.  I've built one but have yet to use it.  Probably will plant stuff in it in early April (1 month before typical last frost).
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 13, 2014, 02:07:07 PM
That is an excellent Idea! Then cover with painter's plastic. I think I could grow toms year round with a little protection from the wind and cold-snaps. I lit fires next to them in Jan 2013 and they survived all but the worst Ms Nature could send their way. I bet Jim's greenhouse will produce awesome veggies.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 13, 2014, 02:10:58 PM
That is an excellent Idea! Then cover with painter's plastic. I think I could grow toms year round with a little protection from the wind and cold-snaps. I lit fires next to them in Jan 2013 and they survived all but the worst Ms Nature could send their way. I bet Jim's greenhouse will produce awesome veggies.

I bet if you incorporate some 5-10 gallon plastic water cans painted black inside the structure they would heat up enough during the day to moderate low temps at night.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 13, 2014, 02:39:23 PM
Filled with a salt-brine! I bet my peppers would flourish and fruit. Man that is a good idea. I could use the jerry-cans breiss extract comes in.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 14, 2014, 01:10:28 AM
I'm lazy today. Got half of the rafters built then a keg of 80/- started calling my name.
(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/14/umunusyd.jpg)(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/14/sabymu4a.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 14, 2014, 11:50:20 AM
Priorities Jim, priorities!  ;)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 14, 2014, 12:15:08 PM
That 80/ looks nice, Jim. And the early greenhouse too !
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 14, 2014, 04:46:17 PM
Must be rough, Jim!  ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 14, 2014, 05:10:43 PM
So you made a jig to produce the trusses? Nice. I bet you can make them really quick and uniform that way.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 15, 2014, 01:40:24 AM
Ya it's the only way to go. I mainly want the exact width and center point of peak. The jig makes that happen. It helps to do a true gambrel too, if you make all your cuts at 22.5° all you need to know is the length. Fortunately there are some great online calculators available. I got a few rafters up today. Fighting wind so I left some for another day.
(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/15/2e7edysa.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 21, 2014, 01:06:12 AM
Good hell Klickitat, that structure is a thing of beauty. 

Cheers to Spring everyone.  I see my garlic is up.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 21, 2014, 01:37:07 AM
Thanks, I got the framing done today. Ignore those 2x4s sticking straight up, their temp support till I get the sheets on.(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/21/gubypajy.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 21, 2014, 01:48:12 AM
I've wanted to use those concrete blocks to build a non connected deck.

Nice work.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 21, 2014, 03:08:34 AM
I used concrete blocks with adjustable brackets for my deck. Worked good
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on March 21, 2014, 07:15:34 AM
Looking great Jim, that's some serious construction you've got going on there.

I've used those blocks for a few projects, they're very handy.  I just used them for a wood shed I added on to my shed shed, although that project is on hold until the weather is dry and I can put a roof on it.  i used them for some stairs down from our deck a couple of years ago too.  Good stuff.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 21, 2014, 04:31:03 PM
Lookin' good Jim!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on March 21, 2014, 04:35:06 PM
Very nice work Jim. I'm a firm believer in tha "you reap what you sow". That should make for a great grow house!  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 21, 2014, 04:37:29 PM
Very nice work Jim. I'm a firm believer in tha "you reap what you sow". That should make for a great grow house!  :)

+1.  Yep. Looks awesome - using the jig is key.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 26, 2014, 12:01:47 PM
Spotty germination in my cold frame.  I had to go out of town and the water gal may not be as excited or diligent as I  ::).

I put a spare ferminator strip in there to monitor temps/ You know there is a home-brewer around when...




How is your project looking Klickitat?  Have your glass up?

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 03, 2014, 12:57:47 AM
Broccoli seedpods? Like little edamame perhaps? Wondering how to prepare them as there are plenty.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-H3ghjQ4-AVQ/UzyWvmkL-SI/AAAAAAAAA3g/8LZ5xndUsGA/w326-h579-no/20140402_175558.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 03, 2014, 01:12:09 AM
Greenhouse coming along slowly. Hard to find non rain non wind time to build lately. My only complaint so far is cutting that clear plastic. Heat gun and jigsaw works best but it ain't easy to do a clean cut. (http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/04/03/ezudemu9.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 03, 2014, 03:54:47 AM
Broccoli seedpods? Like little edamame perhaps? Wondering how to prepare them as there are plenty.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-H3ghjQ4-AVQ/UzyWvmkL-SI/AAAAAAAAA3g/8LZ5xndUsGA/w326-h579-no/20140402_175558.jpg)

Interesting - I've never seen them go to seed like that. I'm thinking the younger the pod, the better. I'd probably treat them like a snow pea, but expect them to taste more like broccoli. I'm thinking stir fry would be my first recipe. If they're not tough, maybe toss them in some mac & cheese?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 03, 2014, 04:32:43 AM
while they are tender I just eat them raw in salad.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 03, 2014, 01:39:00 PM
I better jump on it then. I crunched one up yesterday and it was sweet and green tasting and obviously from broccoli. Not getting any more tender that is for sure!

Thinking of blanching in heavily salted water, then shocking in ice water. Perhaps pickling some also in a spicy brine?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 03, 2014, 02:37:11 PM
sounds tasty
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 04, 2014, 12:52:43 AM
sounds tasty

Well they ain't. :(

I harvested about 12oz of the seedpods. That's quite a few. I blanched 4oz in boiling salted water like edamame. And they are really similar to the beloved pod but just too fibrous to crunch them up; the pods will split but the yield is measly for all the effort. The "beans?" were sweet, and vegetally reminiscent of broccoli.  Overall, an unpleasant experience but educational.

The really small ones were tender and perfect. I will remember that. Harvest much much sooner...

I had one of Dave's brett biers while harvesting the pods. Tropical citrus and cherry. Pleasant in the warm evening sun.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-nSGEmq9wIFg/Uz30y3utE6I/AAAAAAAAA4I/kMuPF6OOQXU/w326-h579-no/20140403_175850.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 04, 2014, 02:16:35 AM
my favorite are daikon radish seed pods. they can get quite large and still be tender. they taste like radishes!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 12, 2014, 05:31:06 PM
Done finally. Finished it off with a Martin condo. Bad angle on the sun, the bird house is green. Looks black in the photo. Now its time to brew.(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/04/13/puru8a4a.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 12, 2014, 06:01:20 PM
Very spacious! Great job!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 12, 2014, 07:00:12 PM
Thanks. Wife is thrilled. She gave me a new roll away tool box as a thank you, and thumbs up to get whatever tools I need.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on April 12, 2014, 07:19:31 PM

...thumbs up to get whatever tools I need.

All of them. The correct answer is all of them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: tschmidlin on April 14, 2014, 06:01:09 AM

...thumbs up to get whatever tools I need.

All of them. The correct answer is all of them.
;D

That looks awesome Jim, great work.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 14, 2014, 11:07:27 AM
Thanks
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on April 14, 2014, 12:05:52 PM
Man, that's a helluva nice build, Jim.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: udubdawg on April 14, 2014, 12:19:13 PM
growing stuff in the Midwest is exasperating.
80F at 2pm yesterday, everything growing like crazy.
currently 30F and an inch of snow on the ground.  Definite hard freeze tonight.

hopefully this is the last one of these of the spring.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: garc_mall on April 14, 2014, 06:29:24 PM

...thumbs up to get whatever tools I need.

All of them. The correct answer is all of them.

I always thought the correct answer was one more.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on April 14, 2014, 06:55:06 PM

...thumbs up to get whatever tools I need.

All of them. The correct answer is all of them.

I always thought the correct answer was one more.

My wife suggested I open a Hardware store as that would be cheaper than my current shop.  8^)

And the correct answer for what should be in the shop is "All of them" in my opinion.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on April 14, 2014, 06:58:18 PM
Another +1 to "all of them".  Funny thing is, my wife has the same policy on buying shoes. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Jeff M on April 14, 2014, 07:09:46 PM
Wow nice Greenhouse Jim, Got a parts list and schematics?:D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 14, 2014, 10:53:32 PM
Wow nice Greenhouse Jim, Got a parts list and schematics?:D

No plans, all in my head. All 2x4s. Some roofing. Couple sheets 7/16" OSB, bunch of screws, some good glue for gussets. Rafter cuts are all 22.5°. Google gambrel rafter calculator for your span dimensions.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: el_capitan on April 15, 2014, 02:42:35 AM
growing stuff in the Midwest is exasperating.
80F at 2pm yesterday, everything growing like crazy.
currently 30F and an inch of snow on the ground.  Definite hard freeze tonight.

hopefully this is the last one of these of the spring.

Amen to that!  We've started a ton of seedlings inside, and I spent most of last weekend adding a 3rd tier to both of our light stands, along with a tip-top DIY germination mat.  Once the weather settles down a bit we'll be hardening off and putting some really nice plants in the ground.  I'm pretty pumped about it.

We bought a couple soil block makers this year, which is working out really well. 

I'm currently only on page 7 of this thread - I've been spinning my wheels over on the NB forum when I obviously should have made the switch when the AHA forum booted up.  Now I'm playing catch-up.

Mort got me all sidetracked with Sepp Holzer and hugelkultur!  I'll post some pics of my intensive indoor grow-rig here in the next week. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: el_capitan on April 16, 2014, 11:27:18 PM
This year my wife has gotten more involved, which has helped us really step things up in the seedling department.  Here's what's up.

Wide shot - Two 3-tier plant stands with grow lights, and DIY germination mats up on top.
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4154_zpsc8b83f1b.jpg?t=1397666137)

Mixed flats with kohlrabi, cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, & kale.  I built the 3-sided wooden trays a couple weeks ago.  Scrap electrical wire for the handles. 
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4143_zpsb3d21b2b.jpg?t=1397666150)

(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4144_zpscfac2ed2.jpg?t=1397666154)

Cabbage in soil blocks.
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4149_zps1e48416e.jpg?t=1397666158)

Peas are going nuts!
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4151_zpsac28d06f.jpg?t=1397666163)

Peas & Bunching Onions (sown 12 per block).
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4153_zpsfd86926a.jpg?t=1397666169)

DIY Germination Mat (make sure your rope lights are incandescent, not LED.)
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4159_zps23269955.jpg?t=1397666176)

Sweet Potatoes and some lettuce just for fun.
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4162_zps46158771.jpg?t=1397666186)




Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 17, 2014, 01:07:05 AM
Wow! I really like that setup! Inspirational actually...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: udubdawg on April 17, 2014, 06:06:53 PM
Wide shot - Two 3-tier plant stands with grow lights, and DIY germination mats up on top.
(http://i391.photobucket.com/albums/oo360/Shifty_Willis/IMG_4154_zpsc8b83f1b.jpg?t=1397666137)


really nice setup.  Something similar took over my dining room and portions of my basement during the neverending winter of 2013...I'll probably do it again next year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 26, 2014, 07:58:43 PM
1st harvest of the year. Going to get down below freezing next couple nights thought I had
better get these yummy things ready for the dinner table.

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Asparagus2014_zpsd07601dd.jpg)

Euge....glad to see this...
I had one of Dave's brett biers while harvesting the pods. Tropical citrus and cherry. Pleasant in the warm evening sun.
That cask was vinegar and is now gone, better enjoy it cause there aint no mo.... 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 26, 2014, 08:34:22 PM
I'd eat the beck outta those asparagus!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 29, 2014, 02:07:32 AM
Woo hoo! We have new tenants in the greenhouse birdhouse. A few pairs of Western Bluebirds
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 29, 2014, 11:50:18 AM
Planted snow peas, sugar snap peas, beets, lettuces, spinach, leeks, kohlrabi this past weekend.  Asparagus are coming on like spring madness.

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-04/925937FF-8CA0-4AD4-B7C6-CEB2781F41EB_zpsyv4bhjxv.jpg) (http://s276.photobucket.com/user/redbeerman/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-04/925937FF-8CA0-4AD4-B7C6-CEB2781F41EB_zpsyv4bhjxv.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 29, 2014, 12:14:13 PM
It's been a long winter and I have the jones to get out in the garden worse than usual. You guys certainly aren't helping :)

I did get my onion plants in last week, so I guess the garden is officially underway for the season. But I won't feel like I'm really started until I can plant my peas and root veggies in the next week or so. Right now I've been coming home from work in the afternoon and walking around my empty garden. It's just not the same.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 29, 2014, 01:21:04 PM
My onions are coming along nicely. A bit small currently, but I think there is too much wood in my soil and it's sucking all the extra nitrogen out despite my application of manure pre-planting.

Haven't planted anything else because my garden is going to transform once again. Bringing in fresh fertile soil and I may expand the growing area as well.

And a drip system. So far the hugelkulture has yet to realize it's full benefits.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on April 29, 2014, 03:42:46 PM
It's been a long winter and I have the jones to get out in the garden worse than usual. You guys certainly aren't helping :)

I did get my onion plants in last week, so I guess the garden is officially underway for the season. But I won't feel like I'm really started until I can plant my peas and root veggies in the next week or so. Right now I've been coming home from work in the afternoon and walking around my empty garden. It's just not the same.
Yes, but that's how you build the vision. Think of it as planning.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 08, 2014, 04:18:19 PM
Frost and SNOW thursday....cold rain tomorra....she is Over.  The mater plants are hung upside down
in the barn....see what we get from there.  Carrots are still ok in the ground for a while longer.
A few little okra and one cherry tomato plant is all that remains...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on September 08, 2014, 04:54:12 PM
Frost and SNOW thursday....cold rain tomorra....she is Over.  The mater plants are hung upside down
in the barn....see what we get from there.  Carrots are still ok in the ground for a while longer.
A few little okra and one cherry tomato plant is all that remains...

The joy of living in the northern tier. Our garden is just starting to really produce some maters. we got them in late because of the barley. Peppers (Fish hot pepper) are doing well. they are variegated, both the leaves and pods. mildly spicey. beans are getting plump for seed. amaranth is almost ready I think (just a couple plants for fun). pumpkins are getting nicely yellow.

thinking about getting broccoli, lettuce and peas in pretty soon here.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on September 08, 2014, 05:05:13 PM
Even with a lot of bugs eating the tomatoes and green beans, we had a great garden this year. Still produced more than we could eat, but would have been nice to have a bigger surplus. However, the second planting of green beans does not look promising. Some bugs have totally eaten the leaves through, just leaving the veins. I'm really sad about it cause this was a variety I had never had. Peppers are still coming in strong as well.

My hops are pretty spectacular this year as well. Got about 2 lbs dried from the Brewer's Gold (2nd yr), and they just smell incredible. New hops these year had great growth with the Crystal bine giving me about 2 oz dried. Pacific Gem, Santium, and Mt. Hood yielded a handful of hops each. Super Alpha is a massive plant, and it is still growing. Side arms are about 5 feet long!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: jeffy on September 08, 2014, 07:08:22 PM
Our avocado tree did really well this year.  We've been eating one or two a day for over a month now and giving some away to appreciative friends and still have at least 15 on the tree.  I just wish the birds or squirrels would stop taking tasting them - I find one on the ground with a little bite out of it almost every day.  Bastards.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: corkybstewart on September 08, 2014, 08:41:02 PM
Our tomatoes made it through the summer heat and are finally starting to produce more than we can eat daily.  That's all I planted this year for food.
My hops have done OK, but a leafhopper infestation took most of the leaves off completely.  They're coming back and I'm seeing lots of new burrs.  I've already gotten about 10 oz's of Cascade(dried) and we still have a couple of months of fall growing season left.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on September 09, 2014, 01:52:47 AM
It was a good year for the garden. We had the soil tested for the first time and remineralized which seemed to be a big boost. Tons of kale up to my chest and cooking and preserving tons of zucchini. Blanched and froze beans and turned the napa cabbage into kimchi. We have green cabbage the size of basketballs and huge leeks, brussels sprouts and parsnips. Also a good year for all kinds of peppers and eggplant. We harvested garlic a couple weeks ago and its huge, tasty and curing well.The onions did decent too. I'm looking forward to a full root cellar and freezer and a winter without grocery stores.
The disappointments this year were late blight on the tomatoes, blight on the potatoes, a weak peach crop due to mold, and varmits getting to my barley. I harvested, dried, and froze a little under a pound each of cascade and galena though. Also, we'll still have enough potatoes and at least we have about 80 plants of sauce tomatoes that we are not totally losing to the blight so we'll can a goodly amount of sauce.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on September 09, 2014, 01:59:14 AM
Our avocado tree did really well this year.  We've been eating one or two a day for over a month now and giving some away to appreciative friends and still have at least 15 on the tree.  I just wish the birds or squirrels would stop taking tasting them - I find one on the ground with a little bite out of it almost every day.  Bastards.
Same problem with chipmunks and tomatoes and beets. If only they would just take one whole one instead of a bite of ten!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on November 03, 2014, 03:14:56 PM
Think I'm going to pull up the tomato cages later on. I got one last tomato yesterday, and a few peppers. Plants are all dead now. Surprisingly, my Brewer's Gold bine had a ton of hops on it, so I picked about 6-7 ozs dried last week. They smelled just incredible. Some of my herbs are still good, although I think I will pick them all and dry those as well. My Super Alpha bine started producing burrs a couple of weeks ago, like a ton of them. It's a real shame that the frost killed them. That really is a bine for the more southern latitudes. May be a good option for growers in the southern portion of the country. I will probably move over the winter, so no garlic planting this year. Need to dig up the hops as well, which I am not looking forward to.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on November 03, 2014, 11:57:36 PM
I noticed when I watered tge greenhouse yeserday that my poblanos are blooming again.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 07, 2014, 05:52:25 PM
Woo, the garden thread laid unattended for the growing season!  Sorry about that.

Glad to hear folks had a good season. 
Still picking the last of the raspberries here.
Liked the Creeper on my Nugget tower.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/a57bd7f8-a262-4728-a6ad-3756e302cc88_zps5bf78c40.jpg)

Time to clean up and get some compost on the show. 
Glad to hear that greenhouse worked out Jim!


Surprisingly, my Brewer's Gold bine had a ton of hops on it, so I picked about 6-7 ozs dried last week. They smelled just incredible.

Interesting!  I have been mulling the use of bine-dried hops for some time.  Let us know how they work out if you use them.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on November 11, 2014, 01:55:28 AM
Pinnah that has to be the living end of your garden now....it is plumb Winter!

Beautiful greenry....Nice   :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 25, 2014, 01:46:45 PM
Whooee vert1, Winter did come, and quickly.  I just managed to get some garlic in ::)
I am way behind, but hey I actually made a starter this morning!

Yesterday I got a seed catalog in the mail.  good grief....but I guess bama and centralcal are planting right now?


I have a couple monster kohlrabi....anybody try to make kohlrabi kimchi? 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on November 25, 2014, 02:43:34 PM
Whooee vert1, Winter did come, and quickly.  I just managed to get some garlic in ::)
I am way behind, but hey I actually made a starter this morning!

Yesterday I got a seed catalog in the mail.  good grief....but I guess bama and centralcal are planting right now?


I have a couple monster kohlrabi....anybody try to make kohlrabi kimchi?

No but I do slice it and pickle it.  Three ways, dill, spicy dill and sweet/hot.  It holds up to pickling quite well and is yummy as well.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on November 25, 2014, 03:12:56 PM
Pinnah, It would be nice to be  planting garden #2 right about now.  At least some
cool weather crops. But that ain't likely at these northern latitudes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 30, 2014, 03:07:46 PM
meh, I am usually a little spent on the garden by this time....you are just dreaming of warmer weather. ;D

Wow the redbeerman has to be the king of putting his garden up...pickled kohlrabi!!  Nice!
I am going to try and learn how to get some saur-kraut and kimchi going this winter.

 Crazy warm here today. I better pack in some compost before "winter" hits.

Cheers all.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2014, 08:16:51 PM
It's always sad to see the frost hit the garden, but that just means a new beginning is coming next spring.  My garden did fairly well this year, including the hops.  Pickled and canned about 3 dozen jars of assorted tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers.  Even made some fresh habanero pepper sauce.  :-X Great stuff! Brewed an awesome Harvest ale with my Magnum and fresh Cascade wet hops this fall.  Used dried home grown Magnum for bittering. Since I'll be busy brewing 500 gallons at a pop at my brewery starting next April, I hope I can coax my wife into planting a few garden veggies next year.

Happy Holidays folks!  8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 11, 2015, 07:00:29 PM
Another year in the Garden?
What are you folks dreaming about growing this year?



I am going to try and get a bunch of beets to store for winter.
I really like the yellow ones and the Cylindra reds...but I usually only plant enough for summer consumption.
Does anyone store beets through the winter?

And pickling cukes....want to make my own gherkins this year.  Yum.

I noticed yesterday that the garlic is sprouting. 
Also have some spinach and lettuces up in the hot box.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 11, 2015, 07:40:47 PM
Last year was my first year of gardening. I learned a lot last year, namely don't plant what you don't eat! Seems like a simple concept, but it was lost on me when we went to the nursery. Preeeeeety plaaaants...  ::)

This year, I'm starting a few things from seeds (just got the little guys started last night) and the rest I'll buy from the local nursery. Looks like we're in for:
-Garlic (planted last year)
-Leeks (started)
-Red bell peppers (started)
-Mini bell peppers (started)
-Poblanos (started)
-Romas
-Spinach
-Mixed lettuce
-Carrots
-Butternut squash
-Cantaloupe
-Peas
-Pole beans
-Onions
-Shallots
-Sweet potatoes
-Various hot peppers
-Various herbs

I gotta work on the garden expansion soon. Going from 3 raised beds with 80SF of space to 6 raised beds with 184SF of space. Much excite! I also now have a pressure canner, so I can put up the things I don't consume immediately. I'm really looking forward to the growing season.  8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 11, 2015, 07:43:30 PM
Another year in the Garden?
What are you folks dreaming about growing this year?



I am going to try and get a bunch of beets to store for winter.
I really like the yellow ones and the Cylindra reds...but I usually only plant enough for summer consumption.
Does anyone store beets through the winter?

And pickling cukes....want to make my own gherkins this year.  Yum.

I noticed yesterday that the garlic is sprouting. 
Also have some spinach and lettuces up in the hot box.
Another long winter here. Sometimes spinach, lettuce, peas etc. go in the week of St. Pat's day. This year there's still 3-4 ft snow in the garden. We plant 175-200 garlic cloves every fall so that we have enough for the year plus seed, I can't wait until that's up: that's the beginning of spring to me.
We do store beets for the winter. This year I plan on doing a better job growing beets and carrots. I built a root cellar in one corner of my cellar. I have a wood stove in the cellar so I needed to make a separate area. Its essentially a small insulated room with a dryer hose going outside to bring in cold air. Its about 45 degrees most of the winter. Garlic onions and shallots are stored in open paper bags as they like it cool and dry, potatoes, beets, carrots, and parsnips go in 5 gal buckets with lid to keep in the humidity. I have also used sand and peat moss but find I like the plain buckets. I like that the root vegetables stay alive.

Hard to believe this:
(http://i1060.photobucket.com/albums/t450/peterbaker8/008_zpsqsfp3awn.jpg)
Will become this:
(http://i1060.photobucket.com/albums/t450/peterbaker8/010_zpsb5596a68.jpg)
And this:

(http://i1060.photobucket.com/albums/t450/peterbaker8/012_zpssrv4szfk.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 11, 2015, 07:49:42 PM
Last year was my first year of gardening. I learned a lot last year, namely don't plant what you don't eat! Seems like a simple concept, but it was lost on me when we went to the nursery. Preeeeeety plaaaants...  ::)

This year, I'm starting a few things from seeds (just got the little guys started last night) and the rest I'll buy from the local nursery. Looks like we're in for:
-Garlic (planted last year)
-Leeks (started)
-Red bell peppers (started)
-Mini bell peppers (started)
-Poblanos (started)
-Romas
-Spinach
-Mixed lettuce
-Carrots
-Butternut squash
-Cantaloupe
-Peas
-Pole beans
-Onions
-Shallots
-Sweet potatoes
-Various hot peppers
-Various herbs

I gotta work on the garden expansion soon. Going from 3 raised beds with 80SF of space to 6 raised beds with 184SF of space. Much excite! I also now have a pressure canner, so I can put up the things I don't consume immediately. I'm really looking forward to the growing season.  8)
Good choices on what to start from seed. We can's help ourselves and are ever expanding. Our main garden is pushing 4,000 sq feet plus a separate 400 sq ft, 1,000+ sq ft of barley, plus a bigger and bigger orchard. Plus perennial herb garden, annual herb garden, plus hops yard. Someone really needs to stop me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 11, 2015, 08:03:41 PM
Good choices on what to start from seed. We can's help ourselves and are ever expanding. Our main garden is pushing 4,000 sq feet plus a separate 400 sq ft, 1,000+ sq ft of barley, plus a bigger and bigger orchard. Plus perennial herb garden, annual herb garden, plus hops yard. Someone really needs to stop me.

Dang, pete! ;D I also forgot about the mini-orchard. We have 4 apple trees coming in a few weeks. Honeycrisp, Jonathan, Dabinett, & Kingston Black. Pretty excited about those.

So what do you keep in your perennial herb garden? I've had trouble keeping things alive over the winter and I'm much farther south than you. I tried to keep rosemary and thyme on the deck over winter, but that didn't last too far into December.  :-\

When are you planting your carrots? I feel like I didn't get enough growing time in with mine last year. I just ended up eating tiny carrots - I was too impatient!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 11, 2015, 08:20:55 PM
Good choices on what to start from seed. We can's help ourselves and are ever expanding. Our main garden is pushing 4,000 sq feet plus a separate 400 sq ft, 1,000+ sq ft of barley, plus a bigger and bigger orchard. Plus perennial herb garden, annual herb garden, plus hops yard. Someone really needs to stop me.

Dang, pete! ;D I also forgot about the mini-orchard. We have 4 apple trees coming in a few weeks. Honeycrisp, Jonathan, Dabinett, & Kingston Black. Pretty excited about those.

So what do you keep in your perennial herb garden? I've had trouble keeping things alive over the winter and I'm much farther south than you. I tried to keep rosemary and thyme on the deck over winter, but that didn't last too far into December.  :-\

When are you planting your carrots? I feel like I didn't get enough growing time in with mine last year. I just ended up eating tiny carrots - I was too impatient!
The perennial garden has things like mints, chives, lemon balm, and sage. It also has medicinals like yarrow and Echinacea and some bee balm as well as a little ornamental plum tree, cool rocks, and a big stone head of shiva. Its an overgrown riot of blossoms, bees, and butterflies. We also have thyme and oregano survive the winter somewhere else.  Rosemary doesn't make it, we've tried brining it in but to no avail. I think you need to get the right kind of thyme.
We start carrots as soon as the ground is workable which will probably be early april here. We sow seeds 2 or 3 times over a few weeks to make sure. The trick with carrots is getting them ahead of the weeds. Last year we got a big roll of burlap and after sowing covered the rows and kept it damp. This kept them uniformly moist, kept down weeds, and protected from frost. Once they come up remove the burlap and you have a weed free row to start. We actually found you need to seed lightly with this method because germination is close to 100%. From there weed and thin, weed and thin. Eat the babies as you thin. Nantes is an easy and fairly uniform variety.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 11, 2015, 08:35:53 PM
The major advantage of raised beds is the "no weeding" part. :D Looks like I'll be putting in carrots in the next week or so based in your schedule.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 11, 2015, 10:48:34 PM
Garlic shoots!!! :D
(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/03/11/8a00475b73e1a8df8240d81cf4485d01.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 11, 2015, 11:05:55 PM
Yay!! Give them lots of nitrogen until you harvest the scapes. Blood meal is great.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 12, 2015, 12:21:22 AM
Excellent!     Gardening 2015


Hard to believe this:
(http://i1060.photobucket.com/albums/t450/peterbaker8/008_zpsqsfp3awn.jpg)


Will become this:
(http://i1060.photobucket.com/albums/t450/peterbaker8/010_zpsb5596a68.jpg)



Awesome.......Yes!..glad you figured out pic posting. :)




I'm really looking forward to the growing season.

! another Redbird house project! 8)

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 12, 2015, 01:05:50 PM
Don't know if I'm going to get a garden in this year. Lot's of stuff on the list first. The garden I left in California is probably doing well about now, assuming the chickens haven't eaten everything.

This year is about getting land, figuring out where everything is going to go (house, garden, etc.) and making a start on it. next year will be gardening time. Maybe a food forest.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 12, 2015, 01:29:07 PM
The major advantage of raised beds is the "no weeding" part. :D Looks like I'll be putting in carrots in the next week or so based in your schedule.

I put mine in Late April early May last year, and didn't harvest till the week a frost was expected in October. We had a bonanza of carrots last year. Big uniform size. So so so tasty.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 12, 2015, 01:55:46 PM


What a great list Amanda! Mine is pretty similar.

I would love to grow leeks. Next year, I think I will make a raised bed with very sandy soil just for leeks. I've had no success with sweet potatoes. Just really pretty vines that spread everywhere. I've been told that you need to put down black plastic over the bed to generate a ton of heat to get them to really produce.

Pinnah: I thought I planted beets last year, but when I went to harvest them, it was carrots. I'm planning on it this year. Borscht is one of our favorite meals. Beets roasted with seasame oil and a ton of garlic is pretty dang good too.

Our garden is going to be huge this year.  :D

Lots of rasberries, gooseberries, elderberries, and blackberries to purchase and plant. My list for things to plant this year includes:
Rhubarb
tomatoes
various greens
various herbs
Need to plant garlic in the fall
peas
green beans
beets
carrots
hot peppers
sweet peppers
fingerling potatoes


Gonna put in about 1000 sq feet of wildflowers. Acreage is gonna get  spring green manure Johnny's with some oilseed radish, followed by the fall green manure and a grain of some sort.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 13, 2015, 03:16:58 AM
This year is about getting land, figuring out where everything is going to go (house, garden, etc.) and making a start on it. next year will be gardening time. Maybe a food forest.

Wow, congratulations man. A new start
with all that west coast learnin.


Carrot are probably my favorite.
My main problem with them is getting them to germinate and not dry out
so your burlap idea intrigues me Pete...do you keep it mashed flush with the ground surface?

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 13, 2015, 12:10:33 PM
Yea. The local farmers co-op sells 50' rolls cheap. I cut it in 1/2 the long way an then fold it so there is a double layer and put it on a freshly sowed row. It solves the problem of carrots being not so great germinators by keeping them moist and the problem of carrots not competing well with weeds by giving them a head start. Take it up as soon as the plants poke through. Don't seed as heavily as normal because of the high germination rate
. Last year we couldn't keep up with thinning using this method. This year we'll mix the seeds with dirt to thin them out.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 13, 2015, 02:59:06 PM
Pinnah, you could always start the seeds in a soil blocks and then transplant.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 14, 2015, 02:26:49 AM
Pinnah, you could always start the seeds in a soil blocks and then transplant.
Tap-rooted vegetables like carrots generally don't transplant well. And its a lot more work.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 16, 2015, 04:12:44 PM
Well some times you have to go to great lengths with a garden to get some things to grow, it depends on your desire and length growing season.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 16, 2015, 10:41:43 PM
I'm more than doubling the size of the garden this year. Added a couple citrus trees and an arbequina type olive sapling.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 17, 2015, 12:57:47 AM
I'm more than doubling the size of the garden this year. Added a couple citrus trees and an arbequina type olive sapling.
Hey, same here! Just started tonight after work. Adding 4 more beds and 4 apple trees while taking out on useless tree. It was nearly 80 today! I can barely believe how beautiful it is here, but I'm taking advantage of it.

Stage 1: started! :D

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/03/16/10d89ea779f95e0a40410ad6f602010b.jpg)

And good to see you back euge!!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 17, 2015, 01:03:52 PM
Well hell yea Euge!  Very cool to see you back here in the Garden Thread.
Hope all is well; like the new look.

Wow Amanda...you have oodles of space there!  Your mini orchard could turn into a regular orchard preety quick.  Are you sourcing your apple trees locally?  I have had some pretty poor luck ordering trees through the mail...they always seem to be spindly sticks that take forever to get cracking.

Boulder!  You still have any time to garden?  Owning a brewery might be cutting into you food preservation time?

I finally cut down all my residual hop plants.  Wow the smell of shattering lupulin was amazing in March.
Planted a few rows of carrots, lettuce, spinach, bok choy chard and a few early beets.
Have not tried the burlap yet...but if it gets much hotter I might.  Record heat here today.
It sure is nice, but we will pay for it later in the water year.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: reverseapachemaster on March 17, 2015, 02:17:35 PM
This year my vegetable/fruit garden is mostly peppers. I overwintered a thai bird's eye chile plant in the house that will be replanted outdoors soon. I ordered my usual jalapeno and hatch chiles for this year. I'm also ordering a white habanero. I'm not sure what I am going to do with all those habaneros but I'll figure something out. I have spring onions back outside after overwintering. I am going to give tomatoes their last attempt this year. I have a handful of herbs and my hops still going from prior years. I am also giving ground cherries an attempt this year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 17, 2015, 02:43:13 PM
Well hell yea Euge!  Very cool to see you back here in the Garden Thread.
Hope all is well; like the new look.

Wow Amanda...you have oodles of space there!  Your mini orchard could turn into a regular orchard preety quick.  Are you sourcing your apple trees locally?  I have had some pretty poor luck ordering trees through the mail...they always seem to be spindly sticks that take forever to get cracking.

Boulder!  You still have any time to garden?  Owning a brewery might be cutting into you food preservation time?

I finally cut down all my residual hop plants.  Wow the smell of shattering lupulin was amazing in March.
Planted a few rows of carrots, lettuce, spinach, bok choy chard and a few early beets.
Have not tried the burlap yet...but if it gets much hotter I might.  Record heat here today.
It sure is nice, but we will pay for it later in the water year.

 Last fall I was so busy I didn't know one end from the other, this year I hope to have more time. If I can find a couple decent helpers at the brewery and keep ahead of demand.

 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 17, 2015, 02:44:30 PM
I'm more than doubling the size of the garden this year. Added a couple citrus trees and an arbequina type olive sapling.

Wow! That should keep you busy.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: BrewBama on March 18, 2015, 12:04:22 AM
We're planning:

Sweet Onions
Tomatoes
Pole beans
Cucumbers
Zucchini
Yellow squash
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on March 19, 2015, 05:21:01 AM
I KNOW its too darn early here in BFE whyomin, but dang you guys have gotten me stirred up
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 19, 2015, 02:09:36 PM
Dave it's been especially rainy here but everyone rushes outside in the dry breaks and are getting things ready for the garden and mowing their lawns. I need to get my seeds started if it isn't already too late. Spring has sprung here in Central Texas.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on March 20, 2015, 05:39:20 AM
Dave it's been especially rainy here but everyone rushes outside in the dry breaks and are getting things ready for the garden and mowing their lawns. I need to get my seeds started if it isn't already too late. Spring has sprung here in Central Texas.
Wow, I was looking at importing some stone crab claws....it is that time of the year you know....
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on March 22, 2015, 01:27:25 AM
Dave it's been especially rainy here but everyone rushes outside in the dry breaks and are getting things ready for the garden and mowing their lawns. I need to get my seeds started if it isn't already too late. Spring has sprung here in Central Texas.

We can see small patches of dead grass and the trumpeter swans are here on their way back to the Arctic so I will agree, "spring" is here.  Now we just need another month before we can actually plant something...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 22, 2015, 05:12:14 PM
It flooded in the back again and the pump worked 12 hours to get the bulk of it out. The ground is so saturated it is the consistency of say, cheesecake. I'm not walking in the yard until it dries up a bit. >:(
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: jeffy on March 22, 2015, 06:34:17 PM
Dave it's been especially rainy here but everyone rushes outside in the dry breaks and are getting things ready for the garden and mowing their lawns. I need to get my seeds started if it isn't already too late. Spring has sprung here in Central Texas.
Wow, I was looking at importing some stone crab claws....it is that time of the year you know....
A local brewery is making a stone crab claw stout today.  They mentioned something about mustard sauce, but I am not sure when they add that.  The crab claws went into the boil.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: BrewBama on March 22, 2015, 07:10:15 PM
Started getting the beds ready yesterday. Amending the soil, moving stuff where we want it, etc. Spring has sprung in N AL.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 22, 2015, 07:59:31 PM
Ordered 59 berry plants. They will be delivered in late April. Planned out the beds. I don't think we will be doing any potatoes this year, which is a bummer. Still, looks like this will be a fun spring.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 22, 2015, 08:28:58 PM
kmccaf - love the sound of all those berries. I'll be putting out mostly tomatoes (I love the Beefsteak/slicing type), chiles (serranos, tabasco, habanero) and some squash vatieties. Plus whatever my wife wants. Love Spring.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 22, 2015, 09:17:30 PM
kmccaf - love the sound of all those berries. I'll be putting out mostly tomatoes (I love the Beefsteak/slicing type), chiles (serranos, tabasco, habanero) and some squash vatieties. Plus whatever my wife wants. Love Spring.

Nice!

I'm thinking a poblano and habanero this year, plus a jalapeño. Definitely some beefsteak tomatoes, and some Romas, and some cherry tomatoes. We do at least 8 tomoato plants every year. The garden won't be as big this year, but it won't be small either.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 23, 2015, 03:00:03 PM
(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/03/23/8a34ef6dcc369aae6af75bc5d4ae3f36.jpg)

Got the 4 new raised beds in this weekend. Next up is getting a semipermanent irrigation system installed! Still trying to figure out the design on it through. The beds are about 85' from the nearest water spigot and I don't want to buy an "irrigation kit" since the size of our garden would make it fairly expensive.

We also took out the stupid almond tree and a 20' tall bush in the backyard. The previous owner LOVED planting in what I'm calling "the warning track" around the yard by the fence, and we are slowly ripping out all the random bushes and bulbs. Only have about 150' of warning track left to go!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 23, 2015, 03:46:25 PM
(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/03/23/8a34ef6dcc369aae6af75bc5d4ae3f36.jpg)

Got the 4 new raised beds in this weekend. Next up is getting a semipermanent irrigation system installed! Still trying to figure out the design on it through. The beds are about 85' from the nearest water spigot and I don't want to buy an "irrigation kit" since the size of our garden would make it fairly expensive.

We also took out the stupid almond tree and a 20' tall bush in the backyard. The previous owner LOVED planting in what I'm calling "the warning track" around the yard by the fence, and we are slowly ripping out all the random bushes and bulbs. Only have about 150' of warning track left to go!
Looks great Amanda. I was wondering what you meant by irrigation system. Is it simply that you need access to a hose and don't want to move it every time you mow or do you want something more automated? I think for something that size I would simply attach a multiple hose adapter to the spigot at the house, get a long farm quality hose and cut the sod so you can tuck the hose under. At the garden you can get a stand that this hose would supply at ground level then the stand has a spigot 3 ft off the ground and a place to wrap a hose. In late fall you simply pull the hose from under the sod and store it, you won't even see it either before or after you take up the hose.
Another idea is to put a large tank of some sort on a stand with a spigot on the bottom which feeds drip tape that you have arranged throughout your beds. You fill it once a day and let gravity feed the drip tape. Or you leave a hose going to it and put it on a timer.
If you use the first method you will have to spend the time to hold the hose, but it makes you get out there every day and check for bugs etc. And there is still a hand for a beer.
My goal, which I doubt will happen this year, is to make a little pond fed by the stream behind my house, and get a solar powered pump on a timer to fill a couple tanks to feed drip tape.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 23, 2015, 04:36:51 PM
I was wondering what you meant by irrigation system. Is it simply that you need access to a hose and don't want to move it every time you mow or do you want something more automated?

Both. I have access to a hose and a spigot, but it is at the house which is about 85 LF away from the closest raised bed. Last year we watered with a sprinkler (overhead watering) that we ran on a long hose from the house. Husband had to move it every time he mowed, which led to it not getting put back, which led to me being lazy about watering. Also, overhead watering spread some pepper disease around that nearly had our entire pepper crop demolished. So I'm kind of over the overhead watering thing and eventually I'd like the watering to be done without much input from me - because I forget. And because we go on vacations.

So the goal is to first get a system of soaker hoses that run off of a PVC/LDPE/PE piping system.


My current research is really in system layout (Do I really need to be able to turn off each box? Or just the trees? Or maybe just the herb box? IDK yet.), materials (PEX fittings are awesome, but are not UV friendly, so maybe PVC? maybe polyethlene? maybe just a garden hose and some hose clamps?? I don't plan on burying the box pipes too much if at all so they can't break when stepped on.), and the like.

I have a couple of weeks to figure it out though, so that's good. Suggestions from the peanut gallery?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on March 23, 2015, 04:53:11 PM
YouTube is your friend here Amanda. Loads upon loads of channels for gardening with instructions on how to install irrigation. Personally, I would start with getting a hose bib down near the beds using PVC in a trench. From there you can do just about anything. Irrigation companies make pressure regulators. I would recommend adding after the hose bib and before the beds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 23, 2015, 05:05:01 PM
YouTube is your friend here Amanda. Loads upon loads of channels for gardening with instructions on how to install irrigation.

Yeah... I've done that a few times over the course of the last 6 months or so. I think I found all the bad/annoying/product placement channels. Any recommendations? I don't think I can watch another crappy gardening YT video.  :-\
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on March 23, 2015, 05:25:17 PM
I like Growing Your Greens. The guy is a bit of the stoner hippy type and pretty entertaining. Some of his guests tend to spout conspiracy theories regarding aluminum, Monsanto and chemtrails, but I filter that out.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUnFheTbVpASikm0YPb8pSw (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUnFheTbVpASikm0YPb8pSw)

Lately he has be testing a subsurface watering system, and those videos did seem a little fanboi, but he recently posted one where he was complaining about some of the issues.

This playlist is pretty solid for raised beds. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB85C9A5921497978 (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB85C9A5921497978)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 23, 2015, 06:56:49 PM
Just a clarification: when I say drip tape I'm not talking about the sort of drip hose that uses emitters at certain points. That being said, its probably more appropriate for gardens or fields with rows than raised beds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 23, 2015, 07:06:45 PM
I'm looking for a combo of drippers and soakers but our water is real hard. Not sure how well the drippers will last.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 23, 2015, 07:33:00 PM
I'm looking for a combo of drippers and soakers but our water is real hard. Not sure how well the drippers will last.

Yeah - that's something else I need to consider. :/

At any rate, I'm looking at a website called Drip Depot. They have plenty of stuff to learn from.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 23, 2015, 07:47:02 PM
I'm looking for a combo of drippers and soakers but our water is real hard. Not sure how well the drippers will last.

Yeah - that's something else I need to consider. :/

At any rate, I'm looking at a website called Drip Depot. They have plenty of stuff to learn from.

Just what I was looking for. I think they must have everything.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 23, 2015, 09:04:17 PM
I'm looking for a combo of drippers and soakers but our water is real hard. Not sure how well the drippers will last.

Yeah - that's something else I need to consider. :/

At any rate, I'm looking at a website called Drip Depot. They have plenty of stuff to learn from.

You may want to consider some rain barrels too.  We put out 3 of them last year and typically had more water than we could use.  A 20'x24' roof will fill a 55 gallon barrel from .1" of rain.  It's pretty cool to get 150 gallons of garden water from a light shower.  All kinds of options out there.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 23, 2015, 10:33:57 PM
I've been pricing large water tanks and wish the trigger had been pulled earlier. It floods so bad out back that in a rainy season... Anyway I could have filled several 1000 gallon tanks with what I pumped out over the weekend with twice that to spare. Easily. Pump ran flat out for ten hours. Plan is for a floodwater fed system in times o'plenty.

One of the guys at my old job has irrigation in his raised beds and it was extremely productive despite an extremely harsh and dry Central Texas summer climate. I always have problems at the height of summer. Saving rainwater could help a lot.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 23, 2015, 11:12:04 PM
Rain capture would likely work better for euge than me. a) he gets much more rain(!) and b) I would have to pump it from the house collection point anyway. Good idea though!

I'm pricing out a basic, expandable system at the Drip Depot place.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on March 24, 2015, 04:48:54 AM
Drip irrigation will be a piece of cake for you.
Make sure you have an anti-siphon hose bib or get an valve with a vacuum breaker if you go that route, for backflow protection.  A simple in-line pressure reducer to ~25psi and a filter assembly to prevent clogging of the emitters and your off and running. There really are tons of options depending on your application. I would encourage you to visit an irrigation/landscape specialty shop like Ewing.  Knowledgeable people can show you the range of options you have and you can see and tinker with various components to find the right mix for you.  Good luck, have fun.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 24, 2015, 01:59:41 PM
 I am using one of these at the moment
 (http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/YB7K_zpstlk5wrxs.jpg)

 ::)

It is however, a vintage model called the Colorado Sprinkler...made in Illinois by Nelson.  ;D

Easy irrigation is key! I sure wish I had an automated system.  My irrigation water does not get into the canal until mid April, so all my starting has to get hand watered.


Tried the burlap on carrots Pete.  Got some peas and beets in.
Vert, spotted a lone asparagus spear already....garden location much earlier than wild fare apparently.

Plums and apricot in full bloom.  >:(  Freeze forecasted for tomorrow.


Anyone grow Okra?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 30, 2015, 01:48:06 PM
We grow okra every year.  Had a bumper crop last year.  They like it hot and usually come on like gangbusters late in the growing season.  We pickle most of it and freeze a bunch for soups.  This year I'm thinking about growing a bunch of different cabbages for sauerkraut, now that I have that process down.  Kohlrabi is also great pickled.  Tomatoes, greens, cukes and peppers will round out the garden this year.  Asparagus should start soon too.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 30, 2015, 02:21:58 PM
We just had more snow Saturday and its actually snowing now. Its supposed to get up into the 40's and 50's this week so hopefully the snow will start melting in earnest. We're down to about 2 feet of snow left on the garden but I think two more weeks and it might be gone. I do have spinach and lettuce coming up in the cold frame and it was just barely warm enough yesterday to put two packages of bees in their hives. I can't wait to get to the overwintered parsnips.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 30, 2015, 09:28:26 PM
Just looked at my phone and it's 73F outside today.  Raspberries are starting to sprout and last years canes are leafing out.  Hostas and tulips are peaking out of the ground.  I'm starting to believe it may actually be Spring.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 31, 2015, 01:10:21 AM
Just looked at my phone and it's 73F outside today.  Raspberries are starting to sprout and last years canes are leafing out.  Hostas and tulips are peaking out of the ground.  I'm starting to believe it may actually be Spring.

Paul
hard to believe it but just a couple years ago it was in the seventies here a few times in March. April is two days away and we have barely hit 40 once or twice since before Christmas and there's 2 feet of snow on the ground. We've had First Naked Beer Day earlier than this.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: udubdawg on April 03, 2015, 01:03:54 PM
ya spend hours protecting things from that occasional late freeze...think you've got it beat, RDWHAHB, only to see the plants suffer blunt force trauma from the "0% chance of precip"  ::) large hail. 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on April 03, 2015, 01:06:06 PM
ya spend hours protecting things from that occasional late freeze...think you've got it beat, RDWHAHB, only to see the plants suffer blunt force trauma from the "0% chance of precip"  ::) large hail. 

Yeah, that sucks.  I lost some amazing tomato plants one year to a big hailstorm. And part of my roof as well. Gotta love the Midwest.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 04, 2015, 07:11:11 PM
My onions are starting to flourish. I just planted my persian lime tree. Everything else has bolted. If it stays dry I'm bringing in a bunch of dirt, and building more raised beds... So much to do so little Will to do it...
Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Rattlesnake44 on April 05, 2015, 04:07:59 PM
Starting to get hot here in SoCal so my "winter" veggies are all coming out this week; Swiss chard, rainbow chard, kale, green beans and English peas. Then it'll be time to get in my tomatoes and cucumbers. I'll probably try and do an early harvest of zucchini and summer squash as well. All in raised garden beds I built a year ago. Oh, and I'll be starting my hops in containers this week too, first time growing hops and I'm kinda excited. (http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/04/05/027efbaa043e07787489d6d7b0f1654e.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 07, 2015, 02:03:42 PM
Sweet.  Looking good SoCal...

Well, Pete's burlap over carrot seeds WORKS.
I have good germination under the burlap strip, and none in my adjacent control.
Thanks for the recommendation!

I dug the rest of the parsnips.  They do make a nice flower in the second year, but they like to reseed and take over.  I pretty much like them roasted...Pete, what do you do with yours?

I set up the other garden this weekend. Hauled about 12 yards of compost. Making soil is hard work.
Planted blackberries and potatoes.

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 07, 2015, 03:13:20 PM
Sweet.  Looking good SoCal...

Well, Pete's burlap over carrot seeds WORKS.
I have good germination under the burlap strip, and none in my adjacent control.
Thanks for the recommendation!

I dug the rest of the parsnips.  They do make a nice flower in the second year, but they like to reseed and take over.  I pretty much like them roasted...Pete, what do you do with yours?

I set up the other garden this weekend. Hauled about 12 yards of compost. Making soil is hard work.
Planted blackberries and potatoes.
Great to hear the burlap trick worked. It gives them a great start against weeds too which is really important for carrots.
I just removed the snow from the parsnip area and the ground there should thaw in the next few days. I too like them roasted. They are also great in pureed curry soups. You can mash them and season them and add bread crumbs and egg to make some cakes to pan fry as a side dish. I also came up with a smoked salmon, carrot and parsnip cake: shred carrots and parsnips, salt them and let them sit for a few minutes then put in a cloth and squeeze to remove excess water. I then mix the shredded veg with smoked salmon flaked into bits, a little mayo, lemon, spices, egg and bread crumbs. Pan fry and serve with aioli, cream sauce, or sour cream with dill. If you need proportions look up a crab cake recipe and sub.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 07, 2015, 04:36:44 PM
Bought one of those tightly wrapped rootballs for an Ebony King blackberry. Wanted to plant it along the fence and see what happens. However it looks like blackberries' shoots grow straight up until they topple over. Can they be trained to grow along a fence?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 07, 2015, 06:13:55 PM
Bought one of those tightly wrapped rootballs for an Ebony King blackberry. Wanted to plant it along the fence and see what happens. However it looks like blackberries' shoots grow straight up until they topple over. Can they be trained to grow along a fence?
What works for me is when I prune them I loosely tie them to, in my case a wire, but same principle for a fence. I use twine and give them some slack but make it so they don't fall.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 07, 2015, 06:34:13 PM
Does/can one use cuttings to propagate? 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 07, 2015, 07:07:20 PM
Does/can one use cuttings to propagate?
Not cuttings but new canes with roots can be transplanted. Or at least that's what I have done, maybe you can root cuttings but using new canes is very easy and you can keep your older plants from spreading where you don't want them. Two birds. One stone.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 07, 2015, 09:09:07 PM
You just dig them (new canes) up and transplant then. Great I don't want them taking up much space but more strategically placed.

There is a spot that I might convince the neighbors to contribute in the future where it could be a big patch.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 07, 2015, 10:26:20 PM
You just dig them (new canes) up and transplant then. Great I don't want them taking up much space but more strategically placed.

There is a spot that I might convince the neighbors to contribute in the future where it could be a big patch.
Just don't expect anything the first year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 07, 2015, 11:23:51 PM
You just dig them (new canes) up and transplant then. Great I don't want them taking up much space but more strategically placed.

Seems some blackberries spread underground (especially the thorned varieties?) and some spread by arching their canes and where the cane tips land on the soil, they sprout roots and grow.  This latter strategy is easy to take advantage of to make new plants for planting.  ie bury live cane tips into a nice bed of soil. wait until well rooted.  dig up root ball, snip cane a few internodes up, and walla you have new plant...

the underground spreading variety are more difficult to control IME. They make bad neighbors.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 08, 2015, 12:45:00 AM
Yeah I'm planning on planting it on the side where my neighbors put their invasive plants. ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 08, 2015, 02:14:51 AM
Yeah I'm planning on planting it on the side where my neighbors put their invasive plants. ;D
this is why I don't have neighbors.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 08, 2015, 02:47:13 AM


I'm pricing out a basic, expandable system at the Drip Depot place.

Finished the drip irrigation today after work. Nice system from that place.

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/04/07/26c634699e3de30d36d759facdabd3ed.jpg)

Next step is mulch and then get ready for my cider apple trees.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: scarecrow on April 08, 2015, 10:14:18 AM
Not sure if this is the right thread for this question or not. I have a hops vibe and am growing my own this year.  Once I start to get hops is there anything I need to do before I use them?  Wash, boil, dry or just chuck them into the wort.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on April 08, 2015, 10:25:36 AM
Not sure if this is the right thread for this question or not. I have a hops vibe and am growing my own this year.  Once I start to get hops is there anything I need to do before I use them?  Wash, boil, dry or just chuck them into the wort.
Pick and put in wort. If you're going to store them then pick, dry, bag, and freeze. I dry mine with a fan. Square common box fan facing down resting on a couple saw horses. Then I put a clean new cheap fyrnace fikter on top and pile my hops on that. Turn on fan. Done in about 6-12 hours depending on how wet and your humidity
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 08, 2015, 11:18:14 AM


I'm pricing out a basic, expandable system at the Drip Depot place.

Finished the drip irrigation today after work. Nice system from that place.

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/04/07/26c634699e3de30d36d759facdabd3ed.jpg)

Next step is mulch and then get ready for my cider apple trees.
That's awesome Amanda. I love it when people rip out lawn and put in gardens. Judging from this and your brewery I'll go out on a limb and say you and your husband are not lazy.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 08, 2015, 11:51:56 AM
That's awesome Amanda. I love it when people rip out lawn and put in gardens. Judging from this and your brewery I'll go out on a limb and say you and your husband are not lazy.

Thanks Pete. And while ideally I would like to have plants everywhere... we still have about 9/10 of an acre left of yard, with about 0% chance of that going anywhere, so we aren't making that big of a dent.  ;)

Speaking of not being lazy, I got clearance (and buy in for husband labor - very important!) to pull off a full kitchen reno. Only caveat is that I have to have it finished before August 1st when a handful of my friends visit from across the country. Wish me luck!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 08, 2015, 01:18:35 PM
That's awesome Amanda. I love it when people rip out lawn and put in gardens. Judging from this and your brewery I'll go out on a limb and say you and your husband are not lazy.

Thanks Pete. And while ideally I would like to have plants everywhere... we still have about 9/10 of an acre left of yard, with about 0% chance of that going anywhere, so we aren't making that big of a dent.  ;)

Speaking of not being lazy, I got clearance (and buy in for husband labor - very important!) to pull off a full kitchen reno. Only caveat is that I have to have it finished before August 1st when a handful of my friends visit from across the country. Wish me luck!
Sounds like we are in the same boat. Work started this week on a 12X12 addition to our kitchen which will become the dining area of an open kitchen. I'll be doing the inside work myself: walls, ceiling, floor, cabinets. I'm still undecided if I'll move to kegging and put taps in. It seems dangerous. We had intended on getting this done over the winter but first cold then snow made that not happen so unfortunately getting the garden in and renovating will happen simultaneously. I'm going to try to make some extra homebrew this week so that in a few weeks I will have that as a recruitment incentive to get some help.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 08, 2015, 01:20:18 PM
Jeez. All that looks great Amanda! Wish my motivation had the same drive as yours! Well my old Marine dad always said "a body at rest tends to stay at rest..."
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 08, 2015, 06:11:14 PM
That looks awesome Amada. Glad you found the right irrigation for your garden. What varieties of apples did you go with?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 08, 2015, 07:01:12 PM
That looks awesome Amanda. Glad you found the right irrigation for your garden. What varieties of apples did you go with?

Kingston Black
Dabinett
Jonathan
Honeycrisp

All dwarf root stocks, G41 I believe.

I ordered them from Orange Pippin last year - should be here this week!

We also have a Granny Smith in the "way back" from the previous owners. Outside of a little scald last year, it was a good producer. I'll be more careful this year with watching/spraying it with fungicide now that I'll have 4 reminders in the 'front of the back yard'.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 10, 2015, 02:06:50 AM
Apple trees are here! Very tiny trees for now, and hopefully the super dwarf rootstocks will keep them that way. I also "finished" the irrigation system, but got an idea on how I can add to it to water the blackberries. Dangit self.

Pics:
(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/04/09/bdbd4de05ba74004c5bae8ae1f9bdca8.jpg)

(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/04/09/03ccf11ce4008c284feb8ae7d01a5589.jpg)

Almost have all of the fabric down for the mulched area. Looks like we are going to be ordering 11-12 CY of mulch for next week. Then maybe it'll warm up enough that I can get some plants in the ground!

Pretty soon it's gonna be a little garden paradise. :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 10, 2015, 02:47:14 AM
Sweeeeeet. Your garden is looking great. I bet it will be nice to drink some of those lagers while sitting around it.

I saw my cortland made it through the Winter, and my crabapple is ready to bloom. I'm going to have a nice long look through those varieties on orange pippin. I would like to get some plums, pears, paw paws, and more Apple trees.

Hopefully I will feel good enough to get out and roto till tomorrow. I got some soil samples prepared to give to soil lab across the street, so there's that at least.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 10, 2015, 03:52:46 PM
processing the first food from my current 'garden'!

Boiling sap today. Tried to do it yesterday on my brew burner but it was too windy outside and the burner kept blowing out.

tapped 4 trees and have collected ~ 10 gallons of sap so far. so woo hoo! should have a quart of syrup out of this.

The sap is still running. really well now actually so perhaps we'll even get more.

I love Vermont.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 10, 2015, 04:04:54 PM
Very cool...back to your roots!
That is a pretty good start to the forest garden. ;D

Wow on the orange pippin - we sure live in a time of having access to amazing variety.
No time like the present to go ahead and plant a tree...

Cheers


Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 11, 2015, 11:41:43 AM
Finally the snow is melted enough that I can pull some over wintered parsnips. I made my parsnip and smoked salmon cakes. The parsnips are so sweet!
Despite having 25 acres of forest we have no sugar maples. I guess I can say that at least I'm not spending all the hours collecting and boiling sap. I have friends who always give me some too. I will be dropping trees for next years firewood this weekend.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 11, 2015, 11:44:44 AM
Ended up with a bit more than a quart. It was warm yesterday and I bet there is another4 or 5 gallons to collect at this point. Probably do another boil early next week and then pull the taps. gonna start staying above freezing at night here pretty soon.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: BrewBama on April 11, 2015, 01:10:44 PM
The G kids and I are planting today. We decided on onions, a cpl varieties of tomatoes, pickling cucumbers, yellow squash, zucchini, and Italian flat bush beans. We also got some patio tomatoes and a thyme and rosemary bush for the side of the house.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 14, 2015, 01:54:54 PM
I stuck a couple chunks of purple potato in the ground on a whim.  They
taste  mighty good and hope is that they produce.  still mostly too cold here yet
Title: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Rattlesnake44 on April 16, 2015, 05:17:01 PM
Finally got a chance to get in some summer veggies; tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, straight neck squash, watermelons, jalapeños, habañeros, tomatillos. The kale and chard are still going strong from a winter planting. Plum tree is sprouting leaves and flowers. Got my hops rhizomes in pots along the wall. Gonna be a great summer!
(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/04/16/cf55c28a68f5a602ac3fd4364845a91d.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 16, 2015, 05:47:16 PM
Finally got a chance to get in some summer veggies; tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, straight neck squash, watermelons, jalapeños, habañeros, tomatillos. The kale and chard are still going strong from a winter planting. Plum tree is sprouting leaves and flowers. Got my hops rhizomes in pots along the wall. Gonna be a great summer!
(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/04/16/cf55c28a68f5a602ac3fd4364845a91d.jpg)
That chard looks amazing and nice rosemary, I wish mine would get like that. My garden finally thawed out this week. I got peas, favas, spinach, radishes and lettuce in yesterday. Onions, potatoes, carrots, parsnips, beets, and broccoli raab will go in this coming weekend. We are still about 6 weeks away from planting summer veg.
I got my soil report back from the lab today and it looks great! It seems that the cover crops really did keep the minerals in the soil. All my numbers are near the desired level and way, way higher than last spring which was the first time I tested and re-mineralized. My exchange capacity is more than doubled.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Rattlesnake44 on April 16, 2015, 05:54:21 PM
Awesome list of veg! The cool thing about raised beds is I can just add soil, compost and fertilizer (manure, I'm pro-organic) to make my own blend. And it makes rotating my crops easy.
That damn Rosemary bush started as a one sprig cutting last year, I chop the crap out of it once a month and it keeps growing!  I'm gonna pull it out of the bed and plant it in the yard as part of the landscaping.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 16, 2015, 06:13:46 PM
Awesome list of veg! The cool thing about raised beds is I can just add soil, compost and fertilizer (manure, I'm pro-organic) to make my own blend. And it makes rotating my crops easy.
That damn Rosemary bush started as a one sprig cutting last year, I chop the crap out of it once a month and it keeps growing!  I'm gonna pull it out of the bed and plant it in the yard as part of the landscaping.
Raised beds are great but my garden has gotten so big and we grow large amounts of quite a few things so last year I decided to take out beds and grow things in rows, farm style. Works better for us but its not for everyone.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 16, 2015, 07:30:19 PM
I've been pricing more wood and the stuff is getting expensive. It may be better to just do rows with a drip. One thing I've found with raised beds is that you still got to weed the heck out of it, and grass invariably works its way in either by creeping or by seed.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Rattlesnake44 on April 16, 2015, 08:29:37 PM

I've been pricing more wood and the stuff is getting expensive. It may be better to just do rows with a drip. One thing I've found with raised beds is that you still got to weed the heck out of it, and grass invariably works its way in either by creeping or by seed.
I got lucky, the wood was all leftover from the previous owner of the house. I laid down black weed matting under all the mulch areas but I still need to weed every so often because there's none under the beds. I wanted it to be open to the earth for drainage and such.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 17, 2015, 02:31:29 AM
I have the gray contractor grade fabric everywhere I can get it. Under the beds, around the house, around the trees... It's the stuff from Ace around here. I havent had to weed with that fabric in 1.5 years.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 17, 2015, 12:34:55 PM
I may have try some of this "fabric" you speak of. Guess you lay mulch or gravel over the top in between the beds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 17, 2015, 01:47:19 PM
Just be sure that you never put wood mulch where you might want to expand your garden later. It takes years to break down and uses a lot of nitrogen to do so.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on April 17, 2015, 02:42:53 PM
Just be sure that you never put wood mulch where you might want to expand your garden later. It takes years to break down and uses a lot of nitrogen to do so.

+1
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Rattlesnake44 on April 17, 2015, 04:18:15 PM
The weed fabric is awesome. It allows moisture through but doesn't allow the weeds to grow. You can mulch or gravel over the parts you're not gonna plant in, but like Pete says, no mulch where you think you might plant later on. It's a b**** to remove and takes forever to break down. If you need to kill weeds or clear a spot for planting,  I've laid down cardboard, then top soil over that. The cardboard kills the weeds and breaks down fairly quickly. Place it down in the Fall (for those of you that have that kinda thing) and by Spring you should have a weed free area ready to plant.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 18, 2015, 07:00:03 PM
The rain toppled my onion tops but they are starting to bulb up nicely.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-CHHBHa-MPyE/VTKm73QkzII/AAAAAAAABL0/BvZLiTaJ76g/w759-h569-no/IMG_20150418_134001.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 19, 2015, 01:02:25 AM
The rain toppled my onion tops but they are starting to bulb up nicely.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-CHHBHa-MPyE/VTKm73QkzII/AAAAAAAABL0/BvZLiTaJ76g/w759-h569-no/IMG_20150418_134001.jpg)
just planted my onions today up here. I think it ended up being 150+ yellow storage onions, 40-50 Red Zeppelin, and about 80-90 sweet white onions. the goal is to store enough for the year. I think the onions are going to have a good year. I gave them prime real estate in the main garden with lots of sun and little weed competition. I only planted the best plants in the rows, the scrawney ones I planted in a group together and I'll use those for spring onions.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 19, 2015, 05:02:19 AM
It sucks that I con only grow short day around here and they don't store well. So I eats what I can. That's about 100 onions. Also trying to see if green onions will work as a year-round onion source.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 20, 2015, 03:18:48 PM
It sucks that I con only grow short day around here and they don't store well. So I eats what I can. That's about 100 onions. Also trying to see if green onions will work as a year-round onion source.
Yea, there's a lot to not like about the short season etc. up here but we can grow some good onion varieties.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 20, 2015, 05:26:35 PM
I may have try some of this "fabric" you speak of. Guess you lay mulch or gravel over the top in between the beds.

Yes sir - like this:
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-EYJ-Xoqx9as/VTEcByrR-7I/AAAAAAAAD28/jvSaLu2bbWk/w1374-h773-no/IMG_20150417_093547259.jpg)

Oh - we started on the mulch/planting this weekend. 6 CY mulch so far, probably need another 4 CY to finish it up. Then metal edging to keep it tidy.

Plant pictures
Romas bordered by garlic -
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Dq3cLtalrWg/VTFj5Z1_nNI/AAAAAAAAD5c/FpnLrK9jsCU/w1374-h773-no/IMG_20150417_144451725.jpg)

Planted some spinach & lettuce -
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-HDOPPvWKy6k/VTFkRva_a0I/AAAAAAAAD5o/JLW7bMpsqIQ/w1374-h773-no/IMG_20150417_144506948.jpg)

Apple tree in bloom -
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-CbZkHBX-UD8/VTEckhqwNcI/AAAAAAAAD3w/sMoKtZqBJLE/w1374-h773-no/IMG_20150417_093814982_HDR.jpg)

Hybrid tomatoes and onions -
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-HgzN3fgJcyM/VTFi-BPW-uI/AAAAAAAAD44/LU2sZ1pz6Hk/w461-h820-no/IMG_20150417_144343311.jpg)

Blackberries are going well so far. Need to remove the rock here and fill in with mulch -
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-c75oFl72Fio/VTEcV2S98MI/AAAAAAAAD4o/olGybpuzneY/w1374-h773-no/IMG_20150417_093633772.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 20, 2015, 07:41:09 PM
Tis a good looking garden there, Amanda.

What an exhausting weekend for me. I tilled up about 1/2 an acre of sod for our berry bushes, and beneficial insect flower garden. I used a big ole rear tine tiller, and that thing was a little unwieldly. The ground was pretty sure that I should not be tearing it up as well.

I also greatly expanded our garden with a 15 x 15' plot. Planted some lettuce, spinach, and swiss chard seeds. Carrots, peas, and some beans will be done throughout this week.

Got my soil analysis back, and my soil is pretty dang amazing. Just need to add a little sulfur to the area where the berries will go, and put in some more organic matter in the acreage. Ordered a flame weeder so that my beds will be good and sterile, and also to avoid using any pesticides. I get that tomorrow, so that will be fun.  :)

My neighbor told me to take all his compost. It's massive mound of compost that has been cooking for a few years. Looking forward to spreading that around.



Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 20, 2015, 08:02:57 PM
Tis a good looking garden there, Amanda.

What an exhausting weekend for me. I tilled up about 1/2 an acre of sod for our berry bushes, and beneficial insect flower garden. I used a big ole rear tine tiller, and that thing was a little unwieldly. The ground was pretty sure that I should be tearing it up as well.

I also greatly expanded our garden with a 15 x 15' plot. Planted some lettuce, spinach, and swiss chard seeds. Carrots, peas, and some beans will be done throughout this week.

Got my soil analysis back, and my soil is pretty dang amazing. Just need to add a little sulfur to the area where the berries will go, and put in some more organic matter in the acreage. Ordered a flame weeder so that my beds will be good and sterile, and also to avoid using any pesticides. I get that tomorrow, so that will be fun.  :)

My neighbor told me to take all his compost. It's massive mound of compost that has been cooking for a few years. Looking forward to spreading that around.
I'm also exhausted in a good way from working in the beautiful early spring weather. Put in onions, kale, kohlrabi, chard, broccoli, cauliflower, reed and white cabbage, and various head lettuces. Perfect timing, today I'm at work and there is a steady but not too heavy rain  :)
The tiller is pretty exhausting especially in unbroken soil.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: gmac on April 22, 2015, 11:02:10 PM
It snowed here today.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 23, 2015, 12:06:47 AM
It snowed here today.

That's a bummer. We will be getting into the low 30s tonight. The wind is gusting up to 30 mph here as well. I was hoping to do more tilling and flame weeding today. Oh well. Got a nice big order from Johnnys today.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 23, 2015, 01:41:02 AM
(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/04/22/71f7a7f65da7587a2e362cd1c6f69c7c.jpg)

Shallots are already popping up! :D

I don't know if I could take cold/snow this time of year. That's just too much winter.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Rattlesnake44 on April 23, 2015, 02:35:39 PM
We had a cold spell here in SoCal too... It got down to 55!!! I had to put on a sweatshirt! Freezing!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 23, 2015, 04:06:45 PM
It snowed here today.

Here too.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on April 23, 2015, 05:18:01 PM
(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/taters0415_zpsc1zc2iwr.jpg)

Here too. Although spring snow is not real snow. ::)

Tater bed yet to sprout. Onions don't mind a little cool down.



Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 24, 2015, 05:13:06 AM
First Fruits (well, ok,  veggies) 2015

Asperges Blanc

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Asparagus%202015_zpsguu75juj.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 24, 2015, 11:53:31 AM
It snowed here today.

Here too.

and again last today. Looks like about an inch on the ground.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 24, 2015, 01:12:56 PM
First Fruits (well, ok,  veggies) 2015

Asperges Blanc

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Asparagus%202015_zpsguu75juj.jpg)

Awesome! Brown butter lemon sauce...!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 24, 2015, 01:27:21 PM
Love to grill asparagus. Its a month away here.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 24, 2015, 01:50:33 PM
Love to grill asparagus. Its a month away here.

+1 Grilled fresh asparagus is how I got my wife to like to like asparagus. It is also the best.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 24, 2015, 01:57:29 PM
I mostly just eat it fresh.  But, the blanc ones get a special cheese sauce and
lightly microwaved.  Also when it comes on strong from my patch, I will blanch
it and flash freeze it for a day later in summer.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 24, 2015, 02:10:09 PM
The blanching technique works very well- far better than ICF vegetables from the store IMO. Seems like they hold up better in the freezer and also taste "fresher" once used.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on April 24, 2015, 03:49:46 PM
Love to grill asparagus. Its a month away here.

We just planted our first crown this year. Can't wait to see what comes up next spring. 
I do believe I will have artichokes this year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 25, 2015, 08:03:46 PM
Love to grill asparagus. Its a month away here.

+1 Grilled fresh asparagus is how I got my wife to like to like asparagus. It is also the best.
Even better is grilled asparagus wrapped in prosciutto. I could eat that by the truckload.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on April 25, 2015, 10:45:36 PM
Does "Weed n Feed"  Really kill dandelions? And any horror stories about tree injury?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 26, 2015, 02:49:48 AM
Love to grill asparagus. Its a month away here.

+1 Grilled fresh asparagus is how I got my wife to like to like asparagus. It is also the best.
Even better is grilled asparagus wrapped in prosciutto. I could eat that by the truckload.
This begs the question: When has the sentence " I wish this wasn't wrapped in prociuotto" ever been uttered?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on April 26, 2015, 03:06:55 AM

This begs the question: When has the sentence " I wish this wasn't wrapped in prociuotto" ever been uttered?
By a vegetarian
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 26, 2015, 11:52:43 AM

This begs the question: When has the sentence " I wish this wasn't wrapped in prociuotto" ever been uttered?
By a vegetarian
True. But they wish they could have it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 26, 2015, 04:10:58 PM

This begs the question: When has the sentence " I wish this wasn't wrapped in prociuotto" ever been uttered?
By a vegetarian
True. But they wish they could have it.

If no-one was looking I bet they'd eat it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 26, 2015, 09:55:35 PM

This begs the question: When has the sentence " I wish this wasn't wrapped in prociuotto" ever been uttered?
By a vegetarian
True. But they wish they could have it.
responses in order:
whenever there is grilled aspargus wrapped in prociuotto on the menu where I am eating.
Exactly.
Only because I want the aspargus inside.
If no-one was looking I bet they'd eat it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 27, 2015, 12:48:49 AM

This begs the question: When has the sentence " I wish this wasn't wrapped in prociuotto" ever been uttered?
By a vegetarian
True. But they wish they could have it.
responses in order:
whenever there is grilled aspargus wrapped in prociuotto on the menu where I am eating.
Exactly.
Only because I want the aspargus inside.
If no-one was looking I bet they'd eat it.

My wife's family loves prosciutto, and I have never eaten it. I would be sick all day if I did. I'm a pescatarian, but it's been so long since I've eaten something like that and I have long since given up any desire for meat. Except my ma's corn beef and cabbage on st. Pats. That is pure torture to be around. Still not a hard decision for me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 27, 2015, 02:48:41 AM
My wife's family loves prosciutto, and I have never eaten it. I would be sick all day if I did. I'm a pescatarian, but it's been so long since I've eaten something like that and I have long since given up any desire for meat. Except my ma's corn beef and cabbage on st. Pats. That is pure torture to be around. Still not a hard decision for me.
It's not quite the same, but smoked salmon would make a passable pescatarian alternative for prosciutto around the aforementioned grilled asparagus.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 27, 2015, 12:19:46 PM
My wife's family loves prosciutto, and I have never eaten it. I would be sick all day if I did. I'm a pescatarian, but it's been so long since I've eaten something like that and I have long since given up any desire for meat. Except my ma's corn beef and cabbage on st. Pats. That is pure torture to be around. Still not a hard decision for me.
It's not quite the same, but smoked salmon would make a passable pescatarian alternative for prosciutto around the aforementioned grilled asparagus.

Now that sounds really good.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 27, 2015, 12:59:36 PM
My wife's family loves prosciutto, and I have never eaten it. I would be sick all day if I did. I'm a pescatarian, but it's been so long since I've eaten something like that and I have long since given up any desire for meat. Except my ma's corn beef and cabbage on st. Pats. That is pure torture to be around. Still not a hard decision for me.
It's not quite the same, but smoked salmon would make a passable pescatarian alternative for prosciutto around the aforementioned grilled asparagus.
I have done this before. I can no longer eat meat and even when I did acceptable prociutto was impossible to find so smoked salmon was a good substitute. Believe it or not my girlfriend mad watermelon prociutto by placing watermelon slices between two blocks of himilayan salt. It was a nice summer snack. Today I am making gravlax from some salmon that a friend caught yesterday in the Quabbin Reservoir.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on April 27, 2015, 01:02:51 PM
FWIW, I like smoked salmon better anyway. I make it (and gravlax) every year. Great stuff.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on April 27, 2015, 06:08:23 PM
Believe it or not my girlfriend mad watermelon prociutto by placing watermelon slices between two blocks of himilayan salt. It was a nice summer snack.
I am very curious about this one. Was the watermelon dried first, or did she just press slices between the salt blocks? How long did it take? Details, please! :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on April 27, 2015, 06:22:47 PM
Believe it or not my girlfriend mad watermelon prociutto by placing watermelon slices between two blocks of himilayan salt. It was a nice summer snack.
I am very curious about this one. Was the watermelon dried first, or did she just press slices between the salt blocks? How long did it take? Details, please! :)

+1
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 27, 2015, 08:10:34 PM
She just placed slices between blocks as is. I think it was for 24 or 36 hours. She put in a baking pan to catch the water. They ended up thin, salty ( but not as salty as you might think), and flexible. You wouldn't exactly mistake them for prosciutto but they were tasty wrapped around cantaloupe and honeydew.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 27, 2015, 08:41:48 PM
She just placed slices between blocks as is. I think it was for 24 or 36 hours. She put in a baking pan to catch the water. They ended up thin, salty ( but not as salty as you might think), and flexible. You wouldn't exactly mistake them for prosciutto but they were tasty wrapped around cantaloupe and honeydew.

Pictures?

I'm imagining this would be excellent as a garnish on a watermelon daiquiri (not the frozen kind!), among many other things.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 28, 2015, 12:30:04 AM
She just placed slices between blocks as is. I think it was for 24 or 36 hours. She put in a baking pan to catch the water. They ended up thin, salty ( but not as salty as you might think), and flexible. You wouldn't exactly mistake them for prosciutto but they were tasty wrapped around cantaloupe and honeydew.

Pictures?

I'm imagining this would be excellent as a garnish on a watermelon daiquiri (not the frozen kind!), among many other things.
no pictures, sorry. I imagine it could be friends with tequila and lime, no?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 28, 2015, 01:40:52 PM
All my brambles and ribes come today. All 59 of them. As well as some rhubarb crowns. Glad I fire weeded the rows last night. This will be exciting!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on April 28, 2015, 01:53:32 PM
All my brambles and ribes come today. All 59 of them. As well as some rhubarb crowns. Glad I fire weeded the rows last night. This will be exciting!

Holy. Crap.  ;D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on April 28, 2015, 03:10:50 PM
All my brambles and ribes come today. All 59 of them. As well as some rhubarb crowns. Glad I fire weeded the rows last night. This will be exciting!
Fire weeding has to be fun.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on April 28, 2015, 03:18:05 PM
All my brambles and ribes come today. All 59 of them. As well as some rhubarb crowns. Glad I fire weeded the rows last night. This will be exciting!
Fire weeding has to be fun.

The smell. I love the smell of fire weeding in the morning.

It is a lot of fun. I did it a bunch when I worked at a state park, and a conservation district as a teen. The sound is a little unsettling, kind of like a jet engine.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on May 04, 2015, 03:04:59 PM
The parents came out this weekend for a yard-work weekend. We got some stuff done.

Garden related:
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-03Z2oP6tFgc/VUaCgRHRs3I/AAAAAAAAEHo/D6St1L6ay9E/w1374-h773-no/IMG_20150503_151550379.jpg)

Moved 4 more CY of mulch into the garden area and moved out ~2500# of the rock that was there. Transplanted some raspberries from the way back to the garden area. Installed 16 10' tall sign posts for vertical gardening and tomato support. Put up some little fencing around the beds. Planted a few more hot peppers. Started getting the metal edging around this area. (BTW - this stuff better last until we move. It is a PITA to put in.)

We also took a chainsaw to a 9' tall "stump" in the backyard. I cut out a section to use for Hammerschlagen, so that should be fun for our Oktoberfest party.  8)

Our peach tree in the way back (behind the fence) has a couple dozen little peaches on it, but it also has some peach leaf curl. I think I need to get those leaves off of it and spray the rest of the tree.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on May 04, 2015, 10:32:41 PM
had to look up Hammerschlagen.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on May 05, 2015, 02:33:21 PM
had to look up Hammerschlagen.
+1 - It loosely translates to "Drinking game that ends badly"
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on May 05, 2015, 03:24:25 PM

(http://i1060.photobucket.com/albums/t450/peterbaker8/127_zpsevfy2inp.jpg)
The sun sets on the garlic patch.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 29, 2015, 12:51:55 PM
That garlic patch probably has filled in a bit by now Pete?  Mine look like they might try and scape out here pretty quick.  What type do you grow?

I used your burlap mulch on yellow beets because I have a heck of a time getting good germination with them - every one came up! 
I was giggly piggly and then two days later some white crowned sparrows came through and feasted on the nice regular buffet of fresh cotyledons. Son of a...

 Glad I am not trying to make a living out of this.

Who knows how to eat bok choy? 
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on May 29, 2015, 01:40:22 PM
Bok choy is delicious and easy. I usually use it in stir fry. It goes in at flameout with the addition of noodles. :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on May 29, 2015, 01:55:42 PM
That garlic patch probably has filled in a bit by now Pete?  Mine look like they might try and scape out here pretty quick.  What type do you grow?

I used your burlap mulch on yellow beets because I have a heck of a time getting good germination with them - every one came up! 
I was giggly piggly and then two days later some white crowned sparrows came through and feasted on the nice regular buffet of fresh cotyledons. Son of a...

 Glad I am not trying to make a living out of this.

Who knows how to eat bok choy?
Yes, the garlic is knee high. I expect it to scape in a week or two, can't wait! I like to grill the scapes like green beans as a veg but the majority get made into a simple pesto. I like to use the scape pesto (just scapes, olive oil, salt) on pizza when we fire up our outdoor oven. I use it in place of tomato sauce on some of the pizzas. We grow Music, German White, and Russian Red. 200 plants is enough to eat all year (I'm still using last year's from the root cellar) and use as seed so we don't ever have to buy any.
Glad the burlap trick worked. Until 2 days ago we were unseasonably dry so it was a life saver for the germination of our carrots.
I use baby bok choy in salad, in stir frys, and like most vegetables I sometimes grill it. I bet the white crispy part would be good tempura.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 30, 2015, 04:41:53 AM
Pinnah,
you got bok choy?  I had mine sprouted under a black fabric, pulled the cover off
and here came the rain....next time I looked at em, they were gonzo.  :'( :'(

Anyhow, I just chunk up the bok choy stems and toss em in the stir fry.  The
green leafy part can go in your salad or the stir fry also think the meaty stalks
may make for a good fermented veggie as in lacto. YMMV
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on June 09, 2015, 04:55:49 PM
The rain jacked up the plants. It was a real pain and has put me behind considerably. Now though, it's dry as a bone after a 10 days and no rain. Hot.

I have 13 young tomato plants, oregano, thyme and marjoram that would have all died without my constant vigilance.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on June 09, 2015, 07:46:19 PM
The rain jacked up the plants. It was a real pain and has put me behind considerably. Now though, it's dry as a bone after a 10 days and no rain. Hot.

I have 13 young tomato plants, oregano, thyme and marjoram that would have all died without my constant vigilance.

I we didn't have raised beds, we would be so royally f'd right now in the garden. We had a 30' wide river running straight through the backyard after 4" of rain in less than 4 hours a few weekends ago. Weatherman says it's rained 34 of the past 40 days. They are showing pictures of an ark on the forecast. I'd like to move out of Seattle please!  :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on June 14, 2015, 10:17:45 PM
Still a ton of rain around here, with rain in the forecast everyday this week. Feels like soup outside. I did see my tomatoes are coming in. Swiss Chard is gigantic, and the kohlrabi is finally looking edible. Going to put those in the stir fry tonight. All of our brambles and ribes are looking good as well.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on June 15, 2015, 11:59:32 AM
We're getting a nice soaker as I write. We have had about 3 good rains in 2 weeks after a dry spring. Things are really taking off. There's more lettuce than we can eat and peas and radishes. Radishes eaten the french way, with butter and salt , are a refreshing snack to eat on the deck with a homebrew in the afternoon after a hard days work. The bees have some honey in the supers and this rain will help them get more nectar so I'm hopeful we will be a good honeyflow.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on June 16, 2015, 11:23:40 AM
We finally got a soaker 2 days ago- the ground was already beginning to crack; even after all the rain we had in the previous months. Rained so hard the pump turned on in the backyard.

Now with tropical storm Bill coming in there might be more rain than we can handle.


Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on July 13, 2015, 10:20:59 PM
oh yea. eating from the garden now.

Amazing wet spring and now already into the monsoon.
Green Green!

I did enjoy the bok choy - although it was very fleeting in my garden and early to bolt.
Had the peas in the garlic patch - seemed to be a little competition there but now the peas are done and gone and the garlic is liking all the sun.

Question about scapes. Typically I would snip off all flowers as soon as the appear because they are only taking NRG from the head development. But I love to eat half formed bulbuils...

Just wondering what you garlic folks do. Do you snip right away?....or wait to harvest your scapes so there is something to eat?

I like them right about here:  some nice bulbuil formation but not hardened. Good fodder for early season garlic in a stir fry.  That is Mt Hood on the horizon.  ;)

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/scapage_zpslvaabjxw.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on July 13, 2015, 10:51:40 PM
oh yea. eating from the garden now.

Amazing wet spring and now already into the monsoon.
Green Green!

I did enjoy the bok choy - although it was very fleeting in my garden and early to bolt.
Had the peas in the garlic patch - seemed to be a little competition there but now the peas are done and gone and the garlic is liking all the sun.

Question about scapes. Typically I would snip off all flowers as soon as the appear because they are only taking NRG from the head development. But I love to eat half formed bulbuils...

Just wondering what you garlic folks do. Do you snip right away?....or wait to harvest your scapes so there is something to eat?

I like them right about here:  some nice bulbuil formation but not hardened. Good fodder for early season garlic in a stir fry.  That is Mt Hood on the horizon.  ;)

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/scapage_zpslvaabjxw.jpg)
I snip mine about that length. I do pretty much everything with them. In the past couple weeks I have grilled them a couple times, the other day I tempura battered and fried them and some broccoli from the garden, and I sauted them with other garden veggies including fava beans and zucchini and served with grilled halibut. I like them best raw though, they keep their garlic flavor better. I always process some with olive oil and use like a pesto including as a replacement for sauce on pizza and they can replace garlic in caesar dressing.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on July 14, 2015, 02:44:59 AM
+1 to what Pete b says. Garlic scapes also make very tasty pickles. Of course, I have pickles on the mind, as I just got done with pickling several pounds of green beans. Used some homegrown dill and coriander as well.

I still wish it would stop raining.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 26, 2015, 04:57:00 AM
going to hafta put these together with some type of yeast...(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/plums%202015_zpsymws88kn.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on September 28, 2015, 07:35:23 PM
going to hafta put these together with some type of yeast...(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/plums%202015_zpsymws88kn.jpg)
Are those apricots?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 29, 2015, 04:44:59 AM
No Pete, they are smallish wild plums. Between the size of a dime and a quarter.
 Mostly seed but HUGE flavor and goodness. They are in primary fermenter as I type. 
The bouquet they give off is intoxicating in and of itself.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on September 29, 2015, 11:58:01 AM
No Pete, they are smallish wild plums. Between the size of a dime and a quarter.
 Mostly seed but HUGE flavor and goodness. They are in primary fermenter as I type. 
The bouquet they give off is intoxicating in and of itself.
Very nice. I just bottled a batch of plum mead with lavender. I bet those little buggers are packed with flavor. What exactly are you making with those?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on September 29, 2015, 12:16:24 PM
I picked up a couple black currant bushes for the garden.  8)

I think next year I'll plant more things that don't need processing. I was overrun with tomatoes this year - I think 8 plants is too much for the both of us. I just can't put up any more marinara sauce with all of our other activities. So I'm going for more things that can either be stored on their own or frozen. I liked the spinach, snap peas, peppers, peppers, peppers, potatoes, carrots, etc. I'll probably do a bit more of those and less tomatoes. I'm also thinking about getting more blackberry plants since I have a good amount of open space.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 29, 2015, 02:39:26 PM
Very nice. I just bottled a batch of plum mead with lavender. I bet those little buggers are packed with flavor. What exactly are you making with those?

I juiced them and introduced sweet mead yeast and some cane sugar to up the gravity....
Should be some type of wine.  May decide to champagne bottle and sparkle, not sure yet.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 29, 2015, 02:41:00 PM
I have a good amount of open space.

From the pic you posted, you are supplying a small village....lol
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on September 29, 2015, 07:27:01 PM
Very nice. I just bottled a batch of plum mead with lavender. I bet those little buggers are packed with flavor. What exactly are you making with those?

I juiced them and introduced sweet mead yeast and some cane sugar to up the gravity....
Should be some type of wine.  May decide to champagne bottle and sparkle, not sure yet.
Sounds great!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on September 29, 2015, 10:40:24 PM
I picked up a couple black currant bushes for the garden.  8)

I think next year I'll plant more things that don't need processing. I was overrun with tomatoes this year - I think 8 plants is too much for the both of us. I just can't put up any more marinara sauce with all of our other activities. So I'm going for more things that can either be stored on their own or frozen. I liked the spinach, snap peas, peppers, peppers, peppers, potatoes, carrots, etc. I'll probably do a bit more of those and less tomatoes. I'm also thinking about getting more blackberry plants since I have a good amount of open space.

Too many tomatoes? I'm afraid I don't understand.

I highly recommend this variety of blackberry:
http://noursefarms.com/blackberry-plants/prime-ark-freedom/

It was our first year with it, but it grew really well in less than ideal conditions, and the berries we got this year tasted incredible.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 30, 2015, 04:59:28 AM
From one bountiful basket gift and one measly spud cut into quarters...a little rick and a bag
of miracle grow potting soil (which was reclaimed) ...came about 5 lbs of these really
delicious purple spuds....what a nice surprise. Harvest is over  only a few carrots remain.
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/Purple%20spuds1%202015_zps8kktqtcp.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on September 30, 2015, 12:37:26 PM
I highly recommend this variety of blackberry:
http://noursefarms.com/blackberry-plants/prime-ark-freedom/

It was our first year with it, but it grew really well in less than ideal conditions, and the berries we got this year tasted incredible.

From Norse, I'm assuming you're getting bare root plants? And you got berries the first year? When are you planting? I ordered currant plants in pots to cut down on the planting to fruiting time and will be planting them tomorrow so they can get established (still mid 80s here for some reason). Thoughts on planting times for blackberries/raspberries? (Also thinking about picking up some Heritage raspberries.)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on September 30, 2015, 01:55:10 PM
I highly recommend this variety of blackberry:
http://noursefarms.com/blackberry-plants/prime-ark-freedom/

It was our first year with it, but it grew really well in less than ideal conditions, and the berries we got this year tasted incredible.

From Norse, I'm assuming you're getting bare root plants? And you got berries the first year? When are you planting? I ordered currant plants in pots to cut down on the planting to fruiting time and will be planting them tomorrow so they can get established (still mid 80s here for some reason). Thoughts on planting times for blackberries/raspberries? (Also thinking about picking up some Heritage raspberries.)
Up here I would plant them in the early spring or, 2nd choice, late summer (very late August/very early September). You might be able to get them established before winter planting now where you live though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on September 30, 2015, 03:51:38 PM
We are finally getting some peppers from our container garden.  We put in Jalapenos and a type of bell pepper but we didn't get any blossoms until mid-August.  It's been a very strange year for growing in Iowa this year.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on September 30, 2015, 04:33:28 PM
I highly recommend this variety of blackberry:
http://noursefarms.com/blackberry-plants/prime-ark-freedom/

It was our first year with it, but it grew really well in less than ideal conditions, and the berries we got this year tasted incredible.

From Norse, I'm assuming you're getting bare root plants? And you got berries the first year? When are you planting? I ordered currant plants in pots to cut down on the planting to fruiting time and will be planting them tomorrow so they can get established (still mid 80s here for some reason). Thoughts on planting times for blackberries/raspberries? (Also thinking about picking up some Heritage raspberries.)
Up here I would plant them in the early spring or, 2nd choice, late summer (very late August/very early September). You might be able to get them established before winter planting now where you live though.

I would also recommend early spring. For this variety, we did not get bare roots, but instead received them as a plant tissue culture. We did indeed get berries this year, like a pint off 5 plants. Like I said, we did not do a lot of preparation for them, and could not keep the weeds down. Had I the foresight, I would put down some black plastic mulch right now, the Fall before planting, and cut out some holes in the spring to plant them into. I would also get the soil ph correct before planting. I could easily see these plants giving a really nice yield this year had I done that.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: reverseapachemaster on October 01, 2015, 12:04:50 AM
We are finally getting some peppers from our container garden.  We put in Jalapenos and a type of bell pepper but we didn't get any blossoms until mid-August.  It's been a very strange year for growing in Iowa this year.

Paul

Bell peppers are finicky as heck to grow. I grow a few different pepper varieties and most either do not flower during the hottest part of the summer or the blossoms drop off because it's too hot (much like tomatoes). I've tried growing them off and on for a few years. I finally found a plant that seems to tolerate the heat here but like most of my pepper plants they only develop fruit in the late spring and fall.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on October 01, 2015, 02:37:48 AM
I highly recommend this variety of blackberry:
http://noursefarms.com/blackberry-plants/prime-ark-freedom/

It was our first year with it, but it grew really well in less than ideal conditions, and the berries we got this year tasted incredible.

From Norse, I'm assuming you're getting bare root plants? And you got berries the first year? When are you planting? I ordered currant plants in pots to cut down on the planting to fruiting time and will be planting them tomorrow so they can get established (still mid 80s here for some reason). Thoughts on planting times for blackberries/raspberries? (Also thinking about picking up some Heritage raspberries.)
If you're growing your own raspberries I highly recommend Anne. Golden raspberries are hard to come by unless you grow them yourself, and the flavor is spectacular.

Outside of wild brambles, the best blackberries I've had (flavor-wise) were boysenberries. I only have a couple of plants that are still around, and I haven't been able to save enough for jam the past few years - they all get eaten between the garden and the house.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on October 01, 2015, 11:37:41 AM
We are finally getting some peppers from our container garden.  We put in Jalapenos and a type of bell pepper but we didn't get any blossoms until mid-August.  It's been a very strange year for growing in Iowa this year.

Paul

Bell peppers are finicky as heck to grow. I grow a few different pepper varieties and most either do not flower during the hottest part of the summer or the blossoms drop off because it's too hot (much like tomatoes). I've tried growing them off and on for a few years. I finally found a plant that seems to tolerate the heat here but like most of my pepper plants they only develop fruit in the late spring and fall.
One thing I learned about peppers is that you will have problems with them flowering and fruiting if the temp gets below 50. Around here that means not planting until June and still covering them once or twice.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on October 01, 2015, 12:12:43 PM
Bell peppers are finicky as heck to grow. I grow a few different pepper varieties and most either do not flower during the hottest part of the summer or the blossoms drop off because it's too hot (much like tomatoes). I've tried growing them off and on for a few years. I finally found a plant that seems to tolerate the heat here but like most of my pepper plants they only develop fruit in the late spring and fall.
One thing I learned about peppers is that you will have problems with them flowering and fruiting if the temp gets below 50. Around here that means not planting until June and still covering them once or twice.

I also didn't plant until it was about 65-75+, which really allowed them to take off once they got outside.

But... I have real problems with pepper diseases, which is why I switched to drip irrigation. Too bad it rained and rained and rained and rained here, so I lost a couple plants/fruits to a bacteria spot. The hot peppers didn't seem to mind, my one large bell pepper plant nearly died (Red Beauty), and my little lunchbox sized bell peppers did quite well despite the disease they had early on in life. I'll be saving seeds after this year from the ones that did well and trying out another variety or two of bell peppers. We make a bell pepper soup that is freakin' awesome, so I have to figure out a way to grow more peppers!  :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on October 01, 2015, 12:32:11 PM
Figured with all this talking, I should add some pictures:

Ghost pepper. I have no clue why I'm growing this. I can barely even go near the plant, much less eat it. Once the 5-6 peppers on it turn red, they will get turned into hot sauce and given to my heat-seeker friends.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/0U6pkvEc-vk4ltwbAOJQfdCIHrZHHo8DR1957p7xC70ts5W19ksl4BynzxrUbvyYHOcU2e4tvzPWJM--v7e6jRaXkiNbSP9pLxD4oWojEpxs0zojOoNZ3MYiFdDNCt7xrAzWMELZdrqRrrOvFyfHci1gCx6lmFQqq_pdB5F2gUHzzOoWCkPJA_j6w53zeYlG9PMmRGqV0Y4ozNG61wYGgu6gvwaJt2VhA6g1Lq3-IDW77CMcl_xCcfXDkFXoE02EWKdtj2qysAhDi5pbctvVNR5poMz4KfMXkbRERom0mD4zYN-SY2Lw0MZtmGgtUf3LcRS-3xybvpOsJLxN9QannWcVkGSLzGTPaC803Y5HZin2Cqh1e4IkWIR2N3VX22TOFYHjGat1J_tLVO5W4bUDFmVUIf7VNV5Jf_QexEG6MnBPcjCJUEBbajce4MJVYKhEgvejN_eXeFAjjKdZrWIyv-vO8X35piGFnQjyVrrruNZLHt1B7nLGr2EYv4faBVeyKvRQtXsFAgCmd_cNevQK4vlvrupToMIUVhipDjNIYDE=w1432-h805-no)

Pepper harvest from September 2nd. Looks like a mix of jallys, poblanos, serranos, and habenaros.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_2Q002RAQ5caK30ob4CYkFz3djNz1O2sJHdf-_f1N9zkltrghAg7APZShOY_eU9wXOV2ixXoQd4tqyh7Cgp_Pu9V0AG-h3aQQ82UD-LmTrB8q0Dc1oqYRUCfDKBvJlINs6tqKIvLcgg4pVk0DTll6vx8d4YYzPYaaTEU3_YU74-JHYqjJNO6bHGrkIRnRlsGkcI1HRRoTXIMceIDxQ4XQ9MYNw86oV-zOgtBQ9T6-LIalouRrHxV3ksi0Hcmy8clwt5Jaz-pIDbUKyupgGVKr7XOhPai7jm3zgn4AftiQaPl-wVDB2zD2GnPKgiDSTiJhn_yAyBBCt6AHoeS7rEqT3nJsRSDWE_Wf1DO59iXSGGDA7FExFLnp6kxNINST_DaKVRk56KlwAOxfn76ss0wlMLf71nS4fNH4gmAxTR8Caa9deEVyGa_KbXQKhyHLYdnRH6Y5VjdL-hYrTb7y9fKuazackJX_NJGVPCkRyAyB3uAhQcm0qMUesEExwWYjB_RyIW7KEbS0WpLuhi8BqrsXCoW-gofhwrOd1RM2uu8MVQ=w1432-h805-no)

The poblanos plants are basically trees. Me for scale. They come up to my chin now. Taken on September 2nd.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/B8y0_aKmeFmvLY7P-rUr-Exc2XoVK8qda8s9VBK1W2v_TC5tVEmIgRdJMdRdl8wSm7MwnXxkl6fobaoWGgxtQw_KzPMi7WF2trHK62xBe9oQiGO05z1C2dY59MZutXBMR-mSy33qOfFYvAHlewY4mTxCw_ouR30UTsLudATkfvYdhp_KhaUJUc0YxJ4J2rhlAsDb59NIjQq-UQvWjYkOLb98nWLOOdNdn8IgCYkMcC879ZKyrhdV6FIJEywo5jZGuI9HZs0B4rZr8eBfT2aSapdw0YgLC9GCCIkpjatkY7OiJnVFEuo72P0X_nsTuecwE1smeo9snni1Zf1hIYjZX6L8z8vwnzvolY5-7azu8uOQDlh8ki0x991aynstbSMQuusPQtA-lworO7JZUJJYAepPBBQ9f_YKLs7QiLf8A_rZB2vuhdPNEV71_QqCB9MyORyEjWif1wezhyT-2x4E21fL6qOs6xfHyu_wShqlWb862pILknQy_OinCNthLOlHIF6xVfr7uvf1vWj-vkVRgb7XbC-0Kzo1KjM8rYCIsgk=w628-h823-no)

Habenaro and serrano harvest from August 15th.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ASLVZx8HByrOLBfNs-oMv-JCUQ6cbcMZX8-Na1ngx_vS7qXl6OHJ_sdMwVhgFJuHXgKRsBsHTNzIhOHqMA5tw8dlb50ll4upQ3h1RmetrNv-g-zhzPeX6Cmkxlm10devDrbpsWkEGaK1gsoQobRvw9OXk1PI-2_a3YQK77al3xnd5LZqrVvm22BTdHYJKSXSuqekUnun_9VrbBNmyPaR3HMSn9xQNds74TwE90Fv0Q6QDGULG17Yn-hpYKP9FdKLqJddc637-tww7i_z9pxwH6uM3y0tpGbJdKC0_1pBvJPo7y1fwFNUYSUSOHnPSfYMMilmmbTR4p-X4gnIb3NpDE4597cv8w3Y0xaPq3O-TBUCvNPbSAdmwoN4FJjUWps9dexQ1WjGIW5VG6Nfvi3d0z-8G8x3CqVlr9jkdWwWQgSfSHKt0IQP4PQF1hfDiCri60mMHPs3u-DubQb1tIavZHfA2sPHFVofJysZF0NnI30Add5vIuPLnqhPZ1xahzXF3lcnvSBK2cTktvaXLJUyt-7_oK6FgdSnReKFrlCTPRo=w1432-h805-no)

Pre-soup bell peppers:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/D56KrVDypaCsXE2zHopy10Kylpn398cB183dk9T0irTBmpZTYPRM_xQ4-djuapkB8voMuLGxYijtlKPKFqG9TXHF20H8CdWKUc_Nt7VLV-FKnzkUN00tnz8U_QrWGa_WMg0PAowXo-2b3ZCXeH3F0MoykOAmjEb-G7kKHRvd_WPiXWgsow8-zI5ftU6okIsN9q7m5wlvQkYHPU1gXukCn24-U4VrXpACsGFnIftejJEh5PnaZ0gwr8MGH-7eLWKeUDOovTkF0BYbCSfQmmIF_-0HVhKhW219TcqYzzGPz4qOyKxxllmXd-Vf8RqwixQFDdLqbKnDuKyC7TOK16bQihfuWZSgHiN434bHYekGnV0elgi1d8ccMai9q8JB8jLJZa0A-mV3WR4iZI1SYgsMIpEItgKYMg-JmHwQjoNglqefSJDPH5zKNtpYVm0rBcr1kSEv5qdXFe4F2P19tdI0E2zjgsSiFUUnqzww2bco6Azj6XWUngC-KdHY_X-YdtdQ_GWaJAuPI65aqSt_tVVtuSCvDzTx2cY6EeitGDG4T_c=w1431-h805-no)

Checking on the carrots in August:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/UAKyblCNiAN3b5puROErsq1d3CoCCTWGe-n1vYouZiRQzkmb3G-DLABrQGg03Q5Zb2iJi53lEYRA9yPhNHzFVB59nxuVpHPToK3uuP9RoY5bJwi__anZRcH4U-hxVhLCGti2CwzqlfmAv9oKM_rIlJ7REDEgbAm0Qdcej3rFxGs-mZRu7ug72SO8KM-tptHQcbmenhuYmNQG0jKOLjFnYzivWzH2qPgkC9wv_LHxfWh_-CuQ4135w0v_vZfKvStEj4PyrhAeJzdkY9NiYyWgcSvacD4j5RciuNOQRyHcceWQCBuxBuQMm5dqwjvM5RSgWj3BnxD5LtjsKb1SQT61oFMY0Fztj2S4je2OpXaAIosTbeLp3tsHqpuBVCm25QcS03lsiwnjcwIKwdv-kdWtuBtq8XZOeBML59w29DTxlb-Y9Yklaf2QFYfHZYSD49BpAp19aHgtsKdk3m64vMbA9rNARjNqHm-a93TbewRbkHaqtA9nnpAqNXOtKGXwlT75nOicwBqy62aME6H3FFAmDWgfhZq7_sDX5_-CT6fn6UA=w463-h823-no)

One of the many tomato harvests. This one was made into marinara sauce.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/X7niVDw0lsPVFsFZOGtV73HIYHsKcD9ahybGeNMuELr6CvTlppdiWZapcRX2L7XCqtTFupMSGggDm4pbyUZpQmVmPP19ngwXx1aaxCVtdnaaDdT-r-g7hgnw77hiIL5O_WgRYgkMraIZ5KKROWCiULACKkpnG3W_QNoPDVmpVe7URxyunwgtwiGnkOCsxlfa-2iWVK657woxiQriN4gIVADl0lpjDM30G5VhmxBwPFt91r-aCwGRadRaK2lDoOgqXKManxf4_CSQB1ypCllTEWDDUFmMqBfOd1r3ShyZKuin30EgAoa_58qrbXjkOSjhpvNzFnGP3gA1NrdkQL47ZJc-KHFPXtAuZuTlHTZ9MtCqTYJS08s0v1KoaDH5-lUv1L9AyfwPov6-BT7f2WGhpTegCzt9SXL3fQwxhhauUcpEQ9NWZIDC174jSsd6zPgioP1QzwtZVQRzFlMJg-gr8E9m3NGIjdRsqr-jY6X3VEqqCGvYPZl3eEuHlbUJR5ByxzoB1K7a-17lBVFDR6YgKrQZOuGj11pDV0HSYLzP2vw=w1431-h805-no)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 01, 2015, 12:34:08 PM
Man, I love chiles! Those look great.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 01, 2015, 12:42:43 PM
Those look fantastic Amanda. I'm so envious of all y'all with garden space right now. I probably won't get much going till the summer after next as my garden space to be is still covered in forest. This year we're mostly focused on preserving some of the local produce others have grown.

I started a batch of lacto fermented pepper sauce with some cayenne, and cascabel (or something that looks similar) and a first experiement with lacto fermented daikon pickles.

My wife has been freezing up a storm in her new freezer so we've strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries by the gallon and greens are starting to take over. some of which go straight in the freezer, some I make into mixed green pesto. mustard green pesto is yummy and spicey.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on October 01, 2015, 12:52:16 PM
I started a batch of lacto fermented pepper sauce with some cayenne, and cascabel (or something that looks similar) and a first experiment with lacto fermented daikon pickles.

What is your procedure here? I've been looking at fermented hot sauce recipes all over the internet and have gotten so many different techniques that I'm about tired of looking. I'm leaning towards the 'whir up peppers and garlic in the food processor, add a touch of yogurt whey, ferment until later, then blend with vinegar and other flavors and bottle in little woozy bottles' thing. But I have no idea if that works well or poorly.

mustard green pesto is yummy and spicy.

We've made spinach pesto here a lot and I love it. Speaking of, I should plant some more spinach.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on October 01, 2015, 01:07:10 PM
I started a batch of lacto fermented pepper sauce with some cayenne, and cascabel (or something that looks similar) and a first experiment with lacto fermented daikon pickles.

What is your procedure here? I've been looking at fermented hot sauce recipes all over the internet and have gotten so many different techniques that I'm about tired of looking. I'm leaning towards the 'whir up peppers and garlic in the food processor, add a touch of yogurt whey, ferment until later, then blend with vinegar and other flavors and bottle in little woozy bottles' thing. But I have no idea if that works well or poorly.

that's more or less it except don't forget the salt, about 1/2 tbls per pint. I think the original idea came from here actually. I know keith has been making it a lot. I've only done it a couple times the first time no whey and just let it go and it worked just fine but didn't really get good for at least a couple weeks. This time I added the whey, just 1/2 tsp or so per pint, and it was working and really smelling nice after a day or two. I also added about a tbls of maple syrup to this batch and it adds a nice sweetness and richness that wasn't there is my last attempt.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on October 01, 2015, 08:52:55 PM
Bell peppers are finicky as heck to grow. I grow a few different pepper varieties and most either do not flower during the hottest part of the summer or the blossoms drop off because it's too hot (much like tomatoes). I've tried growing them off and on for a few years. I finally found a plant that seems to tolerate the heat here but like most of my pepper plants they only develop fruit in the late spring and fall.
One thing I learned about peppers is that you will have problems with them flowering and fruiting if the temp gets below 50. Around here that means not planting until June and still covering them once or twice.

I also didn't plant until it was about 65-75+, which really allowed them to take off once they got outside.

But... I have real problems with pepper diseases, which is why I switched to drip irrigation. Too bad it rained and rained and rained and rained here, so I lost a couple plants/fruits to a bacteria spot. The hot peppers didn't seem to mind, my one large bell pepper plant nearly died (Red Beauty), and my little lunchbox sized bell peppers did quite well despite the disease they had early on in life. I'll be saving seeds after this year from the ones that did well and trying out another variety or two of bell peppers. We make a bell pepper soup that is freakin' awesome, so I have to figure out a way to grow more peppers!  :)

Thanks for the info on the bells.  We've always grown bells and jalapenos along with many other things when we had garden space.  Now that we are trying to do container gardening I'm having to completely relearn how to grow plants.

Our yard doesn't have any spot in it where we get enough sun for a garden anymore as the trees have gotten too big We have 5 - 45+ year old maple trees on a 1/2 acre lot (I didn't plant them they were here when we bought the place).  The grass struggle too.

The one spot that gets some sun also flip flops from a swamp to a desert 10 or 15 times a year so it didn't work too well either.  We decided to plant a tool shed and try containers.  Last year worked pretty well but the abnormal weather in Iowa this year confused everyone's gardens.  Tomatoes were small and subject to more blight than normal.  Peppers would blossom and then a blast of heat would knock them off before the set fruit.  Even the flowers didn't grow normally.

The largest tree also has some serious rot going on since a storm 14 years ago tore it up pretty badly.  My wife and keep looking at it dreading the price of having to take it down.  The bright side would be that we could probably make a garden again.  The dark side is we would have to grow our own food to afford the tree removal.   ;)

Oh well, there's always next year!

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on October 11, 2015, 09:32:20 PM
A guy from the ag program at the university gave me some Carolina Reapers. Allegedly the hottest peppers in the world. A seed goes for $2. Currently, I am drying them out, and will probably put one in a rub, and the other in some hot sauce. I mostly want the seeds to plant as ornimentals though. Really beautiful twisted looking peppers.

Otherwise, I am going to start on some hot sauce. Plenty of Habeneros and jalapeños still on the vine. Haven't made a fermented sauce before, but you all have inspired me, so I am looking forward to that.

Also, my blackberries and raspberries have produced a nice little crop in the last week. We ate a few pints worth.

Sadly, the corn has been harvested around me, and now I think I can spot a neighbor in the distance.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 11, 2015, 09:49:45 PM
A guy from the ag program at the university gave me some Carolina Reapers. Allegedly the hottest peppers in the world. A seed goes for $2. Currently, I am drying them out, and will probably put one in a rub, and the other in some hot sauce. I mostly want the seeds to plant as ornimentals though. Really beautiful twisted looking peppers.

Otherwise, I am going to start on some hot sauce. Plenty of Habeneros and jalapeños still on the vine. Haven't made a fermented sauce before, but you all have inspired me, so I am looking forward to that.

Also, my blackberries and raspberries have produced a nice little crop in the last week. We ate a few pints worth.

Sadly, the corn has been harvested around me, and now I think I can spot a neighbor in the distance.


Man, I'm a chile head and I'm scared of those things ;D.  I can't imagine chiles hotter than the Ghost and I know they're out there.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on October 11, 2015, 11:58:31 PM
A guy from the ag program at the university gave me some Carolina Reapers. Allegedly the hottest peppers in the world. A seed goes for $2. Currently, I am drying them out, and will probably put one in a rub, and the other in some hot sauce. I mostly want the seeds to plant as ornimentals though. Really beautiful twisted looking peppers.

Otherwise, I am going to start on some hot sauce. Plenty of Habeneros and jalapeños still on the vine. Haven't made a fermented sauce before, but you all have inspired me, so I am looking forward to that.

Also, my blackberries and raspberries have produced a nice little crop in the last week. We ate a few pints worth.

Sadly, the corn has been harvested around me, and now I think I can spot a neighbor in the distance.


Man, I'm a chile head and I'm scared of those things ;D.  I can't imagine chiles hotter than the Ghost and I know they're out there.
I hear yah. Someone game me a bottle of dried ghost pepper three years ago, and I still have about a quarter of that left.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 18, 2015, 02:56:36 PM
going to hafta put these together with some type of yeast...(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/plums%202015_zpsymws88kn.jpg)

AND....into secondary they go....kinda dry sweet mead yeast musta liked this sugar...
(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a87/Vertical1/PlumWine2015_zpswfpnznje.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on October 20, 2015, 11:06:51 PM
Whooee Whyomin!
That'll get you thru the long winter.


Sorry I missed Amandas tree form poblanos - mine are turning red now.
We have had an amazing prolonged indian summer. Last night the first time I could see steam off the compost pile!

Still picking raspberries; wow is that a job...every other day, but we have a ton frozen by now.
Processed 25 pounds of cabbage this morning into a crock to saur....I dang near got a blister cutting that stuff up. sheesh.

That lactofermented hot sauce is next on my list. 

Any tips on how best to store beets for the winter?

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on October 21, 2015, 01:35:54 PM
Whooee Whyomin!
That'll get you thru the long winter.


Sorry I missed Amandas tree form poblanos - mine are turning red now.
We have had an amazing prolonged indian summer. Last night the first time I could see steam off the compost pile!

Still picking raspberries; wow is that a job...every other day, but we have a ton frozen by now.
Processed 25 pounds of cabbage this morning into a crock to saur....I dang near got a blister cutting that stuff up. sheesh.

That lactofermented hot sauce is next on my list. 

Any tips on how best to store beets for the winter?
I store beets in a plastic bucket in my root cellar. Root crops like it cold, moist, and dark. They stay fresh until March when it warms up a bit and they sprout and soften, but there's only a few left at that point and they go in the compost.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on October 21, 2015, 02:01:30 PM
Whooee Whyomin!
That'll get you thru the long winter.


Sorry I missed Amandas tree form poblanos - mine are turning red now.
We have had an amazing prolonged indian summer. Last night the first time I could see steam off the compost pile!

Still picking raspberries; wow is that a job...every other day, but we have a ton frozen by now.
Processed 25 pounds of cabbage this morning into a crock to saur....I dang near got a blister cutting that stuff up. sheesh.

That lactofermented hot sauce is next on my list. 

Any tips on how best to store beets for the winter?
I store beets in a plastic bucket in my root cellar. Root crops like it cold, moist, and dark. They stay fresh until March when it warms up a bit and they sprout and soften, but there's only a few left at that point and they go in the compost.

Do you put sand in the plastic buckets Pete? I have heard that storing root veggies in sand will extend the usefulness through the winter. I'm starting to think about building a root cellar, and was looking at putting some boxes with sand in it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on October 21, 2015, 03:15:37 PM
Last night the first time I could see steam off the compost pile!

quote Casper Star Tribune "A Natrona County wildfire that destroyed 12 homes, killed countless livestock and pets and displaced more than 1,300 people began Saturday in a woodchip pile at the Casper landfill."

http://trib.com/news/local/casper/details-emerge-on-cole-creek-fire-s-beginnings/article_563db84b-e6db-52db-91c5-c7812000b320.html (http://trib.com/news/local/casper/details-emerge-on-cole-creek-fire-s-beginnings/article_563db84b-e6db-52db-91c5-c7812000b320.html)

BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!

The city burned half the county their steamy pile of compost got outta hand.

We got evacuated and spent three long days displaced in a motel not knowing if we still had a house....
We were fortunate and the fire got within 100 feet and did NOT consume us..
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on October 21, 2015, 04:08:09 PM
Whooee Whyomin!
That'll get you thru the long winter.


Sorry I missed Amandas tree form poblanos - mine are turning red now.
We have had an amazing prolonged indian summer. Last night the first time I could see steam off the compost pile!

Still picking raspberries; wow is that a job...every other day, but we have a ton frozen by now.
Processed 25 pounds of cabbage this morning into a crock to saur....I dang near got a blister cutting that stuff up. sheesh.

That lactofermented hot sauce is next on my list. 

Any tips on how best to store beets for the winter?
I store beets in a plastic bucket in my root cellar. Root crops like it cold, moist, and dark. They stay fresh until March when it warms up a bit and they sprout and soften, but there's only a few left at that point and they go in the compost.

Do you put sand in the plastic buckets Pete? I have heard that storing root veggies in sand will extend the usefulness through the winter. I'm starting to think about building a root cellar, and was looking at putting some boxes with sand in it.
I used sand the first year I built my root cellar. I found that buckets with no sand kept the root vegetables just as well but kept out mice and bugs plus there was no sand to wash off. I tried moist sand in buckets with lids but they started rotting sooner that way.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on October 21, 2015, 05:02:20 PM
Well, pepper season is drawing to a close here. Just trimmed up the last producing plants to get them to ripen what is on them.

Our harvest so far:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/qY0LP87LkSgp8rNqPohH2W-3b2ICfVlnpN9zN6PkppPpvQdtCoPU0cX98J8q65RLRlf7sGYaZ6i3v3pyeDDq4X62lBzW-paOiis4tz7kaQUcYjOd0ksjEBK5bebjv7arT9rNlGuIV7GejnWx_7WwtFiMnL2_zfj_VhmU0Lymwf_JxYIIoRrlrFwPGJw6TrxxVUT476qeLjbaD2RAN5Iw-TIZ4TxrQn8B7Zq6D6TOAQPn9dN5uJzfqaOVqepQqqyvGf1d0g8KLGPbRnrUnNZd6F-ALIf-6qHeyqM6OZzDX5gan9NhcZ7pWk3wH-Ni29A9DOKPDKrjzvw-eOzhrr6bkmiPUle71cJ5Ml99_QMWwWu-gIjaztfMz_iIbAUdbnr3Kuafufu8ywVr5u7Rh2rYziF5oYbVkgfzLjWatuyX8T5WzuMU2KyjtaVelGKQZuwCu1BDqLO7NOVXH0ipTgksnmKK77kT_fEV9SyyRMpOgp7Y6wlTu8WeR1O64Y_4iO1crj8UxLqZkAb1jlXnKmJOi0c42uaWdgluULDyowkPUOo=w1602-h901-no)

I've probably gotten my $2 worth out of this plant, just by taunting my friends. The ghost pepper:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-jN_90JCxztHWSZfbZ_bWxJV-HdkpJl4JUFflW82TPri0U-g3aKW-Ri4KkqXHSTlOx1kNPCRfOdGu7BbHDdkUkR7Y6gL77VtMORrlFuaItYMXkWBMSQ1x08MDXOxrOetwhw-y8Pdp7Y2HzWIm2TcejCEJznKWNvm3D4MUM-fIdscdWHrURLRrf6xJcXM3rV8rBJxdA51XfQl1VDLvaLHhpR3sIaROr-C1Jji5JCYdjdSI1hZ0_eAAlQa5qa40CtsfwRutbY52ldf5Csnw_PiZglFQZ7NEOYcaxGjibprkZ_xZ4-wQh4sf8MXaBmlR5SSc-TymNN0-08w99-RI5iyrd_iutfHmcIKJAo2NWEtV81ssLMGfAp7QGg7NwRJXLCvs_i4kCtgPekmZmQjfuHt0_1Ve32Wl9DHdCN_rejK_eHIXeAQRyz3Fzapj_PwH3b1T8DkYEm4MWpYs2qHmWPVmQezJ0qheT7N4dqxlyWvmVnQ_f6E-mA_t2pTeRaZEVESm2sXkvUZEBst-UhSFknFLQCWSrT-xYlW3VFeG43O7sw=w1602-h901-no)

Myles' preparing some death sauce:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/M7TeLrQXGl6be4km5oCaNBXal90QOSqu7SLcVkXZqMcNrqtaFELdog-2yPvdz3kjWZiPiP_d-mRg-Pbp6iot20IUpkV9URdCmkRvqMCj-7AidTElLD695_v4YSOA8WKFJGSomj5T3m-TcTXiRZER5ESB2OFPwkOd3BhVLi1hEJwa2al810n5jRmGH0pW7y645uMgUq8ZGH9tIPj03rzryYraA8mTCFfV2tEeCKOA8gK9E6-pD4tHm-XHspa0DPzOrmLwEYbteweMcxOwB-iH8s1mJ5WuLB1KSGCsGoC34qw-brS64yhjVVJ5NwdxqoRAn4wOOxNYaCvwcqRUF3gaXXeyouwTKCk3q4KEWtktPL-X355bS9gaSvJQJRijgBUtlMVddOBImXdmhKPD6scDFlZsJtoH7Vtx_SLaobbmvH2-WD2_3f6Bao5_uPIJcDad5EVQnBsNvdLxwWAtRtOGzvOksv_fvZSclpcuUGH3G-WEgZNIS8vitOA2xXpiis-JbjpzJ0z3DIjTnV8NTfiL1yQenJ45_eSPR5xaVXS7t04=w1602-h901-no)

I helped make the green ones, but I can't be near the two on the right. Fermented one is poblanos (no seeds/pith) and mild-jallys. Next green one is poblanos, real jallys, and serranos. Red one is red jallys, red sorranos, and a few habenaros. Orange one is habenaros and 3 ghost peppers.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/glTR5-GQ9uSiXWdJZvVcGDsD9TeoXOViLSVkVqijeyEpV9Zd7AxQUaUgaLAJZNl-IKpWQQaCeExUBktHiqbpJaalunJZEUINPf6_6JvZkBcN91VO_nrcVSZanln0jW1MTwzq_ntR9ISCW8TWHlVLI5iUOmz_sR9Ceq3BKPihUDJCfsICuJ5u_PXEVY4NphkpR9AOKvDhwt9mfRQtnspyuA7LLpRmLfO65erAy4rTBhPcNsi7yxJdm4WfyfzOrcIUwueZGV6wIRitCO07SbYYCXXpoqIwYRG6QUHBQ4hEHCz8rfHKHUhkEPQkDcYCCpyVLJisSyVL_g10YzKIVL1TSRj3CVaFIoZHS3gAWJnfpU0DwGcQfdtN-5QcQCXlNXlaOk77seiSoOTtFNr2lrB9MN0qAfM1JsGRJzcONLVlcureCMHaOViPY5987bQ6-u4BtMrKmwV3_4VAJ4srE1PDjF4QIo3C6uB7nmxWofsEMdQvP65YzJSmpJeWxe4mqjmMirg_VeU-fLnOCcjWqFZMx4MnmpWP3WmUhGedof_NZrg=w1602-h901-no)

Next year I'm going to grow some "mild hots", or versions of super hots that have only the flavor and a very mild heat. I found a mild habenaro "NuMex Sauve Orange" and a few peppers from Trinidad that supposedly aren't hot. I'm looking at Shis***os as well. Maybe next year I can get in on this hot sauce fun.  :D
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: reverseapachemaster on October 22, 2015, 01:53:04 PM
Next year I'm going to grow some "mild hots", or versions of super hots that have only the flavor and a very mild heat. I found a mild habenaro "NuMex Sauve Orange" and a few peppers from Trinidad that supposedly aren't hot. I'm looking at Shis***os as well. Maybe next year I can get in on this hot sauce fun.  :D

This year I picked up a Craig's Grande Jalapeno which were not marked as mild jalapenos but turned out to be mild. They are barely hotter than a bell pepper. They have good flavor and not bland like the TAM milds but I need some heat. I'm not sure that plant will make the cut for next year's garden so I can plant something spicy but I would recommend it as a mild option.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 22, 2015, 02:07:35 PM
Well, pepper season is drawing to a close here. Just trimmed up the last producing plants to get them to ripen what is on them.

Our harvest so far:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/qY0LP87LkSgp8rNqPohH2W-3b2ICfVlnpN9zN6PkppPpvQdtCoPU0cX98J8q65RLRlf7sGYaZ6i3v3pyeDDq4X62lBzW-paOiis4tz7kaQUcYjOd0ksjEBK5bebjv7arT9rNlGuIV7GejnWx_7WwtFiMnL2_zfj_VhmU0Lymwf_JxYIIoRrlrFwPGJw6TrxxVUT476qeLjbaD2RAN5Iw-TIZ4TxrQn8B7Zq6D6TOAQPn9dN5uJzfqaOVqepQqqyvGf1d0g8KLGPbRnrUnNZd6F-ALIf-6qHeyqM6OZzDX5gan9NhcZ7pWk3wH-Ni29A9DOKPDKrjzvw-eOzhrr6bkmiPUle71cJ5Ml99_QMWwWu-gIjaztfMz_iIbAUdbnr3Kuafufu8ywVr5u7Rh2rYziF5oYbVkgfzLjWatuyX8T5WzuMU2KyjtaVelGKQZuwCu1BDqLO7NOVXH0ipTgksnmKK77kT_fEV9SyyRMpOgp7Y6wlTu8WeR1O64Y_4iO1crj8UxLqZkAb1jlXnKmJOi0c42uaWdgluULDyowkPUOo=w1602-h901-no)

I've probably gotten my $2 worth out of this plant, just by taunting my friends. The ghost pepper:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-jN_90JCxztHWSZfbZ_bWxJV-HdkpJl4JUFflW82TPri0U-g3aKW-Ri4KkqXHSTlOx1kNPCRfOdGu7BbHDdkUkR7Y6gL77VtMORrlFuaItYMXkWBMSQ1x08MDXOxrOetwhw-y8Pdp7Y2HzWIm2TcejCEJznKWNvm3D4MUM-fIdscdWHrURLRrf6xJcXM3rV8rBJxdA51XfQl1VDLvaLHhpR3sIaROr-C1Jji5JCYdjdSI1hZ0_eAAlQa5qa40CtsfwRutbY52ldf5Csnw_PiZglFQZ7NEOYcaxGjibprkZ_xZ4-wQh4sf8MXaBmlR5SSc-TymNN0-08w99-RI5iyrd_iutfHmcIKJAo2NWEtV81ssLMGfAp7QGg7NwRJXLCvs_i4kCtgPekmZmQjfuHt0_1Ve32Wl9DHdCN_rejK_eHIXeAQRyz3Fzapj_PwH3b1T8DkYEm4MWpYs2qHmWPVmQezJ0qheT7N4dqxlyWvmVnQ_f6E-mA_t2pTeRaZEVESm2sXkvUZEBst-UhSFknFLQCWSrT-xYlW3VFeG43O7sw=w1602-h901-no)

Myles' preparing some death sauce:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/M7TeLrQXGl6be4km5oCaNBXal90QOSqu7SLcVkXZqMcNrqtaFELdog-2yPvdz3kjWZiPiP_d-mRg-Pbp6iot20IUpkV9URdCmkRvqMCj-7AidTElLD695_v4YSOA8WKFJGSomj5T3m-TcTXiRZER5ESB2OFPwkOd3BhVLi1hEJwa2al810n5jRmGH0pW7y645uMgUq8ZGH9tIPj03rzryYraA8mTCFfV2tEeCKOA8gK9E6-pD4tHm-XHspa0DPzOrmLwEYbteweMcxOwB-iH8s1mJ5WuLB1KSGCsGoC34qw-brS64yhjVVJ5NwdxqoRAn4wOOxNYaCvwcqRUF3gaXXeyouwTKCk3q4KEWtktPL-X355bS9gaSvJQJRijgBUtlMVddOBImXdmhKPD6scDFlZsJtoH7Vtx_SLaobbmvH2-WD2_3f6Bao5_uPIJcDad5EVQnBsNvdLxwWAtRtOGzvOksv_fvZSclpcuUGH3G-WEgZNIS8vitOA2xXpiis-JbjpzJ0z3DIjTnV8NTfiL1yQenJ45_eSPR5xaVXS7t04=w1602-h901-no)

I helped make the green ones, but I can't be near the two on the right. Fermented one is poblanos (no seeds/pith) and mild-jallys. Next green one is poblanos, real jallys, and serranos. Red one is red jallys, red sorranos, and a few habenaros. Orange one is habenaros and 3 ghost peppers.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/glTR5-GQ9uSiXWdJZvVcGDsD9TeoXOViLSVkVqijeyEpV9Zd7AxQUaUgaLAJZNl-IKpWQQaCeExUBktHiqbpJaalunJZEUINPf6_6JvZkBcN91VO_nrcVSZanln0jW1MTwzq_ntR9ISCW8TWHlVLI5iUOmz_sR9Ceq3BKPihUDJCfsICuJ5u_PXEVY4NphkpR9AOKvDhwt9mfRQtnspyuA7LLpRmLfO65erAy4rTBhPcNsi7yxJdm4WfyfzOrcIUwueZGV6wIRitCO07SbYYCXXpoqIwYRG6QUHBQ4hEHCz8rfHKHUhkEPQkDcYCCpyVLJisSyVL_g10YzKIVL1TSRj3CVaFIoZHS3gAWJnfpU0DwGcQfdtN-5QcQCXlNXlaOk77seiSoOTtFNr2lrB9MN0qAfM1JsGRJzcONLVlcureCMHaOViPY5987bQ6-u4BtMrKmwV3_4VAJ4srE1PDjF4QIo3C6uB7nmxWofsEMdQvP65YzJSmpJeWxe4mqjmMirg_VeU-fLnOCcjWqFZMx4MnmpWP3WmUhGedof_NZrg=w1602-h901-no)

Next year I'm going to grow some "mild hots", or versions of super hots that have only the flavor and a very mild heat. I found a mild habenaro "NuMex Sauve Orange" and a few peppers from Trinidad that supposedly aren't hot. I'm looking at Shis***os as well. Maybe next year I can get in on this hot sauce fun.  :D


Peppers and sauces look great, Amanda ! I'd be all over the first three sauces, but I'm a little fearful of the last. I'm chile crazy but have decided that the ghost is more punishment than I deserve. Love habaneros, though.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on October 22, 2015, 02:18:53 PM
We grew ghosts last year that were not as incredibly hot as I thought they would be. Its interesting because I get really wide variations in heat from year to year. Last year and the year before our jalapenos were really hot, this year their not. Our anchos are WAY hotter this year than they have ever been. I need to learn a little about what conditions effect heat.

Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 22, 2015, 02:31:29 PM
We grew ghosts last year that were not as incredibly hot as I thought they would be. Its interesting because I get really wide variations in heat from year to year. Last year and the year before our jalapenos were really hot, this year their not. Our anchos are WAY hotter this year than they have ever been. I need to learn a little about what conditions effect heat.

Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.

I've grown a lot of chiles and noticed the same thing, Pete. Except for serranos which have always been consistent for me. I see the serrano as a better jalapeno.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Stevie on October 22, 2015, 02:57:34 PM
I read, or saw in a YouTube video, that heat can be influenced by watering. Don't know how true it is.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on October 22, 2015, 05:31:45 PM
I drifted away from this thread for a while. My gardening update is that it went well for as hot and dry as it was. With all the fires I thought my peppers would come out Chipotle. But, in the end the deer got all but a few poblanos, and most of the tomatoes. In fact there were 4 big bucks on the deck one day chowing down on Mrs Klickitat's tomatoes. So the plan is venison tamales in a few days to see if the salsa flavor comes through.

Moved poblanos to the greehouse where they have come back to life and are still producing like crazy.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 69franx on October 23, 2015, 11:28:35 AM
Great to wake up with a Klickitatjim laugh. Venison tamales he says...
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on October 23, 2015, 02:06:21 PM
I love Jim posts. :)

I too am curious about what affects heat levels. Normally I can eat a poblano, no problem. The ones I grew this year (Tiburon) were incendiary for me. Probably about as hot as the Serranos we grew. Great in Kenji's black bean burgers, not good for me on kabobs. I'll probably grow less of those next year (had 5 trees this year).
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on October 23, 2015, 08:34:38 PM
The tale I was always told is that dry conditions produce hotter peppers.  I have no idea if that is true or not.  It seems like it would make a little sense as more water and growth might cause the Cappacin (SP?) to be less concentrated but I have no science to back that up. 

I'm just ready for the work day to end so I can go get a beer.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on October 24, 2015, 01:14:53 PM
The tale I was always told is that dry conditions produce hotter peppers.  I have no idea if that is true or not.  It seems like it would make a little sense as more water and growth might cause the Cappacin (SP?) to be less concentrated but I have no science to back that up. 

I'm just ready for the work day to end so I can go get a beer.

Paul
Anecdotal evidence to the contrary: it rained so much here in April - June that we had 30' rivers running through the backyard and garden. I didn't have to buy a timer for the drip irrigation until July.

I've read that same thing, it just didn't hold up.

I'm going with "it's a crap shoot". :)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 24, 2015, 02:48:13 PM
With jalapenos especially, I've had peppers on the same plant vary greatly in heat. And of course chiles seem to be hotter on the upper half (near the stem) than on the lower half. Past that, I've never been able to figure out a pattern, though it would make sense that dry conditions would concentrate the heat.  I've grown in lots of rain, no rain, average rain - I haven't been able to notice a difference.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on October 24, 2015, 09:01:56 PM
I've always thought the reason for particularly hot peppers was dry weather after the growth period which requires a ton of water. Sort of like getting really flavorful tomatoes. Get them nice and big from all the water, then let them dehydrate on the vine. This would explain why mine, and so may others around me had such hot peppers this year.

But, I have had differences between peppers on the same plant. so what do I know.

Bought 16 heads of garlic at the market today to plant. Varieties were Asian Tempest, Translyvanian, and Kilareney Red. I also got various peppers on the cheap to make some more hot sauces. Ancho, poblano, ghost, lemon, and other habaneros. Since I can't brew at the moment (tore something in my knee), I need to brew something!

I've also been putting down black mulch to kill the grass off, so that I can triple the size of the garden next year. Pulling the tomatoes today. Always a sad time for me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on October 30, 2015, 11:42:14 AM
We've been done for a few weeks now.  Overall, a very good year for tomatoes and peppers, pretty much everything.  Even the leeks turned out well.  We made a ton of pickles and have plenty of roasted tomatoes for sauce.  Made chipotles and have some nice dried anchos and chile grandes for chili.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 03, 2015, 02:20:01 PM
I've also been putting down black mulch to kill the grass off, so that I can triple the size of the garden next year. Pulling the tomatoes today. Always a sad time for me.

We just had a freeze - finally - and I pulled my tomatoes as well.  End of October for maters is really strange but wow it has been a nice autumn.

Tell me about the black mulch...what is it and does it really work?

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on November 03, 2015, 02:22:48 PM
Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.

Huh, I thought I had missed the photos but apparently others can see....
How come I can see Vertical1 photos but not Amandas?






Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on November 03, 2015, 02:26:58 PM
I put down black fabric....the type they use on the highway road bases...thick heavy poly tight weave....
I use it to cover my raised garden in the winter to keep weed seed from blowing into the zone. 
That works ....it gets pulled up every year.  OTOH....I put same down as a barrier all around the house
trying to do a xeriscape thing.  I now have native grass that has completely  grown on top of the
weed barrier because it did NOT get pulled up every year and so to answer your question @pinnah, it may
or may not work, depends upon your application.  Stuff likes to grow on top of it, now if I desire to
change the technology...what a mess I have to undo the grown over fabric.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on November 03, 2015, 02:28:01 PM
Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.

Huh, I thought I had missed the photos but apparently others can see....
How come I can see Vertical1 photos but not Amandas?

I asked this same question in Admin
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on November 03, 2015, 10:29:41 PM
Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.

Huh, I thought I had missed the photos but apparently others can see....
How come I can see Vertical1 photos but not Amandas?

I asked this same question in Admin

They're hosted from Google Photos. Not sure why some can see them and others can't.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on November 04, 2015, 02:35:54 PM
I've also been putting down black mulch to kill the grass off, so that I can triple the size of the garden next year. Pulling the tomatoes today. Always a sad time for me.

We just had a freeze - finally - and I pulled my tomatoes as well.  End of October for maters is really strange but wow it has been a nice autumn.

Tell me about the black mulch...what is it and does it really work?

The black mulch is just black plastic. I lay it over the garden, pin it down, and then bury the edges making it totally immobile. Then I just put holes in where I want to plant things. This keeps the area completely weed free,  and heats the soil. Important for me is preventing soil from splashing onto my plants when it rains, which is where a lot of diseases stem from. You can buy colors other than black, which are supposed to do various things like metallic silver reflects light in a way that keeps insects away, while also reflecting light into the canopy of the plant spurring more growth. As opposed to landscape fabric, water cannot get in through it, so it works really well with a drip setup. I used the black mulch a little bit this year on my brambles and ribes, and saw these benefits right away. Having seen quite a few  commercial setups this year that use black mulch, I will say it works quite well.

I bought mine from johnny's:
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-9195-black-mulch-4-x-100-smooth.aspx
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on November 04, 2015, 08:47:31 PM
Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.

Huh, I thought I had missed the photos but apparently others can see....
How come I can see Vertical1 photos but not Amandas?

I asked this same question in Admin

They're hosted from Google Photos. Not sure why some can see them and others can't.

At my work I can't see the photos Amanda posts because the company I work for blocks most Google App stuff.  The search engine and Maps are allowed but not Gmail or Goggle Photo and stuff like that. 

I can see the pictures fine at home or on my phone.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on November 04, 2015, 11:34:39 PM
Anyway, great looking harvest Amanda.

Huh, I thought I had missed the photos but apparently others can see....
How come I can see Vertical1 photos but not Amandas?

I asked this same question in Admin

They're hosted from Google Photos. Not sure why some can see them and others can't.

At my work I can't see the photos Amanda posts because the company I work for blocks most Google App stuff.  The search engine and Maps are allowed but not Gmail or Goggle Photo and stuff like that. 

I can see the pictures fine at home or on my phone.

Paul
Can you guys see imgur? I'll just host them there if so.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on November 05, 2015, 05:52:04 AM
I don't know amanda, give us a sample to try....but I am a member of the
google thing and use their apps and just don't get it....other than my old dino puter.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on December 22, 2015, 09:12:48 PM
I had a hard time this year with a drought and pests. So dry weeds really weren't an issue but I'm putting down a barrier this spring and hopefully a proper drip system. It was a real PITA watering twice a day and leaving for more than one day was risky.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on December 23, 2015, 02:34:01 PM
That's a real drag, Euge. Drip irrigation and some black mulch would help a lot with pests and water needs.

My cover crops on the field are still growing as we haven't had a sustained frost yet. Which is great cause that hairy vetch is putting in a ton of nitrogen, and the oilseed radishes must be four or more feet long at this point. I find this super spooky though. It will be 60 F outside tomorrow.

We finally got our tractor and attachments last week though. It only took four months after ordering, but I am going to have fun come spring.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on December 24, 2015, 04:47:44 PM
That's a real drag, Euge. Drip irrigation and some black mulch would help a lot with pests and water needs.

My cover crops on the field are still growing as we haven't had a sustained frost yet. Which is great cause that hairy vetch is putting in a ton of nitrogen, and the oilseed radishes must be four or more feet long at this point. I find this super spooky though. It will be 60 F outside tomorrow.

We finally got our tractor and attachments last week though. It only took four months after ordering, but I am going to have fun come spring.
Do you till under the vetch? I planted some a few years ago in a spot where I wanted to expand my garden. It didn't work (I have really sandy soil and it did poorly), but what was able to grow has started spreading a bit. I wouldn't quite call it a weed at this point, but does seem a bit invasive.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on December 26, 2015, 04:09:22 PM
Do you till under the vetch? I planted some a few years ago in a spot where I wanted to expand my garden. It didn't work (I have really sandy soil and it did poorly), but what was able to grow has started spreading a bit. I wouldn't quite call it a weed at this point, but does seem a bit invasive.

That is a problem with vetch. Tilling it under wouldn't be a good idea, as it would just plant more seed. Unless you spread black plastic mulch over the tilled area, which would kill it quite well. The seeds would still be viable for quite a while though. My plan is to cut it down with the sickle bar, the use the flame weeder on it. Then plant something else right away. I may use black mulch after flame weeding as well. Otherwise, 2,4-d will do the job.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on January 05, 2016, 07:52:13 PM
Sorry to hear Euge.  On the positive side, you only have a little time to wait and can start in again!

I just packaged 35 pounds of sauerkraut - all grown in the garden.
Thanks for the help.

There is a pretty nice cornice going on the compost pile....
Happy New Year gardeners. 8)

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/jancascade_zpsrieqjxuy.jpg)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 02, 2016, 11:55:19 PM
I'm slightly sore: hauled in a yard of rich sandy garden soil and topped off 3 rickety beds. A full bed-load that took 6 trips in the wheelbarrow. Picked up one of those giant blue 2-wheeled barrows at lowes on sale- $109 last spring. Would have been 10 loads in a regular wheelbarrow.

Have my onion sets and carrot seeds. Hopefully I can get some romas in the ground in the next couple weeks.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 03, 2016, 02:45:57 AM
I'm slightly sore: hauled in a yard of rich sandy garden soil and topped off 3 rickety beds. A full bed-load that took 6 trips in the wheelbarrow. Picked up one of those giant blue 2-wheeled barrows at lowes on sale- $109 last spring. Would have been 10 loads in a regular wheelbarrow.

Have my onion sets and carrot seeds. Hopefully I can get some romas in the ground in the next couple weeks.
3 months until its safe to plant tomatoes here. I do have a bulk order pick up coming up soon though that a i get in on with my Northeast Organic Farmers Association membership. lots of love to the soil this year: 150# composted chicken manure, 50# gypsum, 100# lime, 50# kelp meal, 50#blood meal, 50# greensand and more. also putting in a drip irrigation system this year.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: troybinso on March 03, 2016, 04:42:54 AM
I'm slightly sore: hauled in a yard of rich sandy garden soil and topped off 3 rickety beds. A full bed-load that took 6 trips in the wheelbarrow. Picked up one of those giant blue 2-wheeled barrows at lowes on sale- $109 last spring. Would have been 10 loads in a regular wheelbarrow.

Have my onion sets and carrot seeds. Hopefully I can get some romas in the ground in the next couple weeks.
Why bother with romas? The ones in the store taste pretty good. I like to focus tomato planting on good slicing tomatoes you can eat raw. Those are the kinds that just don't make it to the grocery store.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 03, 2016, 01:09:42 PM
I'm slightly sore: hauled in a yard of rich sandy garden soil and topped off 3 rickety beds. A full bed-load that took 6 trips in the wheelbarrow. Picked up one of those giant blue 2-wheeled barrows at lowes on sale- $109 last spring. Would have been 10 loads in a regular wheelbarrow.

Have my onion sets and carrot seeds. Hopefully I can get some romas in the ground in the next couple weeks.
Why bother with romas? The ones in the store taste pretty good. I like to focus tomato planting on good slicing tomatoes you can eat raw. Those are the kinds that just don't make it to the grocery store.
I plant 50-75 romas and paste tomatoes for canning sauce because they are prolific and resistant to late blight. I plant maybe twenty heirloom slicers and a few cherries to eat fresh in season.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 03, 2016, 01:10:43 PM
I'm slightly sore: hauled in a yard of rich sandy garden soil and topped off 3 rickety beds. A full bed-load that took 6 trips in the wheelbarrow. Picked up one of those giant blue 2-wheeled barrows at lowes on sale- $109 last spring. Would have been 10 loads in a regular wheelbarrow.

Have my onion sets and carrot seeds. Hopefully I can get some romas in the ground in the next couple weeks.
Why bother with romas? The ones in the store taste pretty good. I like to focus tomato planting on good slicing tomatoes you can eat raw. Those are the kinds that just don't make it to the grocery store.

I don't see why it is an either/or question. I like to plant romas and other varieties.

I believe my Roma tomatoes taste much better than what i can get at the store. It is also what I use a lot of, making the fresh availability of them in the garden highly valuable. Lastly, they are a great sauce tomato.

Euge -- didn't meant to answer for you. I am jealous of your garden timeline. I did order a lot of seed last week, and will hopefully place an order for a drip irrigation soon. We will be expanding to an acre this year.

I did see my garlic is starting to come up already, and the strawberries are looking ready to wake up.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 03, 2016, 02:31:20 PM
I just happen to prefer romas and the ones at the grocer are bigger but not as tasty. They work well in the cuisine here but I mainly make a base unseasoned tomato sauce for freezing and consumption throughout the year. Ketchup also is pretty easy to make with the odds and ends and slightly reject specimens.

Grew some heirloom in 2013. Pretty substantial crop. They produced right up to the freeze. It's a good idea- might do a plant or so this year.

Found it's only really worth growing what'll get used. Tomatoes, onion, carrots, peppers, broccoli, and greens like mustard or collard. Going to try potoatoes. The first year I grew radishes. I don't really care for them and they all went to waste.

On a side note: I gave one a my friends a couple of my indeterminate roma plants last spring and they have managed to survive our very mild winter and a northern exposure. Still producing fruit.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 03, 2016, 03:00:48 PM
The first year I grew radishes. I don't really care for them and they all went to waste.

Euge, try eating radishes with butter and salt as a snack on a nice late spring/early summer afternoon sitting in the sun drinking a saison. You'll care for them then I bet.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 03, 2016, 03:07:39 PM
The first year I grew radishes. I don't really care for them and they all went to waste.

Euge, try eating radishes with butter and salt as a snack on a nice late spring/early summer afternoon sitting in the sun drinking a saison. You'll care for them then I bet.

The French way!

I'll plant some and try. :D Also I think they pickle well with jalapenos. Or is that turnip...?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 03, 2016, 03:17:32 PM
The first year I grew radishes. I don't really care for them and they all went to waste.

Euge, try eating radishes with butter and salt as a snack on a nice late spring/early summer afternoon sitting in the sun drinking a saison. You'll care for them then I bet.

The French way!

I'll plant some and try. :D Also I think they pickle well with jalapenos. Or is that turnip...?
When I have too much I grate them and pickle them to use as a condiment on sandwiches and salads.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: reverseapachemaster on March 03, 2016, 03:24:34 PM
There's still a slight chance the weather will dip under 40F at night so I'm holding off on any planting for another week or two. I have my peppers and ground cherries overwintered in the house and ready to go. I'll probably add another jalapeno plant and look for the thai basil to sprout from the seeds that blew into the ground.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 03, 2016, 03:48:03 PM
If anybody would like some Carolina Reaper seeds, let me know. They go for $1 for a seed, and I was given quite a few peppers. I plan on growing them as ornamentals, and for some hot sauce.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: klickitat jim on March 03, 2016, 09:40:04 PM
I just happen to prefer romas and the ones at the grocer are bigger but not as tasty. They work well in the cuisine here but I mainly make a base unseasoned tomato sauce for freezing and consumption throughout the year. Ketchup also is pretty easy to make with the odds and ends and slightly reject specimens.

Grew some heirloom in 2013. Pretty substantial crop. They produced right up to the freeze. It's a good idea- might do a plant or so this year.

Found it's only really worth growing what'll get used. Tomatoes, onion, carrots, peppers, broccoli, and greens like mustard or collard. Going to try potoatoes. The first year I grew radishes. I don't really care for them and they all went to waste.

On a side note: I gave one a my friends a couple of my indeterminate roma plants last spring and they have managed to survive our very mild winter and a northern exposure. Still producing fruit.
Potatoes... our soil here is what they call "peanut butter" its so muddy in winter and rock hard in summer. So it takes some conditioning. A trick we've been using is to dig 2cf holes in the rows that need more loam, then we fill the holes with miracle grow potting soil, we plant taters in that. They do wicked awesome. Then the next year all that potting soil gets tilled in and we move to the next row... its a great way to keep the garden conditioned, rotating, and grow killer taters all at the same time.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 03, 2016, 10:31:44 PM
That's a great idea as we have heavy clay soil in my area. It's fertile but not really great for the home garden. Pretty much glue when wet, concrete when semi-dry and friable when bone dry. That's when one digs holes IMO. My solution was raised beds.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 06, 2016, 07:28:02 PM
Finally got around to starting peppers.
(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/03/06/71d514fcffb618caf8e15940468c79b4.jpg)

And built a new little PVC seed starting apparatus. I have plans for 26 pepper plants, and will probably start about twice that so I can select for the healthiest ones.
(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/03/06/cd67afff0dbf11c0b224b6f5e164e83c.jpg)

Going to plant some snap peas and various greens today after studying some more.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 06, 2016, 07:41:39 PM
Awesome looking collection of seeds, Amanda. I grow chiles too, but the Red Savina Habanero is my ceiling for heat. The Reaper is too much fun (or misery) for me. Enjoy!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 06, 2016, 09:33:25 PM
Finally got all my onion sets in and the forecast is rain the next several days. Hopefully it is just right and they get a thorough soak and not a beating.

Inserted some kohlrabi and roma seeds among them in key places. And scattered some carrot seeds about.

I made furrows and planted the sets along the ridges in hopes they'll have an easier time pushing dirt away.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 07, 2016, 03:07:52 AM
Awesome looking collection of seeds, Amanda. I grow chiles too, but the Red Savina Habanero is my ceiling for heat. The Reaper is too much fun (or misery) for me. Enjoy!

Oh I'm not eating the Reapers or even going near them after they start fruiting! I have what my friends here call a "baby mouth". So the Numex Sauve Orange and Zavory Habenaro are for me, while the Reapers, Scotch Bonnets, and real Habenaros are for the husband and his hot sauces. I had to leave the house when hot sauce was being made last fall (Ghost, Habs, and Serranos I think).

The Numez and Zavory are supposedly a very mild version of Habenaros... so maybe I'll be able to eat them!  :D The hottest I can do is some Poblanos, but the Tiburons I grew last year were as hot as they were prolific so I didn't get to eat much of them. :/
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 07, 2016, 01:04:36 PM
I watched this over the weekend. They go for the Carolina Reaper... :o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9k-SBpElcWA&sns=em (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9k-SBpElcWA&sns=em)

Way too funny!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 69franx on March 08, 2016, 12:36:00 AM
Great link euge! Love watching someone do "stupid" human tricks, but I'm convinced to never try any if those straight
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on March 08, 2016, 03:53:30 AM
Awesome looking collection of seeds, Amanda. I grow chiles too, but the Red Savina Habanero is my ceiling for heat. The Reaper is too much fun (or misery) for me. Enjoy!

Oh I'm not eating the Reapers or even going near them after they start fruiting! I have what my friends here call a "baby mouth". So the Numex Sauve Orange and Zavory Habenaro are for me, while the Reapers, Scotch Bonnets, and real Habenaros are for the husband and his hot sauces. I had to leave the house when hot sauce was being made last fall (Ghost, Habs, and Serranos I think).

The Numez and Zavory are supposedly a very mild version of Habenaros... so maybe I'll be able to eat them!  :D The hottest I can do is some Poblanos, but the Tiburons I grew last year were as hot as they were prolific so I didn't get to eat much of them. :/
I'll be interested to hear what you think of the Zavory, Amanda. I had some growing last year, but my wife was sick in the middle of the worst part of the drought last summer so my garden went unattended. I lost all my peppers except two Serranos.

I like heat, but I have outgrown my younger daredevil days of putting Dave's Insanity Sauce straight on wings, and other testosterone-driven nonsense. I generally max out at Serranos for my purposes right now. I like the flavor of Habs, but don't need all the heat. That's why the Zavory was really interesting to me.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 08, 2016, 01:10:49 PM
I'll be interested to hear what you think of the Zavory, Amanda. I had some growing last year, but my wife was sick in the middle of the worst part of the drought last summer so my garden went unattended. I lost all my peppers except two Serranos.

I like heat, but I have outgrown my younger daredevil days of putting Dave's Insanity Sauce straight on wings, and other testosterone-driven nonsense. I generally max out at Serranos for my purposes right now. I like the flavor of Habs, but don't need all the heat. That's why the Zavory was really interesting to me.

I'll be sure to let you know. I've never tasted a Hab, but I'll have Myles do a comparison of both the Zavory and the Numex Suave out of curiosity. As for the heat seekers - he makes hot sauce out of a lot of these peppers. Last year, there was a variety produced but the top two heat levels were combos of ghost/habs/serranos and then a hab/serrano/jally. The ghost/hab/serrano blend doesn't even phase a couple of my crazy college friends. We weren't going to grow super-super hots (Ghost+) again this year, but my cousin gave me a handful of Reaper seeds at Christmas. So here we are. Haha.

In other news - my orders from Stark Brothers are coming today and tomorrow! Woot! I picked up 3 triple crown blackberries, 9 Heritage raspberries, a bit of rhubarb, and one of their tart cherry trees.  8) I finally ordered the bits I needed to expand the drip irrigation to everything (including the new blackcurrant bushes) and to run a permanent pipe from the house to the garden... so we will be livin' big this year.  ;D

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 08, 2016, 03:05:39 PM
Getting a box of brambles! That is like an extra Xmas day.

Those reapers make a very tasty hot sauce. I am looking forward to their gnarled beauty along a path in the yard this year.

I am doing my research for drip irrigation this week. I need a lot of it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 08, 2016, 03:22:03 PM
Getting a box of brambles! That is like an extra Xmas day.

Those reapers make a very tasty hot sauce. I am looking forward to their gnarled beauty along a path in the yard this year.

I am doing my research for drip irrigation this week. I need a lot of it.
I'm going to do drip irrigation this year as well, I'm picking up my bulk NOFA order this week that will include that. I'm really looking forward to having it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 08, 2016, 03:23:17 PM
This is probably a topic for another thread, but what do you guy's mean by "hot sauce" made from these nuclear peppers?

Is it a Louisiana/Crystal/Frank's cooked type of vinegar based sauce or are we talking salsa (fresh or canned) or even a fermented sauce?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 08, 2016, 03:32:25 PM
Getting a box of brambles! That is like an extra Xmas day.

Those reapers make a very tasty hot sauce. I am looking forward to their gnarled beauty along a path in the yard this year.

I am doing my research for drip irrigation this week. I need a lot of it.
I'm going to do drip irrigation this year as well, I'm picking up my bulk NOFA order this week that will include that. I'm really looking forward to having it.

FWIW, I've used Drip Depot and will use them again. And again.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Pinski on March 08, 2016, 03:33:56 PM
This is probably a topic for another thread, but what do you guy's mean by "hot sauce" made from these nuclear peppers?

Is it a Louisiana/Crystal/Frank's cooked type of vinegar based sauce or are we talking salsa (fresh or canned) or even a fermented sauce?

I was thinking we should start a "hot sauce" thread. I know there are some folks around that have a lot of experience.  I've had my first experimental fermented batch percolating away for several weeks now. I'd about a gallon of blanched and pureed mostly Habs, lemon cayenne, serranos, anchos, a few jalapenos. Basically everything that was left over from last year and still in the freezer from 2014 tossed into the pot. Added some garlic, onion, sugar and Nancy's Organic plain yogurt. It smells pretty good and is definitely active. I just have saran wrap and a rubber band on top. Really no clue what I'm doing but I figure once I verify the pH is below 3.5 I'm pretty safe to sample. 
Oops, sorry yes a new thread...:)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: AmandaK on March 08, 2016, 04:06:05 PM
This is probably a topic for another thread, but what do you guy's mean by "hot sauce" made from these nuclear peppers?

Is it a Louisiana/Crystal/Frank's cooked type of vinegar based sauce or are we talking salsa (fresh or canned) or even a fermented sauce?

We typically follow the Mrs. Wheelbarrow (Cathy Barrow) approach, found at the bottom of this page (http://www.notderbypie.com/any-chile-hot-sauce-mrs-wheelbarrows-practical-pantry/).

I tried fermenting with lacto from yogurt, which didn't work well. Now I have some Swanson's Lacto Planarium, so I'll be giving it another go this year.

We waterbath can it until it is in use (ensuring the pH is low enough), then it gets into a woozy bottle and the fridge when it's time to open and use it.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 08, 2016, 04:08:46 PM
This is probably a topic for another thread, but what do you guy's mean by "hot sauce" made from these nuclear peppers?

Is it a Louisiana/Crystal/Frank's cooked type of vinegar based sauce or are we talking salsa (fresh or canned) or even a fermented sauce?

I was thinking we should start a "hot sauce" thread. I know there are some folks around that have a lot of experience.  I've had my first experimental fermented batch percolating away for several weeks now. I'd about a gallon of blanched and pureed mostly Habs, lemon cayenne, serranos, anchos, a few jalapenos. Basically everything that was left over from last year and still in the freezer from 2014 tossed into the pot. Added some garlic, onion, sugar and Nancy's Organic plain yogurt. It smells pretty good and is definitely active. I just have saran wrap and a rubber band on top. Really no clue what I'm doing but I figure once I verify the pH is below 3.5 I'm pretty safe to sample. 
Oops, sorry yes a new thread...:)

Niiiiice. I have no clue either, but 2 of the 3 sauces I made were tasty. The other smells and looks terrible.

I was talking about Fermented hot sauce, Euge.

Thanks for the tip, Amanda. I will look into Drip Depot.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 08, 2016, 04:13:36 PM
I think there is one or two but buried years back. Think I'm done with resurrecting those zombies. Ought to start a fresh one!

You need at least 1.5% salt by of weight the peppers when you're fermenting them to encourage the lacto and inhibit other bacteria and yeast. Somewhere stuck in my head is that you add another 1.5% salt after it's fermented out (30 days-ish).

Oh and I do it wild without any culture such as yogurt.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 08, 2016, 04:20:54 PM
I think there is one or two but buried years back. Think I'm done with resurrecting those zombies. Ought to start a fresh one!

You need at least 1.5% salt by of weight the peppers when you're fermenting them to encourage the lacto and inhibit other bacteria and yeast. Somewhere stuck in my head is that you add another 1.5% salt after it's fermented out (30 days-ish).

Oh and I do it wild without any culture such as yogurt.
I can't remember using a culture either.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on March 08, 2016, 05:19:11 PM
Made about 1.5 liters of pure habanero-sauce that is just right. Complex like Tabasco but with the hab flavor and heat.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: HoosierBrew on March 08, 2016, 05:23:32 PM
Made about 1.5 liters of pure habanero-sauce that is just right. Complex like Tabasco but with the hab flavor and heat.


I make all kinds of hot sauces, too. Love the habanero stuff - all the heat I need.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: ultravista on March 10, 2016, 02:05:46 PM
I agree, a hot sauce thread would be great.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 14, 2016, 03:43:45 PM
My last pile of snow should melt away today :-*

This weekend I tore down the remainder of last years hop bines.
The smell of shattered lupulin in March is nice.

I packed and spread an nton of compost this weekend and did some tilling.
Have michilli cabagges sprouting in the hot box...

Growing anything new and interesting in your garden this year?
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: Slowbrew on March 14, 2016, 07:59:48 PM
I noticed the raspberries are starting to sprout this weekend.  That's about it.

Paul
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 14, 2016, 08:27:28 PM
My last pile of snow should melt away today :-*

This weekend I tore down the remainder of last years hop bines.
The smell of shattered lupulin in March is nice.

I packed and spread an nton of compost this weekend and did some tilling.
Have michilli cabagges sprouting in the hot box...

Growing anything new and interesting in your garden this year?
I can't think of anything new, just trying to get better at growing some things. I'm trying a lot of new things though. I'm installing drip irrigation and using a lot more paper and plastic mulch. I also plan on building a "chicken moat" a second fence around my garden where the chickens can graze so there is absolutely know grass and weeds that can encroach into the garden that way.
I'll probably add to our orchard a couple varieties of cider apples. We also want to enlarge the herb garden. It was beautiful yesterday and we wondered some of our property with a beer in hand basically brainstorming ways to make more work for ourselves.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 14, 2016, 09:08:55 PM
It was beautiful yesterday and we wondered some of our property with a beer in hand basically brainstorming ways to make more work for ourselves.

Ha! We this quite a bit....although it is always my chores we are pondering.

Like the idea of a chicken moat.  My ladies just had their annual run of the garden-I let them in in spring - and wow do they do a great job of mixing things up.  They can really move some dirt!


I had some sautéed white radishes on a sammich the other day - wow was that nice. Not hot at all.
I might try some daikon radishes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on March 15, 2016, 01:00:22 AM
It was beautiful yesterday and we wondered some of our property with a beer in hand basically brainstorming ways to make more work for ourselves.

Ha! We this quite a bit....although it is always my chores we are pondering.


Yea, I was being generous when I said "ourselves". We work together for big project days but the day to day stuff and all the building is me. I wouldn't have it any other way, definitely my choice.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on March 15, 2016, 02:17:14 PM
Daikon's are great! I planted a ton of them last year, but only ate a few of them.

I am pretty much doing what Pete is doing. The same things, but more of it. Trying to plan out a drip irrigation system. Due to the amount of rain last year, we had an insane amount of weeds, so lots more plastic mulch and landscape fabric.

Some new things I would like to do: plant some hazelnut bushes, as well as some fruit trees. I am thinking a couple of plum trees, pawpaws, and a few more apple trees. Build a chicken coop. I want to do lots more landscaping projects. Plain ole grass just bothers me. I would like to rip up most of it and plant prairie grasses. Expand the wildflower garden to half an acre. Try to actually take care of the strawberry patch.

So many things to do....
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 15, 2016, 04:07:49 PM
More sugaring today here. I torched the second batch (only ~a quart so not a huge loss) by not paying close enough attention to the final portion. Spent a day scrubbing the stove. flash back to my inside brewing days.

had a good run yesterday and collected about 12 gallons more sap but it was too windy to boil on the brew burner. it's calmed down today so I'm getting that done hopefully.

Planning for next year, the land is still all forest so not much actual gardening to do yet.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on March 26, 2016, 05:51:45 AM
Jonathan,
That has to be a wild crazy change from the left coast.
we are still gripped with winter in BFE whyo.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on March 29, 2016, 08:35:44 PM
Ya, Morticai!  I am excited to hear about the progress on your woodland garden....
now you can really hugelkultur!!  Are you going to have to clear and start from scratch?

Oi Whyomin. Getting some snow I see.  Those spears will be up before you know it.... ???

Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: redbeerman on March 30, 2016, 05:36:42 PM
Starting to see asparagus here.  Will probably plant cold weather veggies over the next few weeks.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 31, 2016, 10:55:50 PM
Jonathan,
That has to be a wild crazy change from the left coast.
we are still gripped with winter in BFE whyo.

yeah, different critter entirely. weather still not stable enough to put anything out. finishing up boiling sap.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: morticaixavier on March 31, 2016, 10:58:13 PM
Ya, Morticai!  I am excited to hear about the progress on your woodland garden....
now you can really hugelkultur!!  Are you going to have to clear and start from scratch?

Oi Whyomin. Getting some snow I see.  Those spears will be up before you know it.... ???

Yeah, going to be doing a fair amount of clearing for the house site, both for lumber and for solar exposure. Hugelkultur is for sure in the plan. Our excavator is a cool guy and totally okay with scraping the top soil and putting it in a separate pile so we'll have tons (literally) of materials to build with.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 01, 2016, 03:12:01 PM
My attempts at hugelkultur have met with limited success; however I did use quite a bit of wood and the discount soil was not quite suited for growing as it was. I brought in the good stuff this year and amended the beds.

On another note the fire-ants love my garden beds and it's been a constant battle keeping them from literally taking over. Force them from one bed and they move to another. Then they'll move back or to a further bed when they encounter my wrath.

Best time to hurt them bad is after it rains which forces the mound towards the surface. If I've managed to force a colony off a bed and into my lawn they get mound-killer. Then I'll get the survivors when they build their much smaller mound- usually just a yard or so away. 8)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on April 23, 2016, 06:54:43 PM
First squash blossoms of the season! Harvested 2 males and a female and made pasta for lunch...

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/t7iFjkPUc1YVN2eDZDWgPporVC99ORAD_h4IOuvb0Cp7aCgw-ekoYE4kBgB3krOQETjS1OVNi46tDN21F-166lSDsu95hhbwyjltNQ-PEYF9OYQNTEcEQXEdEC6o1c6Q0Yq94QumcIDr_3mTKZgU-e7Xfw9EMz1g1z0kPe6tQIaDS8sJnK0vScTq3IdKbjDuHkhruu5y-pfpjFUBf5ACOVJgFuB6oTmd17EoXxT98jS5pSBjSYsr1KY-SzUg-HmKMTPR3Nmxvk0NefqSyK0kpC-_ELpMV-ogCPbkB6U-8SGHvrJn-thITMauCn1yjsEiGNw5cjKvsQP9-qszFkQAUJMHB1DczI8nQiWvR4BwA53c8sft0esfSRRqZ8l17PqZIwI1z2lQHiZ4moWe1VcUFx9H1WlCilwqRk4Iov971m0C7Sxd4zFxkTtZwRw_0WrnOG_dAVO3BWvPd5C5N-g2ceYZrnhxra0ldlLT8EuQIMwq2p7gEMVGTVxErx6rcUNkLJtV2GI4nut1-jqpCPsDuthUSpipaSh2KvRrfxjA66C4M9XlvnLTPyWjOyrc4M58azkC=w729-h971-no)
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on May 13, 2016, 05:01:00 AM
No pix  but on my 3rd cutting of asparagus.  Trying to keep the frost off
is a workout.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: blair.streit on May 13, 2016, 11:30:51 AM
Best time to hurt them bad is after it rains which forces the mound towards the surface. If I've managed to force a colony off a bed and into my lawn they get mound-killer. Then I'll get the survivors when they build their much smaller mound- usually just a yard or so away. 8)
Ever try dumping boiling vegetable oil on a mound? It's probably only moderately effective since it can't kill them all before cooling, but the cracking sound they make when they're hit with the oil is highly satisfying.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: euge on May 22, 2016, 01:25:06 AM
No pix  but on my 3rd cutting of asparagus.  Trying to keep the frost off
is a workout.

Got chilly up there didn't it? I was jealous of those temps.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pinnah on May 23, 2016, 12:10:10 PM
His asparagus probably got frizzed this morning!
I have eaten so much I am almost tired of it -  Love to go hunting for it however, that does not get old.

My silly michilli cabbages are bolting already. That stuff confuses me. Those pretty tight heads in the store are amazing.

I was thinking the other day,
 I wished everything germinated and came up like radishes!
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on May 23, 2016, 02:15:19 PM
No pix  but on my 3rd cutting of asparagus.  Trying to keep the frost off
is a workout.
My asparagus bed sucks. I'm going to reclaim the space and try again somewhere else after some research.
Eating lots of great lettuce and spinach.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on May 23, 2016, 04:24:37 PM
Strawberries are coming in this week. Had my first one last night. Nothing like a strawberry that is still warm from the sun. I saw my last blackberry variety did indeed survive the winter. Currents and Gooseberries are starting to come in, and a couple of the Raspberries have flowered. Elderberries have some lovely blooms as well. I have a few more rows of Sweet Corn and Carrots to plant this evening. I got the Tomato patch set up this weekend as well. Rhubarb patch is looking very good. Might need to match that up with said strawberries.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on May 23, 2016, 05:08:57 PM
Rhubarb is not too shabby in a saison.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: erockrph on May 23, 2016, 05:14:26 PM
No pix  but on my 3rd cutting of asparagus.  Trying to keep the frost off
is a workout.
My asparagus bed sucks. [...]
Same here. I planted 10 crowns 4 years ago and I'm lucky to get a dozen spears total each year from the surviving crowns. I don't really need the space right now, so I don't mind leaving them there. My son will pick and eat them right then and there, and there aren't too many veggies he'll do that with.

I and scaling it back this year in the garden. Every year I convince myself I can keep up with everything and every year in July the weeds and bugs take over for good. I have peas and root veggies in one bed and two rows cleared and covered with black plastic waiting for transplants. In addition to those, my son has a small raised bed, and that will be it for the veggies this year.

My fruit trees have already lost the battle with the gypsy moth caterpillars. This is the second year in a row with them. As much as I want to stay organic, I might have to concede this one and hit everything this isn't flowering or producing fruit with Sevin.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on May 24, 2016, 06:07:20 PM
Rhubarb is not too shabby in a saison.

Yup! That is the plan for the bulk of them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on June 26, 2016, 01:52:07 AM
(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160625/0b933cdff383ca431aeddc9163504f8e.jpg)
This years garlic scapes.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on June 27, 2016, 12:36:28 AM
(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160625/0b933cdff383ca431aeddc9163504f8e.jpg)
This years garlic scapes.

Whoa! That is awesome! Any specific plans for them? I keep throwing them in stir fries, and pickling them.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: pete b on June 27, 2016, 12:54:10 AM
(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160625/0b933cdff383ca431aeddc9163504f8e.jpg)
This years garlic scapes.

Whoa! That is awesome! Any specific plans for them? I keep throwing them in stir fries, and pickling them.
The bulk of them get put through a food processor with olive oil, salt, and pepper and get stored in Mason jars in the fridge. I also grill them and fry them with tempura batter. Tonight I grilled them and some jalapeños and processed them with oil and salt and served them as a condiment for shrimp tacos. Last night they were made into pesto that was tossed with grilled chicken and  beet green fritters. They are versatile.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: kmccaf on June 28, 2016, 03:36:42 AM
Blended with grilled jalapeños does sound amazing. I will have to do that. I did blend them with roasted garlic and olives and make a killer pasta as well.
Title: Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
Post by: 1vertical on September 02, 2016, 03:02:39 AM
Could frost at anytime, but looks promising for another couple of weeks.  I have a few
cow horn peppers and cubanelles, and yellow squash hanging on....some new flushes of
spinach and yes.....SNOW peas are putting on again.  Grape and pear maters are going wild.