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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: ndcube on February 08, 2010, 02:10:12 PM

Title: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: ndcube on February 08, 2010, 02:10:12 PM
The style guidelines say:

"Complex alcohol and ester profile of moderate strength, and reminiscent of plums, prunes, raisins, cherries or currants, occasionally with a vinous Port-like quality."

Where do these flavors come from?  Are there lager yeasts that have that kind of profile?
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: babalu87 on February 08, 2010, 02:40:26 PM
The style guidelines say:

"Complex alcohol and ester profile of moderate strength, and reminiscent of plums, prunes, raisins, cherries or currants, occasionally with a vinous Port-like quality."

Where do these flavors come from?   Are there lager yeasts that have that kind of profile?

Aging and a complex grain bill.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: pinnah on February 08, 2010, 05:57:15 PM
I make my version of a Baltic with 2112,
it could contribute some of those qualities.

babalu, what IBU do you make yours to?
I was a little suprised that "the guidelines" top out at 40.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: babalu87 on February 08, 2010, 06:00:16 PM
I'd have to check when I get home.
Brewed it yesterday and 45 is sticking in my head
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: hamiltont on February 08, 2010, 10:02:06 PM

Where do these flavors come from? 
A long boil helps as well.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: babalu87 on February 08, 2010, 10:14:26 PM
48.9 IBU and a 2 hour boil
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: ndcube on February 09, 2010, 12:34:38 PM
I guess in my head I had esters associated with yeast.  What forms them from the malt?  Acids from the malt reacting with the alcohol over time?
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: babalu87 on February 09, 2010, 12:37:39 PM
I guess in my head I had esters associated with yeast.  What forms them from the malt?  Acids from the malt reacting with the alcohol over time?

3 different base malts for starters.
I think the grain bill on my recipe has 8 different grains with Pils, Munich AND Vienna as the "base" malt
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: ndcube on February 09, 2010, 12:44:26 PM
I guess in my head I had esters associated with yeast.  What forms them from the malt?  Acids from the malt reacting with the alcohol over time?

3 different base malts for starters.
I think the grain bill on my recipe has 8 different grains with Pils, Munich AND Vienna as the "base" malt

Trying to wrap my head around getting plum from a malt but I'll just have to try it and find out 8)
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: babalu87 on February 09, 2010, 02:01:05 PM
I guess in my head I had esters associated with yeast.  What forms them from the malt?  Acids from the malt reacting with the alcohol over time?

3 different base malts for starters.
I think the grain bill on my recipe has 8 different grains with Pils, Munich AND Vienna as the "base" malt

Trying to wrap my head around getting plum from a malt but I'll just have to try it and find out 8)

Crystal 120:

 
Quote
A very dark caramel malt that contributes deep red color and pronounced caramel, burnt sugar, raisin, and prune flavor.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: blatz on February 09, 2010, 02:26:44 PM
yeah - if you use enough 120Lthe plum and raisiny aromas'll  jump out of the glass and grab your nose if you're not careful.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: ndcube on February 09, 2010, 02:52:02 PM
Thanks.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: Hokerer on February 09, 2010, 03:08:56 PM
yeah - if you use enough 120Lthe plum and raisiny aromas'll  jump out of the glass and grab your nose if you're not careful.

Special B sounds similar - "147 L. An extremely dark caramel malt with a sharp, almost toffee like flavor. It will impart a heavy caramel taste and is often credited with the raisin-like flavors of some Belgian ales."

Does it give more or less of the plum/raisin/prune than the Crystal 120?
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: blatz on February 09, 2010, 03:16:42 PM
I can't stand special B, personally, except in dubbels, etc.  Special B seems more intense in those areas, but also borders on being artificial, if that makes any sense.  special B always makes me think belgian ale, so I find it hard to use in other styles.  YMMV.
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: pinnah on February 09, 2010, 05:28:49 PM
I think Special B is stronger than 120 in that respect.

I used both together once and it was too much for me,
some loved it though.

Thanks on the IBU report babalu, um yea, guess I never brew a baltic. Mine are way overhopped.  imperial american porter?  oh brother. ::)
Title: Re: Baltic Porter - Guideline ?
Post by: ndcube on February 11, 2010, 06:45:27 PM
I guess in my head I had esters associated with yeast.  What forms them from the malt?  Acids from the malt reacting with the alcohol over time?

3 different base malts for starters.
I think the grain bill on my recipe has 8 different grains with Pils, Munich AND Vienna as the "base" malt

I'm curious to see your recipe if you don't mind sharing.