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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: capozzoli on November 07, 2009, 05:44:23 PM

Title: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 07, 2009, 05:44:23 PM
Thought this would be an appropriate first post cause I am a much better cook than brewer.

They are two skills that go together really well.

I love authentic ethnic cooking.

Here is an Indian feast that we put out last night.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-2.jpg)


Anybody out there like Indian food? Ill post some recipes later.

My Iguana really loves Indian food.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-3.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: SwashBuckling Drunk on November 07, 2009, 06:50:36 PM
Hey Cap.  Even tough we're opposites (I'm a better brewer than cook), nice to see you here.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on November 07, 2009, 09:20:45 PM
Almost all of our meals are ethnic in one way or another. Since I am married to an Italian and it is also my favorite food we have a lot of authentic Italian. I make a really mean Risotto. I make a lot of fresh pasta. My wife makes the best spaghetti gravy on the planet. I also cook a lot of authentic Mexican food. Peurco Guisado, re-fried beans, and mexican rice is a favorite of ours.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/IMG_1685.jpg)

We live in South East Louisiana and cook a lot of local fare so I guess that is ethnic as well. I am eating Jambalaya right now. The wife makes a fantastic Shrimp Creole:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/IMG_0373.jpg)

And even though I am a transplant Yankee I can boil shrimp, crawfish and crabs with the best of them here.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/IMG_0389.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/Crab.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/IMG_0387.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/IMG_0393.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/boil3.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/boil4.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/boil5.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/boil6.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on November 07, 2009, 09:24:44 PM
BTW, the wife just told me I am cooking the Mexican Pork dish tomorrow but I am going to make corn tortillas and we are going to shred the pork and eat it as a taco with home made Guacamole. We have a large Mexican population in our town so we have numerous Mexican grocery stores and I can get almost any thing I need for a Mexican feast.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on November 07, 2009, 09:30:30 PM
Forgot to add, I make my own sausage and Boudin as well.


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/sausage1.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/family%20pics/Boudin.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 07, 2009, 09:55:56 PM
Cap!  Glad to see you, man.  Let's get this thread started!

Smurfe, great looking Mexican dishes.  I, too, am an authentic Mexican food fanatic (among a lot of other ethnic fare).  I also love Indian and Sichuan cuisine.  French and Italian are favorite too.  Basically, I just love food.   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on November 07, 2009, 11:01:27 PM
Me to, we are I guess what you call "Foodies" here. We rarely cook or eat any "normal" American foods. I subscribe to numerous cooking magazines and get a lot of inspiration from them. About all I watch on TV is the food channel and cooking shows on PBS. I have tons of kitchen gadgets that help one do the job right and I have a kitchen knife fetish and have numerous Japanese kitchen knives.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 07, 2009, 11:25:55 PM
Me to, we are I guess what you call "Foodies" here. We rarely cook or eat any "normal" American foods. I subscribe to numerous cooking magazines and get a lot of inspiration from them. About all I watch on TV is the food channel and cooking shows on PBS. I have tons of kitchen gadgets that help one do the job right and I have a kitchen knife fetish and have numerous Japanese kitchen knives.

Sounds like we're cut from the same cloth.  I was very disappointed when Gourmet announced that they would no longer be publishing after November.  That was one of my favorite cooking mags.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: weazletoe on November 07, 2009, 11:37:16 PM
   Any chance giving me some details on that pork and beans?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 08, 2009, 01:20:16 AM
Smurfe, That stuff looks great. Looks like I am in the right place .

I would love to hear more about the sausage!!! Have you done any curing or drying?

Made some Greek food tonight. Lamb Soulvaki to be exact. With home made pita bread.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie008-1.jpg)

Marinated pounded lamb chunks in a mixture of olive oil , garlic, salt, pepper, oregano, fresh parsley, lemon juice for about 24 hours than grilled them over some lump charcoal.  

For the pita bread. first I made a yeast starter with about a tablespoon of yeast and a half cup of milk. The milk is 90 degrees and I also add a pinch of sugar to get the little buggers going.

With about three cups of bread flour in the kitchen Aid I add the yeast starter two eggs and a teaspoon of salt. Mix till a nice semi dry dough forms. then form it into six or eight balls and set them out on a floured board covered with a damp towel to rise.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie003-3.jpg)

After it has risen, roll the dough out to the desired width. The dough should be no more than 1/4" thick.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie004-2.jpg)

Heat up a large skillet over medium high heat and wipe it with a little cooking oil. Cook the bread on both sides being careful not to burn it. Turn it frequently.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie005-2.jpg)
 
(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie006-2.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie007-1.jpg)


I love Greek food. Its a no nonsense simple less is more type of cooking. Meat and fire, what more do you need?



So, are we abandoning the old site guys?

It has seemed to have gotten pretty boring there.





Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: weazletoe on November 08, 2009, 03:27:05 AM
That lamb looks great! \looks like something else I may need to try. Would it work well with pork?

  As far as the other place, like I said in my PM to ya, it's like going to a bar that turns out to be a sausage fest. I'm done with it. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on November 08, 2009, 03:33:41 AM
Cappo, would goat work with that too?

We/I neeed some goat recipes.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 08, 2009, 04:20:57 AM
Pork or goat would work great.

Boulder, Jamaican curried goat is fantastic! If you remember that recipe from the thread in the old country. If not I could post it again here.

Im still planning the Uzbek feast. Ill post this video here too as a warmer upper. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORtP0k2nxoo

Boulder, you could cook your goat like they do in this video. All you need is a shovel to dig the hole.



 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on November 08, 2009, 05:10:58 AM
Looks like I have to wait until spring to dig a hole. :P   I'll look for that recipe. Any idea on what page?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 08, 2009, 02:47:15 PM
I cant find that curried goat recipe in the old thread.

Here it is though.

Jamaican Curried Goat.  

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0227currygoat001.jpg)

Take about two pounds of goat meat (bones included) you can seperate the bones from the meat but include some cause they add lots of flavor.

Two tabl spoons of curry powder. (your own ideally)
Two large diced onions
two scallions
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
Two scotch bonnet peppers (you can use any hot peppers to substitute) or leave them out if you dont want it hot.
two tblspoons of chopped fresh ginger.
1 whole head of garlic chopped
two tble spoons of thyme (preferably fresh)
one tblspoon of butter
1/2 lb sliced carrot
1/2 lb of 1" cubed potatoes.
1 can creamed coconut milk.

In a blender or food processor add the onions, ginger, scallions, salt pepper, hot peppers, and heprs. Add some of the coconut milk and blend till smooth.  

Cut the goat up into small pieces and rub the blended mixture into the meat. Let it marinade in the fridge over night.

When cooking remove excess marinade from the meat and set aside for later.

Add some butter to a skillet and saute the meat till lightly brown.

Then add the carrots and potatoes to the pan with the marinade and simmer till the meat is tender. About 1 too 1.5 hours

Serve with fried rice and peas, fried plantains and stewed cabbage.





Hey Patriot, I want to see pics of your pazole verde recipe. 

I had pazole verde the other day at lunch. Oh man was it good. I went back to the shop and curled up in the corner for a nap.






Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 08, 2009, 03:24:35 PM
Hey Patriot, I want to see pics of your pazole verde recipe. 

I had pazole verde the other day at lunch. Oh man was it good. I went back to the shop and curled up in the corner for a nap.








Ask and you shall receive!  I am going to smoke a whole chicken today and use it in my pozole verde instead of pork shoulder.  I'll post pics later.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 08, 2009, 03:36:37 PM
Smoke some of your peppers too.

You can make sort of Chipotle peppers that way.

Cant wait.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on November 08, 2009, 06:59:19 PM
I haven't tried to cure or dry any of the sausage yet but was just talking to my buddy I brew with and we were talking about making some sausage. We think we are gonna make smoked sausage next time if I can devise a decent recipe. Right now I just make Italian Sausage as I have my Wife's grandfather's (who came over on a boat from Sicily) recipe that I like very much. I'm still working on my Boudin, so far I haven't got it dialed in where I want it yet.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: dwarven_stout on November 09, 2009, 12:06:05 AM
I too am a better cook than brewer, though I can probably chalk that one up to experience. Been cooking for years, and brewing for only one.

I love SE Asia food: Lao, Thai, Indonesian, as well as Mediterranean and Middle Eastern. Greek and Lebanese are favorites.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 09, 2009, 12:47:57 AM
Ok, cap.  Here are photos of today's pozole-fest.  The pics were taken with my phone, which has pretty decent resolution (3-megapixel camera phone) but the colors are a little off.  The pozole is much more olive in color than the photo suggests; in the photo it looks sort of brownish.  The ancho salsa is brick red in person; it looks really dark in the photo.

First, I smoked a whole chicken (butterflied) and a turkey breast.  I only used one half of the chicken for the pozole.  The rest of the meat will go in various dishes throughout the week.

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/smokedpoultry.jpg)

Here is the finished pozole with garnishes.  I changed the recipe up a little bit this time.  Instead of making my own hominy, I just bought two 15.5 oz cans from my local grocer.  Also, I used swiss chard instead of sorrel.  Finally, I subbed a bay leaf for epazote (not a very close substitute, but it lended a nice flavor anyway).

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/pozole.jpg)

Ancho salsa with roasted tomatillos today.

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/anchosalsa.jpg)

At the end of the meal, I dumped the coals from the smoker into the fire pit.  After about 30 minutes, there were some excellent coals for roasting homemade marshmallows.  These marshmallows were made with some brown sugar, so they tasted like caramel and maple syrup when they were toasted.

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/marshmallow.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 09, 2009, 05:33:20 PM
Oh man that looks good.

Time for Lunch!!!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 05:40:31 PM
Cap!  Glad to see you, man.  Let's get this thread started!

Smurfe, great looking Mexican dishes.  I, too, am an authentic Mexican food fanatic (among a lot of other ethnic fare).  I also love Indian and Sichuan cuisine.  French and Italian are favorite too.  Basically, I just love food.   ;D

+1

I am also a food lover. There's not much I don't like...I believe great food is created from the heart...just like great beer.

Nice looking dishes folks.

Capp...glad to see you and your awesome culinary skills over here.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: akr71 on November 12, 2009, 02:36:18 PM
Cappo, would goat work with that too?

We/I neeed some goat recipes.


Awesome idea!  We had a dairy goat farm when I was a kid (pardon the pun).  Since the buck kids don't produce milk, we usually had a freezer full of goat.  Haven't had it in almost 30 years and forget what it was like.  I'll have to find a butcher that can get some for me.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 13, 2009, 02:53:47 PM
That Greek food looks amazing.  A bottle of retsina and/or ouzo, and some souvlaki and dolmathes...I really need to get ingredients for something similar soon!

Here's my attempt at Korean food (minus the kimchi, I am not a huge fan).  The picture is bad but the meat is butterflied beef short ribs (galbi kui) and bool gogi.  Spicy bean paste (chinese, not korean, though) and a soy dipping sauce.
(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/koreanbbq.jpg)

Also, this ought to count for ethnic cooking...Norwegian food courtesy Andreas Viestad.  He made the recipe for venison, but it works with beef sirloin.  Juniper/fennel spice rub with a brown goat cheese sauce.  And of course, akvavit.
(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/NorwegianFood.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: narvin on November 13, 2009, 04:31:53 PM
All the food here looks amazing...

I made some Tikka Masala based on this recipe (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPCwH8uJawA).  Actually, I did it while camping with a cast iron skillet.  We ate well that weekend :-)

I'm also a big fan of the pizza making discussion back at the old forum.  Keep it up, guys!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 20, 2009, 01:32:31 AM
Indian food while camping. Sounds like a lot of fun. It would be great to set up a campsite tandoori oven.

Made some I-talian tonight.

'Chicken Lorenzo'.

The interesting thing with this variant of Chicken Caccitori is the use of cucumbers in the sauce. Not to many dishes call for cooked cucumbers.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie005-5.jpg)

Take a sauce pan and get it nice and warm over medium heat. Then put in the oil and chicken legs to saute them a little. Sprinkle some salt over the chicken legs as they cook.

Then add a hole onion sliced, a few stalks of celery chopped, a green pepper sliced. a few cloves of garlic whoile but broken open. Add a little more salt and pepper. Then ad some oregano, basil,  bay leaf, pinch of cinamon, and pinch of nutmeg.

Stir and satue till the onions and veg become a little brown. Then de-glaze with about a1/4 cup of balsamic vinegar and then add about a 1/4 cup of water. Then add a large can of crushed tomatoes. Then add about 1/2 cup of diced cucumber. and about 20 raisins.

Let all of this simmer till the chicken is tender. Then slice up two or three potatoes and add them to the sauce.

Simmer over low till the potatoes are cooked.

Squeeze the juice of one lemon into the sauce and stor a little just before serving making sure not to break the potatoes up.

Serve with pasta, rice or nice hearty bread.

Very nice winter food.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 20, 2009, 01:50:57 AM
Looks Great Cap!  8)

I could eat Italian food as the year is long.

Did you use any wine in the dish?

What's your stance on using wine in Italian dishes?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on November 20, 2009, 02:51:24 PM
That lamb looks great! \looks like something else I may need to try. Would it work well with pork?

  As far as the other place, like I said in my PM to ya, it's like going to a bar that turns out to be a sausage fest. I'm done with it. 

Wease, use the spedie recipe I gave you and sub lemon juice for the vinegar and leave out the basil and you basically have it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 21, 2009, 12:59:53 AM
Looks Great Cap!  8)

I could eat Italian food as the year is long.

Did you use any wine in the dish?

What's your stance on using wine in Italian dishes?

No wine in this recipe.The vinegar serves as a de-glazing agent and leaves behind a slightly sour flavor. I think that is the flavor desired in catcciatori. The acidic vinegar flavor. Wine leaves behind a sweet flavor.

Wine is great in Italian cooking. It doesn't go in everything but they surely use it. French food while similar to Italian cooking uses a lot of wine. Wine is a huge thing in France. In France the most important thing on the table is the wine. In Italy the most important thing is the food. Thats one big difference that I found.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 21, 2009, 01:27:22 AM
Being a huge fan of french food, I've read that France wasn't always such a culinary behemoth (I actually think french food has been somewhat eclipsed by that of Spain in recent years, but that's another topic!).  In the 15th century, when Catherine de' Medici of Italy married Henry II of France, she was apparently appalled by french food.  As a result, she insisted her italian chef come with her to France so she could eat "proper" food.  Supposedly, the italian chef turned his french counterparts on to italian cooking methods and had a massive influence on the country's cuisine.  Of course, France came into its own, culinarily speaking, over time and truly has one of the world's great cuisines, IMO.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: slimsparty on November 21, 2009, 05:25:17 AM
Whoa!  am I over matched. 

When I get around to it, I'll fire up a batch of Pasties Yooper Style.

I like Indian, but have never tried to make it.  SWMBO doesn't like spice too much.  I used to work next to a guy with Punjab family he gave me some kinda eggplant or polenta thing that was amazing.  I have to call him.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 23, 2009, 02:49:28 PM
Some heart warming Eastern European (Polish) Food.

Kapusta and Mashed Potatoes with Smoked Kielbasa and Rye Bread.

Kapusta Recipe:
1 1/2lb.pork ribs
2lb bag sauerkraut
1/2 head fresh cabbage
3Tbl barley
3Tbl brown sugar
1 1/2 cup fresh diced tomatoes
fresh dill
bay leaf
10 peppercorns
season to taste
simmer for 1 1/2 hrs.


(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/cc7386e1.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on November 24, 2009, 12:40:58 PM
Smoke some of your peppers too.

You can make sort of Chipotle peppers that way.

Cant wait.

I think I ended up smoking about a 1/2 bushel of jalpenos this year and a few habaneros and poblanos as well.  More than a years supply.  Have a bunch of habaneros in the freezer as well.  I'll have to post the spicy pepper shrimp recipe we got from one of our Jamaican friends soon,  That stuff is off the wall in flavor and heat.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Beertracker on November 24, 2009, 04:24:36 PM
U guys are making me hungry with all of these pics & recipes. Yum!  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 26, 2009, 12:59:56 AM
Northern Indian Vegetarian.


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie-3-1.jpg)


Spinach and pumpkin sauteed with garlic and ginger.

Dal (lentils) and tomatoes cooked with ginger, coriander and garam masala.

Basmati rice with black and white cumin seeds.

Paratha  (layered chapity butter bread)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 26, 2009, 01:11:17 AM
Does "upstate SC descended from Irish/Scott good ol' country grandma learned cooking" count as ethnic?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 28, 2009, 01:13:58 AM
Im gonna say yes.

I guess all regional American cooking is influenced by immigrants one way or another.

I love Southern US cooking. The breakfasts are great.

I have been looking into the cooking of the Southern Appalachia. True hill billy cooking. 

There is a New Episode of Bizarre Foods where they cook and serve up possum and coon. I get a few possum and coon in the yard, skunk too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 28, 2009, 11:28:48 PM
Here is some Uzbek food.

We were planning a huge feast of the stans. Meaning food from countries that end in stan. Uzbekistan Afghanistan.

Well the feast got canceled but we did a little Uzbek thing ourselves.

Pictured is Uzbek Plov A mixture of rice, lamb, onions, spices, tomato, cinnamon sticks raisins and whole garlic.

A rule of Uzbek cooking is: Add a pound of onions for every pound of meat.

Also shown is Uzbek style sauteed pumpkin with yogurt and tomato sauce. Very similar to the Afghan pumpkin and meat sauce.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie-4.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on November 30, 2009, 03:04:43 PM


A rule of Uzbek cooking is: Add a pound of onions for every pound of meat.



That's a rule I can live with! ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2009, 04:09:47 PM
Looking great Capp.  8)

I think the most popular veggie used in cooking period is the onion.  :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 02, 2009, 01:33:23 AM
Gonna do Georgian Food next.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO0yVM-SlfY

http://sisauri.tripod.com/ref/cuisine/cuisine.html

Oh, and there is Atchma.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhiLpaVTRkk




Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 02, 2009, 04:19:56 AM

Oh, and there is Atchma.


Gibanica !!!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 02, 2009, 12:03:53 PM

Oh, and there is Atchma.


Gibanica !!!

My heart is fluttering as I type this.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 02, 2009, 01:03:48 PM
(http://www.ficobalet.org/nove%20goran/gibanica.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 02, 2009, 02:05:21 PM
And then for special occasions there's BUREK.
This food section is funny. I could totally see us gathering around and destroying all these different dishes. Kinda like - oh yeah, try this! We'd be 300lbs, wearing mafia style sweatsuits because of the elastic waist. Guess it's a good thing we don't live near each other.

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 03, 2009, 02:41:31 AM
I had Burek before. While I was visiting the former Yugoslavia no less.

Hungarian tonight.

Cherkin Papricas (Chicken Paprikash) Served with Hungarian Dumplings.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-7.jpg)

Roast a chicken (This one is a Cornish Hen) with some salt pepper, bay leaf, celery seed and paprika sprinkled on it. Add a little water to get a broth.

When done split the chicken or chickens and set aside. Heat a sauce pan and add a half of chopped onion to some oil. Add a chopped clove of garlic. turn on low, add some celery seed, salt and pepper and about two table spoons of Paprika. Toss a little then deglaze while adding the drippings from the roaster pan. Add a little more chicken broth (from can or homemade) Turn on low and simmer.

In a different pan make a roux by adding some flour to melted butter. Let it brown a little bit to get a nice toasty thickener.

Add the thickener to the sauce pan and then add a cup or two of sour cream till you make enough sauce to cover the chicken. Add the chickens back to the pan and heat them up.

Serve with Hungarian Dumplings.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 03, 2009, 12:36:19 PM
Looks and sounds very tasty. I would serve that up with a nice Bopils. Now that's what I'm talking about.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 05, 2009, 02:17:07 AM
French tonight.

Im not sure what this dish is called in French but we call it bisque. It is basically a shrimp, cream and veg soup.

The great thing about this dish is the shrimp were live before I cooked them Man you should have seen these things flopping around. They just didnt want to die. Even after I beheaded them I was de-veining the headless fish and they were still twitching and trying to get away.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie-5.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on December 05, 2009, 03:33:37 AM
I think the French would probably call that magnifique!  If only I could eat shellfish.   :'(
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on December 05, 2009, 06:28:34 AM
Where is the cardamom??
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 05, 2009, 07:25:55 PM

The great thing about this dish is the shrimp were live before I cooked them Man you should have seen these things flopping around. They just didnt want to die. Even after I beheaded them I was de-veining the headless fish and they were still twitching and trying to get away.


Don't you NOT live near water? Where the heck are you getting live shrimp?
No PETA brewers here? Save the Shrimp!  ;)

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 05, 2009, 08:50:58 PM
I actually live about a 100 yards from the river. About an hour and some change from the Atlantic ocean.

The live shrimp though come from a Chinese Grocery store. Occasionally they have them there. My wife just happened in and they were on sale for $3.99 a lb. How bout that?  They were kinda small but delicious. Sweet and very tender. I even ate one raw. It really began twitching when I put it in soy sauce and wasabi. twitched the whole way down. It was yummy.

The area I live is in is great for ethnic cooking. I am within a twenty min drive from a multitude of ethnic grocery stores. Indo- Paki, Russian, Polish, Italian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Greek, Mexicana and more.

I consider myself very lucky to know of these places.

Ill be moving away some day and I will still come back here to grocery shop.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 06, 2009, 12:07:07 AM
I actually live about a 100 yards from the river. About an hour and some change from the Atlantic ocean.

The live shrimp though come from a Chinese Grocery store. Occasionally they have them there. My wife just happened in and they were on sale for $3.99 a lb. How bout that?  

Man I pay 6.99 for Thai shrimp that are probably toxic when they are on sale. Dead, freezer burned, and well - I'm in the midwest. I would totally take that drive - this year is supposed to be phenomenal for lobster lovers. Recession + record haul = low low low prices. Some good scallops here will easily run me $20/lb.  :'(

On a happy note though - Gibanica tomorrow!  ;D

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 06, 2009, 01:56:42 AM
You have to post pics of the Gibanicia.

So how do you know about Balkan food?

Afghan Tonight. Plov.

Im sure most are not eating this way in Afghanistan, lets hope for better days there.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-11.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie003-6.jpg)


Desert is thanks to the Bluesman.  ;)  Are you making Polish food tonight?  

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie004-5.jpg)

I have been on this plov kick. It is great. There is all different kinds from all over that region of the world. Basically like a biryani but more of a stew action taking place under the cooking rice.

A lot of the Persian rice dishes are made this way too. Gonna do Georgian next weekend and then Im moving to Persian cooking for a couple of weeks.

Viva le differance'.

Ill post a recipe for the plov later if you guys are interested. Its not all that hard.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 06, 2009, 02:18:13 AM
You have to post pics of the Gibanicia.

So how do you know about Balkan food?

Is it cheating if I am one? I mean - took no effort on my part to learn about it. It's just what there was to eat while growing up. Let's just leave it as "former Yugoslavia" - people are touchy in that region, don't want to start anything political.  ;)


-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 06, 2009, 03:46:57 PM
Great looking dishes as usual Capp.

I made a stop at the Krakus market yesterday after Capp and I planned out the Brutus 10 build.

For those of you wondering what the Krakus market is...well it's the Polish market in Philly in the local Polish community called Port Richmond. They have all the great Polish Kielbasa, Pierogi, Galabki, Bigos,etc.... I picked up a few of their delights to take back home. They also have a great selection of Polish beer too. What a great place. I will be making a traditional Polish ham and cheese on Rye with some smoked Kielbasa on the side for lunch today.  8)

Thanks for the directions Capp.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 06, 2009, 11:46:09 PM
We gotta get some Serbian cooking going in here.

Hey, its not just burek and gibanica anymore. http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE49645B20081007

(http://www.ananova.com/images/web/1435250.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 07, 2009, 01:50:20 AM
 :o

Now that's serious business!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 07, 2009, 05:51:10 AM
Yeah, that's nouveau Serb. I'm kinda old fashioned.
Unless it grew on a tree or shrub - I ain't putting nuts in my mouth.  :o

-OCD
 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on December 07, 2009, 03:18:25 PM
Dingos kidneys, that's repugnant!

Even beyond eating it, I couldn't cut into that without wincing in vicarious pain.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on December 07, 2009, 04:38:24 PM
Is it ethnic cooking if its casually inspired by an ethnic style of cooking but not necessarily authentic?  Well that's what I did last night, some sort of punjabi inspired mustard greens.  I'd never cooked mustard greens before, but since they inhabit that happy zone of healthy and not very expensive, I thought I'd give them a run.  I chopped up a whole bunch (50cents worth, but enough to fill a pot!) with a bit of leftover wilted spinach, a finely sliced onion, some minced garlic, and a diced jalapeno, added some water, and started cooking it down...meanwhile I had toasted a small amount of whole spices...half a bay leaf, black mustard seeds, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, and fenugreek, then crushed these, added ginger, a bit of cinnamon, salt (too much, sadly) and pepper and cayenne, added this to the simmering veg and let it all cook down til the liquid had evaporated.  Tossed in some shredded coconut, and it was pretty good!  If a bit too salty, my fault.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 07, 2009, 05:07:47 PM
So if its not authentic Indian food and you are Polish - you just made a Polish dish.
If you're non-denominational and you did that - then you just made....dinner.

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 07, 2009, 08:52:58 PM
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/Sx1qYmbem8I/AAAAAAAAAI0/iVu8z-hETwo/s400/gibanica.jpg)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/Sx1psdUuUTI/AAAAAAAAAIY/rjPsY2IsJKY/s800/slice.jpg)

Little overdone on top - inside is still moist. That only happened because I was gonna take a photo of it.  :P

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 07, 2009, 09:28:32 PM
It was Italian last night.

Bolognese sauce (ragù alla bolognese in Italian, also known by its French name sauce bolognaise) is a meat-based sauce for pasta originating in Bologna, Italy. Bolognese sauce is sometimes taken to be a tomato sauce, but authentic recipes have only a small amount of tomato.

The people of Bologna traditionally serve their famous ragù with freshly made tagliatelle (tagliatelle alla bolognese) and their traditionally green lasagne. Less traditionally, the sauce is served with maccheroni or other durum wheat short pasta.

Bolognese Sauce

Brown 1.5lbs Ground Beef and 1.5lbs Italian Sausage

Saute onion, celary, carrots and garlic in EVOO

add some wine of choice

salt, pepper, Italian seasonings to taste

tomato sauce

dried black olives

splash of Balsamic Vinegar

simmer for an hour or more.

It's always better the second day.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/138f7259.jpg)

sauce  getting ready to simmer.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/ff5ea5f0.jpg)

to the plate! Serve with fresh grated Locatelli cheese, Italian Bread and some Luna Rosa. 8)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 07, 2009, 09:31:27 PM
EVOO

Never - say EVOO again! It puts images of her chubby little sausage fingers in my head. I really can't stand her.

Dinner looked good though. :)

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 07, 2009, 09:34:46 PM
So if its not authentic Indian food and you are Polish - you just made a Polish dish.
If you're non-denominational and you did that - then you just made....dinner.

-OCD


Funny!

Im gonna say that any dish that is either authentic too, or strongly influenced by a historically traditional dish that is connected to a certain ethnicity is "Ethnic" cooking.

The stuff I do seems really authentic cause I make a hobby out of researching the culture behind the cooking style. I want to know why some dishes are the way they are, and I want to make them that way. Sometimes it becomes a sort of scavenger hunt for ingredients. Its anthropological research...for fun. ::)

Oh and where is the recipe for the gibanica? Is it the same as that Georgian dish?

Bluesman, Im making meat sauce tonight too, with eggplant parm. Pics to follow.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 07, 2009, 10:49:30 PM
There's no recipes for Balkan food. Pinch of this, hand full of that....

Here's what I believe went into today's dish.
1.5 to 2 lbs feta cheese (crumble it up)
1 16 oz container of cottage cheese
1 8 oz container of sour cream
1 block of philly 8oz
around 8 eggs
maybe a quater cup oil (or less)
and a little bit of baking powder to give the layers a little lift
You're going for a soupy texture for the fill. Somewhere around clam chowder consistency.
You can add more eggs, or splash in some sparkling mineral water if it's too thick.


Alternate phyllo leaves and above mixture until pan is full. Start with 2 layers of phyllo on the bottom.
Brush each layer of phyllo with a little melted butter prior to putting on the mixture. (makes it healthier)
You just want sparse dollops of the mixture all around, maybe 30-40% coverage with the mix and then start another layer.
You don't want mushy Gibanica. Also don't be prissy with the phyllo, wrinkle it up to make it fit, it adds texture. Occasionally throw down a double layer of phyllo - this ain't rocket science. If your pan is biger than the size of a phyllo sheet overlapping the sheets when fitting phyllo to the pan is fine.

Bake @ 350 until it looks done. About an hour or so, check the bottom crust to make sure it's not burning every once in a while.
And that's roughly it. Gibanica tastes different at each house I go to. Different feta, different oils, no one else we know does the butter thing. Ours is probably a little over the top on ingredients - it can be done as simple as cottage cheese, feta, eggs and oil.


-OCD
  
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 08, 2009, 05:00:18 AM


I guess the Phylo dough is the difference from the Georgian Alacha that is made with the layers of boiled bread dough. Interesting. Both sound greasylicious.

In keeping with the layered theme here is some eggplant parm. The real way to make this dish is to layer it. I made it with meat sauce tonight cause we had some thawed grond venison that was "use it or loose it." Usually I make this dish with no meat.

First rub with kosher salt and wrap the slices of eggplant in a clean towel or cheese cloth. and put some weight on them. Let them sit this way overnight. This will drain some of the excess water out of the fruit and make it more firm and less likely to be soggy when finished.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-8.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-12.jpg)

Then  flour-egg-flour and deep fry. When breading I never mix milk with my eggs. It promotes soggyness. 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie003-7.jpg)

Then set the fried slices aside to drain.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie004-6.jpg)

I make my Italian style meat sauce this way.

Brown and chop with a spatula meat in a little veg oil. Then remove and set aside. Brown a LOT of chopped garlic and about a half of a small onion chopped. After this stuff is starting to turn clear add the meat back in with some oregano, basil, salt pepper, nutmeg (A lot of nutmeg) a pinch of cinnamon and a pinch of celery seed. Toss for a little an then add a four cups of chopped fresh tomato, or canned.  Bring this to a boil and then lower to a mild simmer. Then add water or broth as needed. At this time a add a good health portion of locateli cheese. Let this simmer till all of the flavors are married, about a half hour or so.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie005-6.jpg)

Then preheat the oven to 350 degrees and get a roaster pan. Pour some sauce in the pan and spread it around.

Layer the eggplant slices with cheese and sauce alternately as to reassemble the whole eggplant.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie006-4.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie008-3.jpg)

Then top with some cheese and sauce. Place in a 350 degreese oven till it gets hot and the cheese begins to resemble the cheese on top of pizza.

Serve with some macaroni or potatoes with sauce.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie009-1.jpg)









Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 08, 2009, 11:40:02 AM
Eggplant is on my favorites list. Add parma and it's muy magnifico.

Great job my freind!   8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 08, 2009, 07:41:26 PM
I guess the Phylo dough is the difference from the Georgian Alacha that is made with the layers of boiled bread dough. Interesting. Both sound greasylicious.

When it's made with homemade stretched dough it is generally referred to as burek, and rolled instead of layered. So , the georgian dish is one humongous bagel?
I'm not much of a veggie guy but that looks pretty tasty. Another good thing to fry up like that is roasted and peeled red bell peppers. Good alongside some smoked meat, feta cubes, and bread. Even just in a sammich by itself with a dash of salt.

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 12:09:20 AM
Is burek the "celebration steak" ?

I seem to remember a dish that was like Beef Wellington  only with a roast beef baked inside of bread.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 09, 2009, 12:50:48 AM
Can't say I've ever had a Serbian Beef Wellington.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 01:36:06 AM
Found it after a long search. Its called Maslenica. "Passage Steak"

http://en.belgourmet.be/world_recipes/yugoslavian_recipes/Passage_Steak_or_Maslenica_recipe.php

It is indeed very interesting cooking. There are very noticeable influences from Eastern Europe, Greece, Italy and of coarse the Turks among others.

 Have you ever been there? I snuck over the border once through the woods from Hungary. The border guards told me I had to give them $500 for a Visa. F that, I just walked around them. I was on my way to Dubrovnik. Never made it all the way there though. Things were getting a little scary. :'(
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 14, 2009, 12:51:13 AM
Italian again last night.

Chicken Marsala. We call this American style Marsala cause it is different from the traditional way it was made in the old country.  

First slice the chicken into scalapini type pieces and hammer them out a little. Then season them with a little salt and pepper.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-13.jpg)

While you prep the chicken let a pan get really hot and slice some mushrooms. The pan needs to be hot so that you can "pan sear" the mush rooms. Really hot pan and cold oil, immediately drop the mushrooms in. toss them around carefully and when they start to bron sprinkle them with some kosher salt. The salt will wrench out some moisture making it easier to get the shrooms crispy. They should be smaller and starting to get dark.

Remove the mushrooms and set aside.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-9.jpg)


Then dredge them in flour and saute over medium heat in the same pan you did the mushrooms.. Be sure not to let the pan burn cause you will want all the browning flaavor at the bottom there when you de-glaze with the wine.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie003-8.jpg)

While you are sauteing the chicken or before make a butter roux. This is a mixture of melted butter and flour that you add to thicken and flavor sauces. It leaves behind a nice buttery toasty flavor.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie004-7.jpg)


After all of the chicken is cooked return the mushrooms to the pan and add a healty pour of Marsala wine.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie005-7.jpg)

Then add some fresh grated nutmeg, a pinch of salt and pepper and a very small pich of cinnamon. Add a little chicken broth and a little heavy cream. Stir carefully for a moment to blend then add the roux a little bit at a time till the sauce starts to thicken nicely.

Serve with pasta and or potato and veg.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie006-5.jpg)

Good stuff!

One of the wife's favs.



Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 14, 2009, 12:55:17 AM
Slovakian tonight.

I forget how to say this in Slovakian but it is Chicken Livers 'on' caraway seeds.

It is a sauce of onions, garlic, caraway seeds, marjoram, paprika, salt pepper, chicken broth, thickened with a little roux.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie-6.jpg)

I will post the whole recipe, but does anyone really want me too?  ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 14, 2009, 01:50:17 AM

I will post the whole recipe, but does anyone really want me too?  ::)

Yep - Liver ROCKS!

Maslenica - can't find anyone who knows of it.  Maybe it's something newer like within the last 30 years or so?


-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 14, 2009, 03:00:35 AM
I dont know for sure but Im gonna guess that it is not a new dish.

Maybe it is a Croatian dish and not really popular among Serbs?

Founda couple of more recipes for it.http://www.elsgnoms.com/receptes/yugo.htm



The Chicken Liver dish is called." Kuracia Pechienka na rasci " literally translates to Chicken livers on caraway seeds.

Heat up a saute pan and brown sweat some onions till they start to brown. Add a few cloves of garlic chopped. Move the onions and garlic aside in the pan and add a tablespoon of caraway seeds. Then when the seeds start to krakle a little stir into the onions. Add some marjoram, salt pepper, and a table spoon or more of paprika. I like a lot, the wife likes less.

Add the chicken livers and let them brown a little, then turn them over and sear them on the other side. All the while making sure thayt the onions and garlic do not burn. Then add about a cup or more of chicken broth. stir for a moent and then add some butter roux in small parts at a time gradually until it makes a silky thick sauce. Typically this dish is served with rice but mashed potatoes go great with it too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 14, 2009, 05:21:46 PM
Italian again last night.

Chicken Marsala. We call this American style Marsala cause it is different from the traditional way it was made in the old country.  

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie006-5.jpg)

Good stuff!

One of the wife's favs.


There's not a dish I've tried that I didn't like with mushrooms as the complementary ingredient.

Once again complements to the chef!  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 15, 2009, 02:23:42 AM
Slovakian again tonight.

Slovakian style Goulash.

Also, Goulash is a great dish to make in a presure cooker. The beef in this stew is heel meat. Very flavorful cuts but very tough and require a great deal of cooking time because they have tendon in them. Ordinarily you would have to cook heel meat for two hours or more. two lbs of meat with two large onions.

This Goulash was made in the pressure cooker in less than a half hour. A half hour including prep time.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-10.jpg)

Also running a test here and putting up videos as an experiment. Nothing special yet just the pressure cooker in action.  Gonna try to take this cooking demonstration thing to a whole new level.  ;) If all works out I should be able to make it like a cooking show. I dont really want to show my face so I may wear a rubber chicken mask or something. Could be fun.

Anyways, Take the pot part of your pressure cooker and get it hot. Put in a little oil and brown the beef that you have cut up into 1"-2" cubes. Heel meat works best ($1.29 per lb) or some other less expensive cut. add a a little salt, then add two large onions or so, brown with the meat. (nothing smells better than beef and onions saute together!) well almost nothing. ::)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie003-9.jpg)

Then add some chopped up saurkraut, I used some of my homemade sourkrat even though it still needs another week or so till it is completely done. Sort of "half" sour kraut.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-14.jpg)

Let all of the beef, onions and kraut caramelize in the pot stir from time to time for about ten mins. Add a teaspoon of caraway seeds, a teaspoon of marjoram, two table spoons of paprika or more to taste. Then add water, or beef broth to the pot enough to cover the meat by about an inch. Then add a couple of carrots sliced up and a couple of bay leaves.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie004-8.jpg)

Put the lid on the pressure cooker and turn the heat up till the little weighted relief valve begins to dance violently then turn it down till the little thingy dances like this.
"http://static.photobucket.com/player.swf?file=http://vid291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/MOV08533.flv">

Then let it do that for about 20 mins. You will be amzed that when you open the pot every thing is cooked perfectly. But before you open it you have to release the pressure by lifting the weight. Use a long utensil or knife so you are not burned by the steam.
"http://static.photobucket.com/player.swf?file=http://vid291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/MOV08535.flv">

Do this till all of the steam and pressure have been relieved.

Then remove the lid and a a little roux to thicken it a little bit. After it is a little thicker add about a cup or so of sour cream. Stir till blended and smooth.

This time I am serving it with little egg bow ties. Usually we have it with Hungarian dumplings (spatzle) or CZ dumplings as you guys may know.

This meal also accompanied beautifully by som CZ beer from Bluesman. Thanks again bro! Beer...the gift that keeps on giving...well, for a little while anyway.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie-7.jpg)









Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on December 16, 2009, 02:54:43 AM
Peking Roast Duck...

I took a duckling, halved it by removing the backbone, and dried it overnight on a rack in the refrigerator.  Tonight I took it out, applied a coating of sesame oil and a rub of salt, sugar, pepper, and five spice powder.  I roasted this in a very hot kettle grill around 475-500 degrees until it was 180 degrees internally.  To serve, my wife made the mandarin pancakes out of hot water dough and sesame oil, and I made a sauce with hoisin, green onions, honey, ginger, garlic, rice vinegar, wine, and soy sauce, accompanied with some green onion and cucumber slices.  It was great!

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/PekingDuck.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 16, 2009, 02:57:38 AM
Looks and sounds fantastic.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 17, 2009, 12:48:00 AM
Nic, Duck looks freaking great. Was it tender? Duck can be hit or miss sometimes.

I have had a lot of luck by marinating it and then steaming it whole for a couple of houors. then I finish it in a 500 degree oven for an a half or or so. Comes out tender on the inside crispy on the outside. Same thing I dod with the deep fried crispy aromatic duck.

Romanian stuffed cabbage with Hungarian Langosh tonight.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-11.jpg)

Langosh is a fried dough bread. The dough is made with flour eggs mashed potatoes and eggs. After it is rolled thin and fried it is brushed with a very light coat of crushed garlic and oil. Then it is slathered with sour cream and topped with gtated cheese. We used locatelli tonight nigh but you can use just about any cheese. I thik Guyere is recommended cause it is closest to what they use in Hungary.

The Romanian stuffed cabbage is interesting cause it is leaves of cabbage that have been fermented with the kraut. They are sauerkraut leaves. When you make the stuffing it is browned onions and garlic. Ground meat (I used venison) Rice, salt pepper, marjoram, paprika, pinch of caraway seeds. Brown a little more and then add about a quarter cup of chopped saurkrat. Toss a little more till alll ingredients are well cooked. Set aside to cool. When cool add about two eggs and blend till all of the ingredients are coated with the egg. Then roll the leaves around the stuffing.

For the sauce just mix tomato paste, paprika, salt pepper, marjoram, brown sugar and chicken broth. Blend till smooth then layer the stuffed cabbages into a casserole with the sauce. Bake till cooked through and the leaves are tender.

The Hungarian word for kiss is Pussy, for beer is sor, (pronounced sure) wine is bor. And to say hello you say szia (pronounced see ya).

Fun stuff.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 17, 2009, 06:23:11 PM
Hey Capp - The Romanian stuffed cabbage is very similiar to Polish Golabki. I'll have to make my Baci's recipe and post it!

They are fantastic! Great with some good lagered beer.

(http://z.about.com/d/easteuropeanfood/1/0/D/-/-/-/golabki16.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 17, 2009, 06:33:09 PM
Hey Capp - The Romanian stuffed cabbage is very similiar to Polish Golabki. I'll have to make my Baci's recipe and post it!

They are fantastic! Great with some good lagered beer.

(http://z.about.com/d/easteuropeanfood/1/0/D/-/-/-/golabki16.jpg)

What's inside em? That's fresh cabbage right? Not pickled?
Looks good!

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 17, 2009, 07:40:07 PM
Hey Capp - The Romanian stuffed cabbage is very similiar to Polish Golabki. I'll have to make my Baci's recipe and post it!

They are fantastic! Great with some good lagered beer.



What's inside em? That's fresh cabbage right? Not pickled?
Looks good!

-OCD

Here's a similiar recipe. I like alot of fresh crushed tomato sauce and black pepper with mine.

Cabbage Rolls (Golabki)

1 head cabbage
1 lb. ground beef
1/2 lb. ground pork or veal (optional)
16 oz can tomato sauce
8 oz can tomatoes
2 cups cooked rice
2 eggs
1 onion finely chopped
2 Tbsp. margarine
Salt and pepper to taste

Remove the core from the cabbage. Put the cabbage in boiling water and remove the leaves as they soften. sauté the onions in the margarine for a short time. In a bowl add the onions, meat, rice, eggs and salt and pepper, mix this well.

Place about 2 Tbsp. Of the meat mixture in the center of a cabbage leaf and roll. Put the meat rolls in a large pot and pour the tomato sauce onto the rolls. Then squeeze tomatoes from can and arrange on top of the rolls. Simmer over low heat for 2 hours.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on December 17, 2009, 08:40:19 PM
If that don't stick to your ribs, nothin' will. ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 18, 2009, 12:51:31 PM
The Ukrainian style stuffed cabbages are stuffed using millet. The sauce is made with sour cream and paprika, sorta like the paprikash sauce.  Pretty damn good.

I had stuffed cabbage in a middle eastern restaurant once too. Seems just about every country has a version of stuffed cabbage.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 27, 2009, 10:58:40 PM
Italian...

Calamari and Crab FraDiavalo on a bed of capilini

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Doubles002-1.jpg)

Another one of my very favorite meals in the whole world.

FraDiavalo is a spicy hot marinara sauce.

I used Cleaned squid tubes and pasteurized jumbo lump. They had these 6 oz vacume packs on sale for $8, which is unbeliveably cheap for jumbo lump.

For enough  marinara to go with a whole box of pasta.

I  peel and chop a whole head of garlic. Then I chop part of or a very small onion. I chop a stalk of celery.  Over medium heat satue the onions garlic and celery. To taste add Oregano, basil, rosemary, celery seed, old bay spice, bay leaf and salt and pepper. At the very end of the saute add crushed hot peppers. De glaze with a little white wine or better yet a little Marsala. Go light on the wine. Then add a large can of  diced tomatoes with about a 1/2 cup of tomato paste. Add water till it reaches a bothy consistency. Simmer covered for about an hour and add water as needed to maintain a 'brothy' marinara consistency.

After the sauce is completely cooked and the diced tomatoes are beginning to wilt and break down. Slice the calamari into rings. Put the sauce over medium heat and then add the calamari ring. * it is important to note that if you over cook calamari it will become really chewy. The idea is to 'threaten' them with heat. Cook them in the sauce for about ten to fifteen min. Take one out and try it till it is cooked yet tender. Then add your crab meat, toos gently for a few mins and then remove the sauce from the burner. Let it rest covered while you cook your pasta.

Cook the past till it is just about finished then strain, .Add a ladle full of the sauce and a healthy pour of extra virgin olive oil. Gently oss the pasta in the till coated, cover and let it rest a few mins. Then plate the pasta and top with the sauce.

Garnish with some flat Italian parsley and a squeeze of lemon. 

Now that is eating Italian.
 
In Italian they say: 'Mangiare le mie palle!!! '  It means Eat well.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 28, 2009, 03:44:04 AM
Alright, I should be making some "postno" cabbage rolls this week. Should have pictures and recipe soon.....
I don't have keseo cupus, so we'll be boiling the cabbage in vinegar and water to soften it.
Walnuts and leek is the only thing I have planned so far - I'll let you know. Fasting prior to our Christmas so should be interesting.

-OCD
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 29, 2009, 01:36:48 AM
So you guys use the fermented kraut too for stuffing, like the Romanians? I know a Russian guy who stuffs the whole head and then slow roasts it over open coals. falls apart when you cut into it but OMG. is it good.

Do Serbian cooks use polenta? Must be some Italian influence there, right?

I would love to see and hear more about Serbian cooking. Christmas feast sounds great what with a whole roast pig and all. Next Christmas we are doing the seven fishes but maybe we will do the Serbian Christmas feast the year after that.

I still havent done the Georgian thing but it is on deck.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 29, 2009, 02:51:06 AM
So you guys use the fermented kraut too for stuffing, like the Romanians? I know a Russian guy who stuffs the whole head and then slow roasts it over open coals. falls apart when you cut into it but OMG. is it good.

Do Serbian cooks use polenta? Must be some Italian influence there, right?

I would love to see and hear more about Serbian cooking. Christmas feast sounds great what with a whole roast pig and all. Next Christmas we are doing the seven fishes but maybe we will do the Serbian Christmas feast the year after that.

I still havent done the Georgian thing but it is on deck.



Only corn meal I had is "kacamak" ka cha mahk  and it is generally a breakfast food. Yellow and white corn meal boiled until it is very thick. Beat it, like mashed potatoes to get an even consistency, you end up with a corn cake that you flip out onto a plate. You take a hunk and chop it up into bite sized pieces, pour hot milk over it and a bit of sugar.

Stuffed cabbage for Serbs is usually fermented. If you can't get it, you peel the leaves and boil em a little in water and vinegar to soften them. Then for a bit of that flavor you can use regular kraut placed between the cabbage rolls to infuse that flavor through the rolls. Schedule got messed up - they're  on the menu this week, just not sure which day.

I figure you can get to work welding together a spit ahead of time. Maybe test it a time or two in good weather. Maybe you can dual purpose the motor for spinning the spit to be used on your grain crusher.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 29, 2009, 04:28:42 AM
Sounds like Polenta to me. They call it Mamaliga in Romania.  They may call it they same thing in Bulgaria too.

Spit sounds like a good idea. Maybe I can get it broken in on Easter by roasting a whole goat. Head on of coarse.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 29, 2009, 05:13:08 AM
I usually think of "polenta" as a side (maybe firm and fried), or bed for some other food when looking at it in an Italian context.
Gotta leave the head on - gotta shove the skewer thru something. We just have two angle iron triangles to support the skewers on each end and a pan across the bottom for the fire. Nothing serious. It's not on wheels and it's not enclosed.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 30, 2009, 02:45:12 PM
Made the filling for the cabbage rolls last night. Chopped up leek and onions sweated with some margarine. Partially cooked rice - it will finish while the cabbage rolls are baking, and lots of ground walnuts( meat substitute). Ratio is about 2 rice to 1 everything else in equal ratios. I know it's not much of a recipe - but that's how we cook. Salt, Pepper, Paprika and Vegeta to taste.

Fresh cabbage for this one, so cook the leaves in some water with vinegar (1 cup to the pot)  to soften them so you can make the rolls easier. The rolls will be baked, in a roaster, with a small bit of water on the bottom of the pan, maybe a quarter up the height of the rolls. For the sour taste we emptied a jar of kraut on top to cover the rolls and then some of the unusable leaves to cover that keeping the moisture in the rolls.

I'll take pictures at dinnertime.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 03, 2010, 11:00:15 PM
Balti style Indian food.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-2.jpg)

From left to right- chili pepper dal, coconut curry cod fish, masala onion rice, plantains in a sweet and sour tamarind sauce, layered paratha bread.

If anyone wants the recipes Ill write them out. They are long though, especially in the spice department.

नया साल मुबारक हो
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 04, 2010, 12:36:42 AM
I think it's been 3 years since my last indian dish. Some goofy spice or something I had at a buffet made me feel like the Underdog float at the parade, you know, wish you were dead kinda feeling. I still use curry, cumin, tumeric. It's especially good with fresh cabbage - saute onions & cabbage in olive oil, add the indian spices and some salt. Dunno why I started doing it, it's easy, it's good. But I don't do indian anymore.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 04, 2010, 02:24:01 AM
Balti style Indian food.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-2.jpg)

From left to right- chili pepper dal, coconut curry cod fish, masala onion rice, plantains in a sweet and sour tamarind sauce, layered paratha bread.

If anyone wants the recipes Ill write them out. They are long though, especially in the spice department.

नया साल मुबारक हो

That's genious!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 04, 2010, 02:29:59 AM
How about the bread recipe?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 05, 2010, 12:29:55 AM
Kind a hard to spell out some of the tricks to making paratha so here is video from a great cooking web site.

http://72.3.253.187/vahrehvah/popvideo.php?recipe_id=4245

Man this guy is funny.

Oh that is why they call it gunpowder.

Here is a roti recipe too.

http://72.3.253.187/vahrehvah/popvideo.php?recipe_id=427

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 05, 2010, 01:44:08 AM
I had some wonderful indian food at a somewhat humble and not expensive local restaurant last week.  The food was so good, I requested an armistice with indian food...I will no longer aspire to master it, I will just enjoy it.  Cap, looks like you've invested enough to come near to mastery, but I think I'll resign from the south asian front and concentrate on other cuisines to master, for now.

Anything curing lately?  I have a Tender-Quick cured pork loin on the smoker right now to be canadian or "back" bacon.  With that cold smoker I am going to cure and cold smoke lox or gravlax.  Someday I will perhaps even get into the uncooked, dry cured fermented sausages like salume and its ilk, but I'm not nearly so bold now.  Let me cure and eat raw salmon and I'll be making progress from my "everything cooked til its dry" upbringing!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 05, 2010, 03:21:47 AM
Roomali Roti is the thinnest bread in the world. It's quite challenging to make as well.

That guy VahReyVah is funny. He is a motivational cook too. I like him.

I want to try making some gunpowder and experiment with it. VahRey uses it like there's no tomorrow.  :o
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 07, 2010, 05:07:30 AM
Just got back from church - the kuvana rakija was flowin'!  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 08, 2010, 04:37:58 AM
Burek time!
For reference, the island is about 3.5 X 5.5 ft.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/S0a2HV6JGuI/AAAAAAAAAKU/K8CSyS99v4c/s800/Christmas%20091.JPG)
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/S0a2HkhRkqI/AAAAAAAAAKY/PtoSbvDMJSk/s800/Christmas%20092.JPG)
Feta Cheese on top, seasoned beef/onion/garlic on bottom left, and a mix of the two fillings bottom right.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/S0a2HMLeqsI/AAAAAAAAAKQ/H-vOm4-KxGE/s800/Christmas%20106.JPG)
I was too close on this last shot, a little blurry. I gotta work on my camera skills. This is the wife's work BTW.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: narvin on January 08, 2010, 03:53:34 PM
Kind a hard to spell out some of the tricks to making paratha so here is video from a great cooking web site.

http://72.3.253.187/vahrehvah/popvideo.php?recipe_id=4245

Man this guy is funny.

Oh that is why they call it gunpowder.

Here is a roti recipe too.

http://72.3.253.187/vahrehvah/popvideo.php?recipe_id=427



I love that guy.  His tikka masala recipe was damn good, too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 08, 2010, 04:47:07 PM


I love that guy.  His tikka masala recipe was damn good, too.

What am I missing? My tikka sauce comes in a jar.  ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 08, 2010, 05:05:01 PM
Burek time!
For reference, the island is about 3.5 X 5.5 ft.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/S0a2HV6JGuI/AAAAAAAAAKU/K8CSyS99v4c/s800/Christmas%20091.JPG)

Feta Cheese on top, seasoned beef/onion/garlic on bottom left, and a mix of the two fillings bottom right.

I was too close on this last shot, a little blurry. I gotta work on my camera skills. This is the wife's work BTW.

I would love to learn how to make that sometime. There's a real skill to making this great meal.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 08, 2010, 07:02:55 PM
Oh yeah, that looks awesome.

Come on man, crack those knuckles and write out that recipe!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 08, 2010, 08:07:02 PM
Oh yeah, that looks awesome.

Come on man, crack those knuckles and write out that recipe!

I've said it before - I'll say it again - we ain't got no recipes. :D
Wife eyeballs the dough. It's just water, flour, salt, oil and eggs.(claims the eggs make it stretchier)
According to the wife...
Around four cups of warm water, 2 eggs, 1/2 tablespoon of salt, add flour and knead add flour and knead add flour and knead until the dough is thick enough to hold it's shape in a ball. Let it sit a while, in a warm oven - maybe half hour and then you can start stretching.
Well floured cloth, I don't think I can teach you to stretch over the internet, but stretch as far as you can without ripping, then with a knife you cut off all the the perimeter which is too thick leaving only the thin stretched dough. As you see in the picture you only cover 2/3 to 3/4 of the dough leaving some naked dough so it will seal dough against dough to stay in roll form.
Use the cloth to roll the burek, lifting the cloth from the side with filling causing the dough to roll toward the nekked dough.
So you end up with the ~4 foot roll and you bring your pan next to the roll for easy transfer. First cut the ends off the dough where there would be no filling, the cutting motion will seal the edges for you. Then coil the roll into your greased baking pan. We use an official enameled round pan, that just fits into the oven. It takes two of the rolls pictured to fill the pan with burek.
Filling is ground beef, onions, garlic, vegeta, paprika, garam masala (I know - real traditional ingredient), dried parsley, black pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, salt.
Before spreading out the filling add 6-8 eggs and mix well - once baked in the dough it will keep the meat from falling out.
Over season it to overcome the blandness of the dough; the dough above will be enough for about 6 lbs of meat.
Or you can use feta cheese, eggs, cottage cheese, sour cream, oil - just don't make it too soupy. If you know what chicharon is(deep fried pork with skin on), you can dice that up and throw it in with the cheese.
Served hot is best, later when you reheat it you will probably want a dollop of sour cream or yogurt to dip into as it dries out on subsequent reheatings. Not so much on the cheese ones, but definitely the beef one.

350 for 45 minutes to an hour uncovered - just watch the top of the dough till it turns a nice rustic brown color. When it comes out you flick some water across the top with your fingers and cover with a towel for 10-15 minutes to soften the crust just a bit so it's not crumbling when you cut it up.

Ask away - I'll answer whatever I can. We really mostly cook by eyeballing, tasting, feeling the food. The old fashioned way.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 08, 2010, 09:10:48 PM
I cook almost everything the same way. I dont measure to much, only when first cooking something complicated.

I only use cookbooks and recipes as a guide. Once I can make a dish consistently the same way time after time I no longer need a guide.

Your instructions seem like a good guide, Im gonna try it.

Still no word on the Passage Steak huh? MAybe its Croatian. Still sounds borekish what with the feta cheese an meat and dough.

I wonder why it is called passage steak maybe it is an Easter or passover type thing?

Is humus a Yugo thing? or Pastitsio (Greek Lasagna) Lots of Greek influence there right?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 08, 2010, 09:52:33 PM
Still no word on the Passage Steak huh? MAybe its Croatian. Still sounds borekish what with the feta cheese an meat and dough.
I wonder why it is called passage steak maybe it is an Easter or passover type thing?
Is humus a Yugo thing? or Pastitsio (Greek Lasagna) Lots of Greek influence there right?

No hummus, no pastitsio, no passage steak. Could be Cro but they are big into fish (Adriatic).
Mussaka, Paprikash, stuffed peppers, stuffed cabbage, whole roast pig, lot's of smoked meat, feta - that's what I grew up on.
We do Ivar - Roasted and peeled red bell peppers, eggplant, oil, spices, garlic all coarsly ground, slow cooked until thick (a little looser than hummus and eaten with bread. Generally you do one batch in September, put it in Mason jars to last you until next year. Or the same peppers just peeled, with crushed garlic, oil, and salt - eaten fresh as a side.

Foods vary from village to village - so I can't say absolutely no way it's Serbian. But I've never heard of it, nor have any family members of mine. EDIT: google maslenica and you come up with tons of Croatian references - so yes I guess it's a Yugo dish just not particularly Serbian.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 09, 2010, 01:37:02 PM
Mussaka is also a Greek dish. How do you Serbs prepare paprikash, the same as the Hungarians?

Northern  Indian again last night.


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-3.jpg)

In front is a cracked and toasted wheat mixed veg upma. Then a bowl of masala channa dal. Saag Aloo (potatoes in a pureed spiced spinach and onion sauce. And fried naan bread taking the center stage. As with most Indian meals the bread is a big player.



Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 09, 2010, 03:51:31 PM
Looks great.  8)

How do you prepare the cracked and toasted wheat mixed veg upma?

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 09, 2010, 04:05:37 PM
Mussaka is also a Greek dish. How do you Serbs prepare paprikash, the same as the Hungarians?


OK - to Hungarians, it's GOULASH. Paprikas is made with Paprike (bell peppers) and Goulash is generally Potatoes. And then there's Becar Paprikash which is Tomatoes, Peppers and Onions, it'd be vegetarian except for the eggs at the end to thicken.

Wiki "Serbian Cuisine" there's some pretty good stuff there.

Again, the bread in your dinner interests me the most - but I grew up a big bread eater. Bread with EVERYTHING.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 09, 2010, 08:26:15 PM
In Hungary paprikash is a Chicken dish. It is roasted chicken, with the drippings from the pan and perhaps a little chicken broth mixed with a lot of paprika and sour cream.

Ill check out those serb dishes, I love learning new cooking methods, Im running out of new.

Ill post a recipe for the bread and for the upma a little later. Upma is basically Indian style cous cous.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 10, 2010, 12:14:29 AM
Well, I unearthed (in a figurative sense) my gravlax tonight, and while I plan to cold smoke it some tomorrow to add an extra layer of flavor, I tried a few slivers on Norwegian crispbread, and wow!  Great stuff.  As long as I don't get sick.  I bought prefrozen salmon, so the roundworm concern should be negligible.   :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 10, 2010, 01:03:33 AM
I love gravalax. Sometimes we go to the little Cafeteria at the Ikea to get a plate of it. Very nice with some mustard sauce and mixed greens and flotbrod.

cant imagine it smoked though. Maybe it will be good.

I was watching a Swedish cooking show the other day on Create (a great TV station if you dont have it) I think the show is called new Swedish cooking. Always has different hosts cooking outdoors. Really neat. Anyways, they were making fermented sea trout. Trout is very closely related to the salmon. They were taking these small fish after catching them from a hole in the ice. They carefully gutted them and then rubbed them inside and out with sea salt. Then they stacked them neatly into a food grade bucket. covered them with water that has been boiled and then returned to room temp.to sterilize. Then put in a closet at room temp for a "month or two"  :o
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 10, 2010, 03:22:46 AM
You're talking about New Scandinavian Cooking...and if the episode in question is what I'm thinking of, it was an episode with Andreas Viestad (the original, and Norwegian host), and they were making rakfisk fermented in some guys closet.  I'm nowhere near there yet, myself. 

Gravlax and lox (smoked salmon) are really not much different outside of one being smoked, and one not.  I do like the dill flavor though.

But yeah, I can credit New Scandinavian Cooking, and its successor "Perfect Day" (outside of the annoying, nasally-voiced Finnish chick) for igniting my interest in northern european cuisine.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 10, 2010, 04:02:18 AM
Yeah that is the show, but I think the host was English. Cant remember his name but he had an English accent and spoke with a stammer. He did make a gravalax also. I think it may have been for a Christmas feast. He did that roasted pork belly thing too that Scandinavians love so much. Good show.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 10, 2010, 01:46:26 PM
No, that's the same guy, Viestad, he is Norwegian and sounds like he learned English from the Robin Leach School of Overzealous British Accents.  The pork dish was juleribbe, a sort of clove-spiced Christmas side of pork basically with a huge fat cap.  I never see that particular cut of pork in my area, so no aping that for me.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 10, 2010, 11:53:55 PM
Greek.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-4.jpg)

This is a dish of lamb shank, or goat pictured is goat; braised in the pressure cooker for about twenty mins or so with chopped onions splash of white wine, tomatoes olive oil, oregano, rosemary, nutmeg cinnamon salt and pepper. Start by browning your veg spce and onins a little bit then add wine and then tomatoes. Cover with lid and simmer till tender.

I had large goat shanks that are sliced cross ways so I just cut them in chunks, Greek cooks do it this way to but most traditionally the shanks are braised and served whole.

Most widely served on top of a bed of orzo pasta. While hot and strained melt some butter on top and mix through with cheese (parm. cheese or the Greek equivalent if you can get it). Then while the pasta is still hot add a cracked egg into the orzo with a ladle full of the hot tomato sauce. Mix well until the egg cooks from the heat of the pasta.

Put the past mixture on the plate and with a ladle create a depression in the middle of the pile. Then ladle the sauce into the center. Garnish with a few shakes of cinnamon onto the exposed pasta and top with some chopped fresh flat parsley.

I am going to explode.

I was gonna make homemade yellow corn sopes tonight but ran out of time. Maybe later this week.  For some reason all afternoon I had the munchies and I was craving yellow corn sopes.  ;)

So back to the Indian bread. I use bread flour, about two cups for four laves of naan. I mix some yeast into room temp or slightly warm milk. Pinch of sugar to wake the yeast up. Let it start to proof and get going. Add a teaspoon of salt to flour, a few pinches of cumin seed, a few pinches of mustard seed. Both optional. Mix in the mixer till a nice workable dough forms. Add flour if to wet, sprinkles of  milk or water if to dry. Let it rise in a warm place. Roll into balls about twice the size of a golf ball and roll it out, thin. Then fry in a half inch of oil. Or in a dry pan or bake. I get the best results frying in oil. It makes so that they peel off in layers. This is desirable cause Indian food is often eaten with the fingers and this makes for good pieces of bread to create a vehicle for the different sauce and foods. This bread goes great with everything not just Indian food. Also, I call it fried naan but it is more accurately called something else when fried.

The upma is a kind of semolina whole wheat that I get at the Indian grocery store. It is very carefully toasted in a dry pan till light brown. Then it is set asside. There are all different recipes that it is added to mostly for breakfast dishes. The one above is made wit onions, carrots, peas, raisins, garam masala, salt, pepper and a few curry leaves. After the veg and spices have sauteed a little enough water is added to cook like rice. About one part water to two parts wheat.

Good stuff, great for a healthy microwave lunch.


.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 11, 2010, 01:24:15 AM
It is Italian tonight.

Chicken Parmesan. Nice winter warmer.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/2c231013.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 11, 2010, 02:02:06 AM
Oh man that looks good. I love when the spag is baked like that and gets a little crunchy.

Made a Champurrado for dessert with the yellow corn meal. Very warm and filling.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2010, 10:21:28 PM
Italian Tonight.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-5.jpg)

Baked Rottini with tomatoes, spinach, mushrooms and goats cheese. Topped with a hot steaming portion of horse see.....I mean goats milk bechamel sauce.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2010, 10:23:52 PM
It's not even 4:30 are you serving Seniors tonight? Or you just gonna nuke it to warm it over when it's really dinnertime?  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 13, 2010, 11:29:47 PM
Yumm...I am now officially hungry!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 14, 2010, 01:51:50 PM
no seniors, although my inlaws have arrived, I just had to get home early to work in my home office a little,(my inlaws bed room now) other wise they would be in here messin every thing up. :-X

Plus I skipped lunch.

Im thinking the food of Kyrgyzstan next.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 14, 2010, 03:27:15 PM
Negative. I don't get why you would do that to yourself. Get back to the Balkans - those people know how to eat!  :D
Think about it, your inlaws are there - you're already depressed - you need a good meal at least. And Slivo! Did they bring any?


Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 14, 2010, 03:49:51 PM
Negative. I don't get why you would do that to yourself. Get back to the Balkans - those people know how to eat!   :D

 :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 14, 2010, 08:26:36 PM
Yeah, yeah yeah, gibanica, burek. Im sure those are good but you guys probably kick your dogs sometimes too.  :-*

J/K but, I was at a party on the Hungarian side and a bunch of Yugos threw a goat on the fire whole, hair and all. They gutted it but hair horns and everything right on the fire. I kept trying to avoid the smoke but ya know how the smoke always blows your way? I smelled like burnt goat hair for about a week.



No slivo. They gave um a bunch of crap about the bags being heavy and wanted to charge them a lot more money. They ended up leaving that and some other goodies behind. The Slivo will now be following along behind with the brother and sister in law contingent. ::) Mi casa su casa?...wtf was I thinking.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 14, 2010, 11:20:31 PM
you guys probably kick your dogs sometimes too.  :-*
threw a goat on the fire whole, hair and all. They gutted it but hair horns and everything right on the fire. I kept trying to avoid the smoke but ya know how the smoke always blows your way? I smelled like burnt goat hair for about a week.
No slivo.  Mi casa su casa?...wtf was I thinking.

First - the dog was asking for it. Second - that's probably Muslims from the region - Serbs roast Pigs and Lamb.Third SUCKS TO BE YOU ON SO MANY FRONTS; you smell funny, you have foreigners living with you, NO SLIVO, more foreigners coming, and you're gonna be eating food from Kyrgyzstan. Is there a fund we can donate to, to help you out?  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 15, 2010, 03:43:21 AM
http://www.advantour.com/kyrgyzstan/cuisine/food.htm (http://www.advantour.com/kyrgyzstan/cuisine/food.htm)

Doesn't look promising brother. Aside from kefir and blinis - you're screwed.
I can help you out with the kefir if you'd like - got grains to spare.
Guess you need to go thru with it and eat the sheep's eyeballs though, now that you've posted it on the internet.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 15, 2010, 12:52:06 PM
Come on man. Some of that food looks great. peroshki, manti? Both awesome, especially when I make them. 

Looks like the same as Uzbek food. which I love.

and yes...I do smell funny....sometimes.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 15, 2010, 03:59:17 PM
Come on man. Some of that food looks great. peroshki, manti? Both awesome, especially when I make them.  
Looks like the same as Uzbek food. which I love.

Still think I'd be living mainly off of blinis. Saw Andrew Zimmern eating Blinis and drinking Kvass in Russia - sounds good to me. Kyrgyzstan seems heavy into dumplings. Good way to use bad meat I suppose, mince it and cook the heck out of it. You know, sounds more an more like Chinese food - they ARE on the border.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 19, 2010, 03:07:03 AM
Thinking about Moroccan this weekend. Maybe some bastila http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QH-vHqYNI8



Check this out. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDuF-VzD42A





 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on January 19, 2010, 08:07:52 PM
I have a recipe for Zaalouk (eggplant) someplace as well as the carrot salad and tomato./cucumber salad.  I'll post it if I can find it.  Bastilla is yummy, but kind of a PITA to make.  Layers of phyllo dough with ground chicken, eggs, onions, nutmeg and cinnamon, with powdered sugar on top.  Got to make flat bread too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 24, 2010, 01:01:07 AM
I would love to see those recipes. I have a recipe for the Morocco style bread that is eaten with those salads.

Cuban tonight.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-7.jpg)

From left to right:

Tostones.

Cuban style fried pork cubes brazed in a sauce of orange juice, garlic, onions, cumin seeds, paprika, oregano, salt pepper, juice of a few limes.

Rice.

Black beans cooked with onions, garlic, cumin, paprika and tomatoes and red peppers.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-6.jpg)

(http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/7/21/1248198679599/Fidel-Castro-with-Che-Gue-001.jpg)

Viva la Revolucion.





.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 24, 2010, 01:33:38 AM
I had the real deal down in Miami several years ago. Looks spot on my freind.

I guess the mother-in-law didn't cook tonight afterall.  ;)

Great display!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 24, 2010, 02:21:00 AM
M in law was out when I got home.

I managed to throw the pork in the pressure cooker and start the toastones before they got back.  8) Lucky I guess.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 24, 2010, 02:26:29 AM
M in law was out when I got home.

I managed to throw the pork in the pressure cooker and start the toastones before they got back.  8) Lucky I guess.

She doesn't do ANYTHING well? Isn't there a single dish you could let her cook to make her feel useful?
Or have her do breakfast and leave dinner to you? She can do eggs and bacon and toast can't she?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 24, 2010, 02:38:11 AM
Crazy that you ask that. Cause this morning she made scrambled eggs mixed with onions and bacon. The bacon was not crispy. it was like lumps of fat. The onions were under cooked as well as the eggs. EWW. I had frosted mini wheats.

I can honestly say there is nothing she can cook. She cooks meat until it is almost completely decimated.

A cooking quote of hers. "You can not over cook a chicken"  :o

Its hopeless. As the upcoming months pass Ill post some pics. You will see the horror.

I love here though; poor woman here I am talking about her like this.  ::)

Mother in laws are one of the reasons god created beer.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 24, 2010, 02:41:12 AM

I can honestly say there is nothing she can cook. She cooks meat until it is almost completely decimated.

A cooking quote of hers. "You can not over cook a chicken"  :o

Its hopeless. As the upcoming months pass Ill post some pics. You will see the horror.


Oh man! New thread - FOOD DISASTERS!!!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 24, 2010, 03:29:22 AM

I can honestly say there is nothing she can cook. She cooks meat until it is almost completely decimated.

A cooking quote of hers. "You can not over cook a chicken"  :o

Its hopeless. As the upcoming months pass Ill post some pics. You will see the horror.


Oh man! New thread - FOOD DISASTERS!!!

LMAO.

That sucks. You're going to have to do something about that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mH4lRzKboeg


Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 25, 2010, 11:48:10 PM
Huevos Rancharos.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-9.jpg)

With gringo toppings.

As I understand it real huevos racharos is eggs served on top of fried corn tortillas that are also cooked agin in a Mexican style tomato sauce. That is what is above but also topped with lettuce, tomatoes, black beans, avocado, cilantro, crema Mexicana and about a half a jar of hot sauce.


Here is one of the mother in laws specialties.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1019Alexavideo2002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1019Alexavideo2003.jpg)

If you even know what this is you will never have to prove your manhood to me in any other way.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 26, 2010, 01:49:13 AM
I use to make Huevos Rancheros daily when I was a line cook working at Chi Chi's many moons ago. We used to use a tomato stew that was ladled over the eggs and then topped with cheese. It was okay, not as good as what you've shown.

...and that gelatinized meat. Yuchhh.  :o

 I think she destroyed that meat somewhere along the way. Poor women...she probably doesn't know any better. Your going to have to show her the way Capp.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 26, 2010, 02:39:51 AM
Cappo it looks like head cheese but they forgot to grind the bones and form into a nice block and cut it into slices.


Pig nuckle soup chilled.

To quote my wife, " if that is all you have to eat why not and I'll take vegetables any day"
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 26, 2010, 03:18:59 AM
Yeah, every couple years it gets made around here. But it's really just a half decent chunk of beef cooked to death, plucked apart, more garlic in it than any dish you've ever had, and turned into meat jello. They claim the "gelatin" and the garlic are very good for you - so it is a health food. I gotta eat a ton of bread with it because it's so hot from the garlic(uncooked). Then you chase it with slivo - so it works like draino and keeps your veins from clogging.



Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: The Professor on January 26, 2010, 04:46:41 AM
... this morning she made scrambled eggs mixed with onions and bacon. The bacon was not crispy. it was like lumps of fat. The onions were under cooked as well as the eggs. EWW

...A cooking quote of hers. "You can not over cook a chicken"  :o

Well, yeah...it's really easy to overcook chicken (especially the breast meat, which I hate anyway).
But the eggs you describe... sounds like a perfect breakfast... I hate crispy bacon, and I love soft and runny scrambled eggs.   Must be my eastern European genes.

Different strokes I guess. ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on January 26, 2010, 12:52:35 PM
Jerk pork with beans and rice (to mitigate the heat).  Pictures taken after we pigged out.  Pardon the pun.

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/jerkpork.jpg)

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/beansandrice.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 26, 2010, 03:04:29 PM
Well, yeah...it's really easy to overcook chicken (especially the breast meat, which I hate anyway).

True, although even the dark meat can be thoroughly overcooked...my sole experiment so far with a moroccan tagine was to overcook (in a pot over a wood fire) chicken thighs until they literally fell apart into strands and particles.  I wanted "fall off the bone" but I got almost a chicken pate.

Visited a local asian grocer last night and realized I am in the wrong neighborhood to get Korean ingredients...they cater to a local SE asian and Chinese population, I have to go across town where they have Korean and Japanese grocers.  Still got some great banh pho for cheap, some kecap manis, and a variety of other things, including cheap spice refills.  No fish sauce though! 

Maybe later this week I'll drive over there, find some ssamjang and spicy-hot kimchi, and pick up a bottle of soju, too, for a Korean BBQ.  Wish I had a little hibachi, that would be perfect for bool gogi, but the Weber will do.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 26, 2010, 03:07:11 PM
All I got out of that was Chicken and Hibachi.... the rest was like a Charlie Brown cartoon. Wa Wa Waaaaaaaaaaaa! :)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 26, 2010, 09:19:04 PM
I understand it.

Especially the kecap Manis. We call that ABC sauce around here, it is a permanent fixture in my cabinet. I use it in all kinds of cooking. Works great as a gravy darkener and adds a great flavor. It is one of my secret ingredients in lots of stuff.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 26, 2010, 10:03:29 PM
Ah yes, ours is the ABC brand.  Looks like a Belgian beer the way its bottled, except it has a "halal" certification marked, so you know its definitely not beer!

I'm not sure I'm quite adventurous enough to try kecap manis in gravy...I'll have to use it more until I get used to the flavor, which is basically sweet soy tar (not in a bad way).  It was pretty thick at room temperature, I'm not sure if it will pour after being refrigerated.  Do you refrigerate yours cap?  I should try satays with it as a marinade...I have some dried lemongrass I bought there, maybe lemongrass, ginger, Huy Fong Chili Garlic sauce, kecap manis, and some wine to thin it out.  Anything but fish sauce.  :D



Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 27, 2010, 12:11:54 AM
I dont refrigerate it and we keep it around for about 6 months to a year, although I am sure refrigeration wouldn't hurt. Great stuff! It will add great flavor to all kinds of dishes. Try putting a little in Marsala sauce. Trust me. ;) I usually get the medium sweet it is the one with the green label.


Slovak tonight.

Pig tongues in a Paprikash style gravy served with Hungarian dumplings.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-10.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-11.jpg)





Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 27, 2010, 12:47:39 AM
Slovak tonight.

Pig tongues in a Paprikash style gravy served with Hungarian dumplings.


How do you cook it? Mostly the meat. Had La Lingua tacos for the first time on a bus.trip to Monterrey MX a few months ago. It was good! Never cooked tongue before though. Meat jello for desert? :)

What do the old folks think of your cooking?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 27, 2010, 01:17:40 AM
I dont refrigerate it and we keep it around for about 6 months to a year, although I am sure refrigeration wouldn't hurt. Great stuff! It will add great flavor to all kinds of dishes. Try putting a little in Marsala sauce. Trust me. ;) I usually get the medium sweet it is the one with the green label.

Slovak tonight.

Pig tongues in a Paprikash style gravy served with Hungarian dumplings.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-10.jpg)



I'm just thinking about where those tongues were before they were on your cutting board.  :o  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 27, 2010, 01:42:41 AM
I asked the wife today, what are we going to make for dinner? She said she took out tongues. I said Oh yeah, I had them last night and they were gooood. She didnt get it.

I cook the tongues in the pressure cooker for about 15- 20 mins with some onions, garlic, bay leaf, marjoram, caraway seeds salt pepper and paprika.. After the meat is tender I add the sour cream and a little butter roux to thicken the gravy.

For tacos, same thing. in the pressure cooker with onions, garlic, peppers, cumin seeds, salt and pepper and an avocado leaf.

If no pressure cooker simmer covered for about two hours till the meat is very tender, depending on the size.

What do my inlaws think of my cooking? For the most part they love it. But, when cooking for them I cant use any hot peppers, not even a little. Even a little black pepper and they will be screaming about how spicy it is. Basically my mother in law uses no spices or herbs. They like their food as bland as can be.

Once I made a beautiful shrimp and lobster pasta dish with fresh chopped tomatoes. The kind of dish where the pasta is tossed in with the ingredients and there is not a whole lot of sauce. After cleaning up a little I came to the table to find them dumping ketchup on top of my pasta dish. It was disgusting. When I asked them why they said because their is not enough sauce.
Apparently ketchup on pasta is a common dish in Slovakian. F-in Philistines.   
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on January 27, 2010, 04:19:57 PM
Apparently ketchup on pasta is a common dish in Slovakian. F-in Philistines.   

Hey what's wrong about ketchup on pasta man  ???
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: blatz on January 27, 2010, 04:21:54 PM
Hey what's wrong about ketchup on pasta man  ???

I think my wife would beat you and then throw you out of the house if you uttered such a phrase in our kitchen.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 27, 2010, 05:44:17 PM
(http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/10190920/2/istockphoto_10190920-pouring-a-lot-of-ketchup-sauce-on-spaghetti-pasta.jpg)

The things they have stock photos of....
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 27, 2010, 06:37:00 PM
chop up some hotdogs in it and call it a day...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on January 28, 2010, 03:18:36 AM
Hey what's wrong about ketchup on pasta man  ???

I think my wife would beat you and then throw you out of the house if you uttered such a phrase in our kitchen.
I guess NO vacation for me in Florida :(
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 29, 2010, 02:47:23 AM
Man, I can suck the eye balls right out of the head of a roasted pig. Ill eat almost anything. Balls, bugs, whatever, if it tastes good Ill eat it. But, I would never eat pasta with ketchup on it. Even If I was starving I think I would struggle with it.  :D

I was in this pizza place in Bratislava. There is some really good pizza in Slovakia BTW, great little personal pizzas. Anyway, I ordered my pizza and when they brought it out they also brought a bottle of ketchup. I asked what the ketchup was for even though I knew why. It was for the pizza. :o
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 29, 2010, 07:02:24 PM
I think I could actually eat pasta doused in yellow mustard before pasta smothered in ketchup.  I could be wrong, but I won't be experimenting to verify.

Driving across town tomorrow to our little "koreatown" area to hunt for better ingredients.  Might stop by an indian grocer in the area for some fresh indian breads, or just to smell the place. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on January 29, 2010, 07:11:07 PM
You guys are just NO fun.  :'(
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 30, 2010, 03:41:23 AM
T monk you need to cook for me! LOL.


Best part you are somewhat close. I can't get Cappo out of PA.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on January 30, 2010, 03:45:00 PM
T monk you need to cook for me! LOL.


Best part you are somewhat close. I can't get Cappo out of PA.


Hmmm..... Even kids complain when I cook my spagety delight.
But for sure we could have some beer at my house.
How far do you live from me?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on January 31, 2010, 03:06:37 PM
Hey guys.  It's been a while since I've chimed in, so I thought I'd post some photos of what I was up to in the kitchen yesterday.

Potato sopes with goat cheese, salsa verde, cilantro, and a squeeze of lime
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Sopes.jpg)

Puerco verde tacos with homemade tortillas, refried beans with crumbled cotija cheese, and a vienna lager to wash it down
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Peurcoyfrijoles.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 31, 2010, 06:11:03 PM
Hey guys.  It's been a while since I've chimed in, so I thought I'd post some photos of what I was up to in the kitchen yesterday.

Potato sopes with goat cheese, salsa verde, cilantro, and a squeeze of lime
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Sopes.jpg)

Puerco verde tacos with homemade tortillas, refried beans with crumbled cotija cheese, and a vienna lager to wash it down
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Peurcoyfrijoles.jpg)



Looks and sounds tasty. I haven't tried these yet. Looks like a nice appetizer.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 31, 2010, 06:53:13 PM
T monk you need to cook for me! LOL.


Best part you are somewhat close. I can't get Cappo out of PA.


Hmmm..... Even kids complain when I cook my spagety delight.
But for sure we could have some beer at my house.
How far do you live from me?

I'm almost 200 miles from ya.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 31, 2010, 10:42:05 PM
Mexican looks nice!  Homemade tortillas seem like they'd take a bit of practice to get right...I'd probably burn them trying.  I delegate making mandarin pancakes to my wife for the same reason.

I came home with bounteous loot from the ethnic markets I visited...from the Korean/Japanese market, kimchi, a really tasty ssamjang, some well-priced korean sushi rice, a korean pear, sesame oil, and a few other things, and I went all out at the Indian/Pakistani market, getting tremedous deals on various spices...kalonji, dried round red chilis, black cardamom, huge amount of other things, and stuff like chickpea flour, toor dal, ghee, and basmati rice.  Oh and some fresh baked breads...a bit of melted butter and a healthy sprinkle of kalonji makes these quite tasty.

Making a soup with the dal tonight.  Had Korean BBQ last night, which was good.  Kimchi was better after I made a foil boat and "barbequed" it along with the bulgogi, but its still an acquired taste that right now is passing dislike and only approaching ambivalence.  No soju, sadly, the liquor store was out of stock, so an IPA stood in the gap.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 04, 2010, 11:00:13 PM
Oh man the Mexican sure does look great. I love sopes.

Whats the recipe for the sopes dough. Potato?

Greek tonight.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-12.jpg)

A stew of braised octopus, tomatoes, cured green olives, peppers, potatoes, garlic,  onions, herbs and spices. Served on a mound of rice.


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-13.jpg)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-14.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 04, 2010, 11:08:30 PM
Dude, I've loved everything you've posted.....until now... :-X


C'mon, you're just doing that to piss off the inlaws.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 04, 2010, 11:13:41 PM
No man, good stuff. You dont like octopus? Oh man it is delicious. Have you never been to Croatia? They love it there.

I wanted to make it out on the grill but ran out of time. Grilled octopus is unbelievably delicious.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 04, 2010, 11:26:59 PM
No man, good stuff. You dont like octopus? Oh man it is delicious. Have you never been to Croatia? They love it there.

I wanted to make it out on the grill but ran out of time. Grilled octopus is unbelievably delicious.

Got quite a bit  of family there...
Let's just say it's not quite picture perfect, I dunno what to tell you. It's ugly. :D Probably tastes phenominal! Yeah, I'll eat octopus here and there. Not really a staple here.

When I was 9, I was swimming in the Adriatic with my cousin and she was hungry. She dunked under, came up with a sea urchin, flipped it on it's back on a large rock and smashed it with another rock she found underwater. That was her lunch - I went hungry.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 04, 2010, 11:55:44 PM
Oh man I love raw sea urchin.

The Adriatic is beautiful isnt it. I am amazed how absolutely clear the water is. I thought it was considered one of the most poluted seas in the world. You would never know it to look at it.

Sometime I make a Cippino mixed seafood in maranara. I love adding calamari and octopus clams mussels. Ill have to do one soon.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on February 05, 2010, 01:19:54 AM
Oh man the Mexican sure does look great. I love sopes.

Whats the recipe for the sopes dough. Potato?

http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/ricks-crispy-potato-sopes-with-goat-cheese-and-herb-salad

I found the recipe by doing a Google search for "potato sopes," NOT by perusing marthastewart.com.   ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 05, 2010, 02:54:28 AM
I love Martha Stewart, she is cool cause she is a cast iron b****....that really knows how to put an hurderv' assortment together.

Im gonna make some sopes with lengua soon. I got empenadas on deck too. Need some anato seeds.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on February 05, 2010, 04:11:46 AM
I'm going to be immature about this:

Gross dude!  I would pass on the octupi for purely aesthetic reasons.  If I'm starving, there are plenty of sea creatures in the queue that I'll be eating before I get around to anything that looks like that!

In other news I made sushi rolls for the first time:

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Spamushi.jpg)

Wife refused to eat them because of the fishy stink of the nori.  Two rolls of...wait for it...marinated spam and pineapple, and two rolls "Korean BBQ" made with leftover bool gogi, scallions, and ssamjang.  I realize that even when I make it myself, I don't really like sushi.  Granted, this was fully cooked non-fish sushi, but still.  I think next time I get a hankering for nigorizake I'll just fry up a tonkatsu cutlet and call it a day!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 05, 2010, 04:15:50 AM
This isn't ethnic, it's SPAM! :)


(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Spamushi.jpg)spam and pineapple,
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 05, 2010, 04:20:55 AM

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-12.jpg)


 :o  :o  :o

It's aliiiivvvvve!!!!

 ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on February 05, 2010, 06:44:06 PM

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-12.jpg)


 :o  :o  :o

It's aliiiivvvvve!!!!

 ;D

WOW this is too much National Geographic for me!!!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 05, 2010, 07:14:50 PM
Oh, I have eaten worse.

Im gonna make some tacos de cabeza.

Wait till you wussies see what I put on my cutting board for that one.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on February 05, 2010, 08:41:07 PM
I will have to have a couple of beers before I look at this thread again  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 05, 2010, 09:12:35 PM
Ah, Cap's turning into a shock jock type. Next up - grubs on a bed of lettuce, with a mango salsa. Chocolate ant covered cupcakes for desert. Chicha for a refreshing drink.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: mikeypedersen on February 05, 2010, 09:56:45 PM
Ah, Cap's turning into a shock jock type. Next up - grubs on a bed of lettuce, with a mango salsa. Chocolate ant covered cupcakes for desert. Chicha for a refreshing drink.
Maybe if he's lucky it will be a cicada year!  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 05, 2010, 10:05:40 PM
Ah, Cap's turning into a shock jock type. Next up - grubs on a bed of lettuce, with a mango salsa. Chocolate ant covered cupcakes for desert. Chicha for a refreshing drink.

I hope not.  :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 05, 2010, 10:08:32 PM


I hope not.  :-\

You supposed to go over for dinner? :D :D :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 05, 2010, 10:10:40 PM


I hope not.  :-\

You supposed to go over for dinner? :D :D :D

No, we head out on the town. It was "Pho" last week again. Good stuff. I'll post a pic later.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 06, 2010, 01:17:08 AM
Here's the lunch we had at the Vietnemese restaurant "Thang Long" last week in Philly. Capp knows good food when he experiences it. The food was very good. Good "stick to ribs" cuisine.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/025.jpg)

Next door to the restaurant is a place that has live chickens and ducks that can be purchased fresh killed.  :o They have them all on display in cages.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 06, 2010, 01:48:39 AM
Oh man that place is one of my favorites. Dont go out to eat much but when I do I want it to be something I cant/dont really make at home. Havent successfully made a decent bowl of Pho at home yet.

Tet falls on Valentines day this year. One of the things Vietnamese eat on New Years is hard boiled eggs with a partially developed chicken inside. MMMM crunchy.

Not ethnic unless you count the French fries but I will try to redeem myself to all you squeamish types.

Alaskan king crab legs and shrimp sauteed in garlic, celery, old bay, butter and a little white wine.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-15.jpg)

Accompanied by Bluesman's stout. Delicious!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 06, 2010, 01:59:05 AM
Next door to the restaurant is a place that has live chickens and ducks that can be purchased fresh killed.  :o They have them all on display in cages.

Been to markets like that - they clean em for you too - or just whack em?

I had Jam Bong this past monday for lunch. I order it EXTRA spicy - the chick always does a double take and giggles as she writes the order. It's always awesome, just spicy enough to put that dangling tear in the corner of your eye.  ;)

This chick seems to have the closest thing to what I ate. Mainly a seafood noodle soup (I thought maybe some miso?).
http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/jjamppong (http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/jjamppong)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 07, 2010, 12:21:10 AM
They kill them and dress them for you. Just not allowed to sell them to you alive. Not sure why.

They have a couple of different kinds of chickens in there, ducks and guinea hens too.

Havent gotten one yet. I think I will get one next time I go to this place. It is only about three blocks from my shop. We are regulars and they know us there. They own the chicken place too so if you order soup with chicken and or duck it is remarkably fresh. Makes the broth unbelievable. I have to take extra care to keep myself from licking the bowl when finished.

You can order the chicken before sitting down to lunch, can pick it out yourself. It will be ready by the time you are done your soup. Im torn between doing that or going in to watch the process. Twan, our host at the restaurant has offered to take a few photos with my camera of my chicken being processed while I have lunch. Seems like cheating though.

I wonder how much trouble I would be in if I posted pics of a chicken being killed?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 07, 2010, 12:56:20 AM
Maybe sPam Anderson will show up!  ::)

Any Japanese market you should be able to get 3 week fertile eggs. Balut - never could bring myself to do it. San Miguel beer and Tanduay rum; never was able to drink enough to make me want to eat a boiled partial chicken. Kinda regret I didn't man up; but there's just something going on in my head that stops me from doing it. Of course I don't live next to the Phillipino dude anymore so the chances are even less likely now.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 07, 2010, 02:14:35 AM
I forgot to mention, one of my customers owns a poultry processing and distribution business. I got the tour on Thursday. Pretty cool stuff, but boy oh boy does it stink in there. I would have taken pics but didnt have my camera.

He hooked me up with a giant fresh turkey. Gonna make Thanks Giving dinner tomorrow, complete with sweet potatoes and all.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 07, 2010, 02:20:58 AM
I forgot to mention, one of my customers owns a poultry processing and distribution business. I got the tour on Thursday. Pretty cool stuff, but boy oh boy does it stink in there. I would have taken pics but didnt have my camera.

He hooked me up with a giant fresh turkey. Gonna make Thanks Giving dinner tomorrow, complete with sweet potatoes and all.

Sounds great!

It's homemade Chicken and Dumplings for the wife and I tomorrow.

It's not a fresh kill though. ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 07, 2010, 07:40:13 AM
beerocd, I can hook you up with a live chicken. Unless you are chicken! ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 07, 2010, 03:12:07 PM
beerocd, I can hook you up with a live chicken. Unless you are chicken! ;)

12 hour round trip - not including pit stops. Thanks for the offer, but I am gonna have to decline that.
I would like to have a couple of egg layers around; there's a law against urban chickens though.  :-[
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 10, 2010, 01:51:34 AM
Uzbekistan.

And here is a good one for you Boulder.

Sauteed Pumpkin with yogurt and meat sauce, the meat sauce is made with goat.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09706.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09708.jpg)

The goat is braised in a tomato, onion, garlic mixture with cumin seeds, black kolangi, (or whatever it is called)) cinnamon sticks,  oregano salt and pepper. Cooked till the meat falls off the bone. place cooked meat from the sauce and pick the bones out. Give the meat a few chops and put it back in the sauce.

"Real" Italian meat sauce is cooked this way too. Not with ground meat.

Peel slice and saute the pumpkin with a little salt and pepper perhaps a little curry powder.  top with some warm salted yogurt. then the meat sauce.

Its traditionally served with a rice dish like plov. Pictured here is a Uzbek rice dish of onions, carrots cinnamon, salt pepper and orange zest. It is also topped with candied orange zest.

One of my favorites.

Did I already do this one here?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on February 10, 2010, 03:34:22 PM
Kinda looks familiar cap, so maybe!  Looks good though.

I cooked for hours last night...ironically the rougher day I have at work, the more time I want to spend cooking when I get home.  Did a chicken vindaloo, by frying deboned chicken thighs, mixing wine vinegar with freshly ground spices and fried-then-blended onions and cooking the whole mix with more spices and ginger/garlic.  Then some naan, which was a yeast-less recipe that frankly sucked, but it still worked out OK, topped with butter and kalonji.  More like thick crackers, lesson learned, passing on to a new naan recipe.  Then a small amount (1/2 cup) of toovar dal cooked with fenugreek, red peppers, cumin, turmeric, and a few other spices, cooked for an hour or so until most of the water was gone, then blended into a thick dal paste not unlike refried beans, then a good dose of fresh coriander leaf.  Heavy on the indian dried chilies, it was spicier than the vindaloo!  Lastly a cup of basmati rice, simply prepared.

Served with a Chinook IPA.  No pics, but to be honest in many cases Indian food isn't much to look at anyway. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 10, 2010, 10:19:40 PM
"Indian food doesn't always present well." as Bluesman says. True Dat.

Matzo ball soup in turkey broth.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-16.jpg)

Especially good when it looks like this in the back yard.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/copyofcheckfromCapoozzolimetalwo-17.jpg)

Not doin goulash tonight.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 10, 2010, 10:37:03 PM
Yeah, those two softballs ought to hold you till tomorrow.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 10, 2010, 11:04:25 PM
THat was just a warmer upper for after shoveling the driveway.  For dinner Im gonna make a Dagwood style sandwich. Got some head cheese for it too.

(http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/Reviews/shin/heres%20johnny.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 11, 2010, 01:19:25 AM
THat was just a warmer upper for after shoveling the driveway.  For dinner Im gonna make a Dagwood style sandwich. Got some head cheese for it too.

I could go for some meat jello; but it's actually gumbo and jumbalaya season.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 11, 2010, 02:01:17 AM
Cappo, nice goat meat recipe. We have 2 does due at the end of March. Unless we can sell them, they will be food. Just hatched some chicks any recipes for baby chickens?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 11, 2010, 02:51:05 AM
any recipes for baby chickens?

Balut - but you're about a week late.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 11, 2010, 05:38:21 AM
So now you tell me! :'(
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 13, 2010, 01:44:58 AM
I was talking to the people over at the Vietnamese lunch joint. He was telling me those baby chick eggs are not that bad. He may bust some out for us cause this is the time of year for that dish. Ill try it. Why not? maybe I will get some pics.

Southern Style Italian:

Sausage and peppers.
(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie004.jpg)


With Ravioli served in my famous...FAMOUS! Sicilian style tomato sauce.
(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie005.jpg)

Had a Cesar salad too, have to post my sauce recipe and my Caesar dressing recipe too. The dressing is not for every one though. Lots of anchovies and raw eggs.



Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 13, 2010, 03:45:10 AM
those baby chick eggs = unhatched eggs? This sounds interesting!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 13, 2010, 12:28:51 PM
OK, maybe I wont try it.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/25/Inside_a_Balut_-_Embryo_and_Yolk.jpg/576px-Inside_a_Balut_-_Embryo_and_Yolk.jpg)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut_%28egg%29
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 13, 2010, 05:52:49 PM
I'll pass.

(http://planetsmilies.net/vomit-smiley-31.gif) (http://planetsmilies.net)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on February 13, 2010, 06:49:59 PM
But the pin feathers look so soft! ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 14, 2010, 12:00:30 AM
Italian, again.

Pan seared scallops and jumbo lump in a rosa sauce.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie006.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 15, 2010, 12:01:58 AM
Here is the recipe for the above dish. Start with fresh or pasturized jump lump and fresh sea scalops. Or any seafood will work, shrimp, lobster, even flounder or something.

Make a simple marinara sauce. Ingredients for one 24 ounce can of crushed tomato, 1 small can of tomato paste, one whole head of garlic chopped fine, three table spoons of chopped fine onion, 1 stalk of celery chopped fine, peas, bay leaf or two, teaspoon of rosemary,  oregano, basil, nutmeg, black pepper, salt. red pepper seeds to taste.

Brown garlic and onions and celery till they are golden, then add the herbs and spices, deglaze with white wine,stir and then add the cans of tomatoes. add water as needed, it should be on the brothy side cause you will thicken later.

While this simmers start a small amount of bechemel' melt a few table spoons of butter and then add some grated nutmeg and salt. Then add some flour and toss the flour around in the butter so it gets a little toasty. Add more butter as needed it should not be that thick. Then add about a cup or two of milk.Let this simmer on low while stiring till it gets thick.

At this time or before, season your scallops with salt and pepper. Get a saute pan really hot. Then add some veg oil immediately before adding the scallops. (hot pan cold oil food wont stick.) brown on both sides and set asside. Deglaze with a little wine and water and pour into the tomatoes. Lots of good flavor in that pan.

After the tomato sauce has simmered for a half hour or forty five mins, stir the bechamel into it. The sauce should come out rose or blush in color.

Take out a few ladles of sauce and set asside keeping warm.

Start cooking your pasta. After pasta is cooked strain and return to pot. Add the retained sauce that you have set asside and stir.

About five or ten mins, before serving add a 1lb can of jumbo lump to the sauce and bring it up to temp. stir carefully after this so not to break up those beautiful lumps. Then add the pan seared scallops. and a few chopped fresh tomatoes. and some chopped parsley (optional)

Place the pasta on the plate a ladle some of the sauce on top.

OMG...the stuff of dreams I promise. Scallops and jumbo lump pricey? Yes, but it is so worth it, especially on occasion.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on February 15, 2010, 01:55:08 PM
Very nice Cap.  Also good with a mixture of crimini, oyster, and s***ake mushrooms in there!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: blatz on February 19, 2010, 03:10:16 PM
Thanks cap - i will have to make this very soon!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 19, 2010, 05:36:49 PM
Thanks cap - i will have to make this very soon!

+11,000,000,001
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on February 23, 2010, 09:47:36 PM
Chiles Rellenos


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/Food/IMG_2026.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: cowstick on February 24, 2010, 09:43:01 PM
Hey everyone,  Im new to this forum but far from new to cooking. Cap and some of you others know who I am from NB. Good looking food guys your making me hungry. 

On another note. Cap I am now a Corporate chef. I canned the my own place thing, better benefits and job security this way. Thanks for bringing me this way Cap.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 25, 2010, 12:39:13 AM
Hey everyone,  Im new to this forum but far from new to cooking. Cap and some of you others know who I am from NB. Good looking food guys your making me hungry. 

On another note. Cap I am now a Corporate chef. I canned the my own place thing, better benefits and job security this way. Thanks for bringing me this way Cap.

Welcome to the forum and congrats on the promotion. What's been cooking your way?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 25, 2010, 01:20:30 AM
Hey Cowstick, welcome to the forum. Congrats on the top position. Hope ya got good hours.

Are you still at the same place?

Oh man, Ill tell you guys, I want to look more into Puerto Rican food. I love it. I went to this famous place in North Philly today; Freddy and Tony's, OMG it was unbelievable. First off the food on the menu for either eat in or take out is sold by the LB!
It is all served family style. They are in there roasting up whole pigs. Or breaking down whole pigs for the other specialties.

Ill tell ya I havent been this impressed by a resturaunt in a long time. It is cheap and it is wonderful.

The roast pork we had was sliced up with the skin on perfectly cooked and juicy with the shimmer of the garlic and oil that had been drizzled on top. We had the blood sausage which if you have never had the PR variety it is wonderful. Sweet and savory fried plantains. Rice and beans where beautiful. And we had a monfongo.

Other things on the menu were octopus salad or lobster salad. Pork chop and lobster. Meat pies. It goes on and on.

When you walk up to the place there is a window fish tank like display showing off the fried and roasted pork treats.

Truly delectable. Puerto Rican food is seriously misunderstood and underrated.

I am definitely going to do some PR food soon.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 25, 2010, 01:37:14 AM
When I was a  kid I lived in Orlando, Fla. for about a year and we lived down the street from a Puerto Rican family.

I became friends with their son and we used to go swimming and have lunch almost every day.

My friends mother made this Puerto Rican Steak and Onions (Bistec Encebollado) steak with rice, beans and plantains. It was absolutely fantastic!

She made it regularly. It's a thin steak seasoned/marinated with garlic, sazon and vinegar that is seared and then simmered in a tomato sauce until tender.

I love puerto Rican food too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on February 25, 2010, 05:51:53 AM
Somebody please detail the preparation of Plantains....
thanks in advance. ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on February 25, 2010, 06:58:22 PM
I had some wonderful indian food at a somewhat humble and not expensive local restaurant last week.  The food was so good, I requested an armistice with indian food...I will no longer aspire to master it, I will just enjoy it. 

Armistice withdrawn officially.  I have a number of indian cookbooks I have been perusing...unfortunately most of the ones I've had have been "recipe books" which is not a terribly useful thing especially for learning an entire new cuisine.  Here are the ones I've recently read or started to read that I think very highly of:

Taste of India - Madhur Jaffrey.  This one is fairly prized by me not so much for its recipes, which are many, but for the way Jaffrey breaks it down by region and incorporates a number of pages and photographs regarding each region.  It discusses regional culture almost as much as regional cuisine.  It becomes clear at some times that Jaffrey is not a huge fan of the way most Indian restaurants outside (and often within) India tend to limit themselves to the northern mughal/royal style of Indian cuisine.

Classic Indian Cooking - Julie Sahni.  Just started my way through this...quite honestly this appears to be a bit of a Indian food sacred text, the near equivalent of Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  A thoroughly useful book, that doesn't just list recipe after recipe, but focuses with deep intensity on process, which is much, much more important than recipe formulation...much like brewing...How To Brew is a more useful read to aspiring brewers than a compendium of clone recipes.

My wife has thoroughly sickened of dal.  I keep making it and end up eating almost all of it in leftovers.  So far I've been using toovar dal and masoor dal, although with the amount of spices and other ingredients I hit it with, I'm not sure I could tell the difference.

Samosas are on my list eventually...bit of a challenge, but the wife loves those things!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 25, 2010, 10:01:56 PM
1vertical, there are several ways of preparing plantains. Most commonly they are made in to tostones. these are made with green or unripe plantains. peel them and slice into 3/4" slices. Get a fryer or pan medium hot with oil or lard. Fry the slices till lightly brown. remove them from the oil and set aside. Then take a plate or cup and mash them lightly but not all the way flat. Then fry these mashed pieces again till golden brown. Drain then sprinkle with salt. PR style would have a little oil and chopped fresh garlic on them.

There is also the "sweet" style of fried plantains, these are made with yellow or ripe plantains. Often sliced lenght wise they are fried till brown. I love them this way.

At the PR restaurant I was at their tostones were light and crispy. I dont know how they get them that way. Lard? I use veg oil and they are good just a little heavier and not as crisp.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 25, 2010, 11:04:06 PM
Polish,

Pork knee braised in a dill pickle sauce served with perogies.

You can use beef or pork, or game or something for that matter but this time I used pork.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie007.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie008.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie009.jpg)


This gravy is really nice, different too. Start by browning the meat on all sides, remove it and set aside. and then throw in about two large onions chopped, two cloves of garlic chopped. Six (or more) deli style dill pickles. salt, pepper, bay leaf, marjoram, caraway seeds. Let ingredients brown a little. De glaze with a little pickle juice. Now add a cup of chicken broth. Stir and mix. Return the meat to the pot, cover and simmer till the meat is fall off the bone tender. I used the pressure cooker and it took about twenty min. Stove top may take two hours. after the meat is tender remove from the sauce. Now add a little flour roux until it starts to thicken, then add about a cup or more of sour cream. Mix. and bring back up to temp on low. Plate the meat and ladle some gravy over it.

Goes great with mashed potatoes too. But with perogies? Wow!



 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 26, 2010, 01:36:05 AM
Hey Capp...did you get the pierogis at Krakus Market or did you make them from scratch.

Very nice dish as usual.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on February 26, 2010, 05:37:23 AM
Beautiful lip licking photos Cap.  Thanks for the plantain destructions.  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 26, 2010, 01:01:41 PM
Only hand made perogies for my family.

I didnt like the perogies from Krakus at all. I dont think they make them they buy them.

The Polska Delikateski around the corner from Krakus on Allegheny makes good perogies. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on February 26, 2010, 03:07:35 PM
I admit, I buy frozen supermarket pierogies. 

But at least I deep fry them which makes up for some of their deficiencies.  As does a measure of slivovitz!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 26, 2010, 03:22:09 PM
Pelmeni is a dish originating from Tatarstan and Siberia, now considered part of Russian and Ukrainian national cuisine. Pelmeni is a type of dumpling consisting of a filling that is wrapped in thin unleavened dough.

I want to try my hand at these little dumplings.

Capp...I'll bet you could lend some insight into this.

(http://everydayrussian.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/690px-pelmeni.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on February 26, 2010, 03:29:19 PM
Pan fry it and it sure looks like gyoza to me.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 26, 2010, 09:49:59 PM
I love pelmeni. I make them sometimes. Basically they are a perogi. They have all different kinds as you may know. I usually make them with meat. Most would say I make them to big too. I make them perogie size. My pelmeni filling is ground pork with lots of garlic, onions and fresh dill.

I love Russian food. Ill start doing some of that soon. Russian is the original "gourmet".
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: dbeechum on February 26, 2010, 09:55:41 PM
Pan fry it and it sure looks like gyoza to me.

I love the whole world wide category of "savory stuff stuffed into dough and then steamed, baked or fried." It's just so fundamentally universal and has the side effect of making it so that nothing goes to waste.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 26, 2010, 11:45:21 PM
How bout empinadas? Or the Jamaican meat pies. The Puerto Rican stuffed potato balls. OMG are they good.

Here are some images of Puerto Rican food.

(http://travelandsports.com/magazine/jpg/food1.jpg)

(http://www.recipesformeals.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/arrozcongandules250.jpg)

Sweet Plantains

(http://www.restaurantsinpr.com/images/amarillos_pic1.jpg)

(http://www.caracasarepabar.com/imgs/arepa_process7.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3263/2447030021_9513f0fbef.jpg)

(http://static.flickr.com/102/267869369_2931139a9c.jpg)

(http://puertoricoflavor.com/images/mofongo_de_camarones.jpg)

(http://www.nelsonwebhosting.co.uk/wooler/images/pig.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on February 27, 2010, 04:11:26 AM
Arroz blanco con habichuelas y pollo guisado

http://members.tripod.com/~apadilla98_2/recipes/arroz-habichuelas-pollo.htm

(http://www.recetasdemadelen.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/DSC00054.JPG)

Pollo frito con tostones

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3552/3427010039_4bb40c8a85.jpg?v=0)

Flan

(http://keishaksp.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/flan.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on February 28, 2010, 02:54:40 PM
I watched Julie and Julia last night.  I really liked it.

OMG, what have I become?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Hokerer on February 28, 2010, 03:35:04 PM
I watched Julie and Julia last night.  I really liked it.

OMG, what have I become?

You're not alone.  Wife picked that one up a while back so I ended up watching it too.  Wasn't half bad.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: dbeechum on February 28, 2010, 06:37:44 PM
I watched Julie and Julia last night.  I really liked it.

I watched it a few weeks back and enjoyed it too with similiar thoughts.

Now, did anyone else feel that poor Amy Adams was out acted by Meryl. Of course I think she also got the less fascinating story too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 01, 2010, 01:18:58 PM
I can at least point out that my wife made we watch it...   ;D  Yeah, I actually enjoyed the "flashback" scenes with Streep a lot more than the present day storyline.

Although I did briefly consider starting a "Julie/Neufie Project" blog and cook my way through Julie Sahni's Classic Indian Cooking.  But I would take 5 years or so.

Deboning poultry is not the hardest thing in the world to do, though.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 01, 2010, 06:02:32 PM
I love pelmeni. I make them sometimes. Basically they are a perogi. They have all different kinds as you may know. I usually make them with meat. Most would say I make them to big too. I make them perogie size. My pelmeni filling is ground pork with lots of garlic, onions and fresh dill.

I love Russian food. Ill start doing some of that soon. Russian is the original "gourmet".

I want to try them with meat. What recipe do you use?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 01, 2010, 06:20:31 PM
Although I did briefly consider starting a "Julie/Neufie Project" blog and cook my way through Julie Sahni's Classic Indian Cooking.  But I would take 5 years or so.

That book has been on my wish list for a few years now.  I have Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking, which is a great book, IMO, but I'd like to stretch my knowledge of Indian cuisine a bit.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 01, 2010, 08:52:50 PM
It's a good book.  Definitely more of a reference sort of guide than other books of that ilk. 

I have a large bag of chicken/murgh yakhni (meat broth) in the freezer...I don't ever throw away chicken trimmings any more, I either make broth the same night or freeze the chicken trimmings for making broth later.  I'm not sure what I'll do with the broth...might be nice in making a biriyani, or I could just use it to make a flavorful dal soup.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 01, 2010, 10:48:56 PM
I love pelmeni. I make them sometimes. Basically they are a perogi. They have all different kinds as you may know. I usually make them with meat. Most would say I make them to big too. I make them perogie size. My pelmeni filling is ground pork with lots of garlic, onions and fresh dill.

I love Russian food. Ill start doing some of that soon. Russian is the original "gourmet".

I want to try them with meat. What recipe do you use?

Make the dough as you would for perogies. Some people make semolina pasta dough.

For my meat filling I use ground pork. First brown the meat on high and remove to drain. Then sweat a lot of onion diced. Then add a lot of fresh chopped garlic, I would say a head per lb of meat.Let this brown lightly with the onions.  Then add a healthy few sprinkles of chopped fresh dill, Fresh or pickled green pepper corns. If not use dried green pepper corns or black is OK., paprika, marjoram..

Mix the meat into the onion and garlic mixture and then set it aside to cool. When cool add in a raw egg and a few sprinkles of bread crumbs (serves as a binding agent). Then wrap them up and boil as per perogies. Most Russian people make them small, about 1/4 the size that I make them. They also sometimes top with yogurt not sour cream. They add a little water to the yogurt and warm it so it is a little more saucy then they pour it over the pelmeni and sprinkle it with fresh dill.

We like having pelmeni  served alongside Moscow style borscht. Man Im getting hungry!!!

There is an interesting Slovakian dumpling dish that we make. brynzove halusky. They are sort of like gnocci but served in a very special sheeps milk cheese sauce. The cheese 'brynza' comes from a very small region of Slovakia. Hard to get it here there is a Slovakian Deli in Brooklyn that has it sometimes. Ill see if I can get it next time I am up there.

Nic, I see a movie in your version.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 02, 2010, 04:48:11 AM
I would go for that movie Nic, maybe Cappo can do a stop animation for it also. You guys never cease to amaze me!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 02, 2010, 12:12:16 PM
 thats is brilliant.

Working title: Nic and Julie.

There could be intense hallucination sequences that could incorporate animated Indian food.  

Ill tell ya what. Stop motion is getting easier every day with the advance of digital photography.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 02, 2010, 03:40:33 PM
Long before I'd even tasted Indian food I had a huge fondness for Indian classical music.  Ravi Shankar and Yehudi Menuhin on "East Meets West" is pretty awesome.  Raga Piloo is a favorite.

So you could have a high (http://"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ArrLNUzJL4"), and low (http://"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bAN7Ts0xBo"), of music from the Indian subcontinent.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 02, 2010, 05:39:06 PM
imagine a bunch of nan bread and tandori chicken dancing together in a lavish musical type sequence.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on March 02, 2010, 06:38:21 PM
What kind of mushrooms have you been cooking with, Cap? ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 02, 2010, 07:28:39 PM
Come on man, give me a break. I missed lunch, and breakfast.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: glitterbug on March 02, 2010, 07:39:42 PM
Come on man, give me a break. I missed lunch, and breakfast.

You should wake up earlier then  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 02, 2010, 07:46:18 PM
One batch of dal I made got so thick from reheating a couple times and sitting in the fridge that it would have been great for claymation use.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 05, 2010, 12:12:36 AM
Here ya go nic, I havent cooked Indian in a little while.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie012.jpg)

Front to back.

Coconut rice biryani.

tor dal masala.

saag and aloo.

pickled mango and fenugreek.

crushed chili peppers

paratha bread



(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie013.jpg)

The beer; Croation, is thanks to bluesman. He has some kind of awesome beer store down there Delaware way. I may have to go and check it out soon when I have a little extra jingle in the pocket.

I wanted to save it and do some Croation food with it but just couldn't wait any more.  ::)



Hey nic, ever heard of Nusrat Fatah Ali Kahn? He is my favorite Indian musician. Actually I think he is pakistani. He is most noted in the US for his contribution to the Natural born Killers soundtrack.

Great music when you are cooking Indian style. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvQVxrMZB18

I think I was freaking bluesman out a little bit playing this CD in the shop the last time we worked,  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 05, 2010, 02:01:51 AM

Front to back.

Coconut rice biryani.

tor dal masala.

saag and aloo.

pickled mango and fenugreek.

crushed chili peppers

paratha bread

The beer; Croation, is thanks to bluesman. He has some kind of awesome beer store down there Delaware way. I may have to go and check it out soon when I have a little extra jingle in the pocket.

I wanted to save it and do some Croation food with it but just couldn't wait any more.  ::)


Hey nic, ever heard of Nusrat Fatah Ali Kahn? He is my favorite Indian musician. Actually I think he is pakistani. He is most noted in the US for his contribution to the Natural born Killers soundtrack.

Great music when you are cooking Indian style. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvQVxrMZB18

I think I was freaking bluesman out a little bit playing this CD in the shop the last time we worked,  ;)


I love Eastern music. It's definitely an aquired taste.

I need to learn how to make some basic Indian dishes. I'll get some tips from you.

Hey are we working on the Brutus stand this weekend?

Freddy and Tony's Puerto Rican restaurant was fantastic last weekend. I want to go back and try some of those meat pies. They looked awesome.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 05, 2010, 03:52:16 PM
Hey, I had a toor dal last night too.  Ours was not as lavish a spread as yours...just a good toor dal soup (blended, thinned out a bit, with a lot of spices, and a large red pepper and fried onion blended in which really takes the flavor up a notch...lots of coriander leaf) and some griddle fried paratha embedded with kalonji.  I did manage to get some kala jeera, so now I do have both "black cumins".  Oh and some plain basmati with ghee.  Very simple meal but satisfying.  I'm really honing my dal, I think.  My wife is a "southern Indian" (prefers rice) and I am a northerner, preferring bread.

So far all I've really cooked with are toor dal and masoor dal...they are both split lentils, do you have any opinions on the other dals?  Urud dal, moong dal, chana dal?  I have all of those, I just haven't cooked with them yet.  Do the differences of flavor get overwhelmed by the spices or are they quite distinct? 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 05, 2010, 08:53:36 PM
To be perfectly honest I get all of their names confused. I have a couple of varites on hand without any labels. They are very different from one another. Moong dal is very strong and earthy tasting. You may know it as mung beans; the Chinese call them that.

Here is one that is very different in flavor. I cant remember what it is called but it was (something) dal.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie015.jpg)

They look and taste just like little peanuts, which makes sense cause lentils are a legume. Peanuts are a legume just like a potato. Peanuts are closer to a potato than a nut, just like lentils are closer to a potato than a bean.

This is the other variety of dal I have on hand.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/mamka-2xchecksfromPattie014.jpg)

I used the last of what was called tor dal last night.

There are lots of ways to use all the different dal, in soups, in sauces, you can even make flour out of them for breads and chips.

The real winner last night was the coconut rice. Ill post the recipe later.

How do you cook your rice? I have a fool proof way and it goes for all rice.

First, put the rice in a bowl and fill it with water. Swish the rice around with your fingers, the water will get cloudy. Drain it. repaet this about six or seven times until the water runs clear. This is important cause that is how you remove the rice dust, which is starch and will make your finished rice clumpy.

Second, let the rice soak in some clear water for about an hour, more is better.

Third, put the rice in a colander to drain well.

Fourth, heat a pot to medium, put in some ghee, or cooking oil. Drop in some seeds or at least some salt and pepper. (this is also when you would add chopped onion, carrots, peas etc.) When the spices start to crackle put the drained rice in. Stir this constantly till the rice is well coated with oil and begining to turn opaque white instead of translucent white. Stir the rice constantly so not to burn or even brown it.

Fifth, add 1-1/2 parts water to 1 part rice, bring to a boil then cover and turn on low.

Sixth, after all of the water has been absorbed. remove the lid and gently fluff with a fork or something being careful not to break the rice kernels apart. Let it sit for a min for some of the steam and moisture to come out and the rice gets firmer.

Works every time.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 06, 2010, 12:33:04 AM
Not sure about that first sort of dal!  The second looks like masoor dal, orangey salmon colored.

I might do a chickpea flour battered fish fry tonight, some cumin and spices mixed in, to go with finishing out the dal.

Re the music, my flesh creeps at some of the more modern stuff, or south asian pop.  I can handle the hindustani instrumental music principally...call me a hippie influenced by the Beatles, but Ravi Shankar can still groove:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzN2gUGYUGc

As an occasional jazz musician, this is much more my bag.  Not the greatest performance, Ravi's fire isn't what it was, and his daughter is good but, likewise, not like he was in his younger days, and that tabla player is fine, but no Alla Rakha.  A great tabla player is like a great jazz drummer, except he does more with less!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 06, 2010, 12:51:27 AM
I think you are right about the masoor dal. We had these and another varity that was about the same color but were much smaller. I would say about half of the diameter. The little ones are great cause they cook up in about 15 mins in a regular pot.

A friend of ours mother is visiting from India and here for a while. Having spoken with her a little about cooking she is fascinated with the fact that I cook and know about Indian ingredients. There is a huge Indian party at their house in April. we are invited and mother wants me to help prepare the food. I am enormously excited. She has lots of cooking impliments that I have never seen so it should be very informative.

One thing she was showing me is here pressure cooker. It has four layered bowls in it so that you can cook several dishes in it at the same time.  Interesting.

They are vegetarians so I guess they do not have to worry about a meat coarse taking longer.

I will get some pics of this dinner party for sure. Im sure it will be something else cause thye are very well off.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 06, 2010, 12:54:17 AM

Re the music, my flesh creeps at some of the more modern stuff, or south asian pop.  I can handle the hindustani instrumental music principally...call me a hippie influenced by the Beatles, but Ravi Shankar can still groove:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzN2gUGYUGc

As an occasional jazz musician, this is much more my bag.  Not the greatest performance, Ravi's fire isn't what it was, and his daughter is good but, likewise, not like he was in his younger days, and that tabla player is fine, but no Alla Rakha.  A great tabla player is like a great jazz drummer, except he does more with less!

Real nice selection Nic. Love Shankar. Can you imagine tuning one of those bad boys let alone building one. The Sithar has a similiar tone to the banjo which I really enjoy. Hindustani classical is a real fine art form.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 06, 2010, 01:20:30 AM
OK, Capp and Nic...you guys have gotten my attention and sparked my curiosity. I think I'll start out making some Dal makhani. It is known as one of the most popular dishes in Indian cuisine. I will have to hit up my local Indian store for some of the ingredients.

Capp...have you ever made this dish. I'm almost certain you have. If so, how do you make it?

This is from Wiki...

To make dal makhani, lentils and beans are soaked overnight for at least 8 hours and then gently simmered on low heat. In a separate pan cumin seeds and whole garam massala are sauteed in ghee or oil, making a type of chaunk. Ginger and garlic paste is then added; tomato puree is also commonly added. The mixture is cooked slowly for some time. Once it comes to a boil, salt, coriander powder, chili powder, and butter are added. When the dish is done simmering (when the lentils are thoroughly soft and are starting to disintegrate into the sauce itself) dollops of fresh cream and butter are placed on top. When served, the dal makhani is garnished with finely chopped coriander leaves. This dish is a rich stew of sorts, high in both fat and protein and is a staple in the diet of Punjab and most of Northern India and Northeastern India. Similar versions are also made in Pakistan.

Does this sound about right?

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 06, 2010, 01:38:57 AM
Sounds like what I make. I make it several different ways but that sounds like a basic dal recipe. I have never heard of the fresh cream on top or the addition of butter. I usually use a little ghee or some coconut oil.

Never heard that name before either.

Dal is also a staple in Ethiopian cooking. After you guys have a grasp of Indian cooking lets talk Ethiopian. Very similar yet at the same time vastly different. I know how to make injeras too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 06, 2010, 01:45:27 AM
Check out my spice and dal cabinet.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_0830-spices026.jpg)

Here is an image of some Ethiopian food.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_0721-ethiopianfood001.jpg)

The soupy mud looking substance is an Ethiopian dal dish. It is cooked till it is a puree.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tygo on March 06, 2010, 01:49:14 AM
Thanks for the rice cooking tips.  I've been working on getting mine to not be so clumpy.  I've been rinsing it but it appears that more enthusiastic rinsing is perhaps in order.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 06, 2010, 01:51:36 AM
Check out my spice and dal cabinet.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_0830-spices026.jpg)

Here is an image of some Ethiopian food.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_0721-ethiopianfood001.jpg)

The soupy mud looking substance is an Ethiopian dal dish. It is cooked till it is a puree.

Man....your spice cabinet is alot neater than your shop.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 06, 2010, 02:03:19 AM
Ouch. :'(


So, for that coconut rice dish.

Rinse the rise and soak. Then take a pot and heat it up to medium. Then put in a chopped onion, a chopped fine clove of garlic. Let this saute dry for a few mins stirring frequently. Then add some ghee. then add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, kalangi seeds (or whatever they are called) fenugreek, black pepper and salt. Then add some chopped carrots, peas and chopped cashew nuts.  When the onions start to brown and the nuts are getting toasty add the rice. Stir frequently till well coated with oil.

Now for the coconut you can use fresh grated or dessicated shredded coconut but I have found that the "creamed" coconut works the best by far. It comes in a box and looks kinda like a bar of soap. It is typically Caribbean Spanish in origin but even the Indian stores carry it.

Once the rice is opaque in color add about a quarter cup of the coconut and stir it in well. Once mixed add the water and bring to a boil. Cover and turn on low.

Very good rice dish, it has that exotic coconut flavor. MMMM
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: gail on March 06, 2010, 02:08:58 AM
Cap--did you do the Ethiopian bread, too?  If you did, care to share your recipe?
Gail
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 06, 2010, 02:11:32 AM
Ouch. :'(


At least you don't have to eat off of your welding table.  :-\

Metal shops are naturally dirty. Comes with the territory.  8)

Real nice rice making process there by the way.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 06, 2010, 02:32:08 AM
I did make the injeras.

It took me years literally to learn how to do it. Finally after going to a little Ethiopian restaurant as a regular I got to know the servers and cooks. They took me in the back and showed me how to do it.

There are several ways of doing it. The easy way that does not require patience and the hard way that does require some patience.

The main ingredient in injeras is teff. This is a grain that comes from Ethiopia. You will see all kinds of recipes for injeras that excludes teff but they are not the same so it is best to find the teff.

The easy way is to mix the teff flour with water till it is about the consistency of crepe batter. Then add some yeast. Bread yeast is OK. Cover this and put it in a bowl or something in case it blows over, and let it sit for a few hours. When it comes time to make them add some Aunt Jemima self rise flour. I would say about one part Aunt Jemima to two parts teff batter. Add some water as needed to get back to the crepe like consistency. Let it sit for another 15-20 mins.

Then heat up a large flat pan on med-high heat.  I use (and Im gonna get some crap for admitting this) a 16" non stick pan. Nonstick works great for injeras. I pour a little veg oil in a bowl and then dip a paper towel in it to wipe the pan with some oil. To much oil and they fall apart, to little and they stick.

One of those electric griddles on high would work great I bet. I dont have one.

Once the pan is hot, Ladle in some batter and turn the pan around to spread the batter thin. Then cover the pan with a lid. Keep an eye on it. When bubbles form and the top is dry it should pull and slide right out. If it is to thick add some more water to the batter, if it is to thin add some Aunt Jemimahs. Wrap the finished injeras in a towel to keep them warm and soft.  

The hard way is to mix the teff batter with water and leave it to spontaneously ferment to achieve the leavening. It takes a week or two. Then mix with flour or use it strait.

I get teff from a little Ethiopian grocery store, assuming there isnt one near you you can get teff from this place.

http://www.teffco.com/products.html

Here is a pro doing it.

(http://icons-et.dk/images/injera-bager.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 06, 2010, 03:39:51 AM
Awesome technique.

No wait a minute...Did you say that you heat them up in a non-stick pan....

Just kidding...I guess it's better than a crock...well nevermind. ::)

Excellent work Capp!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: gail on March 07, 2010, 02:53:07 AM
Thanks!  I'll be on the lookout for teff and give it a try.  Love Ethiopian food.  The actual cooking sounds like nalaszniki (spelling?) or crepes.  Glad a non-stick pan is acceptable   ;)
Gail
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 07, 2010, 04:35:55 PM
Nalaznici? Is that Ukrainian?

Slovakians; of which my family unit is half,  call crepes palensinki.

But I think yes, injeras are blinis, blintzes, crepes, just the Ethiopian teff variety. I have seen sour blinis where the rye batter is left to ferment (sour) a little bit. They are very much like injeras.

There are lots of different kinds of injeras, flour, corn even sour sop but the sour "beer' tasting crepes that you are no doubt familiar with are made with teff.  

Here is a good place to order some of the rare hard to get herbs and spices that make for authentic Ethiopian food.

http://www.ethiopianspices.com/

There are only a few items that can not be found anywhere else, mainly koseret and beso bello. When cooking Ethiopian food in the American kitchen Koseret is substituted with a 50-50 mixture of basil and oregano. beso bella is not replaceable, we have nothing like it. It smells like fresh blueberries. If you dont have it you just leave it out, but it is one of those things that gives it that special little something that you will notice missing.

So Gail, do you cook Ethiopian food? Most people dont understand.

Have you ever made tej? Tella?

I havent made Tej but it is on deck. I have most of the ingredients including the gesho (woody hops) not actually hops but a bittering agent used both in tej (Ethipopian mead) and tella (ethiopian beer).

I actually have to do some bottling and drinking if I am ever going to brew or make mead or cider again. I have several batches in the basement inadvertently aging. Good for my cider but my beers are going to taste like cardboard if I dont do some bottling soon. Im just not looking forward to bending over for four hours. ::)

Tej is next though.

 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 08, 2010, 12:16:32 AM
I'm a sucker for pairing cultural distinct brews with their native cuisines, so I may have to brew a tej and try my hand at Ethiopian.  It honestly doesn't look profoundly different from many Indian styles of cooking.  But I just sunk 60 bucks at the Indian grocer, I'm in no position to spend a bunch buying gesho and teff online! 

Fish fry went well...the chickpea batter wasn't the best fish batter but the fish was quite tasty, consumed together with leftover cooked down toor dal (which was quite heavily seasoned, and acted almost like the "seasoning" to the whole meal), fried onions, and basmati. 

Tonight, pierogies and Luksusowa potato vodka, and The Hunt for Red October on DVD...  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 08, 2010, 12:23:26 AM
Ah, The Hunt for Red October.

Clearly plagiarizes 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.

Wouldnt Pelmeni? be more appropriate?

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 08, 2010, 12:28:03 AM
Oh, probably, but........they don't have pelmenis in my supermarket freezer section!

Yes, hanging my head in shame, but its more of a fast food thing.  Been doing a lot of cooking in the past week or so, this is an equivalent of ye olde frozen pizza.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 08, 2010, 12:31:00 AM
I know what you mean.

Hey, some of my favorite pizza is frozen. Ellio's Pizza, you guys have that around there? May just be a local thing.
Good wholesome ingredients. Its kinda a reminds me of being a kid thing. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 08, 2010, 03:05:57 AM
Yea...I just got done bottling a Wee Heavy. It's a job. That's why I only bottle a couple of times a year. I keg everything else. Kegging is so much easier. Did you ever consider kegging?

I roasted some beef today. Traditional method in the oven. Turned out really good.

Grilled sausages and made lentils with pretzels and mustard last night. Great German meal. I love German food especially with beer!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: gail on March 08, 2010, 08:03:37 AM
Nalaznici? Is that Ukrainian?
 
Polish, actually (so the correct spelling of "nalasznici" is a mystery to me, along with most Eastern European words).  The technique of making injeras sounds so similar but the texture is totally different.  The "cold sponginess" of the injeras I've had is a curiosity but works so well with the spices and texture of the food.  I am not yet at a point where I cook Ethiopian food but I certainly enjoy eating it.  Many of the dishes are very reminiscent to me of good Southern African-American food that I've had when visiting relatives in the Southern US.  I'd love to try tej and will likely try to make a small batch one day.  Let us know how it turns out if you give it a go.
Bottling can be a pain, especially when you have a lot to catch up on...I have a hard time even bottling those beers that I know would be better as bottled conditioned, aged brews when I have the luxury of kegging.  I'll never go back to bottling everything.
Thanks for the info, Cap.
Gail
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: narvin on March 08, 2010, 05:39:26 PM
I know what you mean.

Hey, some of my favorite pizza is frozen. Ellio's Pizza, you guys have that around there? May just be a local thing.
Good wholesome ingredients. Its kinda a reminds me of being a kid thing. 

As in, the cardboard rectangle pizza?  Makes me think of school lunch... *shudder*. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 08, 2010, 06:42:21 PM
Ahhh, I loved our school's rectangle pizza!  With the small cubes of pepperoni instead of slices?  :D

Edit: Behold its glory!!!

(http://www.nardonebros.com/Products/image/rectangle.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: dbeechum on March 08, 2010, 07:01:05 PM
Oh god, they had that stuff at my highschool.. crap.. in '89.

Oh so, so terrible..
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 08, 2010, 07:30:36 PM
Oh god, they had that stuff at my highschool.. crap.. in '89.

Oh so, so terrible..

+1

It looks alot better than it tastes. I give it a 2 out of 10 for taste.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: dbeechum on March 08, 2010, 07:33:44 PM
It took me years (ok, actually a few months of living in Boston) to get over my fear of pizza after that stuff in high school! :)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 08, 2010, 07:54:38 PM
Oh, I still have fond memories.  They also had a hexagonal "Mexican pizza" that was also awesome!  I mean, awesome, in this terrible quality food way, the same way a can of Milwaukee's Best Light (or those awful nachos with the fake cheese you pay five bucks for at a stadium) might have some sort of amusing/pleasing appeal.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 08, 2010, 10:27:44 PM
I dont care what you guys say Ellios is good. Not sure what brand of rectangular pizza you guys had.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellio%27s_Pizza

Is it the best pizza, certainly not. But I like it better than half of the s***ty pizza shop pizza that is out there.

I like it with Vietnamese chili garlic sauce slathered all over it.

Makes good pizza sandwiches too.  Take two slices put one down and stack on some salami roasted peppers and fried onions. Then top it by putting the other slice cheese side down on top.

MMM good stuff!!

Another big thing around here was pizza rolls. Delis would make them. Usually for a dollar or two you could get an Italian roll with garlic olive oil sauce and cheese melted in the oven. Oh man that brings back some memories.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on March 09, 2010, 12:39:35 AM
Wow, I have been away from the boards too long. Great looking stuff here. Capozzoli, I bow to you. You posted some fantastic looking delicacies. Even the octopus, I love it. The pig tongue intrigues me. I have never had that. I love cow tongue though.

Haven't cooked much of anything new lately. Did see a mention of Gyoza here earlier. I made them recently and was advised this next weekend I will be making them.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/Food/IMG_2009.jpg)

Been making Shrimp and Grits a lot as well.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/smurfe/Food/IMG_2042.jpg) :-X
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: novabrew on March 10, 2010, 01:08:28 AM
Uhm, shrimp and grits.  Got a good recipe to share?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 10, 2010, 01:11:24 AM
Uhm, shrimp and grits.  Got a good recipe to share?

+1

Looks tasty!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on March 10, 2010, 02:43:53 AM
Uhm, shrimp and grits.  Got a good recipe to share?


My shrimp and grits is based on Bobby Flay's recipe. I had eaten some at a local restaurant one day and then I'll be darned if that night on Throw Down with Bobby Flay that they didn't have a Shrimp and Grits throw down.

Bar Americain's Gulf Shrimp and Grits

Recipe courtesy Bobby Flay

Prep Time:
    20 min
Inactive Prep Time:
    --
Cook Time:
    22 min

Level:
    Easy

Serves:
    4 servings

Ingredients
Grits:

    * 4 to 5 cups shrimp stock
    * Salt
    * 1 cup yellow stone ground cornmeal
    * 1 cup grated white Cheddar
    * Freshly ground black pepper
    * 3 green onions, thinly sliced, for garnish

Sauteed Shrimp:

    * 1/2 pound thick double-smoked cut bacon, cut into lardons
    * 2 tablespoons pure olive oil
    * 20 large (21 to 24 count) shrimp, shelled and deveined
    * 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
    * Salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the grits:
Directions

Bring 4 cups of the water and 2 teaspoons of salt to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Slowly whisk in the grits and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking until the grits are soft and have lost their gritty texture, whisking every few minutes, 15 to 20 minutes. If the mixture becomes too thick, add remaining water and continue cooking until absorbed. Add the cheese and whisk until smooth; season with salt and pepper.

For the shrimp:

Place bacon in a medium pan over medium heat and cook until golden brown and crisp and the fat has rendered. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon to a plate lined with paper towels.

Remove all but 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat from the pan and place back on the heat. Add the olive oil and increase the heat to high Season the shrimp with salt and pepper, and add to the pan with the garlic. Saute until golden brown on both sides and just cooked through, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Remove shrimp to a plate. Reserve the garlic oil to drizzle over the finished dish.

Divide the grits among 4 bowls and top each with 5 shrimp. Drizzle the top with some of the bacon-garlic oil (that the shrimp were sauteed in) and sprinkle with some of the green onion.


What I do different. I don't use Shrimp Stock as I don't like shrimp stock. I just use lightly salted water. It might be hard to find medium grind corn meal and I have used regular corn meal, the same stuff you make corn bread with with great results. I can normally find medium grind at Whole Foods though. I like corm meal better than true grits as it comes out much smoother. I also do not drizzle the oil from the shrimp on the finished grits, I drizzle a spoonful of bacon grease instead. I found it much more flavorful. I normally chop much more green onion to as I really like the flavor. These always come out quite tasty.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 10, 2010, 04:06:21 AM
Oh yeah, Im gonna try that shrimp and grits thing too. Is that a Louisiana thing?

I make a grilled sea food and polenta dish that is really nice. Serves on a brothy peasant style marinara.

Grillin season is upon us. Im gonna do some grilled octopus soon.

I cant wait to do a Korean BBQ out side too. I have been thinking about Lonniemacs grill bowl. That thing would be perfect for a Korean BBQ. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 10, 2010, 02:31:27 PM
I like dak gui (chicken) more than the beef gui (galbi gui and bool gogi) in Korean BBQ.  I would like to get a small hibachi someday to do the cooking with.  Thigh chicken meat is the best I think.

Last night I cooked did a "chicken tandoori" recipe that turned out excellent, using a natural papaya based meat tenderizer (Adolphs brand) and a spicy yogurt marinade.  Served with masoor dal made with red pepper, basmati, and two types of parathas, one with a mild aloo (potato) filling and one with a spicy saag (spinach) and coconut filling.  Watched most of the 4th season of Blackadder again.  Beats "Rat au Vin"..."a rat that's been run over by a van".
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 10, 2010, 02:41:11 PM

Grillin season is upon us. Im gonna do some grilled octopus soon.

I cant wait to do a Korean BBQ out side too. I have been thinking about Lonniemacs grill bowl. That thing would be perfect for a Korean BBQ. 

I want to try some Korean BBQ.

Look at this spread. Delectable!

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3214/2372070629_ea6401137b.jpg)

How about this setup?

(http://notograph.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/korean_bbq.jpg)

Looks fabulous!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 11, 2010, 12:52:03 AM
One thing about those pics is that place has gas grills. You have to find a place that uses hardwood coals. Makes all of the difference.

There are a few great Korean BBQ place up this way. One is Kims. Its built into an old diner car. They use select beef in that place. Beautifully marbled. Oh yeah, and they bring out all of the little dishes of pickles and things. Which if I am not mistaken are all called kim chee, not just the nappa.

I usually go to the Korean store and buy all of the little trimmings, cause damned if I can figure out how to make some of that stuff.

One of those little round bbqs from the grocery store work great too. You just have to get one of those screens so the little pieces of meat dont fall through.

Here are some pics of our last back yard BBQ, note the make shift grill.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC02859.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC02850.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC02856.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC02863.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC02856.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC02855.jpg)

Going through the stack of photos I have from the old thread is great. Im gonna start posting some of those recipes here.

 




Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 11, 2010, 02:27:22 AM
I always thought gas grilling was the best grilling. Fast and convenient. Lately I am trending backwards in the sense that I started using hardwood charcoal grills and charcoal smokers. I find that they lend better flavor and an overall better cooking experience.

In our fast paced high-tech world, people want fast food and convenience. Unfortunately, one must sacrifice quality and the overall experience.

I want to try some authentic Korean BBQ. The best way to be able to create their food is to experience it.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Beertracker on March 11, 2010, 05:12:36 AM
You guys are making me hungry again... stop it!  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 11, 2010, 01:37:13 PM
Cap, very inventive Korean grill, there!

For the less inventive among us, or for those who don't have a nice grill wok and cast iron pan to use:

http://grocerythai.com/thai-charcoal-grill-table-p-958.html

Seems like it'd do the job fairly well.  Next time I acquire a bottle of soju I'm doing Korean again.

And Bluesman, gas and charcoal have their good points...some types of grilling gas is definitely more efficient, but I like charcoal because even aside from flavor, I just like the slower processes...I like the experience of grilling and smoking, if I didn't, I would cook inside during the winter!   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 12, 2010, 12:09:35 AM
Spring time is Tamale time too, here are some naca tamal, (Nicaraguan style tamales.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal005.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal001.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal003.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal006.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal004.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal008.jpg)

If anyone wants the instructons for any of this stuff, let me know and I will post Them.



Also wrapped in banana leaves. Robert Rodriguez's Puerco Pibil.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Alexaintheshoppingcart084.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0307Puercopibil002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Alexaintheshoppingcart085.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Alexaintheshoppingcart086.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Puercopibil001.jpg)


Do you know how to cook?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gO8EiScBEjA
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2010, 05:51:18 PM
Spring time is Tamale time too, here are some naca tamal

If anyone wants the instructons for any of this stuff, let me know and I will post Them.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Puercopibil001.jpg)


Looks Delicious!

What's your Tamale recipe?

Thanks for that link. I am going to get the proper spices as I have a small spice grinder to make the Puerco Pibil recipe. I just have to figure out where to get the banana leaves.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 14, 2010, 02:12:11 AM
For tamales.

Make a pork stock by boiling a pork shoulder or something. Chicken, beef, venison...etc.

Then mix the stock, with salt, massa harina and rendered pork fat (lard) until a cake like consistency is achieved. I also add a small amount of baking soda although this is optional.

They have banana leaves in the freezer section at just about any Chinese grocery store.

There are all kinds of fillings.

Nicaraguan style is fiiled with the pulled pork, green olives, green peppers, potato/juca, onion, raisins, chick peas, fresh mint, salt pepper, cumin seeds, jalapenos (optional).

Spread out some dough on a banana leaf. fill then wrap. Steam for an hour or two. I love these tamales.

There are all kinds of tamales, even dolce (sweet ones).

Here is a chocolate tamale. It is pinnah's favorite type of tamale.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/CocolateTamales001.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 14, 2010, 05:52:16 AM
Outstanding Capp, I love tamalies!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 14, 2010, 05:25:35 PM
Im gonna make some homemade flour tortillas tonight.

Wow, Robert Rodriguez is a good cook.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBgsLmDcL78

I want to start making some of these 10 min cooking videos.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 15, 2010, 12:51:08 AM
Here is some fajitas served with Mo Mo Sevarina's tortillas.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/food-1.jpg)




Also made an app. of ceviche. This variety is made with sea scallops, crab meat, onions, lime juice, coconut milk, avocado and cilantro.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/food001-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 15, 2010, 02:49:48 AM

Wow, Robert Rodriguez is a good cook.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBgsLmDcL78

I want to start making some of these 10 min cooking videos.

That guy knows his stuff.

Great videos too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 15, 2010, 02:51:53 AM
Here is some fajitas served with Mo Mo Sevarina's tortillas.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/food-1.jpg)


mmm..homeade tortillas ... I love fresh tortillas.

I want to try some of those breakfast burritos.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 18, 2010, 10:24:40 PM
Oh man they were good. So fluffy light and flaky.

Since smoker season is coming up here are some images of European style cured and cold smoked wild boar and Klobasa.

Also some cold smoked striped bass.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/smokedmeats003.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/smokedmeats001.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009007.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009016.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1102Alexatakesabath3m006.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1102Alexatakesabath3m009.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/smokedfish002.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tygo on March 18, 2010, 10:59:47 PM
Wow...just wow.  Those pictures are making me drool.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 19, 2010, 01:38:04 AM
Capp...you are the man!

I love smoked fish. Fresh smoked. I want to cold smoke some salmon one of these days.

The food looks delicious.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 19, 2010, 01:33:57 PM
Since smoker season is coming up here are some images of European style cured and cold smoked wild boar and Klobasa.

Dude you mean ENDING.  I welcome the warmer temps and all but cold smoking is best when ambient is at refrigerator temps.  Summer temps are going to make me retire my cold smoke generator for a while.

Did you use nitr[a/i]tes for your curing or did you do the adventurous salt-only style curing?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 19, 2010, 05:24:51 PM
Now here is some serious smokin'. I can imagine the aroma coming from this thing.

(http://www.blackdogblues.com/bbq%20pit.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 19, 2010, 09:37:37 PM
Since smoker season is coming up here are some images of European style cured and cold smoked wild boar and Klobasa.

Dude you mean ENDING.  I welcome the warmer temps and all but cold smoking is best when ambient is at refrigerator temps.  Summer temps are going to make me retire my cold smoke generator for a while.

Did you use nitr[a/i]tes for your curing or did you do the adventurous salt-only style curing?

Yeah, oops. Cold smokin season is gone. I really meant BBQ season. For me anyways, BBQ is synonymous with summer. I love goin down the shore with a stack of pre-smoked ribs. Stopin along the way for some Jersey silver queen corn, beef steak tomatoes,I love the shore, not so much a beach person, just love the escape of it, the sea air, the roller coasters.

Anyhow, I mentioned the cold smoked stuff for the ethnicity of it.  

Come on, BBQ isn't ethnic. Not unless you are in another country.

Oh yeah, I cure meat using Morton's Tender Quick. Only salt and sugar for the fish, but from what I have heard the Mortons Tender Quick works great on fish.  Just haven't tried it yet.

There is a ton of info on curing smoking and other forms of food preservation within this site. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 20, 2010, 02:50:47 AM
Indian.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/gulash.jpg)

Mixed pickles, curried potato. Dal masala, Tomato, chili, and onion salad with yogurt and Indian munchies garnished on top,

The star though is the dosa, another fermented batter crepe. Very nice.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 20, 2010, 12:10:05 PM
I meant to try dosas the other day...basically rice and dal soaked, then pureed into a batter, then left to "ferment" for 24+ hours.  Ended up chickening out and doing a normal flatbread, which, when kalonji is liberally sprinkled on top and rolled in, is a major weakness of mine.  What was your dosa recipe?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 21, 2010, 02:47:44 AM
I used these recipes.

http://indianfood.about.com/od/ricerecipes/ss/makingdosasbs_8.htm

http://vahrehvah.com/Masala+Dosa+%28Spicy+Dosa%29:45

 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 21, 2010, 03:24:36 AM
I got some time off now, time to try your Indian dishes Capp, doubt I can find the spices but I will make due.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 21, 2010, 05:48:10 AM
What is a good website for recipes for these indian dishes?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 21, 2010, 06:35:19 AM
This site is great. Check out how many of the recipes have videos.

http://www.vahrehvah.com/
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 21, 2010, 01:13:35 PM
doubt I can find the spices but I will make due.

Was about to suggest googling for a local Indian grocery store, then I tried it myself and realized just how out of the way Boulder Junction appears to be!  Only "Indian" hits I got had more to do with reservations and the like.  So it looks like you'd need to do mail order unless a roadtrip to one of the bigger cities is in order.

It is true that you can cook Indian without all the exotic ingredients..I've seen recipes using normal grocery store yellow split peas instead of chana or toovar dal, and with, say, whole cumin, cardamom, garlic, ginger, turmeric, red pepper flakes or cayenne, and various other accessible ingredients one could get pretty far.  The four key elements I think (at least, not among the jains who would supplant things like garlic with hing/asafetida, not something I recommend doing personally, man does it stink up the house) are cumin, sort of the master spice in Indian, garlic and ginger, and red pepper.  I admit I cheat and use bottled crushed garlic and bottled ginger for Indian food.  Its just quicker, call me a Philistine...they use garlic/ginger paste quite a bit over there, as well.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 22, 2010, 02:06:43 AM
No doubt Indian cooking is all about the spices. I suppose the the difference between good and bad is not so much about what one uses but more importantly..."how one uses" in Indian cooking.... :-\

Great display of Indian food Capp.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: smurfe on March 22, 2010, 08:02:22 PM
Spring time is Tamale time too, here are some naca tamal, (Nicaraguan style tamales.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal005.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal001.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal003.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal006.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal004.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009Nacatamal008.jpg)

If anyone wants the instructons for any of this stuff, let me know and I will post Them.



Also wrapped in banana leaves. Robert Rodriguez's Puerco Pibil.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Alexaintheshoppingcart084.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0307Puercopibil002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Alexaintheshoppingcart085.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Alexaintheshoppingcart086.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0315Puercopibil001.jpg)


Do you know how to cook?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gO8EiScBEjA

I have made Robert Rodriguez's Puerco Pibil as well, I just make sure I don't make it too good though!  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 24, 2010, 10:53:43 PM
Capp,

I think you've posted about making Robert Rogriguez's recipe before (possibly on the NB forum) and, if I recall, you were somewhat unimpressed with the lack of flavor (correct me if I'm misremembering).  My question is: have you tweaked the recipe so that it's more to your liking?  If so, could you share your tweaks?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 24, 2010, 11:26:47 PM
There were (for me) some flavor problems and those pics are from that post. I just wanted to pt some of the recipes from there on to here.

I have made that dish a few times and a little differently each time. My favorite version has the addition of lots of fresh chopped garlic and shallots, I also omitted the tequila in my opinion it leaves behind a less than desirable flavor.

If you search around there are lots of recipes for this dish to use in formulating one to your tastes.

I want to try roasting it wrapped in the banana leaves on the BBQ.

All and all a good dish, just didnt agree with some flavors and the meat had an overcooked stringy consistency when cooked for the time that Robert recommends.

But, Patriot, you have to try the breakfast tacos and homemade flour tortillias...AWESOME. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 25, 2010, 01:02:18 AM
Yeah, I betcha the tequila is not a particularly authentic ingredient...those folks in the Yucatan probably reserve that for their glasses, excepting the more wealthy, perhaps.

A habanero relish, however, would put that puerco over the top!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 26, 2010, 11:30:34 PM
Potato pancakes, Polish style.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00453.jpg)

Just coarse grate two or three large potatoes, (dont use baking potatoes), coarse grate a medium sized onion, Fine grate a few cloves of garlic.

 Mix with two eggs and two table spoons of flour, teaspoon of baking powder, salt, pepper, celery seed, and a teaspoon of corn starch.

 Then get a pan with about a half inch of oil hot over medium low heat. Using a large enough spoon ladle the potato mixture into the pan. Flatten it out by spreading it out with the back of the spoon. They shout be about 1/4-1/2" thick. Turn them over and brown them well till crispy.

 I like them well done.

Serve with sour cream and apple sauce.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 27, 2010, 04:03:07 AM
Thanks Cappo,

These should get me out of the Dog House! Great Idea!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 27, 2010, 03:25:09 PM
Reminds me of when I was a kid staying the night at my Baci's house. She would make these for us for breakfast. Mmmmm....they are delicious.
I make them every now and then and they are always a winner.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 27, 2010, 08:24:12 PM
Hey Capp,

I think I'm going to attempt a smoked version of the puerco pibil tomorrow. Any suggestions? I think I'm going to set the banana-leaf-wrapped pork shoulder in a roasting pan in the smoker.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 27, 2010, 11:19:52 PM
I would say try to get more of a hot roasting action from the coals rather than say just a smoke stream.

 Wood fire roast it like a real wood fired Mexican oven.

Cant wait to hear how it comes out.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 28, 2010, 05:46:08 PM
Found a recently opened Caribbean grocery place just a few miles away, and decided to welcome the hesitant arrival of spring with some island food.

The ribs are a sort of jerk rib, with a guava BBQ sauce.  Two racks of pork spare ribs were trimmed down, making st louis cut ribs.  This really at least halved them in weight...the rib tip section was huge.  For the rib tips and the flap section I used a traditional BBQ rub.  For the ribs proper, I used a blended marinade of scotch bonnet pepper, orange zest and fruit (leaving out the pith) lime zest and juice, Angostura soy sauce, a fig balsamic vinegar, some allspice/clove/cinnamon, garlic, and a large number of scallions.  These all marinated overnight.  Then, I put the ribs (and the trimmings) on the smoker...gave them a good four hours smoke (mostly apple wood), and it got a bit spitty weatherwise so they finished in foil in the oven.  They were basted at end of cooking with a guava paste (Goya brand) based BBQ sauce, hat tip to Steve Raichlen (again).  Strangely not as spicy as expected and a bit too citrusy (overzealous with the microplane I guess).
 
The rice and beans are basmati rice (what I had on hand, a great long grain rice) and kidney beans, with coconut milk, a green scotch bonnet pepper (halved, then removed after cooking), green onions (bruised whole, removed after cooking), a sauteed onion, several cloves garlic, the diced up smoked flap from the spare ribs, several spices (the usuals, allspice etc), a hint of soy, and salt and pepper.  Surpisingly mild, but nice mellow flavor.
 
Then some bulla cake that I did not make myself (nice sweet spicey flavor), some fresh pineapple, and a Dark and Stormy with Goya ginger beer and Bermudan "Black Seal" rum.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/JamaicanRibs.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 28, 2010, 11:23:22 PM
Pretty damn delicious lookin there nic. Drink sounds good too, I love ginger beer, its usually kinda spicy hot. Been thinking about making it homemade, ever try that?

The Caribbean store should have that cake of creamed coconut that comes in a box. Real good stuff for making all kinds of things. Works great in Indian cooking and Thai cooking. There is also this Puerto Rican coconut ice cream that I want to learn how to make, I get it at this little bodega near my work. No diary is involved, its more like a coconut milk water ice. It is awesome.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tygo on March 28, 2010, 11:24:17 PM
Made up some potato cakes inspired by Capps post above to go with some beef tenderloins tonight.  Skipped the garlic and added some chopped scallions.  Also squeezed as much of the water out of the potatoes as I could and then added the starch back in.  Laid the steaks on the cakes and topped it all with a Bearnaise sauce.  Outstanding.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on March 29, 2010, 12:19:40 AM
Drink sounds good too, I love ginger beer, its usually kinda spicy hot. Been thinking about making it homemade, ever try that?

Yep, but its always the bona fide fermented beer, not a non-alcoholic pseudo-soda as most ginger beer is.  A ginger porter I did back in my extract days was great.  Very tasty, and spicy.  It's just too much work to manage a false fermentation to make a naturally carbonated non-alcoholic ginger beer.

The Goya ginger beer, I looked at the ingredients...after several kinds of ginger extract it lists "capsicum".  Holy crap that's why it was so spicy!  They kicked it up with cayenne!!!  Good stuff though.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: gail on March 29, 2010, 12:44:51 AM
Every try using a Ginger Beer plant?  Makes great ginger beer (non-alcoholic or very low alcohol) very easily.  Carbonates naturally, needs very little to no sanitation and the recipes are really easy to modify to your tastes.  Raj Apte did a presentation at the AHA conference in 2006, if you search his name and ginger beer plant, you'll find a lot of info. Mike Dixon, whom I believe has posted a number of times on this Forum also has a number of really good recipes that can be found on the web. 
Time to make another batch...the sunlight coming in my windows is getting nice and warm, perfect for a good ginger beer ferment.
Gail
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on March 29, 2010, 12:49:17 AM
Made up some potato cakes inspired by Capps post above to go with some beef tenderloins tonight.  Skipped the garlic and added some chopped scallions.  Also squeezed as much of the water out of the potatoes as I could and then added the starch back in.  Laid the steaks on the cakes and topped it all with a Bearnaise sauce.  Outstanding.

Sounds great.

I forgot to mention that I also add a teaspoon of corn starch to the batter. It really makes them stay crispy. Im gonna go back and edit the potato pancake post.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on March 29, 2010, 01:18:03 AM
Found a recently opened Caribbean grocery place just a few miles away, and decided to welcome the hesitant arrival of spring with some island food.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/JamaicanRibs.jpg)

Nice looking spread!

I smoked a couple racks of ribs today. Sorry no pics.

I've seen that Ginger beer in a local market here and will have to pick some up next time I'm there.

I assume you smoked them on charcoal indirect. Did you marinate or just use a dry rub?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 03, 2010, 11:44:10 PM
Whats everyone doing for Easter? We used to make roast rabbit on Easter. The last few years though the tradition has been to make Goulash out on the tripod.

We hide eggs in all of the sticks and branches that fell over the winter. After finding the eggs we drag all of the sticks over to the fire bowl break them up and build a big fire. Big yard lots of trees, byy the time the afternoon rolls around we have a bowl full of hot coals for the kettle.

Its a really fun way to get rid of the wooden lawn waste.

Ill surely post some photos and some instructions for traditional out door Hungarian Goulash.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on April 04, 2010, 12:28:53 AM
Cap I have been meaning for YEARS to do goulash.  I have the firepit and tripod and everything.  However I haven't gotten around to it yet.  Can you post your recipe for the goulash?  How spicy is it?  Do you use the hot hungarian paprika...or, is that "traditionally" allowed?  I'm just a sucker for spice so I'd want to give it a little kick, even if mild by new world standards.

Tonight, not particularly easter themed, but I'm going to light some charcoal, grill a couple sirloins, and serve with some sauteed mushrooms and onions (just finished a spinach and cucumber salad).  Tomorrow I'm going to delve more heavily into cooking with spicy potato samosas, fried papad with a bottled spicy lime pickle, and a dal masala using red pepper and coconut milk.  My dal has gotten very "kitchen sinky", the ingredients number probably two dozen by the end, and its slightly different each time, but its very good, and very spicy/flavorful.  Makes a good "dip" for chapatis and paratha.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 04, 2010, 11:20:46 PM
Well, had a little bit of trouble today. Went to start the fire, picked up the fire bowl to clean it out and it practically deteriorated in my hands. It was rusted out to nothing. Guess I should have put it away, it was pretty thin and cheap. Guess Ill have to make one.

Since open fires are not permitted in my township I moved the Goulash operation indoors. :'( Whatcha gonna do?

Here is my recipe for honest to goodness Hungarian Goulash. Two rules are NEVER add tomato and NEVER ad green or red peppers. It just wont be Hungarian Goulash if you do.

Best ingredients are:

Meat: Ox tail for stock, Shin or heel meat for stew.

Veg: Onions, garlic, carrots, potatoes,

Spice: Paprika, caraway seeds, marjoram, celery seed, bay leaf, salt and pepper.

Make a brown beef stock by first peel all of the veg and keep the peelings. Then heat up a large stock pot. Put some oil in the bottom and pour in the peels from your veg. Let these begin to brown. Then add your ox tail.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04203.jpg)

Add enough water to cover and bring to a boil. Then turn to low and let simmer for about 3-4 hours.

Then strain the stock and remove the ox tails.

Wipe out the stock pot and return to the heat. Over medium heat add some oil, then add the heel or shin meat that has been cubbed into 1-2" pieces. Let brown and season with salt and pepper. Dont add to much meat at once or it will pull the water out and bol it insted of browning it. Repeat untill all of the meat is browned.

Remove the meat and set aside.

 Then add the onion and carrots. Toss and let them brown in the pot. Then add the spices. toss and saute for another five mins or so.

Then put the beef cubes back in and add the stock covering all of the ingredients. Let simmer for an hour or so until the meat is tender.

 After the meat is cooked add the potatoes cut into 2" pieces and return the oxtail pieces as well. Cover and over low heat simmer until the potatoes are cooked.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04288.jpg)

There are many variations on Goulash in all different countries. But this is the authentic Hungarian version. I learned how to make this in a little town in Hungary. It was so much fun.

Nic, spicy goulash is still authentic. I like it spicy too.  But I would suggest you do what I do. Make it with sweet paprika and have some chili garlic sauce on the table for those who want it spicy.

June Meyer, one of the foremost authorities on Hungarian cooking in this country has a great website. http://homepage.interaccess.com/~june4/goulash.html

Her recipe differs slightly from mine mostly cause of the caraway seeds, I have had this discussion with Mrs Meyer and she agrees that the caraway seed is authentic she just does not include it in her recipe. I, on the other hand  feel that it is indispensable.

She has lots of great recipes on that website.


 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 05, 2010, 01:48:02 AM
Looks great Capp!

What kind and quantity of spices did you use for this batch?

Do you have a ball park spice schedule or do you go "no pants" each time you cook.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 05, 2010, 11:11:14 AM
I go 'no pant', I never measure anything. Just keep tasting it along the way and ad as needed. Ya just cant be to heavy handed or you could put to much of something.

Amounts of spice and other ingredients depend on amount of meat and broth you are using. Above was a three gallon batch using 4 lbs of beef.

If any one is making this dish let me know how much beef you have and I will let you know how much of the other ingredients to put in.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on April 05, 2010, 01:35:44 PM
Did you use plain jane paprika or the pricey Hungarian stuff, and if the latter, sweet or hot?

Funny you put chili garlic sauce in.  Not super authentic if its the Huy Fong stuff but probably very tasty!  I use that stuff (Huy Fong Chili Garlic) for all sorts of things...mixed into hamburger meat, anything (asian or otherwise) that needs a kick up.

Made samosas last night.  Dang that took hours to do!  But worth it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: chumley on April 05, 2010, 04:10:22 PM
You gotta go with Hungarian paprika when making goulash.  The California stuff just doesn't cut it.

I like to go with a ratio of 3 parts sweet paprika to 1 part hot paprika.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 05, 2010, 11:25:05 PM
I actually go with the fresh ground paprika I get from the Indian grocery store. It is sweet. It is also far superior to anything you can get in a can. I used to use the stuff in the red can but I compared the two side by side. I could tell right away just from color that the Indian stuff is better, its smell is wonderful and the taste is beautiful. Just makes the Hungarian can stuff seem like old dried out crap. Paprika losses its freshness very rapidly.

If you cant get fresh ground paprika then the Hungarian can stuff is the best. .

Nic, never made somosas. lets see your recipe. I would love to see some step by step pics too. I know that is a pain in the ass.

I still want to post a cooking video. Got everything set up. But I remember what you said about the vah reh vah chef's voice being funny. I have a weird voice too and it might open the door to some ridicule. I dont have an Indian accent though.

I was thinking welding video too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 06, 2010, 02:14:51 AM
I actually go with the fresh ground paprika I get from the Indian grocery store. It is sweet. It is also far superior to anything you can get in a can. I used to use the stuff in the red can but I compared the two side by side. I could tell right away just from color that the Indian stuff is better, its smell is wonderful and the taste is beautiful. Just makes the Hungarian can stuff seem like old dried out crap. Paprika losses its freshness very rapidly.

If you cant get fresh ground paprika then the Hungarian can stuff is the best. .

Nic, never made somosas. lets see your recipe. I would love to see some step by step pics too. I know that is a pain in the ass.

I still want to post a cooking video. Got everything set up. But I remember what you said about the vah reh vah chef's voice being funny. I have a weird voice too and it might open the door to some ridicule. I dont have an Indian accent though.

I was thinking welding video too.

I think that goes with any spice. I f you can fresh grind it...buy it whole.

I am also a proponent of using fresh herbs and spices. The fresher the better for the most part.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on April 06, 2010, 01:10:09 PM
Hmmm, will have to consider picking up Indian paprika.  The grocery store stuff is basically red powder, no flavor at all.

The samosas I did were straight out of Julie Sahni's Classic Indian Cooking.  The dough was simple (rub shortening into flour, add water, knead forever, then roll into 16 pieces, roll each piece into a 6" circle, cut in half...that gives you 32 half moons) and the filling was simple enough too (boiled potatoes, some peas, and a variety of spices, the most interesting was ground up anardana or dried pomegranate seeds, which gave a distinct tartness) but it all just took time to do...I'm not super quick working with dough.

No worries on the voice, man, cooking videos require funny voices!  The better the TV chef, the more unusual the mode of speaking, it seems.  Julia Childs being the ultimate there.  I like to adopt the accent of the region whose cuisine I'm cooking...a habit (among many!) which annoys my wife.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 06, 2010, 01:20:13 PM
I actually go with the fresh ground paprika I get from the Indian grocery store.

Do you buy it already ground from the Indian store?

Go for it Capp!  But keep your pants on or at least keep the video from the waste up.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 06, 2010, 10:20:33 PM
My voice isnt really funny. I was just kidding. It is actually silky and smooth just like.Don Cornelius's voice.  ;D

Dont worry about me keeping my pants on. I almost always do while cooking. I only have them off for one dish; Sausage Capazzoli.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 07, 2010, 01:00:14 AM
Here is a good place to get real Hungarian paprika. The first one on this list is awesome, I had it before. The same as the Indian stuff only more than four times as much in price. http://www.hungariandeli.com/Paprika.htm

My mother in law (currently staying with us) is Hungarian actually doesnt speak much English but the wife translates for me. She said the Indian paprika is the same as Hungarian paprika. No doubt comes from the same place. She said the type of peppers used come from India via the Turks to Hungary. Hungary ships paprika to India.

Check out this info. http://www.budapest-tourist-guide.com/hungarian-paprika.html

Scroll down to Hungary http://www.foodarts.com/Foodarts/FA_Feature/0,,250,00.html


Ron, they grind it there. Subzi Mandi is a HUGE spice importer. They have spice mill machines in the back and they grind up whole spices, make their own garam masala and chili powder/paprika.Other ground spices too. I havent tried to make my own dry paprika but we have made the wet variety wtch is basically roasted red peppers made into a puree. We use that to make Letcho. I bet it would be fun to string up and dry some peppers to make paprika. .

I use a coffe grinder for spices so I mostly buy them whole. one spice grinder for spice, one for coffee. Never the two mix.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 10, 2010, 12:15:08 AM
Went to Bells MArket on the way home.

Its a beautiful Russian grocery store. Its wonderful there. You should see the cashiers!  ;)

Didnt make this stuff but got it prepared just had to heat it up.

Klobasa and sauerkraut with blood sausage and mashed.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04356.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04359.jpg)

Cold smoked Sazan fish

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04365.jpg)



I cook with this sometimes but check out what the lable suggests.  :o

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04360.jpg)





Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on April 10, 2010, 01:43:00 AM
Alles sieht sehr gut aus!

(thats about as far east as I get language wise)

Just got done racking two batches of beer and bottling a third, and I'm a bit on the hungry side, so that spread looks particularly nice...as it stands I'm thawing a frozen bag of homemade pastrami.  Need to suss out a side from my limited pantry...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 10, 2010, 04:36:02 AM
C'mon! Lard, garlic, bread and a hot pan.(+pinch of salt) Now there's a meal! (ok, a really tasty snack)
Look which city it comes from.  ;)



Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 10, 2010, 01:36:59 PM
All the good meat stuffs comes from Chicago. Ever read The Jungle by Upton Sinclair?

I should have posted a pick of the "high fat" sour cream that I got too. Man that stuff is good. Have to make a batch of perogies.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 10, 2010, 06:30:25 PM
You need a bottle of this with that meal.

(http://www.russiablog.org/BaltikaLogoBlue.gif)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 10, 2010, 09:17:52 PM
I really, really love Russian food. It is hard to go through that Groceryt store witout drooling on the floor. The smoked meat section is to die for. Has to be 200 different kinds of smoked klobasa hanging there. Get past that and you are in the cold smoked fish department. OMG.. I wish I had my camera with me.

I have to get a jack so I can upload pics from my phone or something.

Here is another interesting dish. These little sandwiches of  thin sliced cold smoked pork bellies are popular all over Eastern Europe. Served on a wedge of rye bread topped with things like, sliced scallions, horse radish and mustard.

They go great with beer, and are said to go with drinking too as the fat somehow prevents a hangover.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04400.jpg)


I cant remember how to say it in Slovakian but they are called "little soldiers". there. 

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: The Professor on April 10, 2010, 11:50:45 PM
C'mon! Lard, garlic, bread and a hot pan.(+pinch of salt) Now there's a meal! (ok, a really tasty snack)


+1
The Eastern European po'folks sure knew how to eat.

I still remember my grandma (Hungarian) skewering a big hunk of pork belly (szolona)  on  a stick:   she'd deeply score the non skin side in a crosshatch pattern and slowly and patiently spin it over a wood fire (being careful not to let it burn), and as the pork belly heated up catching the drippings on rye bread (which was covered with sliced onions, peppers, and radishes).
After it was spent, the crosshatched cubes of rendered fat were cut off and lightly salted for a hearty sandwich (with more of the vegetables).

Peasant food at it's best.  I still enjoy this treat once in a while...tasty  and satisfying Hungarian soul food...  and healthy too if you don't eat it every day.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 11, 2010, 09:35:56 PM
My wife says she remembers doing this when they were kids in Slovakia. Said it is the equivalent of roasted marshmallows or wienies on a stick in this country. They would do it a lot on picnics.

BTW it is called Slanina in CZ/Slovakia.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 12, 2010, 03:15:12 AM
"Chasing the drippings" would be the translation to english. It's really fun to do off a whole pig on a spit.
Your hand gets all super hot over the coals, while you're trying to catch some drippings holding onto a piece of bread under the pig. Good times!

It's slanine in Serbian. The slavic languages are very similar. You say klobasa I say kobasica.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 14, 2010, 12:23:06 AM
English pub fare tonight.

Used some of that lard.


Steak and Kidney pie.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04478.jpg?t=1271204495)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04480.jpg?t=1271204543)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 14, 2010, 12:33:45 AM
Your makin' me hungry again dude.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: The Professor on April 14, 2010, 04:06:17 AM
English pub fare tonight.

Used some of that lard.
Steak and Kidney pie.....

A thing of beauty.  LOVE steak and kidney pie...I hate it when places dumb it down to be "steak and mushroom" pie.

I learned growing up that offal is not awful.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on April 14, 2010, 04:41:05 PM
English pub fare tonight.

Used some of that lard.
Steak and Kidney pie.....

A thing of beauty.  LOVE steak and kidney pie...I hate it when places dumb it down to be "steak and mushroom" pie.

I learned growing up that offal is not awful.


Guts are yummy, if well prepared., but they are easy to screw up as well.  Unfortunately, due to the high amount of cholesterol in them, I don't eat them very often.  One of my old faves was pork kidneys sauteded with hot frying peppers.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 14, 2010, 10:17:52 PM
The guy that taught me how to make this pie was funny.

He told me "The first step in making good steak and kidney pie is to take your kidneys, put them on a cutting board. Then go over to the trash can tilt the cutting board to a 45 degree angle and scrape the kidneys into the trash. They taste like piss."

I use one small kidney in this dish, I soak it over night in salt water and wine. Then I chop it into small pieces. I use much more steak than kidneys. They are strong in flavor and a little is OK. To much and it gets a little nasty.

Its good to just leave the kidneys out all together. I also add the carrots peas and potaoes to the inside of the pie instead of serving them alongside.

Didnt patriot make this dish? I wanted to compare but could find his. .

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on April 14, 2010, 10:59:10 PM
Didnt patriot make this dish? I wanted to compare but could find his. .



I made steak and Guinness pie, which is pretty similar.  Yours looks delicious!

Photos here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=1316.0

Recipe here: http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef-recipes/steak-guinness-and-cheese-pie-with-a-puf
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on April 15, 2010, 08:18:04 AM
Ok finished the thread last night. The E. Euro comfort food I like. Rich but fairly healthy. I like noodles. Pho... ;D

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 17, 2010, 12:39:18 AM
Pho is on my list. I have made it but the broth comes out dark and rich, not light and clear like the Vietnamese make it.

Ethiopian tonight.

Quick Injeras: Mix fresh water, 1 part teff flour to 2 parts Aunt Jemima self rising flour and a pack of dry bread yeast. Let rise for an hour or two. Mix to a crepe batter consistency.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04493.jpg)

Take some veg oil and pour some in a little bowl. Dip in a paper towel and wipe a coating of oil onto a nonstick pan over med. heat.

Ladel in the batter starting at the center of the pan and work your way out in a spiral motion. Tilting the and twirling the pan to spread out and form a thin layer of batter. When dry on top and the sides starting to pull away lift out the injera and wrap it in a towel. They will feel a littl crispy at this time but dont wrry they will soften up after they sit under the towel for a while.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04495.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04498.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04499.jpg)


Left to right is t'ibs w'et (beef and pepper stew) Dinich w'et (potato stew) and azifa (lentil stew)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04500.jpg)



siksikosh (oxtail stew) This is usualy made with short ribs but oxtails are used too.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04501.jpg)


viola!

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04503.jpg)





Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on April 17, 2010, 12:48:28 AM
Wow, cap, that's like 4 main dishes in one night.  If I made that much food we'd be eating on it for a week!  Actually, I'd be eating on it for a week...my wife isn't a great fan of leftovers past about a day.

All looks great though...break out the tej!

And love the ubiquitous board book in the 4th pic.  Very much understand!  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 17, 2010, 01:01:26 AM
No left overs either. Its all gone.

Some of the guys from work came up and helped us out killing it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 17, 2010, 03:08:59 AM
Super Wow Dude. How much time did it take to prepare and clean up. I bet it was worth every minute. Looks fantastic.

The key is the wrapping presentation. That brings it all together (literally too). The SNPA is the icing on the cake my friend!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on April 21, 2010, 11:36:30 AM
Curry shrimp (carribean style)

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/th_0_1-1.jpg)

w/ beans and rice

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/th_1_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on April 21, 2010, 05:47:51 PM
Is there coconut milk in that there shrimp curry? Salivary glands working overtime. Post the recipe please?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on April 21, 2010, 08:22:15 PM
Is there coconut milk in that there shrimp curry? Salivary glands working overtime. Post the recipe please?

shrimp 1/2 lb. per person
onion 1/2 large sweet per lb. of shrimp
parsley
1 tsp. turmeric
salt to taste
pepper to taste
crushed hot pepper (I used dry cayenne this time, but I have used dried habanero as well) make it as hot as you like it.
olive oil
sweet green peas
1/2 cup coconut milk is optional (I forgot it this time, but will use it in the pad thai I make tomorrow)

sautee onion and herbs and spices until onion is soft.
Add shrimp.  Cook until just done.
Add peas.  Cook for two or three minutes.
Add cocnut milk and simmer for about five minutes.
Serve with rice and beans,  Plantains if you have them.  Make sure the plantains are ripe though, because they suck if they're not.  The rice and beans are cooked with garlic and onion, S&P, one crushed allspice seed.  The rice is cooked in chicken broth.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 24, 2010, 05:41:52 PM
More on savory crepes.

A lot of people in this country dont know it but "real" manicotti is made with semolina crepes, not pasta tubes.

I mix half and half durum wheat flour and regular flour with a mixture of eggs and a splas of milk till it reaches a crepe like consistency. You dont want them to be to thick or they will break when you roll them.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Manacotti001.jpg)

For this batch I used a riccotta filling mixing riccota and locatelli and an egg or two. Also a little chopped Italian parsley.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Manacotti002.jpg)

Roll em up and set them on top of some gravy in an oven pan.

Cover them up with sauce and then some cheese on top. Bake till hot throughout.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Manacotti004.jpg)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Manacotti006.jpg)


Aw man are these good. Just warms my heart.


Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 24, 2010, 09:47:06 PM
Just adding to the crepe thingy - spinach, a white cheese sauce, and chicken or shrimp are a  pretty awesome combo. I just grease the pan, roll up the crepes with the spinach, sauce, and meat then cover with leftover white sauce and some extra mozzarella. Just bake to heat/melt everything.

!!! Cap has non-stick in his house  ??? ::) :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 25, 2010, 12:53:22 AM
I do, they are a crutch sometimes.

 I have never been able to turn out a decent injera witout non-stick. One thing non stick is good for is crepes. I have a regular iron crepe pan that works great but it is only 6".

Nothing wrong with nonstick pans. I just get better results with most cooking if the pans are regular. Plus I use metal cooking utensils. Im a metal guy and I cant bring myself to use a plastic spatula.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on April 25, 2010, 01:50:48 AM
I cant bring myself to use a plastic spatula.

Me frickin too.  I hate, hate HATE plastic spatulas.  I don't care if I have to throw out a pan after a few years, I'm not using a plastic spatula any more than I'll use a plastic chef's knife.

We have a non-stick griddle pan which is what we use for a variety of things, pancakes, chapatis, etc.  But for almost every other kind of stovetop cooking I prefer stainless. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 25, 2010, 02:18:10 PM
The non stick was just funny - we had a whole 'nuther thread on it where Cap rips off everyone's head for using it. And heaven forbid you mention crock pots.  ;)

How often(or do you) restock your spices? Obviously when you're out. But more importantly - say file' for gumbo(for example) which may not get used much. Do you do an annual restock of old unused spices?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on April 25, 2010, 03:39:40 PM
Non-stick is for sissies. That is where you separate the men from the boys.

Crock pots? That is where you separate the chefs from the cooks.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on April 26, 2010, 07:02:53 AM
Gawd those manicotti look awesome cap. That skillet looks restaurant grade.  ;)

I bought a non stick once per Alton Brown for omelette's but lost it in a move. What do ya'll think about a properly seasoned pan or griddle? Teflon coating's new (relatively) invention. Cast iron seasoned right is just about the perfect non stick IMO. Provided the proper temps are used.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 26, 2010, 12:05:48 PM
You could guinea pig that "orgreenic" non stick pan for us and post a review.  ;D  $20 plus shipping.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on April 26, 2010, 04:53:34 PM
Haha I went to the site. Looks interesting but they want force their "shipping & handling" upsell. No interest in the chopper or cookbook for extra $6.99. Wonder if there is a recipe for Sag Paneer in it...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 26, 2010, 05:00:40 PM
Great job on the manicotti Capp!

I want to try making them someday.

I use non-stick pans for alot of my cooking. They have a time and a place in the kitchen just as a crock pot does.  :D

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 26, 2010, 05:41:19 PM
Wonder if there is a recipe for Sag Paneer in it...

Man, I could just live off of that and naan.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on April 26, 2010, 06:35:21 PM
Naan.... mmmm. Gotta be fresh out of the oven- it goes downhill fast.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on April 26, 2010, 08:03:31 PM
Used to go to indian buffet often, hot naan and saag paneer till you bust. But then one day  :'( they put a few new items on the buffet and some spice just kicked my _ _ _! Felt like the underdog float for the rest of the day. Haven't gone out for indian in at least 3 years. I use the most common spices at home - don't want to feel my way through the other spices to figure out what it was that day.

I think all breads are better fresh and hot - aren't they?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on April 26, 2010, 08:46:42 PM
Indeed it is.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on April 29, 2010, 02:13:37 AM
Hey Capp...when can we see some of those noodle recipes coming out of you new pasta machine. Some more Italian might be good. I could eat Italian food every week and be very happy with it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 01, 2010, 01:07:36 PM
Cochinita pibil (achiote-marinated pork, slow roasted in banana leaves) in homemade tortillas and garnished with a spoonful of reduced pork juice, pickled onions, chile de arbol salsa, and cilantro.  Served with refried beans and a mezcal margarita.

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/photo2.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 01, 2010, 05:34:17 PM
Wow, man that looks good. The tortillas look phenomenal. Bet that is a the best way to enjoy puerco pibil.

Hey patriot, you ever make sopas? I want to start making those.

Working on some Goan food for tonight. Spiced nan and a sort of curry stew made with lamb and tripe among some other things.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 01, 2010, 05:54:45 PM
That does look good. Well done! I had Tacos Al Pastor for lunch a couple days ago. Dripping with grease. Wonderful! Just love it! A Mexican version of the Gyro.

Looks healthy but this type of food is the reason my city is usually in the top three fattest cities in the nation.  :D

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 01, 2010, 07:03:04 PM
Goan food sounds good, tonight I'm making sol kadhi which is a traditional Goan "drink/soup" made from kokum and coconut milk.  Also some spinach dal, naan of some variety, coconut rice, and keema samosas.  The Goan dish vendaloo is one of my favorites, although I often use chicken instead of the (rare for India) pork.  Black mustard seeds, vinegar, and lots and lots of chilies...lots of flavor in it.  But actually I find I've been cooking with much less meat nowadays.

I do a simulated tacos al pastor by using leftover BBQed pork and pineapple.  Good stuff, the sweet acidity of pineapple adds a  nice touch.  I'm not quite as brave to try making my own tortillas, but then, tortillas are widely available premade, whereas Indian breads I had to learn to make out of necessity.

I'm not big into Ayurveda by any stretch of the imagination...I cook with ingredients for flavor, little else, but I found a comment to this article about kalonji/nigella seeds amusing: 

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-kalonji.htm

"is kalonji good for spinal cord injuries?"

I think that may be asking a bit much from a humble seed used for flavoring bread!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 01, 2010, 07:15:44 PM
Putting some in  my naan tonight and my back feels better already. It prevented my male pattern baldness too.

 .......wait, I forgot I drank a couple of ThirstyMonk's maibocks after getting back from Sesame Place this morning. Thats whats good for spinal injuries.


Just got back a little while ago from the Halal butcher. They have some nice stuff there, very fresh. Fresh killed goats whole too. I aksed them what Halal meat means. Everything there is killed in the name of Allah and bled out properly.  They didnt have any mutton tripe. So just got lamb neck and beef tripe for the Goan stew. Its in the pressure cooker with the tomatoes coconut milk and spices now.

Here are the rules for Halal "legal" meat.

Explicitly forbidden substances

A variety of substances are considered as harmful (haraam) for humans to consume and, therefore, forbidden as per various Quranic verses:

    * Pork meat (i.e., flesh of pig)[Qur'an 2:173]
    * Blood[Qur'an 2:173]
    * Animals slaughtered in the name of anyone but Allah. All that has been dedicated or offered in sacrifice to an idolatrous altar or saint or a person considered to be "divine"[Qur'an 2:173] [Qur'an 5:3]
    * Carrion[Qur'an 2:173]
    * An animal that has been strangled, beaten (to death), killed by a fall, gored (to death), savaged by a beast of prey (except that which you may have slaughtered while it was still alive){{cite quran
    * Food over which Allah's name is not pronounced(or at least not in a name other than Allah)[Qur'an 6:121]
    * Alcohol and other intoxicants[Qur'an 5:090]

[edit] Dhabiha: Method of slaughter
Main article: Dhabiha

Thabiha or Dhabiha (Arabic: ذبيحة‎), is the prescribed method of ritual slaughter of all animals excluding fish and most sea-life per Islamic law. This method of slaughtering animals consists of a swift, deep incision with a sharp knife on the neck, cutting the jugular veins and carotid arteries of both sides but leaving the spinal cord intact. It is believed by Muslims to kill instantly and painlessly.[2]

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 01, 2010, 11:56:38 PM
my city is usually in the top three fattest cities in the nation.  :D



You live in Chicago too?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 02, 2010, 12:20:10 AM
Halal meat Goan fare.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04590.jpg)

From the rear to the front:

Mixed padad (lentil crisps),

spiced naan,

mango pickles and sweet chili chutney. (sweet does not mean not hot cause..damn) ,

 an odd salad of sliced cabbage, carrots, raisins, cashews, honey, yogurt, spices sometimes called "yogurt salad" 

another odd but very refreshing salad made with watermelon, mint, sugar and black pepper.

Lamb with tripe stew made with coconut milk, tomatoes, ginger, onions, spices. (awesome)

Rice layered with lentils.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 02, 2010, 01:18:58 PM
Well done cap!  I would be tired after all that work.  Nice presentation too!

I conceded trying to have nice presentation for this meal, after having dirtied nearly every pan and dish in the kitchen making it:

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Samosas.jpg)

The keema samosas are awesome, the keema meat was very finely minced and dry and the flavor was perfect.  The sol kadhi (in cups) was interesting but not something I'll be making again, probably...the green chili and coconut milk sort of obscured any sour taste from the kokum.  Also served, a strongly spiced spinach dal, some leftover Carribean rice and beans (made with basmati, close enough for government work), and a basic naan.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 02, 2010, 08:31:40 PM
Hey patriot, you ever make sopas? I want to start making those.

Sopas, as in soups?  Or sopes, like these  ;) ;D:
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Sopes.jpg)

I love making sopes.  They're so easy and so delicious!  The ones above were topped with a little goat cheese, some cilantro and a squeeze of lime juice.  There's a restaurant I get sopes at in the Twin Cities that serves theirs with goat cheese and greenery consisting of chopped cilantro, chives, and julienned romaine and mint.  They might dress the greens with a little vinegar or lime juice (there's definitely an acid in there).  Anyway, they are phenomenal.  You should definitely make some sopes.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 02, 2010, 09:32:13 PM
 ::) yeah, I meant sopes. I have enuff trouble spelling English let alone Spanish.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 02, 2010, 09:49:43 PM
::) yeah, I meant sopes. I have enuff trouble spelling English let alone Spanish.

Just giving you a hard time, man.   :P 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 03, 2010, 04:51:49 PM
^^^As is in Tex-Mex those would be called "puffy-tacos" but with different meats or beans. Split them like pita-bread and load up with pollo, or picadillo, lettuce, tomato, cheese and salsa. Then they are called Gorditas. My absolute favorite drunk food with the exception of Tortas- a sandwich concoction.

Love the goat-cheese and herbs. That has to marry very well with the masa.

My Mexican neighbor had me over for a BBQ Saturday. His wife is diabetic so there wasn't any cheese or flour tortillas. Corn tortillas, BBQ chicken legs and paper thin bone-in ribeyes and Nopalitos

I'd never had Nopalitos before. Thin sliced cactus simmered with garlic. Wonderful! Very much like string-beans.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 04, 2010, 02:12:47 AM
Nice work gentlemen. There never seems to be a dull moment on this thread.

My mouth is watering at all of the great recipes and pics. Keep up the great work fellas!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 05, 2010, 02:47:00 PM
A very simple and tasty dinner:

Leftover sookha keema meat folded into leftover basmati, with cilantro, lemon juice, and garam masala.  Makes a very tasty pullao!  We had that with mango lassi last night.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 06, 2010, 04:22:11 AM
In regards to the time it takes me to make those big multi coarse meals. I do it fast. I have restaurant experience that helps, but mostly it is because I expedite the prep work and cooking really well. Plus I use a pressure cooker.

The Goan meal took about an hour and a half including cooking time and bread. The dough for the bread was made earlier in the Kitchen Aid mixer.

Pressure cooker and Kitchen Aid. Two tools that are indispensable in my kitchen.

Of coarse the first time you cook these type dishes it takes a little longer but with a little practice you can do them rapidly.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 06, 2010, 02:29:04 PM
That makes sense...my restaurant experience is in dishwashing, so not as applicable!

I'm also just a slow cook...I put an audiobook on my MP3 player, pour a glass of something, and take my time.  A pressure cooker would help with lentils, but usually I start the lentils, then work on all the other dishes over the next couple hours and it ends on time anyway.

I'm going to have to try dal wafers again.  Did some a few weeks back but I overcooked them...they cook in seconds, and they were all kind of burnt tasting.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 06, 2010, 05:03:32 PM
For me it's usually "low and slow". I generally like to take as much time as I need to make things the best I can. Time is a factor but I try to make sure I have plenty of it when I'm making a big meal. If I spent less time typing .....I would have more time to cook.  ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 06, 2010, 05:20:06 PM
I like to cook fast. Some stuff takes longer or has a different prep requirement, but ultimately I don't want to spend hours in the kitchen as my free time is limited.

So +++1 on the pressure cooker. A severely underrated item. Bad-ass short-ribs in less than 20 minutes? Beans in ten? That's why I like it... And having one is almost essential in Indian cuisine AFAIK.

I tend to shy away from putting lentils in the PC. They cooks so fast anyway.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 06, 2010, 07:47:43 PM
Yeah, lentils cook in the pressure cooker in about 30 seconds. A little longer and they turn into sort of re-fried beans ( which BTW are made in a PC). 

I actually want to get an Indian pressure cooker. They have lift out sections that stack in so that several coarses can be made in the same pot at the same time, It is brilliant.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 06, 2010, 08:17:19 PM
Toor dal seems to require a bit longer cooking for me than chana.  Dal encompasses a variety of split peas, lentils, and beans, actually, so they do have different characteristics.  I approach cooking in the kitchen like I approach smoking outside...yes, I could shorten the process by parboiling ribs (  :o ) or otherwise speeding the process (maybe microwave that 12lb brisket first! ;) ), but quite honestly cooking is a bit of a respite for me, so I LIKE to be able to retreat to the kitchen, or to the smoker, and relax.  Nice thing after a days work.  Cheers!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 06, 2010, 10:20:24 PM
ya gotta point there.

must be a hundred different kinds of dal at my Indian grocer.

I cant remember all of the names.

Isn't channa chick peas?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 07, 2010, 12:05:01 PM
Isn't channa chick peas?

Yeah, I think so.  I had some channa masala yesterday for lunch at this new(ish) Indian place in the Twin Cities.  It definitely had chick peas in it.  I also had some chicken josh.  Mmmmm!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 07, 2010, 04:12:38 PM
I also cook my dal until it can be easily blended...undercooked toor dal can be gritty and not smooth, and the wife prefers it smooth.  Generally the dal is somewhere between a thick soup and thin refried beans in consistency, and being highly seasoned we use it to dip bread, mix with rice, etc.  Chana masala I believe are whole chickpeas.  As I recall:

chana:  chickpeas
toor/toovar: yellow pigeon peas
masoor: red lentils
moong:  mung beans
urud: gram beans
There are others but these are what I have in stock.

Never heard of chicken josh....rogan josh applied to chicken I suppose! 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 07, 2010, 05:50:25 PM
Never heard of chicken josh....rogan josh applied to chicken I suppose! 

Yes, that was my impression.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 13, 2010, 02:32:47 PM
No pictures, but another Indian meal a couple days back...all the usual carbs, basmati rice, naan bread.  I had some chicken thighs so I deboned them and used the bones to make a rich, aromatic Indian broth (yakhni).  The thigh meat was diced up, coated in batter of besan (chickpea flour) with crushed panch phoron (Bengal 5 spice mix, varies a bit based on recipe) as well as some ajwain, red pepper, lemon juice, and garlic.  I used the broth as a base to cook the dal (1 dry cup of chana dal), and used the chicken fat skimmed off the top to sautee diced onions and garlic to add later to the dal.  Also diced up several small sweet peppers for the dal, and a huge list of spices I could not possibly remember were added, as well as some leftover fresh spinach and coriander leaves.  Then I heated up the oil and fried the kheema samosas I had prepped and then the chickpea battered chicken pakoras.  The pakora batter was a winner...I added the panch phoron on a whim but it hit the spot!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 14, 2010, 07:57:08 PM
I am not really knowledgeable about Italian food past the popular Italian American foods you see on the menu at Fazolis (I know, I know...) and a dozen episodes of "Lidia's Italy" but I'm doing a lasagna tonight, along with garlic bread and fried ravioli and a salad.  Watching "The Godfather", so I figured it would be appropriate!  :D  Maybe a bottle of marsala to sip at after, nice Sicilian wine, that.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 15, 2010, 11:35:39 PM
You know what I love about the godfather? That most of the people that are playing Italians are Jewish. Awesome. And the guy that play Waltz, ya know the Jewish movie producer, the actor is Italian.

Italin food sounds good nic,

Speaking of Jewish, another one of my favorites is Jewish food. I especially love all of the sandwiches. Italian sandwiches are great but they got nothin on the Jews IMO.

More innards...Chopped liver.

Real easy, If you make chicken soup in advance, always a good idea with Jewish food. Make a rich chicken broth. Put in frdge to cool down. Skim the hardened fat off of the top and set asside, this is called schmaltz. Then make a few hard boiled eggs and set assie to cool.

Then in a pan over med. high heat render the chilled schmaltz. Put in a large onion chopped, a clove of garlic, salt and pepper, pinch of celery seed, and marjoram, a few sprinkles of paprika. Then toss in a pound or so of chicken livers and saute till cooked through.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04750.jpg)

After they are cooked let them cool just a little, warm is ok when you put them into the food processor. Give this a fe pullses till starting to become like paste. Now add a few table spoons of chicken broth, Then add the peeled hard boiled eggs chopped a little. Pulse again a few times till the eggs are chopped small and fully incorporated.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04752.jpg)

  בתאבון

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 16, 2010, 03:21:06 AM
Capp...that is 2 kool.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 16, 2010, 04:08:03 AM

  בתאבון



Bon appetit. You know, I've had to look up a bunch of your @#$ .... like capsicums the other day.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 16, 2010, 08:56:37 PM
Thats what they call em in New Zealand.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 16, 2010, 10:26:02 PM
Wasn't there a kiwi in our epic thread over at NB that made mention of it?  Forget his username, sadly one who seems not to have joined us on our exodus...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 16, 2010, 10:36:48 PM
Yep, Coldaz, I told him we were over here talkin cookin and brewin, guess he never came to check it out.

I always call them capsicums now. Mostly to hear people say "what?".

Cold is definitely an experienced ethnic cook. I think at any given time he has about twelve exchange students from any given country living in his house. He makes it a point to cook their native food for them. He also has 6 kids of his own (or something crazy like that) all living at home. This may explain his infrequent posts, maybe he will stop by one day.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 22, 2010, 12:21:20 AM
Heres some interesting stuff.

Frogs legs Pescatore style. Basically cooked in a marinara sauce with lots of garlic, fresh basil and white wine and green beans.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04803.jpg)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04805.jpg)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04806.jpg)


Served on, what else but pasta.


I got them at the Chinese grocery store they were frozen at $3 per lb.I wanted to get fresh but they were out of them.Fresh meaning they are there live and they kill them and clean them for you. They are better this way. When you get them home and dump them out into a bowl after rinsing they are still moving a little.Sprinkle them with salt and they move around a lot.

I was hoping to post a video of that, maybe the next time I go there they will have the live frogs.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tygo on May 22, 2010, 03:14:09 AM
Fresh meaning they are there live and they kill them and clean them for you. They are better this way. When you get them home and dump them out into a bowl after rinsing they are still moving a little.Sprinkle them with salt and they move around a lot.

Just like when my granny used to hack the heads off some chickens and they'd run around for a minute or so headless.  Then she'd cackle and say, "See, chickens are so stupid they don't even need their heads to live!"
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 22, 2010, 03:56:10 AM
So, Cap....
your kid eats all these dishes you put on this forum? Or are there fishsticks, chicken strips, and Ore-Ida fries in the background somewhere? Or do you shred everything for the kid and cover it in ketchup?  :P

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 22, 2010, 04:19:26 AM
At just about two she is a pretty good eater. Hasnt eaten meat yet, doesnt seem to want it at all, she makes that face.

She ate the pasta in frog flavored marinara no problem.

One fun thing is she likes spicy hot stuff. She loves Ethiopian food. And she shares with me these various different types of spicy crunchy Indian snacks. Some of them really spicy.

The wife freaks out thinking it is unhealthy somehow for the kids stomach. ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 22, 2010, 11:18:07 PM
So what is frog meat like, texture and flavor wise?  Seems like it would land somewhere between chicken and fish or something...

Doing an Italian meal tonight....sausages and peppers, with some fettuccine and fried ravioli.  Got Godfather Part II queued up!  Have a cheap pinot noir on hand, will pretend its something Italian...not that I could tell anyway!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 23, 2010, 03:19:37 PM
Frog Legs are a delicacy down here in Slower Delaware as is Snapper soup and Muskrat. I think they were originally a French delicacy. Frog likes taste very similiar to chicken wings. They say they are great on the grill although I haven't tried them that way yet.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 23, 2010, 05:21:48 PM
I've always preferred the smaller froglegs since the larger ones can be tough and full of tendons. But, frog tastes very similar to chicken. Better than chicken IMO...

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 24, 2010, 12:16:37 AM
A little Slovakian tonight.

Segaden Gulash with CZ dumplings.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04908.jpg)

Accompanied beautifully by thirstymonk's Rauch bier and Maibock.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04910.jpg)

Afterward we retired to the family room for some circa 1957 Slovakian cartoons.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04920.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 24, 2010, 12:19:00 AM

Accompanied beautifully by thirstymonks's Rauch bier and Maibock.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04910.jpg)


So the Maibock is in the sippycup then, right?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 24, 2010, 12:22:12 AM
Yep, and thats just what I need after a few of his maibocks. I have to borrow it from the kid. Otherwise it spills all out and runs down my shirt and all, Awful waste,
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 24, 2010, 12:28:15 AM
Hehe, yes those new sippy cups are ingenious, nothing like we had when we were kids.

In all seriousness I would love to get into Eastern European food, but usually when I start up a new ethnic cuisine I go to one of their restaurants first and expeience it first...in Kansas City, I don't think there are any eastern european restaurants, which is silly, because we have a pretty wide variety in general, for a midwest town.  We do have some of the best povitica, due to a pocket of Croatian/Slovenian immigrants, but I think you'd probably have to get invited to their home to enjoy the savory cooking, since they only commercially sell the povitica bread.  Which is good stuff, for the record!   Funny, when I google povitica it brings up KC companies in several of the first links...maybe a semi-local thing?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 24, 2010, 12:38:33 AM
Eastern European food is easy, Well, I should say central European is easy, some Russian dishes get pretty involved.

But Polish, CZ, Slovakian, Hungarian. Very simple "less is more" type cooking. Lots of hearty stews. Lots of onions, smoked meats and sausages, sauerkraut and rendered pork fat, marjoram,caraway seeds and paprika.

There is a CZ dish that is one of my favorites.Its called svickova (svitch co va). Ill have to make that one soon.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 24, 2010, 02:33:52 AM
Funny, when I google povitica it brings up KC companies in several of the first links...maybe a semi-local thing?

I think it's the terminology that has you coming up short on searches. I looked on the wiki, "my people" call the potica - strudla, and what is commonly referred to as strudle is called "pita". There's no right or wrong, it's just maybe you can find it by calling it something else.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 24, 2010, 12:39:00 PM
Seems there are so numerous languages/cultures from eastern Europe, with so many shared dishes, that you can find a half dozen at least spellings for each dish, potica/povitica, for one.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: chumley on May 25, 2010, 04:01:21 PM
Last night I made chana dal! It was dee-licious!

Here is the recipe I used (courtesy of aleman, with a tweak or two):

1 cup of dried chana dal beans (I got mine here: http://www.purcellmountainfarms.com/Chana%20Dal%20Beans.htm (http://www.purcellmountainfarms.com/Chana%20Dal%20Beans.htm)
1 can of Italian style tomatoes (basil and oregano flavored)
1 large yellow onion chopped
1 cup plain greek yogurt
6 cloves chopped garlic
3 TBS finely grated fresh ginger
2 diced serranos, seeded
1 tsp tumeric
¼ tsp fresh grated nutmeg
1 tsp of salt
¼ cup of olive oil

For the masala

1 tsp of whole pepper corns
1 bay leaf
1 TBS of whole coriander
3  whole cloves
½ tsp whole fenugreek
1.5 TBS of whole cumin
1/3 teaspoon of whole fennel seed

Soak the chana dal bean over night.
Pressure cook the soaked beans with the salt for 7 minutes, then mash them up any way you can, Immersion blender, tater masher, big spoon, etc.
Blend in the yogurt
Add the tomatoes
Add tumeric and nutmeg.
Fry the onions until brown reduce heat and stir in serranos, garlic and ginger until soft.
Add onions, serranos, garlic, and ginger to daal.

Put the masala ingredients into an iron skillet.  Toast over medium heat, stirring things around with the bay leaf. When you see whips of smoke coming up remove the masala from the heat. Place the masala in a coffee grinder, grind and add this to the daal.

Garnish with chopped cilantro, cashews, and a squirt of lime juice.

I served mine with naan and a cucumber-feta salad.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 25, 2010, 11:57:37 PM
Chumley,

sounds like you were pretty close to Doubles there. Ever have Doubles?

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Doubles.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 26, 2010, 01:21:49 AM
Looks like some serious turmeric in that naan!

Does it give a good flavor?  Most of my indian breads, leavened or not, are unseasoned unless stuffed paratha, but that looks kinda tasty...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 26, 2010, 01:28:22 AM
The bread is actually called Barra. It is very similar to naan, kind of a mix between naan and pori.

It is spiced with turmeric, cumin, and kolongi. or whatever those black cumin seeds are called.

They are fried in about a half inch of oil. They are awesome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OV0-Lvr9zw
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 26, 2010, 01:36:03 AM
So is it leavened like naan?  Most of the recipes in my books are unleavened...paratha, chapati, roti, puri, etc.  And I did misspeak, I do season all breads heavily with kalonji ("black onion seeds", nigella).  Those little seeds give a really great flavor, along with a brushing of ghee...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 26, 2010, 06:29:36 AM
That looks fantastic!

Found some interesting Indian dishes at world Market for $3.99 last week. Influenced by this thread I bought some for random quick meals. Far cheaper than what I spend at the cafeteria for lunch most days. Healthier I imagine. Vegan dishes by a brand called "Tasty Bite" and imported from India.

Had the Aloo Palak at work on Saturday. Tried to give me indigestion but a Rolaid fixed that. There's a spice element that I can only describe as faintly bitter. Not bad... Good on rice.

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/S_y4rdCZn0I/AAAAAAAAAHw/8hpxfeJ5yVM/s640/img_0347.jpg)
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/S_y4r-9g0ZI/AAAAAAAAAH0/XSr9KeJT1hg/s640/img_0361.jpg)

However, tonight I found these pouches at the local HEB for only $0.98!!!
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/S_y4sWi6b1I/AAAAAAAAAH4/2CcJJ8d1Od4/s640/img_0363.jpg)

I'm gonna have to start working on the bread now as well as making this stuff from scratch. Any good recipes for the bread?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: babalu87 on May 26, 2010, 02:18:15 PM
Thought occured to me

Isnt all cooking Ethnic?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 26, 2010, 03:04:29 PM
Isnt all cooking Ethnic?

Hamburgers, hotdogs, and pork steaks on the grill and a cooler full of bud light.  Name that ethnicity.....
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 26, 2010, 03:08:33 PM
Ethnic Group - An ethnic group is a group of people whose members identify with each other, through a common heritage that is real or assumed. This shared heritage may be based upon putative common ancestry, history, kinship, religion, language, shared territory, nationality or physical appearance. Members of an ethnic group are conscious of belonging to an ethnic group; moreover ethnic identity is further marked by the recognition from others of a group's distinctiveness.

as per Wikipedia.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: richardt on May 26, 2010, 03:19:45 PM
Isnt all cooking Ethnic?

Hamburgers, hotdogs, and pork steaks on the grill and a cooler full of bud light.  Name that ethnicity.....

American... just like baseball, grandma, and apple pie.  But I would swap out the contents of the cooler for something better ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 26, 2010, 03:54:40 PM
Vegan dishes by a brand called "Tasty Bite" and imported from India.

I'd be careful, particularly if serving to a practicing vegan, with Indian food unless very explicitly stated as vegan.  There are a great number of Indian vegetarians of course, but veganism isn't quite so prominent; the use of ghee in cooking is very common and one of those dishes marked as vegetarian (properly, granted) was a paneer dish which uses cheese.  So those dishes could very easily have ghee in them as a cooking oil, which I gather isn't terribly kosher for your veganites.

I really recommend Julie Sahni's book for learning processes (more than simple recipes) for Indian cooking, but hers is kind of old school, and because naan is more a commercially baked bread in india, only includes recipes for all the various unleavened breads more commonly made at home in India.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 26, 2010, 04:27:58 PM
American... just like baseball, grandma, and apple pie. 

You can't eat the baseball  ::)

American just doesn't strike me as an ethnicity. Ask someone what their ethnicity is and you get an answer like 50 percent German and 25 Polish and 25 Chinese on my mother's side. :)  I understand that's ethnic heritage, but it's linked.

Start an American cooking thread... what the heck would go in there? (I'd guess sloppy slathered bbq ribs)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 26, 2010, 05:09:40 PM
Nic thanks for the advice. These little pouches will give me an idea of what to expect when I try the recipes. Channa Masala looks easy and chickpeas are my favorite bean anyway. I'd like to do bread and forgo rice.

Quote
American just doesn't strike me as an ethnicity. Ask someone what their ethnicity is and you get an answer like 50 percent German and 25 Polish and 25 Chinese on my mother's side. Smiley  I understand that's ethnic heritage, but it's linked.

Start an American cooking thread... what the heck would go in there? (I'd guess sloppy slathered bbq ribs)

Haha how about Chickd steak with cream gravy? Meatloaf or Sloppy Joe's?!


Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 26, 2010, 06:21:17 PM
American food is generally a natural version of a sort of "fusion" cuisine from all the old world cuisines.  Even chicken fried steak with gravy, probably originated in areas thick with central European and German immigrants who took the local beef and made schnitzel out of it!  Almost any typically American food has a discernible lineage from immigrant nations.  Maybe not succotash and pinole!  :D

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 27, 2010, 12:14:58 AM
When I think ethnic I mean the cooking of our immigrant ancestors. Recipes in their more pure form,how they were originally made.Ya know, authentic.

Some of these dishes, pazole for example have been made the same way for a thousand years, maybe more.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 27, 2010, 01:29:58 AM
Some of these dishes, pazole for example have been made the same way for a thousand years, maybe more.

Not quite the same......


Quote
According to research by the National Institute of Anthropology and History and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, in these special occasions, the meat used in the pozole was human. [4] After the prisoners were killed by having their hearts torn out in a ritual sacrifice, the rest of the body was chopped and cooked with corn. The meal was shared among the whole community as an act of religious communion. After the conquest, when cannibalism was banned, pork became the staple meat, as it "tasted very similar", according to a Spanish priest.[5]
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: richardt on May 27, 2010, 01:32:39 AM
I love cooking on the grill.

Today I saw a quote from http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/5-tricks-to-grill-your-way-to-better-health-1464885/ (http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/5-tricks-to-grill-your-way-to-better-health-1464885/)

"Marinate meats. Marinating can reduce HCA formation by as much as 92 to 99 percent, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). One study in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry showed that marinating red meat in beer or wine for two hours significantly reduced HCAs. Scientists believe the antioxidants in these marinades block HCAs from forming."

Yet one more reason why beer is good!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: babalu87 on May 27, 2010, 01:33:18 AM
Isnt all cooking Ethnic?

Hamburgers, hotdogs, and pork steaks on the grill and a cooler full of bud light.  Name that ethnicity.....

Hot dogs = German

Hamburgers = German

Pork steaks................. I'd bet most ehtnicities eat that.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 27, 2010, 01:37:39 AM
the meat used in the pozole was human.


Meat is meat, it's how well you cook it that matters!  :o
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 27, 2010, 01:43:51 AM
Hot dogs = German

Hamburgers = German

Pork steaks................. I'd bet most ehtnicities eat that.
.
So your answer is German, clinched by the fact there is a cooler full of lager beer from a company founded by a German Immigrant. I was going for "American"  ;)  
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 27, 2010, 04:18:32 AM
MMM long pork pazole....nice.

I had an "American" pizza in Germany. It had corn on it.

Pork sausages on a bun. Sausages have been around a long time. Maybe the Germans invented the frankfurter and the wiener but the "Hot Dog" as we know it is American. Just ask someone from Chicago.

Germany, come on man, they dont have yellow mustard and they dont have neon green relish, they dont even have baseball !









Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 27, 2010, 10:30:58 AM
Germany, come on man, they dont have yellow mustard and they dont have neon green relish, they dont even have baseball !

But they are some of the greatest brewers in the world.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 27, 2010, 03:55:27 PM
The "hamburger" as we know it is also an American invention. Arguably, inspired by a German dish...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 28, 2010, 01:06:15 AM
The "hamburger" as we know it is also an American invention. Arguably, inspired by a German dish...

The Origin of Hamburgers and Ketchup, by Prof. Giovanni Ballarini:

    The origin of the hamburger is not very clear, but the prevailing version is that at the end of 1800' s, European emigrants reached America on the ships of the Hamburg Lines and were served meat patties quickly cooked on the grill and placed between two pieces of bread.

But, anything "Americanized" into bigger, better, cheezier, spicier, deep fried - bears little resemblance to the original.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 28, 2010, 08:41:51 PM
"Ich bin ein Berliner."
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 29, 2010, 02:23:00 PM
Homemade salsas (chile de arbol salsa and salsa verde) and potato sopes.  Sopes are topped with goat cheese, the arbol salsa, and chiffonade of romaine, cilantro, and chives, tossed with fresh lime juice.  Garnished with salsa verde, lime wedges and chive blossoms.

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/DSCN0186.jpg)
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/DSCN0188.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on May 29, 2010, 04:08:01 PM
"Ich bin ein Berliner."

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Berliner-Pfannkuchen.jpg/250px-Berliner-Pfannkuchen.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 29, 2010, 05:14:44 PM
(http://www.blogcdn.com/www.politicsdaily.com/media/2009/08/jfk_fabulous_review.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 29, 2010, 06:54:22 PM
Sopes look awesome, still havent tried them yet.

Had to make some pazole for lunch today, what with all of the culinary anthropology talk.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05038.jpg) ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tubercle on May 30, 2010, 12:49:35 AM
Isnt all cooking Ethnic?

Hamburgers, hotdogs, and pork steaks on the grill and a cooler full of bud light.  Name that ethnicity.....


 Redneck ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 30, 2010, 12:56:35 AM
Last night did a pot of mostaccioli with a really nice sauce...3 large red peppers roasted until blackened over charcoal, peeled, then blended to a puree...a sweet onion and garlic sauteed in olive oil, mixed with the pepper puree, salted, spiced with oregano, crushed red pepper, and fennel, and then cut with heavy cream.  Made for a delightful sauce...served with cheese bread and smoke roasted italian sausage.  Paired this with Godfather III but had to stop it after 40 minutes.  My god, I couldn't take the bad acting.  It was like Star Wars prequels...decades after a directors brilliance they try to revisit it and fail absolutely miserably, both times particularly failing on godawful dialogue.

Still, the food was good.  Makes for a great tomato-less pasta, quite strongly flavored.

Did a sweep of the ethnic stores today too...restocked methi, black pepper, star anise, and basmati and the indian store, and Ukrainian paprika at a generally Russian store, with 2 liters of Polish blackcurrant nectar as well, with a freshly made chocolate puff pastry for the wife and daughter, who devoured it hastily.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 30, 2010, 02:43:47 PM
I didnt think Godfather three was all that bad. Bad but tolerable. At least it was consistent. It would have been better if they demonstrated the fall of  the Corleone family and evaporation of the Italian mafia. Maybe have the Russians and the Chinese taking over. Lets just say that film would have been awesome if I made it. ;D

Star Wars prequels were on the other hand awful on so many levels. No continuity what so ever. To name a couple (and there are many). In Empire Strikes back, the ghost of obi wan sends luke to the degaba system to learn from Yoda "The Jedi Master that taught me" In Phantom Menace Obi wan is under the tutelage of  Gui jon jin or what ever his name was. WTF. And why could R2D2 fly? That was ridiculous. Why couldnt Darth remember C3PO if he built him as a child. Just stupid. No redeemable qualities in those three films at all.

Just saw Avatar last night. What is the bid deal with that movie? It wasnt terrible but not much better than Godfather three IMO. More like a video game.

Anyways, starting the fire for Kotlik Goulash levesh. Pics to come.
 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on May 30, 2010, 04:27:03 PM
I always wondered about the DV not recognizing C3PO. Put it up to that his was a common model... As far as Avatar goes: visually stunning, but derivative, formulaic and predictable. I fell asleep near the end. I give it 5 stars for visual effects and 2 stars for plot and acting.

Nic that tomato-less pepper based sauce sounds just right. I'll have to remember that one. But on pasta...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on May 30, 2010, 08:14:19 PM
Perhaps I would have liked GFIII more if I watched the whole thing.  I was expecting it to be worse, just not the nosedive.  For some reason, Al Pacino seemed so much more "Al Pacino" than "Michael Corleone" and some of the dialogue just seemed bad.  I'll give it credit, it did not seem to be trending towards the absolute catastrophic drop in quality the SW prequels had, but it lost all the magic I thought the first two films had (and almost all of the cast, too!). 

I felt a similar pang of disappointment with each Peter Jackson installment of LotR, the first one I loved, second one I mostly loved, third one just deviated so wildly from the plot and consisted of the most ridiculously banal dialogue (of which J.R.R. would have gagged on his bitter) that the whole series seems a bit of a disappointment.

You'll like the tomato-less pepper sauce.  I stole the recipe from a blog my wife reads...skipping the pine nuts and adding some more spices:  http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2009/03/pasta-with-roasted-red-pepper-sauce-groan/
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 31, 2010, 05:29:42 PM
Hungarian

Kotlik Goulash

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05106.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05058.jpg)

You will need some nice fresh beef and stock bones, ox tails or something. I used neck bones which yield a great flavor. Also some beef you can use just about any roast type cut into 1-2" cubes. I use heel or shin meat witch seems to holdup well.

The veg are: Lots of onions, carrots, taters,

The spices are lots of paprika, caraway seeds, marjoram, bay leaves, rosemary, black pepper, salt, and hot pepper if you like it that way.


First build  a good fire and make a pile of hot coals. Get the kotlik good and hot and then brown the bones in a little lard or oil.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/th_MOV05061.jpg) (http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/?action=view&current=MOV05061.flv)

Then after the onions have caramelized add the spices.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/th_MOV05062.jpg) (http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/?action=view&current=MOV05062.flv)

Toss that around a little then add some water and bring it to a boil.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/th_MOV05065.jpg) (http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/?action=view&current=MOV05065.flv)

When the meat is almost done add some potatoes and a fist full of fresh parsley.

Let the taters cook for a while and dont accidentally spill anything into the kotlik.  :D

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/th_MOV05169.jpg) (http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/?action=view&current=MOV05169.flv)

Serve with some hearty Slovakian bread or rye bread. MM MM good.

Anyone know how to edit the videos together?







Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 01, 2010, 01:04:14 AM
All kinds of awesome!  This is going to be on my next month's grocery budget.

Do you fish out the bones before serving or just leave them in?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 01, 2010, 01:38:08 AM
I fish some out, I leave the ones that have meat on them. The ones with the meat on them are the best part.

You can do it on a fire with out getting a hanging pot. Just use a regular pot and find a way to stand it over the fire. Like on bricks or something. Just regulate the heat by moving coals under the pot or away from the pot as needed.

Flames are not really necessary. I just did that for the dramatic effect.

I have to find a way to edit the videos together than I can make a step by step cooking type video. It would be like living my dream. ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 01, 2010, 12:35:48 PM
Plain old Windows Movie Maker does the trick...ships with every XP, Vista, 7 copy.

Already have the hanging pot and tripod stand, so I'll be good to go...not a traditional goulash pot, but an enameled pot that should do fine, and has worked for other live fire cooks.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on June 01, 2010, 04:50:46 PM
Very nice work on the Hungarian Kotlik Goulash Capp.

What kind of consistency do you achieve when all is done. Is it more soupy or closer to a stew-like consistency?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 01, 2010, 07:50:23 PM
In Hungary there is 'regular goulash' (stew) served plated with potatoes or dumplings, or there is 'goulash levesh' levesh (im sure not spelled right) means literally 'soup'. The version we made was Goulash Levesh served in a bowl. with bread on the side.

It does get a little thick with the reduction that takes place and the starch from the potatoes as they cook.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on June 02, 2010, 12:15:47 AM
Very nice work on the Hungarian Kotlik Goulash Capp.

+1  I'm always impressed when you cook in that outdoor kettle.  And now I want to try making some sort of goulash.  Yum!!!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 03, 2010, 01:57:42 AM
Ill tel ya what my dream is.

I want to build a "landscape BBQ" set up. But with my idea there is a curved organic "Santa Fe" look.  I want to build a re-bar and wire mesh frame as an armature coated with cement and hay. Then incorporate from bottom to top a fire pit for the tripod brewing, or open spit roast, a tandoori oven, a counter top, sink, 'Argentinian' grill which is just a flat grill for coals but with a grid and rack that has adjustable height using a recycled bicycle gear and chain). Above that a hearth for bread / pizza,  a smoking / drying chamber.

I can do it pretty cheap. I figured it all out. The biggest cost is concrete but still manageable. The rest would be found stuff. Bricks from a fireplace demo, scrap rebar. or even new,  some other found steel. The other things that will cost money: plumbing supplies, the stones for the ovens and the fire clay for the tandor. Then finish the counter with tile. maybe finish the whole thing with crushed up glass and tiles, make a mosaic of a primitive hunter chasing dear or something. I was even thinking of forming a little curved alcove bench around the fire pit for cozying up to the fire during winter cooks.

I was going to do it here but because it is on footers/ permanent install and im try to sell this house, not doing it here, definitely the next house.

Maybe I could sell them? Maybe I could be a landscape fire pit artist.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tygo on June 03, 2010, 02:07:23 AM
make a mosaic of a primitive hunter chasing dear or something.

Something like this would be good:

(http://www.crossfiteastbay.com/2009/07/06/captain-caveman1.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 03, 2010, 02:29:40 AM
I want to build a "landscape BBQ" set up. But with my idea there is a curved organic "Santa Fe" look.  I want to build a re-bar and wire mesh frame as an armature coated with cement and hay. Then incorporate from bottom to top a fire pit for the tripod brewing, or open spit roast, a tandoori oven, a counter top, sink, 'Argentinian' grill which is just a flat grill for coals but with a grid and rack that has adjustable height using a recycled bicycle gear and chain). Above that a hearth for bread / pizza,  a smoking / drying chamber.

I can do it pretty cheap.

I had it figured at 6k for materials only to do a stone oven, with a fireplace underneath to double as a smoke chamber and a bbq to one side. Now that's with lining the insides with firebrick and using refractory cement. Outside would have been finished with brick. Then the world fell apart...

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 03, 2010, 03:08:48 AM
6K?

What was so much money? How much is refractory cement and fire bricks?

Oh you mean kast -o- lite. I put that in forges.

Do you think that is necessary?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 03, 2010, 04:28:54 AM
6K?

What was so much money? How much is refractory cement and fire bricks?

Oh you mean kast -o- lite. I put that in forges.

Do you think that is necessary?

You'll be around 1000 degrees when initially firing the oven. Regular bricks will eventually start to crumble, but depends how often you use it and how well you manage your fire. You can do it, but you will be RE-doing it eventually. 6K is build it once and your great-grandkids will be using it. Oh and it was going to be a barrel shape big enough to slide a whole pig into.

I was going for ...
(http://www.fornobravo.com/graphics/residential_ovens/Photos/Tuscan1.jpg)
just not those colors.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 04, 2010, 02:13:30 AM
My idea is a little more third world.

More like these.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2748/4173130182_98d9039054_o.jpg)

(http://www.villagok.dk/tandoor/tandoor.jpg)

(http://s4.hubimg.com/u/61259_f260.jpg)

(http://www.killdawabbit.com/ebay/tandoorOven_files/image014.jpg)

(http://www.killdawabbit.com/ebay/tandoorOven_files/image025.jpg)

(http://www.instructables.com/image/FT7OP8VF6B7T1LB/How-to-build-a-Pizza-Oven.jpg)

(http://clayoven.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/036.jpg)

(http://image63.webshots.com/63/9/7/81/443790781kvdfOO_ph.jpg)

(http://www.snapshotjourneys.com/images/Argentina/buenos%20aires/BuenosAiresGauchoBarbecue.JPG)

(http://farm1.static.flickr.com/147/425102493_f17fe0f622.jpg?v=0)

http://hubpages.com/hub/Make_a_backyard_mud_oven_Cheap__fun__and_makes_a_professional_qualtity_pizza

http://www.killdawabbit.com/ebay/tandoorOven.htm


Imagine something like this spread out with more than one cooking surface.







Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 04, 2010, 02:35:32 AM
If/when I move to flagstaff AZ where the summers are cool, winters are mild and the air is rarely humid, I will/would invest in a serious outdoor kitchen setup like some of those.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 04, 2010, 02:44:50 AM
Sure, sounds simple doesn't it? lay some bricks, dig up some mud and bam! you got an oven. You'll still likely need to pay for the mud (the proper mud), those look cool too, bit rustic. You can use metal on the outside too, the outside wouldn't get too hot because you would have some kind of insulation going on. So you can show off your welding skills, and still have a proper brick oven on the inside where it counts.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on June 04, 2010, 10:40:26 AM
It looks like one big crock pot.... ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: maxieboy on June 04, 2010, 06:03:46 PM
It looks like one big crock pot.... ;D

(http://www.threadbombing.com/data/media/4/oh_snap.jpg) ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 05, 2010, 01:16:04 AM
No expensive clay/fire cement or bricks.  ;)

I have a few friends from India that say they know of ovens, stoves and even houses made of this following stuff  and are over 100 years old. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2i1cHHJAguA

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 01:47:55 AM
After dancing lacucaracha for half an hour you get a dozen bricks? That's gonna be one long work in progress. And to make it look really good you need one of these...
(http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/ej6vCHa0yw4DUMHcx32JmfUyReUIdg_WGY9V3PsSnpmAaqf64ixZJNuhQcXEFn2X7R_UFyY00a8d4uj5RukTGHFJry5Xrbuo_0NfQCeRkKVkqk23N68Wc6uNGS-p1FlJHtLhbhlTat5MzW3XqOEnOycRDmnfpvjWLHRq-viH5WmmJnoW5mvaa31Y)

My grandmother has one in her yard made of homemade bricks. When you have more time than money - that's how you do it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: boulderbrewer on June 05, 2010, 04:29:04 AM
They all look good, but beerocd yours looks like it could have come from the Hans Christian Anderson story of Hanzel and Gretal. It gives me the creeps.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 04:41:19 AM
They all look good, but beerocd yours looks like it could have come from the Hans Christian Anderson story of Hanzel and Gretal. It gives me the creeps.

Bah, that's just cuz it's painted/stucco. I'd have all brick if I could afford it.

(http://www.wiseacre-gardens.com/toons/hazel_cookbook.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 05, 2010, 08:07:44 AM
The mix I would use is actually a little different.It will have cement added to it and the hay will be pre-chopped up. Mixes up real easy, a few flips with a shovel and its ready.

I want to build a house with bails of hay dipped in a slurry of cement but it wont pass building code. Building codes are stupid.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 02:25:54 PM
The mix I would use is actually a little different.It will have cement added to it and the hay will be pre-chopped up. Mixes up real easy, a few flips with a shovel and its ready.

I want to build a house with bails of hay dipped in a slurry of cement but it wont pass building code. Building codes are stupid.

What exactly in the code says you can't? It's a GREEN sustainable building material. You should write to Obama, and your local treehuggers too. Save the earth, make a difference, yes you can!

I've only had one coffee (black) - no clue where that's coming from....
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on June 05, 2010, 06:32:37 PM
Depends where one builds their hay-bale house and if you want to insure it.  AFAIK insurance companies won't insure these radical alternative types of construction. But then who really needs it if it is basically fire-resistant...?

I've wanted to do something along those lines, but out in the County out of the City limits and their codes. 100% solar and rainwater capture plus vermicomposting toilets  Not up to code technically, but no utilities or septic system to contend with either. Hard to regulate when one isn't connected to the grid.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 05, 2010, 07:23:34 PM
Well, I want to be on the grdi,at least while it is still there.

I just want to build a radical design.

Speaking of the loss of the grid. I have been thinking about boulders comment on Hansel and Gretel. In a previous comment from Beerocd he mentions the oven being big enough for "pig" and the world falling apart in the same post. HMM?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 07:59:53 PM
I have been thinking about boulders comment on Hansel and Gretel. In a previous comment from Beerocd he mentions the oven being big enough for "pig" and the world falling apart in the same post. HMM?

Please see Post #443 of this same thread. Maybe this should be your new house...
(http://api.ning.com/files/qVr8FRRkOGeDt0m*aQd1XuAw0wDvLKHJ9HhEFg8LPKY1gRADsIxAPpJfAHon5k1bL5p4Q87GzlRdDYYBuw4o*bS*yjufLmw-/GlassHouse3.jpg?crop=1%3A1&width=171)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 06, 2010, 11:54:23 PM
Sunday Sicilian.

Salad of watermelon and sopressata.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05208.jpg)

Calamari Fra Diavalo

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05209.jpg)

Hey Mambo Italiano.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 07, 2010, 12:33:31 AM
Ok, I'll ask...
what's in the shot glass?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 07, 2010, 12:54:05 AM
yeah, meant to mention that. That is a very nice balsamic. wonderful stuff if you have never had it. Got it on sale, still expensive but not as expensive as the $400 bottle next to it.

I drizzle and dip the watermelon with it. I even drink it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on June 11, 2010, 01:38:05 PM
Interesting combo...watermelon and sopressata with balsamic. I can't quite put those flavors together in my head. Soooo much food soooo little time.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 11, 2010, 09:36:01 PM
Think proscuttio and melon.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on June 11, 2010, 10:55:32 PM
I had a prosciutto e melone salad when I was in northern Italy.  Not a very intuitive flavor combination for most Americans, but very tasty!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: richardt on June 11, 2010, 11:01:04 PM
canteloupe + proscuitto is the best melon pairing I've had.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 13, 2010, 10:01:59 PM
So for my daughters 2nd b day party we are going to do the Argentinian BBQ Thing. Depending on the amount of people and the size of whole pig we can get we are going to make the metal apparatus for splaying it out.

Like this

(http://images.travelpod.com/users/stefank/1.1234707300.grilling-argentinian-style.jpg)

A friend of mine did one this way last year and said it only took three or four hours.

If not Im gonna build one of those big grill beds like this.

(http://images.travelpod.com/users/flyingtiti/1.1240704000.preparing-the-asado.jpg)

Already starting the plan for the other Argentinean sides.

Anyone else ever try cooking a splayed pig?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 13, 2010, 10:45:59 PM
These guys seem to have it down pretty good. Argentinian looks cooler, but Cuban is SO simple. I did the spit because it's traditional for us and we already had it but I'd like to try it Cuban style one day.
http://cuban-christmas.com/pigroast.html (http://cuban-christmas.com/pigroast.html)

(http://cuban-christmas.com/images/pigroaster_steel_mesh.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 14, 2010, 04:04:54 PM
For my daughter's second (last friday) we kept things simple and just had snack food.  I did aloo and keema samosas, which folks seemed to quite like.  Spicy fried things rarely fail to please!

The pig avenue looks nice though, if a bit more work!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on June 17, 2010, 02:47:15 AM
BBQ is one of the most primitive methods of cooking. I am intriged by the techniques employed by our immigrant ancestors.

It amazes me as to the ways and means used to BBQ meats. When the first Spanish explorers arrived in the new world they found the indigenous peoples preserving meats in the sun. This is an age old and almost completely universal method. The chief problem with doing this is that the meats spoil and become infested with bugs. To drive the bugs away the natives would built small smoky fires and place the meat on racks over the fires. The smoke would keep the insects at bay and help in the preserving of the meat.

BBQ is a fascinating craft.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 19, 2010, 11:45:05 PM
Found a nice (little!) shop in north Kansas City that caters to Eastern European food...somewhat generally, but with a special emphasis on Balkans it looks like, and everything I ended up getting was Serbian.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/SerbianFood.jpg)

Hot and Sweet serbian paprika...tomorrow I will be doing, finally, at long last, a gulyas over the fire, using a little of the former and a lot of the latter.  Funny, I have meant to do this since Cap started the old "epic thread" over at NB.  Also picked up some sremska ljuta kobasica, a Serbian style spicy sausage, which will make a nice light meal sliced up with good bread and mustard.  And a slightly yellow tint 8-year slivovitz, "Navip" brand, also Serbian.

George's Brand Meats is the source of the sausage...they had everything there, beef, pork, all kinds of traditional cured stuff.  Several types of slanina, which I probably ought to have picked up...ah well, there's next time.  Here is the provider of the meats...domestic, but European style.

http://www.georgesbrandmeats.com/
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 20, 2010, 01:31:36 AM
WOW! good stuff. I think? No Serbian groceries around here that I know of, and I know everywhere. Maybe the
Russian store has some Serbian stuff.

The Slovakian Slivovitsa is clear.

Tonight we made some solvaki on my makeshift grill set up. Works great for kebabs.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05401.jpg)

Meat and fire, cant really go wrong with that.

Cooked homemade pita bread over the coals too.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05403.jpg)

Served with hummus,tadziki, lettuce and tomatoes.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC05406.jpg)

Marinade the hammered out beef cubes with olive oil, lemon, chopped fresh garlic, oregano, rosemary,salt and pepper. Then skewer.

For the hummus into the food processor with cooked chick peas, tahini, loads of fresh garlic, lemon, olive oil, salt pepper, blend till smooth, add water as needed till you reach your desired consistency.

For the tatziki, grate cucumbers into a bowl, add yogurt, lemon garlic, oregano, olive oil salt and pepper. Mix it up and let it sit a while. Fresh mint is great in there too.

Nic, cant wait to see the gulash set up.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 20, 2010, 02:29:35 AM
The Slovakian Slivovitsa is clear.

Most of the serbian ones are clear too, but a few of them are aged in oak...this one is marked 8 years old, and I have to assume it was aged in very worn and untoasted oak, as it only has a minor hue of yellow to it.  Bourbons, for example, are aged in charred casks and pick up a lot of color.  Could be only oak aged for a short time, too, as most whiskies, even the paler ones, with this much age, pick up more color.

I get slovakian and slovenian all mixed up in my mind.  I'm slowly starting to parse Eastern Europe properly.

The Greco stuff looks great.  I've made tzatziki before but I didn't do very well with it.  I'm planning a trip to a local greek eatery for some "reconnaissance" and then I'll try again.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 20, 2010, 02:22:19 PM
WOW! good stuff. I think?

Yeah, George's is good stuff. The Slivo will go down smoother if you keep it in the freezer, like vodka. Ask the guy at the store if he can get you Zuta Osa or Imperia - that stuff would be smooth even out of the trunk of your car on a hot summer day.


EDIT: There's Zuta (yellow) Osa and Bela (White) Osa
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on June 20, 2010, 04:41:01 PM
Really good looking Q Capster!

Did you make the pita bread from scratch.  Flame suit on.  ;)

I love grilling vegetables. Fresh tomatoes, mushrooms, onions, garlic and zuchinni w/ EVOO, salt and pepper.

mmmm....mmmmm....good!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 20, 2010, 04:58:51 PM
EDIT: There's Zuta (yellow) Osa and Bela (White) Osa

They had both zuta and bela osa...figured I'd try the navip but if/when I go back, I might spend a few extra bucks for the zuta osa.  The Maraska white was the cheapest, and I remember it being good.  I think zuta osa is around 32 bucks.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 20, 2010, 05:07:45 PM

They had both zuta and bela osa...figured I'd try the navip but if/when I go back, I might spend a few extra bucks for the zuta osa.  The Maraska white was the cheapest, and I remember it being good.  I think zuta osa is around 32 bucks.

Zuta is cleaner than the Maraska. While not totally unpleasant, it does have an aftertaste that isn't there in the more expensive brands. Around here Maraska is under 20 and Zuta and Imperia are over 30. Another way to look at it is Cuervo/Patron; One you bring out and give shots to everyone and anyone - the other is in the liquor cabinet and comes out when you are alone.  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 21, 2010, 02:27:05 PM
Time at long last for gulyas....

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas1.jpg)
Basic ingredients: Two diced yellow onions, three or four carrots, a diced green pepper and red pepper, two diced potatoes, and two pounds of bottom round roast sliced up.  The spices are a good deal of Serbian sweet paprika, a small amount of ljuta/hot paprika, salt, pepper, caraway, a pinch of thyme, and a few dill seeds.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas2.jpg)
Tons of sticks in my yard from a recent storm...getting the fire going.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas3.jpg)
First, the onions went in, with healthy pat of butter.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas4.jpg)
Then in with the beef, adding fuel to the fire to increase the heat.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas5.jpg)
After the beef started to brown, I added the carrots, green pepper, and red pepper.  After a while I added the paprika and spices, and stirred to coat.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas6.jpg)
Then, just enough water to make it somewhat soupy.  Covered and commenced simmering!  After maybe a half hour, I added the potatoes, covered, and in another 40 minutes, it was done.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Gulyas/gulyas7.jpg)
Plated up with a dollop of sour cream, some crusty bread, and a glass of Navip 8-year slivovitz.   Good, really simple comfort food.  Easier to do on the stove, yes, probably, but this was fun. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 21, 2010, 02:49:16 PM
I'd eat that!

You guys kinda make me want to get one of those tripods.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on June 21, 2010, 03:41:43 PM
You guys kinda make me want to get one of those tripods.

Hell yeah!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 21, 2010, 09:39:42 PM
This place has them. scroll down about half way. http://www.hungariandeli.com/Cookware.htm

You can maybe find them cheaper. I got mine in Slovakia it was about the equivalent of $75 there. Thats like a half a weeks pay for the average Slovakian.

Nics pot is pretty slick looking.

Tri pod is real easy to make with a welder. Just weld on som chain links. It can be done mechanically with a drill a few bolts and shackles or those dog leash things. .
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 21, 2010, 10:10:28 PM
I went the complete cheap route...that pot was around 11 bucks on eBay I think and the tripod stand was probably around 30 some bucks at Cabelas.

http://www.cabelas.com/p-0009522512974a.shtml

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 21, 2010, 10:16:47 PM
Nice, thats pretty cool. So did you get the grill thing too. I remember you posting something about that German grill. Cant remember what it was called. That thing looks just like it.

I got the a really big one cause mostly we are doing it for large groups of people. And we take it to the local Slovakian club where they have pot lucks.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on June 21, 2010, 11:03:05 PM
Yeah I'm just cooking for a small family.  I do have the grill though.  Don't use it though, my weber kettle grill would do the same thing a lot easier!  Mainly I don't use it because the sycamore wood I get isn't really good for direct cooking.  If I had plenty of cheap oak or apple or hickory, I'd probably use it! 

I believe the German grill is called schwenkbraten, swing-grill or something like that.  Mine is functionally identical but basically is a cheap lightweight camping tripod.  I think at the time I paid only 20 bucks as memory serves, instead of the 35 on cabelas now.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 22, 2010, 01:56:28 AM
we take it to the local Slovakian club ...

They let you in?  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on June 22, 2010, 02:00:54 AM
Tri pod is real easy to make with a welder. Just weld on som chain links. It can be done mechanically with a drill a few bolts and shackles or those dog leash things. .

I could just be way cheap and put the dutch oven right on the coals.

What would I weld? Wouldn't that make it unportable, or even worse unstorable? Sorry, just don't have the welding imagination going for me just yet. I think in right angles at the moment.  :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on June 22, 2010, 02:45:58 AM
You could just put the pot on the coals,but the idea of the the tripod is that you can raise and lower it to adjust the heat. Raise it to the top and it will stay warm throughout the gathering. Plus its way cooler.

The welding works great. Take three pipes or square tubes about five feet long. take a length of chain with six links. Tack weld a link to the top of one of the tubes then skip a link and tack the next one to the next length of tube and do it again. After that tack the links together. This makes the tri-pod collapsible as well as strong enough to hold the weight of a giant kettle of stew. Then get a long enough length of chain to hang from the links above to the ground. Get a couple carabeaners or other link thing that you can work with your finger. hook one at the end of the chain to attach to the handle of the kettle. keep another one on the length of chain and use it to take slack out of the chain as needed to raise and lower the kettle.

You could use just about any pot that you can hang from the handle as long as it is stable when stiring or serving. Dont wantitto be top heavy or tippy.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 12, 2010, 02:36:14 PM
I will not let this thread die!!!

I've been experimenting more with frying lately.  Picked up some wonton wrappers and egg roll wrappers.  Last night I cooked a rack of ribs semi-Chinese style, with a marinade paste of ginger, kecap manis, sriracha, garlic, and five spice powder.  Smoke-roasted with hickory for about 90 minutes at highish heat, 350-375.  Came out perfect, nicely browned but not yet burnt, and very tender.  A sweet sauce with all of the above plus sugar and hoisin sauce went on the ribs and sizzled down until nicely thick and bubbly on the meat.  Then I made a simple egg drop soup, and fried up some homemade king crab rangoon (in the wonton wrappers) and some spicy chicken and cabbage egg rolls.  Nice little assortment of dim sum-ish chinese-american food!

Going to cook a chicken paella tomorrow on the grill, with mushrooms and sun dried tomatoes.  I'm not sure what rice I should use...I have short grain sushi rice and long grain basmati.  I don't have any spanish style "bomba" rice....any recommendations on which rice of the two I have I should use?  I'm more inclined to use the short grain if its a tie otherwise because we eat the basmati with other stuff all the time and the sushi rice has just been sitting there, unused.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 12, 2010, 03:18:17 PM
It's not dying - it's just BBQ season. It'll pick up once the harvest comes in.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 12, 2010, 03:23:56 PM
It's not dying - it's just BBQ season. It'll pick up once the harvest comes in.


+1

It won't die. Trust me on that!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 12, 2010, 04:05:26 PM
Didn't MacArthur say something like that...old threads never die, they just fade away.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 13, 2010, 11:25:03 PM
(no pics)
Gyros.

I had some ribs that had to go, maybe two pounds(leftovers already smoked/cooked). Plus 1 pound ground beef. A spanish onion, half a head of garlic from the garden. Obliterate the onion in the blender, strain out the juice and add it to the meat. I finely chopped the ribs, and mixed it all in the blender, a snowball size at a time. The spices are a tablespoon of marjoram and a tablespoon of rosemary, salt and pepper. I threw in a handfull of greens from carrot tops (big garden). Any italian spice mix will do, but I believe marjoram is key to getting the right flavor. Just throw it all in a meatloaf pan and bake for 80 min, uncovering for the last 20 or so minutes to give it a crust on top.
Pan fry the pita with some water and oil to get the separation, cut em in half. Whip together a cucumber sauce, add lettuce, onion, tomato - voila!

Oh yeah....crumble some feta on top. (btw: I use bulgarian. at $4/lb pretty hard to beat.)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on July 14, 2010, 05:46:09 AM
The approximate Shwarma blitz on the leftovers and what's available is very much like the cooking sometimes at Casa euge.

Is it finely sliced like shwarma or more like a slab of meatloaf? Or was the meat's texture more homogeneous and paste-like before cooking?

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 14, 2010, 01:27:43 PM
Yesterday I cooked the paella over charcoal...quite nice in the end.  Got a good fire on the weber and then started frying onions in bacon grease over it.  Lots of garlic, then added chicken cubes with sweet paprika, oregano, salt and pepper.  Added diced green pepper, mushrooms, and sun dried tomatoes, and some more salt and pepper, with crushed red pepper, fennel, and thyme.  Then I hit it with a shot of some homemade achiote oil as a sort of saffron substitute (we think my wife may be allergic based on her one experience with saffron), and added a good measure of sushi short grain rice.  Continued frying, then added the homemade chicken stock, covered, and let roast (with some hickory putting out smoke) for about a half hour.  Very nice "soccarat" crust on the bottom.  Had some cheap sherry on hand, which was actually semi decent, being dry.  Cheap dry sherry is so much better than cheap port, I'd have to say!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 14, 2010, 01:34:03 PM
I used the vitamix blender to get the meat to a paste like consistency. With the spices it's actually very difficult to tell what meat is or isn't in the mix. Last time I used lamb. So I ended up with a well seasoned meatloaf that I used a bread knife on, to slice fairly thin (1/4 inch maybe - anything less would crumble) and line up some slices on the pita bread before loading up the toppings.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 14, 2010, 04:19:40 PM
Yesterday I cooked the paella over charcoal...quite nice in the end.  Got a good fire on the weber and then started frying onions in bacon grease over it.  Lots of garlic, then added chicken cubes with sweet paprika, oregano, salt and pepper.  Added diced green pepper, mushrooms, and sun dried tomatoes, and some more salt and pepper, with crushed red pepper, fennel, and thyme.  Then I hit it with a shot of some homemade achiote oil as a sort of saffron substitute (we think my wife may be allergic based on her one experience with saffron), and added a good measure of sushi short grain rice.  Continued frying, then added the homemade chicken stock, covered, and let roast (with some hickory putting out smoke) for about a half hour.  Very nice "soccarat" crust on the bottom.  Had some cheap sherry on hand, which was actually semi decent, being dry.  Cheap dry sherry is so much better than cheap port, I'd have to say!

Sounds great Nic!

No pics... :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 14, 2010, 05:57:14 PM
Thought about doing pics but the pace things were at, moving all those dishes to and from the kitchen and the grill, I would have screwed up if I tried to document it!  Maybe next time...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 14, 2010, 09:41:37 PM
Stared building an Argentinian grill for the party. Gonna make it out of 2" open bar grate. Its gonna be like 3'x6'. Its gonna be about 12 " off of the ground sorta like a coffee table.  Still havent found a pile of hard wood yet though.

The idea is to build a big fire, make coals and then place them around under the meat and move as needed to control heat. Then when you get the grill hot before putting on the meat you make an emulsion of sea salt and water. This you brush on the hot grill with a big rag swab or something. Then as the water evapotates you get a crust of salt on the grill. I think it is not difficult to get a thick crust of salt.

Some items Im looking at to grill: Cross cut beef ribs (bandelaros) Morcillia, braided beef intestines, splayed chicken, shoulder of pork etc.

Pics to come...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 14, 2010, 09:52:36 PM

Some items Im looking at to grill: Cross cut beef ribs (bandelaros) Morcillia, braided beef intestines, splayed chicken, shoulder of pork etc.

Pics to come...


I see leftovers in your future :)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 14, 2010, 09:58:37 PM

Some items Im looking at to grill: Cross cut beef ribs (bandelaros) Morcillia, braided beef intestines, splayed chicken, shoulder of pork etc.

Pics to come...


I see leftovers in your future :)

Oh no...Capp is all about the organs.  ;D

It's an ethnic thing...he tried to get me to eat some baby chick eggs once... :o

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 14, 2010, 10:02:37 PM
It's an ethnic thing...he tried to get me to eat some baby chick eggs once... :o

Yeah, I was offered balut once. I wasn't drunk enough to eat it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 14, 2010, 10:08:38 PM
Here Cap save a bunch of time and just buy this one...
(http://a248.e.akamai.net/f/248/9086/1h/s7diod-isorigin.scene7.com/is/image/Hammacher/11118?wid=200&op_sharpen=0&qlt=85,1) only $5000.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 15, 2010, 12:59:01 AM
I too am a sucker for unique grills, but until I get good at metalwork like cap I think I'll stick with my trusty Weber.  There's very little you can't do with a kettle grill!

I'm having my wife pick up some gjetost this week, its been a while since I've done scandinavian grilled beef with a gjetost sauce.  I better make sure I have enough juniper berries.  Speaking of, I should skip the akvavit this time, hard as that may be, and get some gin and vermouth and try one of those meat-tinis you guys have been chatting about.  Maybe with some more Balkan style dried meat products from these guys...

http://www.georgesbrandmeats.com/
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 15, 2010, 10:49:37 AM
There's very little you can't do with a kettle grill!

+1

Weber grills rock!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 15, 2010, 10:43:05 PM
Wow! $5000, WTF, who has money for that stuff? Doesent look like anything special either.

Im just doing the braided intestines for look. Not getting a whole lot of it. Just that the Spanish butcher has it. I like the morcillia but I dont expect to many to dig into that either. Just getting that stuff mostly for the photo op.

The other stuff offers a bit of a dilemma for me. Authentic Argentinian grilling uses only salt and fire, no marinade or dry rub. I like using a marinade to flavor and tenderize the meat. I sometimes fill a cooler with a marinade and meat and brine covered in ice and then store it away for a few days before the feast. Replacing the ice and draining as needed.

The Argentinian way is to just grill the meat simple till tender and then serve sauce in the side. Usually chopped garlic, olive oil, vinegar and different variations of that.

Im gonna stik with just the salt, but it has me scratching my head.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 15, 2010, 11:19:52 PM
Flavor comes from the smoke, salt and the meat itself. You'll be surprised how much flavor is there. Just make sure you got plenty of dry wood for the smoke. So the real meal is chicken and pork shoulder. I did a beef brisket and whole pork loin, each under $2/lb and the crowd loved it. Probably could have done an old shoe and people would have went wild for the smokey taste. Nobody smokes anymore; just stupid propane grills!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 16, 2010, 12:36:18 AM
I dont think there is suposed to be a lot of smoke. Im told, that around here the best wood is oak. Make a fire and make hot coals then scatter the coals right on the ground under the grill.

But I understand, the simple combination of wood, meat and salt. Wonderful,its primal.

Im a less is more kinda guy anyways.

I think the real star will be the bandelaros (sorry cant spell Spanish) They are the meaty end of the ribs of the cow. They are cross cut into 2" strips. Thats where it got its name ,causeit looks like the belted bullets that might bee worn crosshatch on a guacho.

Argentina has a completely different way of breaking down cows.

(http://cristian.francu.com/Photos/Persons/Panoramas/2008-02-10-argentina-cow-map.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 16, 2010, 02:42:02 AM

I think the real star will be the bandelaros (sorry cant spell Spanish) They are the meaty end of the ribs of the cow. They are cross cut into 2" strips.

I wish I lived closer, because obviously there will be practice rounds before the actual party.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on July 16, 2010, 11:45:53 AM
The key to the flavorful Argentine beef is that it is NOT aged and not juiced with hormones or grain.  Ate at a bunch of Argentine restaurants in the Miami area and all were awesome.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 16, 2010, 02:46:29 PM
I love picanha, a Brazilian cut, but I'd be surprised if Argentina didn't have an equivalent.

I'd say there's a pretty hefty difference with the idea of smoke in south american cooking.  All the grilling I've read about or witnessed was direct, open fire grilling, traditionally over wood.  Not the enclosed, indirect, low temp N. American smoking method.  You will get a unique flavor from high heat grilling over wood (its the only time I really like using mesquite, which can be a bit like a cigarette butt as a low temp smoking wood, but makes a fantastic cooking fuel for direct grilling).  I love a good steak over a blazing wood fire.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 16, 2010, 04:09:32 PM
I love a good steak over a blazing wood fire.

+1

Now that sounds really good right now.  I have always wanted to build a firepit in my backyard.  This will give me even more incentive.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 16, 2010, 04:15:55 PM
I dont think there is suposed to be a lot of smoke.

I challenge you to have a real wood fire, without smoke.
It'll be more spit flavor than "smoker" flavor, but it'll get in there.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 16, 2010, 04:37:38 PM
Now that sounds really good right now.  I have always wanted to build a firepit in my backyard.  This will give me even more incentive.

Not to undermine your reason to build a firepit, but you can of course build a wood fire in any charcoal grill, as long as the wood fits.  But there is just a lot of fun cooking over an open firepit though.  Sort of like camping in your backyard.  I wish I had a better supply of firewood!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 16, 2010, 04:44:33 PM
Now that sounds really good right now.  I have always wanted to build a firepit in my backyard.  This will give me even more incentive.

Not to undermine your reason to build a firepit, but you can of course build a wood fire in any charcoal grill, as long as the wood fits.  But there is just a lot of fun cooking over an open firepit though.  Sort of like camping in your backyard.  I wish I had a better supply of firewood!

Less grass to mow is a wonderful reason to build a pit. and a bocce/petanque court, and a horseshoe pit, maybe a swimming pool...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 16, 2010, 08:32:28 PM
Yeah, and I think where I am doing this grill on the ground will be next years garden. If Im still here. ::)

Smoke yes, but I meant its a much smaller part of the big picture, unlike or BBQ which there is usually along enclosed smoke.

I love Korean BBQ. We go to a place near my house where you get a wood fired grill at the table, not a gas grill. Huge difference, cause the meat is getting smoke.

I wonder though, Ill bet if you do an Argentine grill on a windy day as opposed to a still day you will get a lot less smoke on the meat.

There was just a really good radio show I listened to the other day. This BBQ anthropologist is traveling around the researching BBQ. I wish I could remember his name.

Getting all of my beef from a Brazilian butcher over in Riverside NJ. Its like little South America on that side of the river. Lots of Portuguese store and restaurants too.  

I think the Portuguese do this same open fire method with Spanish cuts of meat, as do a lot of countries.

Gonna make some Chimichuri with a few other sauces too. Gonna make a huge fruit salad and some other trimmings. I have a request to make Sangria. So Ill make cooler full of that with lots of fresh fruit.

Anyone know any other good Argentinian sides?  
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 16, 2010, 08:35:54 PM
Check out this Argentinian set-up.

Argentina presents a fascinating case study of how a variety of different cultures—indigenous Andean; Spanish, Italian and Arab, the independent gaucho, living in the wilderness, among others—have combined to create the “criollo” or typical Argentine cuisine, and infinite variations of it. And while beef, empanadas and dulce de leche may be the most famous manifestations of the Argentine cuisine, they are far from the only ones.

Copied from a website I was visiting.

(http://www.mdz-intercultural.org/images/600px/iron_pots.jpg)

(http://media.news.com.au/travel/lp/images/BN3647_35.jpg)

(http://www.argentinaforless.com/images/news-peru/2009-3-19-KoreanHotelsOfferingHighClassCuisine.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 16, 2010, 09:13:21 PM
I wonder though, Ill bet if you do an Argentine grill on a windy day as opposed to a still day you will get a lot less smoke on the meat.

Bigger factor is simply the heat of the fire!  Hotter the fire, in my experience, the less smoke you get.  If its really raging hot, its not going to dump out a lot of smoke (a lot of the "smoke" flavor from direct grilling comes from drippings incinerating in the fire) compared to a lazier fire.  Also, letting a wood fire burn down to coals will also decrease the amount of smoke being put out.

I've got to figure out what cured eastern european meat product I want to get tomorrow.  They have big hunks of cured, dried beef, all sorts of sausages.  I could get that cured fat product...whats it called...slanina? 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 16, 2010, 10:08:08 PM
Yeah, Im hearing that you are supposed to make a fire separately and then only transfer hot red coals under the meat.

The slanina nic is sorta like a lunght of bacon, usually smoked it is used in making little sandwiches. I really like them as a now and again treat.

Boil it for about twenty mins or so, and remove from the water. Save the smokey pork water to make bean soup. Then make the slanina cold in the fridge. After slice it kinda thin and place on wedges of rye bread. Then top with any combination of horse radish chopped scallions or onions, good mustard. Serve with sliced radishes and cucumber. Great for breakfast.

Those pots look like the South African ones for the porje or what ever that stew was called. I really want one of those things.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 16, 2010, 10:23:27 PM

Smoke yes, but I meant its a much smaller part of the big picture, unlike or BBQ which there is usually along enclosed smoke.


Yeah I know, just tired of agreeing all the time.  >:(

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 16, 2010, 10:32:29 PM
Boil it for about twenty mins or so, and remove from the water. Save the smokey pork water to make bean soup. Then make the slanina cold in the fridge. After slice it kinda thin and place on wedges of rye bread. Then top with any combination of horse radish chopped scallions or onions, good mustard. Serve with sliced radishes and cucumber. Great for breakfast.


We chop slanina up into little cubes and put it out on the appetizer tray along with olive, dried sausages, feta...
If you have fresh bread, some green onions or garlic (with lots of salt), and slanina - that's a meal right there.
Why are you boiling it? It is "ready to eat", been eating it like that all my life.
And yes a few big chunks in a pot of bean soup is what makes the bean soup taste like it's supposed to, the slanina will fall apart and you can get a bit of meat into every serving.

The sandwich idea is interesting - never had a slanina sandwich in my life. It IS good on Pizza though!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 16, 2010, 10:50:59 PM
I get the fresh smoked stuff from the Russian.Ill eat that without boiling,

but some of the packaged stuff I worry about. Its kinda like eating raw bacon isn't it?

I learned boiling from the Slovaks. Plus takes a little fat out of it too.

Slovakian call the little slanina sandwich wedges vojacik (voy ah cheek) translates too "Soldiers".

They are awesome with beer!!!  Breakfast.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 16, 2010, 11:57:50 PM
I get the fresh smoked stuff from the Russian.Ill eat that without boiling,

but some of the packaged stuff I worry about. Its kinda like eating raw bacon isn't it?

I learned boiling from the Slovaks. Plus takes a little fat out of it too.

Slovakian call the little slanina sandwich wedges vojacik (voy ah cheek) translates too "Soldiers".

They are awesome with beer!!!  Breakfast.  ;D

Well, Georges for instance... I'll eat that straight but I think he/they boil it before they smoke it. The texture just isn't the same. The truly smoked stuff is awsome and chewy and getting harder to find. It's on my to do list this fall to smoke a few slabs of slanine to last us through the winter.

EDIT: Need it for cabbage rolls too. Not in em, on the side in the broth.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 17, 2010, 12:51:47 AM
We make it in the fall around thanks giving. Around the time the late cabbages come out and we are packing some keisla kupusta.

 Its not hard.

Here is some pics of slanina from the old thread.

Cold dry wisps of smoke. 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/bacon001.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1102Alexatakesabath3m010.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_0504-Kikatehu263011.jpg)

Going through the pics I found some good ones from the last cold smoking season.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/HAM003.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1102Alexatakesabath3m006.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1102Alexatakesabath3m009.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/smokedfish002.jpg)

Here is a pic of me playing with my poppy cock. He was my buddy, I miss him.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1101BillyKikaAlexa3mold009.jpg)


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/appledumplings015.jpg)

OOO and look, apple dumplings, made from late jersey wine saps. Oh man, I love the fall! Hate summer.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on July 17, 2010, 01:36:45 AM
That looks good. So is slanine a pork-belly type of cut? And, is that a brick in your smoker?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 17, 2010, 01:51:31 AM
yep it is cured and cold smoked pork belly.

Its basically bacon but not sliced, when eaten it isn't fried and many westerners are turned off by it similarities to raw bacon.

I love it, I have even had versions that are straight fat.

It is actually a stack of bricks. They are there to both block and absorb some of the heat coming from the fire box. the idea is to keep the smoking chamber well under 90 degrees while cold smoking. I aim for 50 degrees havent gotten it in that smoker yet. More like 75.

Long cold dry smoke preserves meat and fish.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: richardt on July 17, 2010, 03:01:42 AM
God!  I love this cooking thread!

Cooking is every bit a skill/obsession/hobby as brewing.

Cap--you gotta do a Zymurgy or BYO column every month.  I predict that, singlehandedly, you WILL make the readership double.  People love food.  And all those pics--mmmmph!  you make us hungry!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 18, 2010, 02:17:50 PM
God!  I love this cooking thread!

Cooking is every bit a skill/obsession/hobby as brewing.

Cap--you gotta do a Zymurgy or BYO column every month.  I predict that, singlehandedly, you WILL make the readership double.  People love food.  And all those pics--mmmmph!  you make us hungry!


+1

Just have to inject homebrew into the topic.

I have always wanted to do some cold smoking. I need to come up with a cheap and easy means to do it. Did I say cheap and easy... :-\

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 18, 2010, 02:22:46 PM
Cardboard box and flexible dryer duct seems to cover both of your requirements.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 18, 2010, 05:07:16 PM
I have always wanted to do some cold smoking. I need to come up with a cheap and easy means to do it. Did I say cheap and easy... :-\

Cheap is relative, I guess...I'd really have to recommend the Pro Q cold smoke generator.  26 quid, not sure the exchange rate to USD.
http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/OrderROW.html

For a refill of sawdust, these guys have the best prices...bearing in mind that even one pound of sawdust will run the CSG for MANY hours.
https://www.psseasoning.com/index.cfm/act/products.view/category_id/20
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on July 19, 2010, 12:07:56 AM
Chana masala with basmati and naan.  This chana masala recipe was the best I've made.  It was one of the most delicious indian recipes I've had in a long time.  You can find it here (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/02/chana-masala/) (incidentally, this website is full of great recipes).

Sorry for the blurry photo!
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/chanamasala.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 19, 2010, 02:43:45 AM
That chana masala looks good.  I think I slightly overdid it on Indian cooking and have given it two or three weeks rest.  I shall return, as MacArthur promised.

Yesterday I snuck off to the E. European market and got some more cured meats.  A bit of smoked slanina, some suva govedina (dried, smoked hunk of beef), and an albanian dried beef sausage.  Also some ajvar, which I can't think I would in anyways dislike since I am so partial to roasted peppers in any as-yet-sampled form.
(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/SerbianFood2.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: richardt on July 19, 2010, 02:52:05 AM
Do any of these meats have americanized equivalents?  I'm not up on the foreign lingo.
If you know, please supply the extra info for those of us who don't share your ethnicity or cultural experience.
I'd think most of us would want to know if we were eating unusual animal parts.  Just saying...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 19, 2010, 03:08:21 AM
Do any of these meats have americanized equivalents?  I'm not up on the foreign lingo.
If you know, please supply the extra info for those of us who don't share your ethnicity or cultural experience.
I'd think most of us would want to know if we were eating unusual animal parts.  Just saying...

Hehe, not my personal cultural experience or ethnicity, any more than amchur, hing, and all the other funky Indian ingredients are from my culture.  I do have an uncle by marriage who hails from the Balkans but the most I know from them is povetica.  I'm just naturally curious about other cultures' foods.  I'm a mutt of Dutch and English and "miscellaneous" stock, as I understand.

But broadly speaking the slanina is basically a cured bacon that is meant to be eaten "raw" in the sense of not cooked, but it is cured, smoked, and dried to a point of safety.  Likewise for the beef sausage and that hunk of dried beef.  The closest parallel for Americans would be various European charcuterie, particularly Italian salume.  Italians have some dried beef products, the name of which escapes me.  Beef jerky is a good consideration...the sremska ljuta kobasica (Serbian spicy sausage) I got last time had a distinct "jerky-like" flavor.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 19, 2010, 12:50:06 PM
Yesterday I snuck off to the E. European market and got some more cured meats.  A bit of smoked slanina, some suva govedina (dried, smoked hunk of beef), and an albanian dried beef sausage.  Also some ajvar, which I can't think I would in anyways dislike since I am so partial to roasted peppers in any as-yet-sampled form.




So now you just chop it all up like so...
(http://files.myopera.com/Vecana/blog/meze2.JPG)
get some fresh bread, a little cheese,  green onions, slivo and maybe a beer....
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 19, 2010, 06:50:08 PM
That just looks completely fantastic!  Yes please!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 19, 2010, 07:11:59 PM
I'll take two to go...and make it snappy!  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 19, 2010, 08:03:26 PM
In Slovakia that platter is what they have for breakfast.

Nic, the Italin style cured dried beef is called Bresiola. Good stuff!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on July 20, 2010, 01:19:06 AM
Since eastern European charcuterie seems to be so en vogue around here right now, I would suggest that anyone who finds themselves in the Chicago area pay a visit to Publican (http://thepublicanrestaurant.com/).  Not only does their charcuterie satisfy the aficionado, but they also have some incredible peasant fare.  The restaurant is basically set up like an old school eastern European dining hall.  Oh, and did I mention that the entire menu is basically beer-focused??  Yeah, it's pretty much the Grey Havens for our sort.  ;)

Edit: I promise I have no affiliation with Publican.  I just think it's a great establishment!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 20, 2010, 02:04:15 AM
Took a pic of the spread tonight, will upload tomorrow with thoughts.  Haven't really dug in yet (waiting for the little one to be off to bed) but the govedina I think will be a major hit, the Albanian style sudzuk is OK but I prefer sremska kobasica, and the slanina....damn, I am so weirded out by that stuff!!!  Tried a bit and, yeah, it is basically identical in texture to the also-cured, also-smoked American bacon.  But eaten raw.  I know its a cultural hangup, but I'll get past it...or I'll be using the rest of the slanina as a flavoring for soups and potatoes and such like!  Doing some pasta tomorrow, maybe it would be a good addition to the sauce...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 20, 2010, 02:28:03 AM
Took a pic of the spread tonight, will upload tomorrow with thoughts.  Haven't really dug in yet (waiting for the little one to be off to bed) but the govedina I think will be a major hit, the Albanian style sudzuk is OK but I prefer sremska kobasica, and the slanina....damn, I am so weirded out by that stuff!!!  Tried a bit and, yeah, it is basically identical in texture to the also-cured, also-smoked American bacon.  But eaten raw.  I know its a cultural hangup, but I'll get past it...or I'll be using the rest of the slanina as a flavoring for soups and potatoes and such like!  Doing some pasta tomorrow, maybe it would be a good addition to the sauce...

How are you slicing up the slanina? Hate to beat this to death, but I don't know anyone who doesn't like it. Unless you have incredibly HUGE hands, I would slice the slanina into chunks about pinky size only to the first knuckle from the tip. Small, tasty, bite size - not too much chewing...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 20, 2010, 10:47:26 AM
How do you guys serve those little chunks of slanine?

We first slice off the skin, then set that aside to use in soup or something. Then we slice it thin and serve on slices of bread about the same size as the slice of slanina. Like  hor derves.

Top it with horse radish and slice scallions. Awesome, never chewy.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 20, 2010, 01:15:58 PM
I sliced the slanina into long, thin slices, like most bacon is presliced in the US...as thin as I could get it.  Did not try it in small chunks.  But anyway, yeah, I'm not sick this morning (yet!) so hooray!  But the slanina was my least favorite of the meats I bought.  The wife wouldn't touch it.  I've never eaten raw american bacon but I'm at a loss as to how it would be much different.  Maybe the slanina I had wasn't the greatest?  I would like it more if it was cured and dried a little harder and firmer.

The suva govedina is fantastic, and the suxhuk was good but not my favorite in its flavor.  Back to serb pork sausages I guess!  Anyway, served with some cheese on hand, cucumbers, pickles, black and green olives, green onions, bread, a spicy Macedonian ajvar, and slivovitz, with a glass of homebrewed cider for the wife.  A ajvar and govedina sandwich is packed in my lunch...

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Meze.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 20, 2010, 01:44:20 PM
I think I found the motherload as far as smoked and cured meats and sausages go....enjoy!

Check out Jovan Foods LTD

http://www.jovanfoods.co.uk/product.htm

(http://www.jovanfoods.co.uk/images/newmd10.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 20, 2010, 03:20:26 PM
How do you guys serve those little chunks of slanine?

Just the way nic had them on the plate, just smaller. About half the size of those sausage slices or maybe as big as a grape tomato - just depends on your mood. And by chewy, I don't mean beef jerky chewy but definitely not mushy unless it hasn't been smoked enough. Some of those slices are almost pure fat and I can see that being a big turn off to him or his wife chewing that up since they're not used to it. I flip through almost all the packages when choosing and look for the thickest runs of meat going through the slab. And there's always a meatier end and a fattier end, save the fatty end to flavor your bean soup and eat the meaty end.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on July 20, 2010, 10:55:58 PM
Ha I love this...!

Makes complete sense. Everything either preserved, pickled or totally fresh. I looked for Slanine but found a fully cooked bacon product by Karl Ehmer. Expensive and unknown so was passed over. They're good for liverwurst etc...

So smoked some local sausage. Smoky, fatty, crunchy... goes great with the ale.

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TEYj-rE43iI/AAAAAAAAANQ/fZwd0jZ2SI0/s512/img_0468.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 20, 2010, 11:50:00 PM
Man this is my kind of thread! Change the subject to SMOKED!!!

I've been meaning to do a fatty, flatten out a bob evans sausage - roll it up with a stuffing inside and then smoke it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 21, 2010, 12:23:57 AM
How's the Tank 7?  I've gotten really bad with keeping up with my local brewery, Blvd, mainly because I'm too cheap to pay 8 bucks for a beer, now that homebrewing has become so efficient.  It reminds me of how when I lived in Pasadena for years I never once went to see the Rose Bowl Parade...one of those things, the closer you are to it the less you appreciate it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on July 21, 2010, 12:34:28 AM
The Tank #7 was wonderful. http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2909.msg32964#msg32964 (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2909.msg32964#msg32964)

This one's given me a spike of re-interest! If it's consistent it could make it to the beer-rotation, but competition's fierce! Only $9 a pop.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 21, 2010, 01:34:53 AM
The Tank #7 was wonderful.
 Only $9 a pop.

Man, I don't think I like beer that much.  :-\
It's a mental block, cuz it's beer.
One time for an occasion, sure - but to regularly pop that much...  :'(
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: chumley on July 24, 2010, 03:38:52 PM
Yesterday was our company picnic out at Hauser Lake.  Those in the office whose last names began with"A-J" were supposed to bring a salad, last names "K-Z" were to bring a dessert.

I chose neither and decided to make my great-grandmother's recipe for "knuckles".  My great-grandmother, along with my great-grandfather and two small children (one of them my 2-year old grandfather) emigrated from what is now Stara Voda, Slovakia (then it was a province in the Austria-Hungary Empire) to Niehart, Montana in 1895 to work in the silver mines.  While my great-grandfather was from Stara Voda, my great-grandmother was actually from Budapest.  We suspect that "knuckles" was how Montanans grew to pronounce "gnocchi" over time.

Here is the recipe:

Grate 6 potatoes (red or yukon gold work good).  Add 2 cups of flour and one beaten egg in a large bowl, adding more flour if necessary to make it less sticky.  On a floured surface, knead the dough 20-30 times, then let it rest for half an hour.  Then, roll it out and cut it into bite size pieces.

Get a large pot of salted water boiling and boil the potato dumplings a few at a time. When they float up, they are cooked.  Remove with a slotted spoon and place into a warm bowl, and continue cooking the rest.

Meanwhile, dice up 1/2 or 3/4 pound of salt pork (be sure to remove the tough pig skin from it first), or a pound of bacon cut into slices.  Fry those up.  Grate 2 cups of sharp cheddar.

After the last dumplings have been cooked, dump the water from the pot, then place the dumplings back in the pot on low heat.  Add the grated cheese, a small carton of cottage cheese, and stir. If it seems a little dry, add a bit of sour cream to the mixture.  Stir in the bacon/salt pork bits and its done.

__________________________________________________________________

This dish was big hit at the company picnic.  People would come up and rave about my potatoes, only to have my wife, who is into more healthier things, correct them and tell them, "Its not potatoes, its dough".

Oh well.  A little Slovakian peasant food once a year is goog for the soul.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 24, 2010, 08:32:14 PM
Once a year, its more like once a week in this house. Maybe twice.

Im not sure how the Slovakian got the name Gnocchi it comes from Italy. Not far from Slovakia. Interesting thing about that dish you are talking about. From that region of Slovakia there is a very special sheeps cheese called Brynza. It is used to make a famous local dish called Brynza Halushky. (Cheese and dumplings) Instead of using salt pork the they use slanina which is discussed on the last page.

That is where the dish you are talking about derives. I guess when the Slovakians came here they worked with the ingredients they have and began to call it 'Knuckles'

Around here Knuckles is a very painful card game.  

Here is the Argentinian grill set up, Pennsylvania style.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06394.jpg)

May give it a wet run tomorrow.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 24, 2010, 09:08:42 PM
You aren't going to burn on those stones are you? I bet they crack...
Tell me you made a pan, for the fire, tilted with the back high and the front low - right?
Think of the stones man...  :'(

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 24, 2010, 09:38:37 PM
No pan, just hot coals right on the ground, or in this case the stones.

Its fine if they crack, they may not though they are like 2" thick. I have lots of them left over from a landscape patio we made.

I may eventually replace the stones with a bricked in fire pit if we decide to keep this grill in the yard.

This is what Im talkin about.

(http://www.try2cook.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/Gauchos-making-Asado-in-the-Pampa-425x266.jpg)

Rustic.

(http://www.torontopoloclub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/004.jpg)

(http://argen-travel.com/travelblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/shapeimage_4.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 25, 2010, 12:50:22 AM
Man those crucifixes are so medieval and cool - but the stones will still crack. I had like 8x8 stones  around the firepit and they popped. It will not affect your bbq at all, just saying if you place any value on those stones at all... they're goners. Shouldn't you have a bit of tilt on that grill to move your meat from blazin to just hot during the course of the bbq? I know you'll just move coals around, but I thought you were all about authenticity.  ;)

Oh, btw have you checked the price of grills/smokers? I think maybe you need to start a new line of biz...

 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 25, 2010, 01:01:37 AM
im not worried if they crack. after a few uses Ill brush in a couple of bags of sand till it is filled in.Then later brick around it.

You cant really see it in that photo but it sits on  alittle hill. It is about 12 inches from the ground on one side and about 16 on the other. The grill is 4 foot by 3 foot and the removable warming shelf id 4 foot by 16 inches.

The idea is to have a really hot side and start the meat there, then salt it and move it off to the less hot side salt it and leave it for a slow cook. , then when it is done stack it on the warming shelf above. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 25, 2010, 01:30:20 AM
The idea is to have a really hot side and start the meat there, then salt it and move it off to the less hot side salt it and leave it for a slow cook. , then when it is done stack it on the warming shelf above.  

Just salt?
(http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=24265&d=1235258500)
Popdaddy says you need 3 layas of FLAVA. I'd link you to the thread but I'm not sure you're FUNKY enough.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: chumley on July 26, 2010, 03:12:43 PM
Hey, thanks for the great information, Cap!  I am forwarding that on to my mother.

Interesting, we visited Stara Voda in 2002....we stayed in Kosice,the nearest city of any size, and searched for that dish,  We finally found it.....and my mom ended up smuggling a bunch of that sheeps cheese in her luggage back to the U.S.   :o

I did not know what that bacon was called.  Thanks again.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: chumley on July 26, 2010, 03:54:23 PM
Rats.....looking around the internet, I was unable to locate that bryndza cheese.

This site says less than 300 lbs. of it is imported to the U.S. annually...

http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/bryndza.html

Anyone know of a place that gets some of this in the U.S.?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 26, 2010, 04:08:40 PM
I had a pig out of a "la caja" box this weekend. It's a nice hands off type of cooking, and will still yield killer pig with crispy skin. I got recruited to help slice it all up for serving and well, let's just say I didn't eat much once it all got to the buffet. There was crispy skin, there was bark, there was extremely tender and juicy meat. Only way to improve on it would be to add smoke - which there is an attachment for so you can even cold smoke with it.

Yeah I know I suck - no pics. My hands were kinda greasy!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tubercle on July 26, 2010, 04:16:55 PM
Every time we cook a whole pig, we slice off chunks of the skin and deep fry them.

mmmmm...homemade pork skins.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on July 26, 2010, 04:18:07 PM
We made Panzanella for the first time this weekend with fresh bread dried in the toaster oven. Then I made it with a stale rock hard heel off a loaf that was at least a week old if not older. I prefer the latter.

No pics yet but I will be making this frequently from now on. Sorry birds.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 26, 2010, 11:59:22 PM
Hey Chumley, Ive been thinking of this too. We usually get a hipment of Brynza in the inlaws luggage once a year. Maybe next time I can save you a chunk.

I have been thinking of this combination of cheeses as a substitute: Soft unripened goats cheese, Soft farmers cheese or potted cheese (whatever they call that where you live) and grated peccorino romano. Im not sure how much of each to use but I am sure that there is a reasonable likeness in that mixture.

Now you just have to find slanina or nice smoked slab bacon.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 27, 2010, 01:25:09 AM
So how is this cheese different than a young block of feta? I can google with the best of them - but no one compares the tastes. The way it spreads on bread reminds me of "kajmak" \kai-mock\ which we usually equate to butter but I guess it is more of a soft cheese spread. A really good fake of it is to whip up a stick of butter and a block of cream cheese and add a little salt.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 27, 2010, 02:04:33 AM
Its soft, kinda a little crumbly. Hint of gameness from the sheeps milk but mild, a little salty, very creamy. Good melting and emulsification qualities. Good stuff.

I found it, its a little pricey too, especially with shipping. Dont recognize this brand though.

http://www.slovczechvar.com/?page=20&category=1&subcategory=62
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 27, 2010, 02:33:50 AM
Chicago, FTW!

(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1154/855755779_8ce0ebc312_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 27, 2010, 03:34:21 AM
not saying that is one of them, but i have tried a lot of brydza cheese that just wasnt it. There is a Polish one that is very different in flavor, There isa Russian one that is completely different. and the Romanian one is like parm cheese.

Im not even sure the one I posted is the real thing.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 27, 2010, 04:29:41 AM
Ah well, I get a point for effort. Guess depending on where you are from and what you were raised on this may be "the real thing". Like I just can not do farmer's cheese (domestic feta) - invokes gag reflex. And yet other people are just fine with it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: chumley on July 27, 2010, 08:41:38 PM
Thanks for the link, Cap!  I think i will order some of this, just to say I tried it once.  And I will order some of that slanina bacon, too.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 28, 2010, 02:56:58 PM
As I posted in the martini thread:
(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Slaninatini.jpg)

Slanina, brown goat cheese, and olives, pickled in vermouth and Beefeaters!  The pizza in the background was one of my usual pizzas except using Albanian beef sudzuk sausage, which has similarities to true pepperoni (not the fake mass manufactured stuff).  Topped with olives and with some Macedonian ajvar and diced jalapenos mixed into the pizza sauce.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 28, 2010, 03:16:35 PM
$15 martini
$50 pizza

nice...
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 29, 2010, 09:32:12 PM
Yep, just salt.

(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/06/11/travel/11next_grill_650.jpg)

Meat salt and fire. Thats all real men need for BBQ. Putting anything else on the meat when you cook it is just for sissys.

Did a run of asado style belt  cut short ribs the other day with just salt. WOW. F-in good. Its true, all you need is salt. The flavor of the meat and the hint of smoke flavor is the goal.

Got the wood; oak, also been acquiring some of the meat cuts have a few more to get. It should be interesting.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: weithman5 on July 29, 2010, 09:46:43 PM
Yep, just salt.


. WOW. F-in good.

Hey we have been through this. No need to spare the letters in the word.  the computer modifies the word on its own  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 29, 2010, 09:55:35 PM
oh really? f##k.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 29, 2010, 10:54:30 PM
Quote from: TheGreatCAP
Meat salt and fire. Thats all real men need for BBQ. Putting anything else on the meat when you cook it is just for sissys.



(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_0830-spices026.jpg)

Sorry, couldn't hear you - what were you saying???

Besides my funky dude would kick your toque wearing dude's ass!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 29, 2010, 11:12:10 PM
LMAO!

Cap you should do a dry rub with those sprinkles.

And re the word netnanny, it doesn't seem to work for me, it lets the word right through.  As in, this meat is firkin good!  See?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 29, 2010, 11:20:24 PM
f##k gets changed, but that's about it.

So far everyone's been adult enough to not make it a concern.

f##k this, f##k that, f##k the other thing.... boy I hope this works.  :-[
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 30, 2010, 12:33:57 AM
f##k gets changed, but that's about it.

So far everyone's been adult enough to not make it a concern.

f##k this, f##k that, f##k the other thing.... boy I hope this works.  :-[

Speak up ...I can't hear you.  8)

Seriously meat, salt and fire is a wonderful thing.  I can't deny that. 

However...dry rubs are the bomb-diggity-dogg!

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 30, 2010, 02:46:42 AM
With beef I tend to be more spartan with seasoning.  Likewise with direct grilling.  A really nice steak can get by nicely with just salt, although I'm partial to the complexity of "Montreal steak seasoning", which has among other things, dill seeds.

With smoked pork ribs though, removing the seasoning removes so much.  Pork ribs are a bit of a blank palette on which to paint...hence I have done versions inspired by Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Greek, German, Jamaican, and other cuisines.  without seasonings, be it marinades, dry rubs, or glazes, it would all just taste like salty pork.  Which is fine, for what it is!

Funny about f--k getting censored.  I imagine they only censored the acronym...let me try...FlugAbwehrKanone.   Heh, that seemed to go through, but when I use the acronym....  f##k.  Weird!  I thought it was a pretty well accepted and non-controversial term for anti-aircraft artillery?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 30, 2010, 09:53:51 PM
Salt, you gringos,...salt.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6WK2r9cxI8
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: weithman5 on July 31, 2010, 01:34:32 AM
i only have 3 f##k ing food groups, salt, grease, beer. and combinations and their original sources. 8)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 31, 2010, 01:23:49 PM
Salt, you gringos,...salt.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6WK2r9cxI8

I stumbled upon the great Steve Raichlen's comments here...

Meat. Salt. Fire.

Grilling Argentine-style involves the primal basics
May 25, 2010|By Bill Daley, Tribune Newspapers

Classical Greek literature is not the first source most North Americans would turn to in making an analogy about grilling, but then how many of them have ever seen Argentine grilling in action? Steven Raichlen has.

"Argentine grilling is the most heroic grilling in the Homerian sense," said the Miami-based grill expert and author. Homer, of course, was a legendary poet, author of ancient Greece's most sweeping war epic, "The Iliad."

"It's very primal. No adornment. Nothing fancy. No elaborate marinades," Raichlen added. "It's about meat, salt and fire."

This just lays to claim "sometimes the best things in life are the simplest"   ;)

(http://www.sanpedroex.co.cl/foto/asado.jpg)

(http://images.travelpod.com/users/stefank/1.1234707300.grilling-argentinian-style.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on July 31, 2010, 01:44:35 PM
Yeah, but they use chimichurri as a sauce for grilled meats, and the common grilled sausages that they grill along with other meats are assuredly packed with various spices and such like.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on July 31, 2010, 03:03:01 PM
This is true. I just got done making the chimichuri. Its best to let it sit a while so the flavors "marry".

 And the morcillia I got is RED hot.

Building the fire now to get the hot coals ready. 80 people. Heads spinning. have to stay focused.

Ill try to post some pics tonight ifIm not too smashed.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on July 31, 2010, 03:06:08 PM
This is true. I just got done making the chimichuri. Its best to let it sit a while so the flavors "marry".

 And the morcillia I got is RED hot.

Building the fire now to get the hot coals ready. 80 people. Heads spinning. have to stay focused.

Ill try to post some pics tonight ifIm not too smashed.

Can you post your recipe for the chimichuri when you sober your drunken a## up sometime.   ;D

..
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on July 31, 2010, 04:06:57 PM
Building the fire now to get the hot coals ready. 80 people. Heads spinning. have to stay focused.

Ill try to post some pics tonight ifIm not too smashed.

Post anyway - you know what this place is missing? "Drunk post of the week!" :)
So, you bought vats of ketchup from Costco - right. Since you're not seasoning your meat at all.
(I keed, I keed, I'm a kidder - c'mon!)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 01, 2010, 02:33:55 AM
Oh man, this is the ONLY way to go. Im sticking with this method. It was easy to turn out, I had complete control. The flavors are awesome. The fat in the pork and beef give off so much flavor that you truly only need salt. To put anything else on is to cover up.

Even when I smoke the BBQ Im gonna finish on this grill. Didnt try pork ribs but the beef ribs are out of this would cooked this way.

It was a blast, sorry you guys missed it bluesman.

Here are some random pics of the BBQ. Ill post the recipe for my chimichurri later.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06463.jpg?t=1280629389)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06447.jpg?t=1280629504)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06446.jpg?t=1280629602)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06445.jpg?t=1280629645)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06444.jpg?t=1280629682)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06443.jpg?t=1280629743)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06442.jpg?t=1280629780)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06441.jpg?t=1280629812)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06440.jpg?t=1280629852)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06438.jpg?t=1280629893)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06435.jpg?t=1280629927)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06439.jpg?t=1280629959)


The party gave opportunity for me to wear my guyabera shirt and I dindnt get a spot on it.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 01, 2010, 06:18:02 AM
Hey that top rack is moveable - removeable? I don't recognize most of the stuff on the grill (especially the green things) but I'd probably eat em anyway. You wanna 'splain what's what? Overall - how'd the party come off - big hit, no puking, no fighting?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 01, 2010, 01:11:31 PM
No puking or fighting, although I thought of strangling my wife a couple of times before the guests arrived, if she asked me to move a table one more time.

I thought it would be like a guessing game trying to identify what is on the grill.

My head hurts.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: deepsouth on August 01, 2010, 02:01:02 PM
i'm really digging that pit.  did you make that yourself?  on smaller cuts of meat, i often just use salt & pepper (usually add a bit of peeper as well).  you are right that it really all you need.  the reason i use a coat of mustard and some rub on large cuts of meat (such as a boston butt) is for bark formation, although i suspect i'd get good bark anyway, just not with the additional seasoning.


today i'm testing the "beer can/butt chicken" method two ways.....  it's been disproven that it really adds anything to the chicken, but i'm guessing that the vast majority of the time, people are using budweiser or lighter.  i'm doing two chickens, two ways.  one direct and one indirect.  one with oskar blues ten fidy and one with an 11% barrel aged double ipa i made.  i'm going to be trying to document it pretty well as i'm not going to cook them slow, rather going to bump temps up to 375-400 in order to get the liquid hotter.  in low and slow cooks it has been proven that the beer doesn't reach high enough temps to boil.  for one of the case studies, check out the nakedwhiz's site.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 01, 2010, 02:36:17 PM
My head hurts.

Coffee Coffee Coffee...

What'd you drink that's got your head hurtin'? I've not had a headache/hangover off my own homebrew yet. Could be a combo of sucking in all that smoke and the alcohol. Did you go Argentinian on the drinks too?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 01, 2010, 09:47:05 PM
That's what you call "Q" heaven.  Nice job Capp!

Were the darker ones blood sausages.  How did it all taste.  It looks really good.

Salt...meat...fire.   :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 01, 2010, 11:55:01 PM
Yeah built the grill at work with leftover material. Gonna make some crosses next for pigs ad goats, turkeys.

Yeungling Lager. More than I would care to mention. Made Sangria too. And home made lemonade.

Oh yeah, the top rack is removable. and the flagstone cracked. a lot. Doesn't matter though gonna sand that area.

Gonna have to use this thing a lot to season it.If not it  will get all rusty. Tip for your steel outdoor cooking apparatus, get a spray bottle of cooking oil and spray it down a couple of times as it cools. This will create a heat thickened coat of oil with lots of reverse osmosis. You can get another use out of old frying oil this way too, just strain it out before you use it or it could clog your spray bottle. You can brush it too.

Ill post a little more, gotta mash the potatoes.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 02, 2010, 12:43:39 AM
Ill post a little more, gotta mash the potatoes.

Philly cream cheese and an egg. Then it reheats just the same as the first day.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 02, 2010, 01:20:03 AM
Ya know where Philly Cream Cheese is made?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 02, 2010, 01:31:08 AM
Ya know where Philly Cream Cheese is made?

I'll guess NewYork - hoping NOT CHINA.  
Did you just drink more to get rid of the headache? Hair of the Dog?!?!
Percoset, Darvoset and Vicodin work good.  ;)



http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/yuengling-traditional-lager/884/ (http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/yuengling-traditional-lager/884/)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 02, 2010, 01:47:24 AM
Keep guessing, the answer is a lot closer than you think.

Hey nick that beef is a big chunk of sirloin not brisket. and honest it was melt in your mouth juicy fire roasted beef. Crazy but true.
Its slow roasting of meat farther from the fire.

The Chimichurri is awesome.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06567.jpg?t=1280713139)

For the Chimichurri start by pan toasting some cummin seeds. Grind them and set asside. In a food processer put a whole bunch of parsley, a whole bunch of coriander, a whole bunch of fresh a oregano, a wholehead of garlic peeled, the groundcumin seeds, olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper.

For the salt on the grilling use fine ground sea salt.

Meat on the grill was chicken, skin on pork shoulder, sirloin roasts, beef tounge, cow intestines, blood sausage, and the star of the show, cross cut short ribs.

Nothing is on the meat when cooking but salt. It is left up to the diner if they want to sauce or spice the meat.

Everyone loved it, one guest was from Argentina and another just spent a lot of time there, got two thumbs up from them. Four other guests loved the intestines but two of those were dogs.

Rate beer is far to generous with their rating, Lager is swill, but I sort of grew up on it, it is like mothers milk. Just slummin it a little.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 02, 2010, 02:42:25 AM
I'll always whip up a mild or a wheat or both 2 weeks prior to the party. (It's good enough for them)
Don't want them slammin' the upper ABV stuff thinking it's BMC like and then crashin on the way home.
So your friends don't know you homebrew?

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 02, 2010, 02:51:30 AM
Oh yeah they do,and they were all looking for it. Just haven't brewed in a while. Seems I brew a lot more in the fall and winter. This is a really busy time of year for me, when I do most of my work, before and during the holidays it gets really slow. After even slower.

In the summer cooking takes up most of my free time.

I have a lot of dreams for the brewing but for now I just bottle in ezcap bottles. Gotta em stacked up, just all empty.

I have a couple of carboys of cider aging and one of tej. Gonna bottle some of that soon.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 03, 2010, 01:32:11 AM
I'm with you, sirloin needs very little but fire and salt (and....maybe a dash of pepper, but nothing too fancy!).  I didn't see it there, I referenced brisket kind of generally.

All looks very good.  Lots of malbec and aguardiente on hand?  I guess they don't really do pisco in Argentina.

The tej reminds me, I need to get some gesho and start brewing so I have something on hand to start wading into Ethiopian food.  I just polished off a rather nice dinner of besan battered fried fish, naan, basmati, a red pepper and spinach masoor dal, and spicy potato samosas.  Lots of heat and spice.

I'm not really getting into Eastern European cooking, per se, but I am getting into their dried and smoked charcuterie!  I am a bit in love with suva govedina and ajvar, with fresh and pickled veggies and olives and crackers or bread.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 03, 2010, 02:32:41 AM
PR style yellow rice and beans served with Morcillia.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06657.jpg)

And yes this is the last time I am going to eat blood sausage for a while.  ::)


Sounds like a nice Indian meal there, ever heard of Bombay Duck?

Making a Tandoori for my back yard kitchen is high on my list.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 03, 2010, 02:34:33 AM
hey, so you tacked down the grate instead of making a lip for it to rest on? never anticipate having to replace the grate?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 03, 2010, 02:53:13 AM
Yeah, just tacked it in. Why would have to replace the grate?

might make it easier to ship though. ;)

The stand is only made of two in x 1/4 flat stock the legs are one inch angle. Its pretty simple. I suppose if I had a problem I would just replace the whole thing.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 03, 2010, 03:10:59 AM
Yeah, just tacked it in. Why would have to replace the grate?

Rust.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on August 03, 2010, 03:17:14 AM
And warping.

But, it probably took cap 30 minutes to throw together.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 03, 2010, 03:38:30 AM
it wont warp. it is 5/16 rod. If I use it it wont rust. gotta keepit loaded wit veg oil.

Yep, took about a half hour.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 03, 2010, 01:05:08 PM
it wont warp. it is 5/16 rod. If I use it it wont rust. gotta keepit loaded wit veg oil.

Yep, took about a half hour.

Being the welder extraordinaire that you are.  It was your time and material cost. Hell...I bet that only cost you $20 bucks...if that?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 03, 2010, 09:16:05 PM
I used scrap but the mesh materials about a hundred sheet half a sheet of that, ($50)  the length of flat bar is about $9 with a length and a half of that needed ($13.50) one half a man hour with some expediting we will say one hour at a $50 cost. Might add another half hour to make the optional fire pan. 

$150 material and labor.

I could get that down to $60 if I started manufacturing them. I would sell them for three thousand hundreds and dollars.

I am trying to figure out a way to rig the crosses on the sides like a cross with a pin that slips into a sleave welded to the side of the grill top. With the tip of your finger you could turn the meat around to face the coals from the other side. Might not be big enough for a pig though.

I was also thinking of a tri pod attachment. for a gulash kettle.

Ok, dont anyone steal my idea.

 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 03, 2010, 09:30:12 PM

Ok, dont anyone steal my idea.

 

Too late.  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 04, 2010, 12:22:27 AM
I used scrap but the mesh materials about a hundred sheet half a sheet of that, ($50)  the length of flat bar is about $9 with a length and a half of that needed ($13.50) one half a man hour with some expediting we will say one hour at a $50 cost. Might add another half hour to make the optional fire pan. 

$150 material and labor.

I could get that down to $60 if I started manufacturing them. I would sell them for three thousand hundreds and dollars.

I am trying to figure out a way to rig the crosses on the sides like a cross with a pin that slips into a sleave welded to the side of the grill top. With the tip of your finger you could turn the meat around to face the coals from the other side. Might not be big enough for a pig though.

I was also thinking of a tri pod attachment. for a gulash kettle.

Ok, dont anyone steal my idea.

 

can't the gulash holder just be a swing away hook, like a "7" or a hangman's noose? you have the grill itself for stability - the tripod I would think is no longer necessary. And then the top of your meat cross can lean against the "7" with a flat tip for stability.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 04, 2010, 12:27:34 AM
Hmmm....why not just make the grates themselves removable (which would help with cleaning anyway), so you just pull them out, and then have a hook welded on the second shelf, and then attach a chain to the hook to hang the gulyas pot from the second level shelf.  Of course, that wouldn't work with the current iteration, but it would be nice with a second, I think...you could use the same fire for both pot cooking and grilling.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 04, 2010, 12:33:05 AM
Yeah, thats what I was thinking.But  I guess you can just put the kettle on the grill top given enough room.

Im loving the hook idea.

I think the rule is to scrape the grill off and never to wash it. never with soap.  Washing it makes it susceptible to rust.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 04, 2010, 02:25:13 AM
I think the rule is to scrape the grill off and never to wash it. never with soap.  Washing it makes it susceptible to rust.

Well, you're gonna season it just like a wok - which in a restaurant is just plain ol steel. If you get it real hot and use a spray bottle with some oil it should coat it pretty well for starts. You'll have to figure a way to tip it up while hot so you can get an undercoat going too.

(http://images.travelpod.com/users/stefank/1.1234707300.grilling-argentinian-style.jpg)

If you look at the bottom of this one; it's like a flag holder type thingy. Spin the rod and tighten it into place. I'm sure you have some gloves that can withstand the heat. You can throw em into the package when you're selling em on your infomercial. ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 04, 2010, 02:48:58 AM
yeah thats what I want to weld on the sides.

YEah season it. I have a spray bottle filled with strained old frying oil. Good way to get one last use out of it.

I just got some beautiful Beef Back ribs from the mega wall mart. some fo thestuff in there is not so bad.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 04, 2010, 12:16:08 PM
I just got some beautiful Beef Back ribs from the mega wall mart. some fo thestuff in there is not so bad.

The back ribs I usually see are carved out between the bones...overzealous butchers getting every bit of rib meat they can! 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 04, 2010, 08:29:02 PM
These ribs are awesome and very meaty. They are $2,50 per lb. I paid 4.50 per lb for the ones at the party. :'(

The walmart ones are great. I am doing another round tonight cause I personally didnt get but a taste at the party. They went fast.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 04, 2010, 08:37:14 PM
These ribs are awesome and very meaty. They are $2,50 per lb. I paid 4.50 per lb for the ones at the party. :'(

The walmart ones are great. I am doing another round tonight cause I personally didnt get but a taste at the party. They went fast.

That's why the alcohol WHACKED you.  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 08, 2010, 03:57:01 PM
Italian

Pan seared scallops in a tomato and fresh garden herb sauce.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06739.jpg)

Works great with any seafood really, shrimp even canned clams. Fast, simple and delicious.

Salt and pan sear your scallops over med heat in a little veg oil and remove. Toss in  six or eight cloves of garlic chopped let brown for a sec. Deglaze with white wine or sherry. Add some cooking pasta water salt pepper squeeze of lemon, dash of hot sauce, dash of Worcestershire sauce.

Put in chop tomatoes, (i had some beautiful Jersey beefsteaks) From the garden fresh chopped basil, oregano, parsley and rosemary. Add mostly basil.

The trick is to only cook the tomatoes and herbs slightly before you add your seafood back to the pan. Then add a few pats of butter and toss till melted a blended. Not to long cause the butter will separate and get greasy instead of adding a creamy finish.

Love it!!!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 09, 2010, 07:52:01 PM
Looks delicious!

I love pan seared scallops in any dish.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: richardt on August 09, 2010, 08:09:34 PM
MMMM!  Any room in there for bacon crumbles?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on August 10, 2010, 04:30:46 PM
Looks delicious!

I love pan seared scallops in any dish.

Unfortunately for you, you weren't hungry enough to partake when you stopped by.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 10, 2010, 04:41:14 PM
Looks delicious!

I love pan seared scallops in any dish.

Unfortunately for you, you weren't hungry enough to partake when you stopped by.

Yea... but don't think I wasn't eyein' them up.   :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 13, 2010, 02:15:15 AM
Vietnamese

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009042.jpg)

A mug of "33"

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009029.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009039.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009031.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009041.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on August 13, 2010, 04:55:42 AM
Vietnamese

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009042.jpg)

A mug of "33"

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009029.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009039.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009031.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009041.jpg)

+10

By far my favorite food bar-none!! Those fried-spring-rolls look great. Summer roll too. Looks like vermicelli and basil-beef. Man I need to get some tomorrow!

Those fresh vibrant flavors and textures. Awesome.

Have you done a pho yet?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 13, 2010, 10:54:44 AM
Capp...they remind me of the rolls we had for an appetizer at the Pho restaurant we frequented during the Brutus build.  Man they are fantastic.  Yours look identical.  Did you have some hot chili and hoison sauce with them?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on August 13, 2010, 04:24:01 PM
Looks yummy Capp.  I've got to get to the Asian grocery, I'm out of all kinds of stuff.  Thinking about maybe a make your own roll party.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 13, 2010, 04:26:09 PM
Looks yummy Capp.  I've got to get to the Asian grocery, I'm out of all kinds of stuff.  Thinking about maybe a make your own roll party.

AND....they are healthy too. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on August 13, 2010, 04:43:49 PM
Always a plus in my book :D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 13, 2010, 10:30:32 PM
 we do the Vietnamese wrap feast a lot. It is fun. Does work great for parties and comes off of a back yard grill great.

Make a bunch of steamed prawn, grilled pork, beef or any manner of Vietnamese item. Then get a bunch of heads of curly leaf lettuce for wrapping, packs rice papers and a few spray bottles and some clean towels. Let the guests reconstitute the rice papers as they want them. Just lay it out on the towel and spray it with water. In a matter of seconds it is ready to go and the excess water soaks into the towel.

Vietnamese food is traditionally eaten warm even room temp sometimes cold, never hot. another convenience for a buffet.

Gota start by making caramelized sugar.

euge, I have made pho and it was good.Just that my broth comes out rich and dark brown havent mastered the way they get the beef broth clear. My pho is good just not very authentic.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 14, 2010, 12:22:04 AM
My pho is good just not very authentic.

Faux pho. (couldn't help it)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 14, 2010, 12:31:57 AM
Good one, but ya know? the actual pronunciation is more like 'fur'.

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 14, 2010, 12:36:53 AM
So be it.... Faux Fur!  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 14, 2010, 12:47:11 AM
Check this out. you can play it about quarter the way down the page.

http://www.lovingpho.com/pho-opinion-editorial/how-to-pronounce-pho/

Clear though there is becoming an English version of the word which is pronounced 'faux'.

I always try to say it correctly when ordering but they always correct me. I guess I have to practice.

Those guys over at Thang Long restaurant (I call it "Long Thang")  pretty much told me all the tricks.   They wont give up the clear beef broth secret though. Im still working them for it,  ;)

Anybody ever go out for Pho at 8 AM? The places are packed!

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 14, 2010, 02:40:00 AM
We are going to have to go to that Vietnamese restaurant this winter again.  Pho is best when the weather is cold.  It warms you you up straight through your soul.  I really enjoyed that restaurant.  You remember...Thang Long on Kensington Ave.
PHO GA TU'O'l  *  BUN CHA HA NOI  (Healthy Authentic Vietnamese Cuisine)

(http://www.thesunblog.com/gourmetgal/pho.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 14, 2010, 03:36:49 AM
OK so I got a Q about the pronunciation. Do yous guys Paak the Caa over there? Cap said it was like fur and I don't hear no "r".
Even worse though is the time I did in STL and people there put in extra "r" sounds like worshing your car.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: dbeechum on August 14, 2010, 08:15:42 AM
The Vietnamese engineer who works for me says something that sounds like "fuh" and insists that you're a dummy for saying anything else and don't you try and test her.

I won't.. she periodically brings me super awesome banh mi sandwiches.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 14, 2010, 12:20:51 PM
Oh man, lucky you. I love Vietnamese hoagies.

The Vietnames in my hood sound like they are saying 'fur' with a very faint R sound at the end.  Kind like they are going to say the f word but instead end it with a faint back of the throat r sound.

Its way to hard to describe.

I dont think I have that much of a local accent from this area. Than k goodness too cause it is really bad around here. People say 'wooder' instead of water. Man that makes me cringe.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: euge on August 15, 2010, 12:28:16 AM
We pronounce it as "phuh" but as long as it tastes right I don't care. Had a bowl yesterday and half an order of springrolls. I was stuffed!

Cap I believe it takes them at least 24 hours to do the broth, and they start it cold. Jealously guarded secret because not all pho the same. I've actually had bad pho.

Rare beef, bible tripe and soft tendon!!! This is the way to go.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 15, 2010, 01:14:27 AM
Oh I know, I soak the bones and oxtails over night. Then cover them with water and boil for 15 mins.Then strain and discard that water. Clean out the pot and rinse the bones again. Then cover them over with clean water. Then salt it and simmer for 4-5 hours. scooping off the scum as it rises.

After I add a tea bag chese cloth thingy full of cinnamon, allspice, black pepper, clove, star anise, then a few shakes of  fish sauce.  scallions and parsnips. Then simmer for another hour or two. Remove those things and strain the broth through a strainer and cheese cloth.then the broth is ready.

I follow this method but the broth comes out dark brown and heavy.

I think they must give the stock an "ice bath" or something.

Maybe Drew can ask the person that works with him. Lets bug him.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Robert on August 15, 2010, 10:35:37 PM
Are crab boils ethnic?

Snow crab was on sale this week so wife and three yr old wanted it for dinner. Here's the clusters waiting for the bath water to get warm enough.... ;D


(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/f16a948d.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: andrew on August 17, 2010, 09:59:20 PM
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs280.snc3/28155_394493532718_500077718_3891575_7217598_n.jpg)

crab  boils are awesome, don't know if they are ethnic either. still good though.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: andrew on August 17, 2010, 10:08:04 PM
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs280.snc3/28155_394493532718_500077718_3891575_7217598_n.jpg)

crab  boils are awesome, don't know if they are ethnic either. still good though.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs320.ash1/28155_394493332718_500077718_3891572_804472_n.jpg)

caught them off this "louisiana super highway"
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 17, 2010, 10:16:13 PM
Check out smurfe's pictures on page one.

Some Swedish food tonight.

Meatballs and gravy with herb potatoes cooked with milk and herring pieces. And of coarse lingon sylt.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06878.jpg)

For the meatballs you can use any ground meat. I like to use tri mix, veal, pork and beef.

Start in the food processor add a small onion a few cloves of garlic and a slice of fresh ginger. Pulse till chopped fine, add a little milk and pulse a little more. Add that mixture to the ground meat sprinkle in some marjoram, salt, pepper and paprika and an egg. then mix well roll into 3/4" balls or bigger if you like. LAy them out on a baking sheet and broil in the oven until brown.

For the gravy add a mixture of a little cooking oil and butter in a large pot. Add a few tablespoons of flour to make a roux. Then stir well, then add a few chopped onions, a grated nutmeg, marjoram, a few allspice, a bay leaf salt pepper. Then add some beef broth and a splash of sherry. Mix well as it starts to get really thick add a little water as needed. Then add a cup or so of sour cream. Stir well to mix and simmer on low. Add water is it starts to get thick.

Never add milk after you started with sour cream.it will curdle.

Then take the cooked meat balls and add them to the gravy. Simmer for a few more mins and it is ready.

I have to find a way to get some rain deer meat.

Maybe I should re-title the thread "Ethnic and Regional cooking" 
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 17, 2010, 11:00:20 PM
Break out the akevitt!  I love Northern European cooking (UK inclusive).  It has a hearty simplicity and elegance, a nice counterpoint to continental cooking.  I need to hone my Swedish meatballs.  I used to make the Danish sort (frikadeller) but it was early in my cooking "career" and they tended to fall apart on me...so with egg noodles and a hearty gravy I transformed them into "Scandinavian spaghetti" by breaking apart the failing meatballs.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 18, 2010, 01:26:24 AM
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs280.snc3/28155_394493532718_500077718_3891575_7217598_n.jpg)

crab  boils are awesome, don't know if they are ethnic either. still good though.




That is a beautiful sight.  I love blue crabs.  I used to go crabbing throughout the summer when I was younger.  I really miss it.  Crabbing is alot of fun and very rewarding.  Do you use beer to steam them?
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 18, 2010, 01:30:10 AM
Check out smurfe's pictures on page one.

Some Swedish food tonight.

Meatballs and gravy with herb potatoes cooked with milk and herring pieces. And of coarse lingon sylt.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06878.jpg)

Maybe I should re-title the thread "Ethnic and Regional cooking" 

This is one recipe I have always wanted to make but never have.  I will put them on the list.  They look delicious.

I think Ethnic and Regional would work and allow a bigger umbrella.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: Robert on August 18, 2010, 04:04:49 AM
Check out smurfe's pictures on page one.





Now why'd you make me go back there and look at the crawfish, knowing they're out of season!  >:(

My 3.5 yr old and 1.5 year old  went nuts over them. We couldn't peel ours fast enough to keep them happy. Mama and me barely got to enjoy them. Next time around, I'm doing multiple batches, one mild for the boys and while the adults batch is cooking, we'll pre-peel the kids crabs so we can focus on ours.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 19, 2010, 02:18:11 AM
I changed the title of the thread because I am just as fascinated with all the different local specialties all around the US.

Chicago style hot dogs.

Philly Cheese Steaks.

Ludafisk. Oh man what is that all about?

Calamari Steaks of coastal California. Man, I would love to have one of those again.

Wanna make a good Philly cheese steak?  Get the butcher to throw some chuck or sirloin on a deli slicer or something. Get it sliced thin.

Then heat up a pan or griddle med high heat. A little oil then throw in some diced onions and fry them golden brown Then the  slices of beef saute till starting to brown and crisp around the edges add salt and pepper. Turn the heat on low and divide the meat into portions for the rolls. Then put slices of American cheese on top of the meat (some use cheese wiz, blah). Sprinkle in a little water and cover. The steam will melt the cheese nicely. 

Then take some french bread or long sandwich rolls. We call them hoagie rolls. Brush them with a little oil and maybe some chopped garlic and toast under the broiler for a few seconds till a little crispy and brown.

Then put the roll on top of the meat and reach under it with a spatula. Flip it over and plate. Sprinkle with a little oregano. This is a Philly cheese steak sandwich.

I like a Cheese steak hoagie. That is the above topped with thin sliced onions, lettuce and tomatoes. 

Another really good variation is a pizza steak. With this one add some fried mudrooms (or other pizza topping) to the mix when you fry the meat. Then add tomato sauce and mix around after you turn the heat down. This time turn the meat onto the roll with out the cheese. Then put it on an oven pan and top with slices of mozzarella cheese. then put back under the broiler and lett the cheese melt an bubble like a pizza.

Oh yeah!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 19, 2010, 04:10:59 AM
Stop you're making me hungry and I just lost 4 pounds... :D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 19, 2010, 12:22:39 PM
The famous Philly Cheesesteak is one of my favorite foods and it goes great with a German Lager.
I make them pretty regularly using variations like beef, chicken, mushrooms, onions, peppers and  garlic. 
I am not a big fan of lettuce and tomato but I like a bit of ketchup on them.

I think the thread name change to "Ethnic and Regional Cooking" was a great idea. 
I think this will definitely generate even more interest.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Robert on August 19, 2010, 01:28:17 PM
Nice new name. I'd like to add brisket tacos to the regional thing. I've seen them popping up at almost every tex-mex joint around. To make mine, I trim the fat cap and cube into large cubes so the whole brisket will fit in a large pot. Cover with water, add garlic, an assortment of dried peppers (I'm a huge fan of ancho, guajilla and pasilla combo) salt, pepper and onions and let simmer for 3-4 hours. Remove meat, shred and place on large baking pan and place under broiler to brown a bit and crisp up some of the edges. I like to top with fresh pico de gallo on top of corn tortillas. I've been meaning to buy a bucket of lard to give this a bit of a carnitas spin to it, rather than using water, using the lard.

Another similar dish is barbacoa. Just got back from San Antonio and some of the best real barbacoa in a long time. The stuff up here in Dallas is just seasoned shredded beef, but it doesn't hold a torch to some real cow head.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bobburchler on August 19, 2010, 02:19:05 PM
If you don't already do so, make your own tortillas. There's no comparison between them and the manufactured ones. A little tricky at first, but once you get the hang of it, they only take a few minutes to make.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: narvin on August 19, 2010, 02:54:29 PM
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs280.snc3/28155_394493532718_500077718_3891575_7217598_n.jpg)
crab  boils are awesome, don't know if they are ethnic either. still good though.




That is a beautiful sight.  I love blue crabs.  I used to go crabbing throughout the summer when I was younger.  I really miss it.  Crabbing is alot of fun and very rewarding.  Do you use beer to steam them?

Steam them with flat beer, vinegar, and liberal amounts of Old Bay!
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: andrew on August 19, 2010, 02:55:27 PM

[/quote]
That is a beautiful sight.  I love blue crabs.  I used to go crabbing throughout the summer when I was younger.  I really miss it.  Crabbing is alot of fun and very rewarding.  Do you use beer to steam them?
[/quote]

No, that would have been alot of beer! We caught 12 dozen in 2 hours. We just boiled them in zatarain's crab boil.

Yeah, I went alot when I was young too. Crawfished in the spring and early summer and crabbed in the summer and early fall. Don't get to do that much any more now that I live in South FL and not in LA. My 2yr old enjoyed it too, but he caught more moss than anything with an occasional crab. Good thing he was a little afraid of'em though, those things can put the hurt to you. (http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs320.ash1/28155_394492797718_500077718_3891539_6551046_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 19, 2010, 03:07:36 PM
What's the difference if any between the Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab and a Louisiana Blue Crab?

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: andrew on August 19, 2010, 03:34:48 PM
What's the difference if any between the Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab and a Louisiana Blue Crab?


I don't really think there is a difference, except for the obvious of where they are caught. They look and taste the same.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 19, 2010, 10:56:21 PM
I saw some real nice crab

They were giants, 6 pointers. $56 a dozen.  :o

I can remember getting a bushel of 6s for $40 6 or 8 years ago. WTF.

I make a great crab bisque its easy. Make an old bay crab stock with the crabs, celery and onion, tomatoes. Make a flour roux and blend it into the stock add some heavy cream, sherry and paprika. Only need two or three of the smaller crabs and a pound of jumbo lump. Something to do if you only have a few crabs.

You can add flounder at the very end instead of jumbo lump. Tastes almost the same once it cooks in the crab stock.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 19, 2010, 11:57:39 PM

I can remember getting a bushel of 6s for $40 6 or 8 years ago. WTF.

You're OLD.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on August 20, 2010, 05:24:04 AM
The Vietnamese engineer who works for me says something that sounds like "fuh" and insists that you're a dummy for saying anything else and don't you try and test her.
It's pronounced "fuh" around here too.  These places are all over the place, Yelp comes back with 373 when I search for pho in Seattle ,there's 10 places within a few blocks of where I work.  Crazy.

Best name ever though - Pho King
http://www.yelp.com/biz/pho-king-federal-way
I've never been there but I'd suggest the Pho King beef, although the Pho King chicken is probably quite good too. :)
Title: Wall of offal and parts
Post by: euge on August 20, 2010, 06:40:05 AM
Wall of offal and parts:
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gYMjLrrI/AAAAAAAAAOE/63lLNRpNIWU/beef_cheek_meat.jpg)
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gYKFg9UI/AAAAAAAAAOI/jJ1yyXaydI8/beef_sweetbreads_fresh.jpg)
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gYFnl7zI/AAAAAAAAAOM/r41Y-zjJsuM/beef_tongue_fresh.jpg)
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gYQrspDI/AAAAAAAAAOQ/9aogBdd9xwM/fresh_beef_honeycomb_tripe.jpg)
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gYdSsbAI/AAAAAAAAAOU/-miOXO786XE/fresh_beef_kidneys.jpg)
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gkb135tI/AAAAAAAAAOc/66Oa8PMIeoU/fresh_beef_tripas.jpg)
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gkXasNLI/AAAAAAAAAOg/TeZYWYuIboM/fresh_pork_hocks.jpg)
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TG4gkhVl-tI/AAAAAAAAAOk/garfAzYo5vw/fresh_pork_tails.jpg)

My local supermarket. It's close to the weekend when this stuff gets cooked. There's other stuff too. This section is larger than the main case of beef and pork. Certainly outweighs it!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 20, 2010, 12:20:24 PM
Hell's bells!  Those are some interesting miscellany.  I saw tripa, is it a Latin market? 

The local Chinese/SE Asian grocery has things I wouldn't be able to identify.  I actually find myself averting my eyes when walking past the freezer section.  I'd rather just not know.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 20, 2010, 04:40:16 PM
No just a regular HEB (http://www.heb.com/welcome/index.jsp), but I have a feeling they're catering to the shoppers in the surrounding neighborhoods.

Everyone loves HEB so much it's put Albertsons, Kroger, etc out of business in many areas- a major player in Texas. They're a lot like a Vons (http://www.vons.com/IFL/Grocery/Home) supermarket out West.



Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 20, 2010, 11:32:36 PM
That tripa is not to be confused with tripe. It is cow intestines. They were on the argentian grill a few pages back.

Ive been to a cvouple of HEB's, that is a nice store. The one Iwas in they had a Mexican bakery making all kinds of stuff. Home made tortillas were my fav.

They havet hat wet corn masa too white and yellow. We cant get that around here.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Robert on August 21, 2010, 04:36:13 AM
HEB only makes it as far north as Waco. After that, Krogers, Albertsons and Tom Thumb rule the roost. We do have Central Markets scattered around DFW though. Otherwise, La Michoacana is the carnecieria around here.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 21, 2010, 12:36:45 PM
Im pretty sure the owner of HEB is good people. He payed for the the building that houses the Harte Institute in Corpus Christi. My buddy went there to get his PHD in Marine Biology.

The guy (cant remember his name) is a major philanthropists that gives a LOT back.

He also contribute piles of money into research for protecting the Gulf of Mexico. Wonder what he is thinking These days.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 21, 2010, 04:06:17 PM
The founder was Howard E. Butt. No joke. He's passed on but his family runs the business. They're billionaires like the Waltons.

They do a lot for the communities they are in. It's a great chain to work for and to shop at. You should see an HEB during the holidays- esp Thanksgiving. Product flying off the shelves and the stockers working overtime barely keeping up!

They've expanded into Mexico where they are more like a Walmart but with greater emphasis on food AFAIK. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 23, 2010, 12:37:23 PM
Paella again...no process pics, but and end result:

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Paella.jpg)

Only used 1 chicken breast, diced rather small and seasoned with oregano, paprika, salt, pepper, and moistened with dry sherry.  Had a 4oz dried Spanish style chorizo that I sliced up as well.  But anyway, I did all the chopping first, but the first thing I cooked was 4 Hatch chilies and one large red pepper...capsicum, if you will...over the charcoal chimney, until blackened, then peeled and chopped.

After spreading the lit charcoal in my Weber kettle grill, a large bit of bacon grease and olive oil went into the paella pan.  Then 2 large diced red onions went in and cooked til just hinting at brown, then in with a large quantity of diced garlic.  After a while I added the chicken, let it start to firm up and get mostly cooked, and I added the diced chorizo.  Then, in with some finely diced celery, chopped mushrooms, and chopped sun dried tomatoes.  I also added the chilies and red pepper at this point.  When it was starting to get fully cooked, I added two cups of rice (nothing fancy, just plain supermarket rice...all I had!).  I let it sort of get coated with the remaining oil and fry for a bit, and added a healthy shot of achiote oil (my substitution for saffron) that I made up on Saturday.  Then, in with four cups of vegetable stock.  I stirred it all up, returned it to a boil, then added a couple chunks of hickory to the fire and covered the grill.  After about 30 minutes the water was absorbed, the paella was cooked and nicely smoky, and the "soccarat" or browned crust on the bottom was absolutely perfect...not burned, just a browned and crunchy layer of rice.  Goes nice with a bit of sherry!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 23, 2010, 01:26:31 PM
Nice work nic!

You even have a paella pan...I'm impressed. 

I'd like to try this dish with some prawns, clams and mussels.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 23, 2010, 01:42:43 PM
Found the paella pan at Costplus World Market for a very reasonable 14.99!

I know seafood paella is more common but my wife dislikes most seafood and I am more ambivalent than anything else, so we do a more land/air based version!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 28, 2010, 11:45:46 PM
I have always wanted to make a Pallela pan. I would actually like to make a few pots, maybe a gulash pot. My father in law made his kotlik.

Here is some Argentine BBQ we did at a friends house. They have a nice brick Argentine grill.

Lamb roasted over hot coals the Argentinian way (just sea salt)  This is also the way they do it in Greece and Italy, Spain and elsewhere.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07056-1.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07058.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07077.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07104.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07137.jpg)

YEAH BOOOOYYYY!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 29, 2010, 01:25:23 AM
I think I just lost my appetite.   :o   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 29, 2010, 04:15:00 AM
I think I just lost my appetite.   :o   ;D

You kidding? That looks awesome! Prehistoric even.
Never done em flat out like that - gotta keep my people's tradition going you know...  :P ;)

* is it me or does that lamb look like it's sporting a "grill"
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_B1LlYh6iKqs/Sr1dYkqFxKI/AAAAAAAAAzQ/z2Nn5oadyks/s400/flavor-flav-grill.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 29, 2010, 05:07:30 AM
Bánh xèo is one of my favorites. I filled myself up on this for lunch. It was unbelievably awesome!

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/THnl4oSqZmI/AAAAAAAAAPI/jtLYPnI-Vus/s640/2010-08-28%2013.56.53.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 29, 2010, 11:31:57 AM
I remember years ago when Vietnamese restaurants started showing up, they called those Happy Pancakes.

Did you make them yourself? Looks perfect.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: maxieboy on August 29, 2010, 02:58:04 PM


* is it me or does that lamb look like it's sporting a "grill"


Ha! I was thinking the same thing!  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 29, 2010, 04:14:28 PM
Make them myself? No- though this is a good idea. Pho might be difficult but I imagine one could make these fairly easily. Cap you ever make them?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 29, 2010, 06:55:17 PM
I have made them before. Just another one of those things I havent made as good as the original. There must be a trick.

Ive used the rice flour, turmeric and water recipe. They dont come out light and airy like at the restaurant.

If I make them again I think Im going to try some baking soda and maybe an egg or something.

If you try it let me know what you come up with. By all means try the original recipe first.

Maybe you will find the mistake I am making.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on August 29, 2010, 08:39:22 PM
I have absolutely no background in cooking that dish, but I have two suggestions based on other types of batter-like recipes.  Try either using something carbonated (sparkling water, perhaps) like you would in fish & chips, or ice cold water like you would in tempura.

If it has an egg in it, you could whip the crap out of it like in "diner-style omelets" (which I detest).  Is it souffled at all? Can you whip the whites and yolks separately?

Or submit the idea to Cooks Illustrated and let them try the 84 different cooking combinations and figure out what works best.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 30, 2010, 02:18:39 AM
Couple trips to ethnic markets this weekend, one to the Indian place for some nondescript spice/rice restocking, and one to the East Euro place for some more of that awesome suva govedina and ajvar.  Got some Bulgarian sheep cheese, feta style...wow, pungent stuff.  Not a huge fan immediately, maybe I'll try it in a shopska salad.  On my third jar of ajvar though, I'm bordering on addicted.  Olives, thinly sliced vegetables, cured meats, ajvar, and bread or crackers, make a fantastic little meal.

I'd probably enjoy that lamb, but less so picking from the skull.  That likely makes me a less adventurous foodie, but then, I'm ok with that.  I can debone a whole chicken comfortably and without qualms, but heads or "peripheral organs" are a bit off limits for me, and thanks to my economic position, need not enter into my repertoire.  Wasn't it Serbia that was into, well, the "testier" meats?  I'll pass!  Same with seal, or lamb eyeballs, delicacies or nay.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 30, 2010, 02:32:24 AM
I have eaten eye balls from a pig. Pretty nasty. No more eye balls for me.

That brain was very tasty though. Buttery and rich, not gamey at all. A few of the guests and myself only got a taste.

I started after the tongue, but if you can imagine acquiring it was visually tough. I just left it. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 30, 2010, 02:44:02 AM
East Euro place for some more of that awesome suva govedina and ajvar. 

You wanna kick that ajvar up a notch, heat up some olive oil in a pan with some garlic in it. Then warm up your ajvar in that and eat it warm on some fresh bread. You can't really over warm it, it can turn a little darker red if you leave it in the pan a while. That's the way I like it when I'm not being lazy. But out of the jar is even good. Not worth making it at home anymore except out of pure tradition.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 30, 2010, 03:00:30 AM
East Euro place for some more of that awesome suva govedina and ajvar.  

You wanna kick that ajvar up a notch, heat up some olive oil in a pan with some garlic in it. Then warm up your ajvar in that and eat it warm on some fresh bread. You can't really over warm it, it can turn a little darker red if you leave it in the pan a while. That's the way I like it when I'm not being lazy. But out of the jar is even good. Not worth making it at home anymore except out of pure tradition.

That sounds very appetizing at the moment.  The only way to make this is fresh.  I really love the melding of the flavors.
Do you have a specific recipe?

Looks like the commercial exampes are pureed a bit.  I like it as more of a ragu.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on August 30, 2010, 11:40:21 AM
Do you have a specific recipe?

We use a meat grinder - like the coarse ground beef type attachment. So, you char a bushel of peppers on the grill, throw em in a big pot and cover em to let them steam. It will help separate the skin from the meat of the pepper. Also 3-5 huge eggplants, cut em in half and roast em in the oven till they are mushy. About 5 heads of garlic, a handfull of hot hungarian peppers for a little zing but you gotta make it so everyone can eat it. After everything is peeled and deseeded you run it through the grinder, toss it in a big roaster, and let it go for about 3-4 hours. It's not the time - you're trying to slowly thicken it to your desired consistency. Mostly just salt and pepper. Garlic salt if you didn't nail the right amount of garlic down. About a cup of oil, not olive oil cuz it's weird in the fridge. So just keep stirring and waiting for it to condense down. We jar it - so to keep the color we hit it with a bit of fruit fresh and fill the jar to about a finger from the top - and then top it off with (usually corn) oil as an air barrier. You just stir it in when you pop the jar. I've eaten the stuff over a year old this way - no problems.

So, it's a loose recipe - it's what we do. Salt and pepper are to taste, we know when it tastes right to us.  :D  Just remember as the whole shebang cools down the heat of the hot peppers goes up. We use one of those big electric roasters (like Nesco) and leave it uncovered while cooking as you want the water to escape.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 30, 2010, 01:41:34 PM
Got some Bosnian beef kulen sausage too but haven't tried it.  Any thoughts on what to expect?  So far in the realm of sausages I've tried ljuta sremska kobasica (good, has a dense jerky like flavor) and albanska sudzuk (slightly strange taste by itself but a lot like pepperoni and very good sliced thin on pizza).  I lean towards the whole muscle meats though...the beef has been our favorite but this last bit of it we bought had such large sections of fat my wife didn't like it (Brother and Sister brand...much richer smoky flavor though!).  The dried pork loin is good too.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Robert on August 30, 2010, 03:13:14 PM
Hatch Chile Time!!

Picked up a box Saturday morning and spent Sunday roasting.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Hatch%20Roast/2440694c.jpg)

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Hatch%20Roast/cb6e598b.jpg)

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Hatch%20Roast/9a6c1d6a.jpg)

Looking for some good recipes if you have any. I love these things in just about everything.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 30, 2010, 05:16:55 PM
I love them too!  I bought about 10, half went into a paella (pictured above) and half into a steak sandwich sort of thing.  I also tried one sliced up raw...really have to say, these chilies are not particularly good raw, at least to my taste!

The steak sandwiches were good though.  Roasted the peppers over charcoal, then peeled and chopped them.  Also grilled (and then chopped) some onion "rafts" and chopped them in with the peppers.  Grill a large > 1lb sirloin steak, well seasoned, until med rare, let it rest, then slice thinly against the grain (reserving any escaping juices and adding to the mixture) and mix with the peppers and onions.  Place on grilled or broiled slices of buttered French bread with some sort of cheese.  Good stuff!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 04, 2010, 12:28:08 AM
7 - course meal. 1 pound chicharon + 6 Victoria beers  :D

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/TIGR1GMTQ9I/AAAAAAAAAN0/Fyzcl5cqtLs/s288/HPIM3050.JPG)

The mexican markets have it on the weekends; deep fried pork with the skin on.
The beer is good but not worth $9 a sixer.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 04, 2010, 12:51:40 PM
Oh man, I love chicharon! It is sinfully delicious.

Freddy and Tony's , a land mark Puerto Rican restaurant in North Philly makes them fresh as well as other deep fried treats. They have deep fried pork ribs. OMG are they good.

I love Spanish food, I love that restaurant! Ya gotta love every restaurant that starts out the day roasting several giant pigs in a series of giant ovens.

Never heard of Victoria beer.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 04, 2010, 01:41:16 PM
Oh man, I love chicharon! It is sinfully delicious.
Never heard of Victoria beer.

I just chop em up into bite sized chunks, warm em up (last night they were warm from the store) and hit em with some hotsauce. There's a thread on here with some guy begging for Victoria beer to be shipped to him. I guess it's limited availability; but I'd say you're not missing much. $36 for a case is a bit steep.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 04, 2010, 08:38:08 PM
I really love PR food. Its not great for a weekday lunch though. After sitting down to a PR meal dont expect to go back to work, .Just find a hammock somewhere.

I want to learn how to make some more Caribbean Spanish food. I got Cuban down but not a whole lot to learn there is is mostly just like American cooking.

I have to practice my papas rellenas. (http://www.mycolombianrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/papa-rellena-con-carne-047.jpg)

Or pastillias (http://images.eurica888.multiply.com/image/8/photos/upload/300x300/R4S0agoKCqoAAEzKd5w1/DSC02397.JPG?et=7pw2I%2BdFNkWKSEIU7dlYGg&nmid=76811256)

I may have to get up off my ass and make that happen this weekend.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 06, 2010, 11:21:47 PM
Ghana

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07258.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07260.jpg)

Clockwise from rea rleft. Pork stewed with tomatoes red peppers, ginger, onions and vinegar. Little cumin and salt and pepper. I would venture to say that dish has the same influences from the Portuguese that the Indian dish Vindaloo has.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07259.jpg)
 
Sweet potatoes stewed in onions, ginger and coconut milk.

The tamale looking thing is Ga Keneky, a mush of fermented corn meal dough steamed in a corn husk. It is very sour but nice. Kinda like sour fufu with a consistency of thick mashed potatoes.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07256.jpg)

I used store bought cause it seems very hard to make, havent tried to make it homemade yet.

These are dishes one might find in a "Chop Bar" they are popular eating and drinking social type places in Ghana.

(http://ghanatravels.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/chop-bar-princes-town-ghana-img_0779.jpg?w=500&h=375)

In the illustration on that sign they are making Ga-Keneky in a large mortar and pestle.


Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 07, 2010, 01:17:41 AM
Man Cap...you never cease to amaze me with your culinary skills.

Looks fabulous as usual.  I'll bet it tastes even better.

I am a big sweet potato lover.  Homade sweet potato pie...mmm...mmm delicious.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 07, 2010, 01:23:59 AM
All indeed looks great.  Interesting at least!  I've got limited experience with African food, so I wouldn't really know what I'd like.  What was that chili sort of sauce at 6 o clock?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 07, 2010, 01:30:06 AM
OK, here's my labor day cook.  With the sweet sounds of Alfred Apaka crooning over weeping steel guitar glissandos, we did a pineappley, pseudo hawaiian luau.  The ribs are marinated in pineapple juice, kecap manis, ginger, and a few other things, and then smoked, then sauced with a thick sweet sauce based on hoisin, pineapple jelly, and ginger.  The rice is made with pineapple, green onions, chilies, and ginger.  The wontons are sweet, not savoury, with a filling of cream cheese, brown sugar, and crushed pineapple.  Throw in some pineapple spears, and a drink made of pineapple juice, lime juice, and Goslings black rum.  Oh, and yes, I had to include my lap steel, tuned to C6...my latest obsession.

"Are we going, to the hukilau, the huki huki huki huki huki hukilau..."   

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/Hukilau.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 07, 2010, 01:49:06 AM
I took a block of George's Slanine and put it on the smoker for a couple of hours. SUPER salty tasting, but it all got eaten it was so tasty. Good thing I got slivo in the freezer to keep the ol' arteries clear. (you know - it acts like draino for your innards)

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 07, 2010, 01:57:02 AM
See I could go for slanina cooked like that!!!  And yes it was uniquely salty stuff but I agree, very good!  Next trip to the E. Euro store (I take altogether too many) I need to restock on slivo and perhaps some slanina (we'll see!).  I bought a chunk of this stuff:

http://www.eurofoodmart.com/bs-smoked-beef-suho-meso-1-5lb-p30309.html

Brother and Sister brand, it is much smokier than the suva govedina I've tried otherwise. 

Oh, and if the slanina rendered a lot of lard on the smoker you could potentially have a nice grease fire next time you get a hot fire going in the grill.  I have that happen every now and again if it builds up a lot of grease in the bottom.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 07, 2010, 02:04:33 AM
I had a ham going on the grill and felt bad about all the wasted grill space so I just went rummaging for stuff to smoke. Found slanina and about 3 kielbasas. Everything is better with smoke! The other stuff only went on for like the last two hours or so to pick up the smoke so the fire was pretty steady in the low 200's by that time. I didn't lose much fat off the slanina.

That cut of meat looks good. Just straight up meze (appetizers). I actually bought a meat slicer this last week. I got a hunk of prosciutto and was kinda ticked off at my knife skills - so I placed an order online.  ;D

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on September 07, 2010, 05:43:18 PM
I had a ham going on the grill and felt bad about all the wasted grill space so I just went rummaging for stuff to smoke. Found slanina and about 3 kielbasas. Everything is better with smoke! The other stuff only went on for like the last two hours or so to pick up the smoke so the fire was pretty steady in the low 200's by that time. I didn't lose much fat off the slanina.

That cut of meat looks good. Just straight up meze (appetizers). I actually bought a meat slicer this last week. I got a hunk of prosciutto and was kinda ticked off at my knife skills - so I placed an order online.  ;D



LOL I did the same thing! As far as sausage goes. Cleaned out some of the vacpacked stuff that I hadn't taken all the way and even a length of Andouille that never made it into a pot of Gumbo. All went in the smoker!

One of my bro's had a Geka meat slicer in his trunk for several years which he gave to me earlier this summer. It was totally disgusting but after dismantling completely and a trip through the dishwasher it looks brand new. Sadly, I haven't used it yet. I'm thinking roast beef for sandwiches.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 09, 2010, 11:59:21 PM
Ghana 2

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07262.jpg)

Rear: FuFu made of potatoes farina and plantain flour, served in a tomato pepper, garlic and lentil stew.

Front left: boiled plantains.

Right: Fried fish with a crust of green peppers, ginger and garlic. 

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 10, 2010, 12:34:28 AM
Interesting combo.  How do the flavors blend together?

If I tripped over Ghana food I wouldn't know it...looks good!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 10, 2010, 12:44:42 AM
Ghana 2

Ghana-re-deux
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 10, 2010, 01:38:32 AM
The flavors go together very well. Ghana style cooking is very simple. Easy to do for the most part. They really like these startchy mushed foods that no doubt come from the tribal type peoples. They are made with all different kinds of tubers.They mash them all up with farina and stuff like this. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxmBKzrPpSY

They are also known for their sea food.

Another thing that is popular in Ghana is bush meat. I think Im gonna avoid that.

Also I meant to answers Nics question about the hot sauce. It is s***o, a mash of hot pepper sauce and dried shrimp.

Wow, I cant believe it wont let me write that word. it is spelled s h i t o.

 

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 10, 2010, 02:56:28 AM
Reminds me of Thai cooking (hot peppers and dried shrimp), must have something to do with being a coastal nation in the tropics.

I just got Steven Raichlens "Planet Barbecue" from the library, I have to say, this is going to likely launch many a future ethnic cooking obsession.  I get bored with his US-centric stuff, because we're pretty much well-acquainted with all that, but he does a great job introducing world cuisines, even if constrained to live fire cooking.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 10, 2010, 11:24:11 PM
I listened to an interview with him on the radio a couple of months back. That is what inspired me to set up an Argentine grill.

How is that book? Im sure it is good. Lots of pictures? 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 11, 2010, 12:53:21 AM
I have three of his books.  Great recipes and techniques.  I want to get "Planet BBQ"
Sounds very interesting.  His books are great resources.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 11, 2010, 01:02:52 AM
BBQ Bible is good, very world oriented.  BBQ USA, I have to say, bored me, because it was equally as much space dedicated to minor variations in one single country's live fire cooking.  I also have his Ribs book and Beer Can Chicken book, and I really like the ribs book, as it launched me on a number of foreign adaptations of the typical rib recipes, but the Beer Can Chicken book is more, well, the recipes are the same, basically, similar sauces and all, and once you dispense with the false magic of the beer can (non boiling liquid in the chicken cavity) a lot of the gimmick is gone.

But Planet Barbeque looks like it takes up where BBQ Bible left off, lots of very varied world cuisines represented.  The guy has a pretty sweet gig, travelling the world and sampling the best of the world's grillmasters produce.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 11, 2010, 05:23:51 AM
But Planet Barbeque looks like it takes up where BBQ Bible left off, lots of very varied world cuisines represented.  The guy has a pretty sweet gig, travelling the world and sampling the best of the world's grillmasters produce.
I have BBQ Bible, and would love to know if people think it is worth it to get Planet BBQ as well.  Is it different enough?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 23, 2010, 01:11:47 AM
Cameroonian.
 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07466.jpg)

Top is a chicken stew made with coconut milk, herbs spices, pumpkin and mushrooms.

Fried bananas

..and more of that fermented cornmeal mush. Damn if I can remember what that is called. Sour but goes really well with the coconut sauce.

I like the African food, it is exotic but also very simple salt of the earth type food.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 23, 2010, 01:32:35 AM
But Planet Barbeque looks like it takes up where BBQ Bible left off, lots of very varied world cuisines represented.  The guy has a pretty sweet gig, travelling the world and sampling the best of the world's grillmasters produce.
I have BBQ Bible, and would love to know if people think it is worth it to get Planet BBQ as well.  Is it different enough?

Haven't read it all yet but it does appear to be quite distinct.  I don't know if I'll buy it (I've got a library checkout) but I would consider it worth it, for me, if I wanted to add to the cuisine related library.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 23, 2010, 02:36:02 AM
Cap...this looks and sounds appetizing. How did it taste?  I really like fried plantains or bananas. I used to get them at this great Cuban restaurant in Miami with roasted glazed pork and black beans with rice.  Cuban food is fantastic...very filling too. You need a hand truck to get your boby out of the restaurant after eating.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 23, 2010, 03:00:17 AM
The coconut chicken is awesome. It is kinda like the Thai coconut sauce that is popular. It has black cumin in it it,lots of onions and garlic. Pumpkin and mushrooms too.  Very agreeable and easy going for the uninitiated.

The fried bananas I really like but they are really sweet, maybe to sweet for me on the table with the savory food.

The mash of fermented cornmeal is indescribable. Its fermented so it is very sour with a kinda "beer" flavor.

What gets me is that this food is meant to be eaten by hand. im pretty good at that, i eat Ethiopian with my fingers, I eat Indian with my fingers. I can do it very neatly cause these dishes are designed to be eaten by hand. The bread and size of pieces make it pretty easy. But this west African fufu type dishes. Impossible to do it with your hands and turn into a complete mess. They serve these dishes with a large bowl of water for washing the fingers.

I understand the concept of touching your food, because it is precious. But with these dishes I just dont get it.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 24, 2010, 02:39:14 AM
When you say black cumin...forgive me for asking this again...but what are you referring to?  Sometimes people refer to kalonji, or nigella sativa seeds, as black cumin (I gather erroneously...they are also called black onion seeds).  The Indian black cumin is something different (kala jeera)...its not nearly as distinct or potent, in my view, as nigella/kalonji.  It also is more of a long, thin, dark gray seed, whereas kalonji are more square or roundish, and very black.  Not that kala jeera isn't great, I just find it more subtle.

Kalonji is one of those spices that I am a bit amazed hasn't really made inroads into other world cuisines...it is so distinct, not in a bad, asafetida way, but in a wow, that's tasty and savory sort of way.  I used it in a spice rub on some cured, smoked canadian bacon a while back and everytime I hit a bit of kalonji seed I really appreciated the little bit of zippy flavor.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 24, 2010, 02:47:37 AM
When you say black cumin...forgive me for asking this again...but what are you referring to?  Sometimes people refer to kalonji, or nigella sativa seeds, as black cumin (I gather erroneously...they are also called black onion seeds).  The Indian black cumin is something different (kala jeera)...its not nearly as distinct or potent, in my view, as nigella/kalonji.  It also is more of a long, thin, dark gray seed, whereas kalonji are more square or roundish, and very black.  Not that kala jeera isn't great, I just find it more subtle.

Kalonji is one of those spices that I am a bit amazed hasn't really made inroads into other world cuisines...it is so distinct, not in a bad, asafetida way, but in a wow, that's tasty and savory sort of way.  I used it in a spice rub on some cured, smoked canadian bacon a while back and everytime I hit a bit of kalonji seed I really appreciated the little bit of zippy flavor.

Whoa! This is probably like you guys standing around listening to computer geeks. I got no Idea WTF you're talking about. Actually my eyes glazed - I can't even read the whole post it's so food geeky.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 24, 2010, 11:53:44 AM
Kalonji.

Ill post some food geeky close up spice shots when I get home.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 24, 2010, 11:57:45 AM
Whoa! This is probably like you guys standing around listening to computer geeks. I got no Idea WTF you're talking about. Actually my eyes glazed - I can't even read the whole post it's so food geeky.

Wake up food geeks and smell the Kalonji !!!   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 24, 2010, 05:45:18 PM
Kalonji.

Ill post some food geeky close up spice shots when I get home.
Glad nic asked.  I had assumed you used kala jeera. :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 25, 2010, 12:00:05 AM
There are several varieties of cumin seeds. Some may not really be cumin though. Here are a few.

Food geeks rejoice.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07553.jpg)

Kalonji / sometimes called black cumin. this goes in a lot of Indian Pakistan and African dishes.Not sure if it is related to cumin at all.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigella_sativa

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/2c/Black_Onion_Seed.JPG/450px-Black_Onion_Seed.JPG)

They mess us up by shipping this stuff over with all different names in English.


(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07554.jpg)

Pakistani cumin / also sometimes called black cumin.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07557.jpg)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumin

Common cumin seeds, what most of us are familiar with.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 25, 2010, 12:51:53 AM
I've got all that stuff available to me. Plenty of ethnic stores all over the place - just no clue what to do with it.  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 25, 2010, 01:01:45 AM
I love Ethnic grocery stores. Lots of different ones around here too. I just cant drive by one with out going in.

Indian grocery stores are great for spices. They usually have a large variety and at a fraction of the cost at a grocery store.

Much better quality also. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 25, 2010, 01:09:01 AM
I love Ethnic grocery stores. Lots of different ones around here too. I just cant drive by one with out going in.

Indian grocery stores are great for spices. They usually have a large variety and at a fraction of the cost at a grocery store.

Much better quality also. 

You gotta talk to the ethnic people to figure out which stores are actually good. As an example - I had a Pakistani dude working for me; and he has to eat zabiha meat. Some stores will take regular meat and mark it up like halal prices, it takes a while and the owner makes awesome profit - but it's eventually figured out and word spreads.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 25, 2010, 02:39:17 AM
There are several varieties of cumin seeds. Some may not really be cumin though. Here are a few.

Food geeks rejoice.


Cap..maybe for the sake of ethnic nutrition. 
Guide us through an Indian spiced 101 dish, or for lack of a better word... recipe.
Possibly using some of the aforementioned spices and cooking techniques...

Thanks.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 25, 2010, 04:39:04 AM
If you are serious about learning Indian cooking the first thing to do is go out and get a good round of the basic spices. You will do best going to an Indian grocery stotre. Dont worry you will find that it is possible to work all of theses spices into your regular cooking.

Also get a coffee grinder dedicated for spices, you wont regret it.

I would say that the first thing to learn is,how to make garam masala. That is basically "real" curry powder. There are all kinds of masalas that consist of various combination of herbs and spices.Sometimes other ingredients. There are wet and dry masalas.

For my garam masala I get a fry pan hot on med heat. Then I toast stiring constantly a mixture of.

Whole cumin seeds
Whole cinnamon stick
Whole bay leaves
Whole black pepper corns
whole fenugreek seeds
Whole balck mustard seeds
whole cloves
whole cardamon seed pods.

Toast till the color starts to change and the essential oils are coming up. About 5 mins. Dont stop stirring cause they can burn.

Then put them into the spice grinder and make it into a fine powder. Store in a jar in the spice cabinet.

Really good stuff and you will find yourself putting it into other dishes.

Ill post some good "curries" next.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 25, 2010, 04:48:40 AM
I've got all that stuff available to me. Plenty of ethnic stores all over the place - just no clue what to do with it.  :P
The top one I know by the name nigella, aka kalonji aka black onion seed.  According to Tony Hill's The Spice Lover's Guide to Herbs and Spices (http://www.amazon.com/Spice-Lovers-Guide-Herbs-Spices/dp/0764597396/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285388386&sr=8-1) you have to make sure you have the real thing, as sometimes you get black cumin (below), black mustard, or even black sesame seeds.  The slew of names for it only adds to the confusion.  The seeds are "almost triangular" in shape.

Tony's got a few recipes that include it, including his Ras El Hanout, which he says is good on roasted meats, in casseroles, stews, or ground as a condiment.  I'd type it all in, but it's got 20 ingredients :)  Here's his Panch Phoron, which he says gets tossed in bread doughs and ground into rich soups in beans and lentils.

1/4 cup each of nigella seeds, fennel seeds, cumin seeds, fenugreek seeds, and brown mustard seeds.  Use whole or cracked as needed.

The second one is black cumin, aka kala jeera.  It is brown rather than black, thinner than common cumin.  Tony describes it as "musty in character with grassy hay aromas".  He uses it in his Kashmiri Garam Masala:

6 Tbs coriander seeds
4 Tbs Tellicherry peppercorns
2 Tbs cardamom seeds
2 Tbs black cumin seeds
1 Tbs whole cloves
a generous pinch of ground mace
2 tsp freshly shaved nutmeg
2 tsp cassia-cinnamon chips

These should get you started.  Tony's a friend from when he lived in Seattle and owned his spice shop, although he's since moved to London and we've fallen out of touch.  But regardless of that, I highly recommend his book if you're looking to understand some exotic (and even common) spices.  
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 25, 2010, 01:15:49 PM
I would say that the first thing to learn is,how to make garam masala. That is basically "real" curry powder. There are all kinds of masalas that consist of various combination of herbs and spices.Sometimes other ingredients. There are wet and dry masalas.

For my garam masala I get a fry pan hot on med heat. Then I toast stiring constantly a mixture of.

Really good stuff and you will find yourself putting it into other dishes.

Ill post some good "curries" next.


I got store bought garam masala. I like it a lot in chilli. I'm sure yours tastes better than the mass produced stuff though.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 25, 2010, 01:39:27 PM
I have an old coffee grinder that I don't use much anymore and there is an Indian grocery store not too far from me. I think I'd like to start with the basic spices need to make some fresh curry powder.

Step 2... :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 25, 2010, 01:54:43 PM
Fenugreek, or methi, is one of my favorite indian spices, and is a key component of my curries, otherwise, they just seem missing a dimension.  Strange thing is, it is used for artificial maple syrup.  I would have never guessed that except for going back to my methi stash and smelling it.  Did I just say "methi stash"?  Let me be clear that was not a typo!

Panch phoron is good too!  I made up a jar of it, the flavors are a perfect balance, although I usually eyeball my spice mixtures.  Garam masala is integral, but I usually use it as a component of a spice mixture, in that on its own, its a bit too "warm" (that's in the name...garam masala, warming spices, vs chaat masala, cooling spices) with all that cinnamon, nutmeg, and such like.  You could almost make a garam masala pumpkin pie!

Speaking of which, a garam masala sweet potato casserole sounds awesome.  I've already used it with mashed potatoes...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 26, 2010, 04:23:25 AM
I have an old coffee grinder that I don't use much anymore and there is an Indian grocery store not too far from me. I think I'd like to start with the basic spices need to make some fresh curry powder.

Step 2... :-\
What are you looking for here blues, a recipe for curry powder?  My wife's favorite is this Madras curry powder from Tony's book.

1/4 cup coriander seeds
2 Tbs brown mustard seed
2 Tbs ground turmeric
1 Tbs fenugreek seeds
1 Tbs cumin seeds
2 tsp ground ginger
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tsp black peppercorns
1 tsp cardamom seeds

You can also add red chile flakes to it to suit your taste.  The original recipe calls for 1 Tbs, but I typically leave it out of the blend and add it at the table so the rest of the family can tolerate it :)

Good luck cleaning the old coffee grinder.  :-\ Grinding up some salt and then dumping it helps to get some of the stuff out, but mostly it just takes time.  It might be mild enough to give a really interesting flavor to your spice blends.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 26, 2010, 04:39:05 AM
funny thing about the garam masala I have. this place opened up that had chicken tikka sammichez and it came with UBER greasy masala fries. Not knowing anything about anything - I goes and grabs me a can of garam masala.  :-\
It's good stuff, but not the spicy red concoction I had all over my fries. Any clue what that's called?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 26, 2010, 05:11:13 AM
Can you describe the flavor?  There are lots of different kinds of masalas, and even garam masala can have a wide variety of ingredients.

If I had to guess I'd say it was tikka masala, since that's what the sandwich was.  Tikka masala has paprika added, which would explain the red color.  I don't know of any Indian masalas that have paprika, Capetown is the only other one I can think of.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 26, 2010, 12:34:14 PM
Masala is a generic word that you will find everywhere...it doesn't correspond directly with garam masala, the brown, N. Indian finishing spice blend.  It often means simply a spicy gravy, or spiciness.  So the masala fries could have been anything!

I agree that what we know as curry powder does not equal garam masala...garam masala is one of many blends of spices, and is usually used to just add some aromatics as a finishing spice, after cooking.  To approximate what we know as curry powder.....you need turmeric!

Reading what I wrote again: "You could almost make a garam masala pumpkin pie!" I am struck by the sneaking suspicion that I've read somewhere in these massive threads that Cap has already done this...    ;D

Your almost critical components of Indian flavors...fresh garlic...fresh ginger...fresh green chilies.  Add spices like coriander, cumin, and others (mentioned above), coriander leaf (cilantro), and that's pretty much the core.  Chilies, ginger, garlic, spices!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 26, 2010, 01:09:29 PM
Can you describe the flavor?  There are lots of different kinds of masalas, and even garam masala can have a wide variety of ingredients.

If I had to guess I'd say it was tikka masala, since that's what the sandwich was.  Tikka masala has paprika added, which would explain the red color.  I don't know of any Indian masalas that have paprika, Capetown is the only other one I can think of.

Well, I'm horrible at this - but it was the type of spiciness and heat you get in a good bowl of Thai red beef curry. I did have an indian ground red chili powder. That stuff was crazy hot- quarter teaspoon was enough for a pot of chili, half a teaspoon and it was damn near inedible. So that's not it. Maybe something along the lines of Lay's flamin' hot potato chips- but more complex and much less salt.

It's also been a while since I've had em, but sitting here thinking about them, I could really go for some. I have a couple of "rubs" I bet I could use to get spicy fries. Hit the potatoes with some olive oil, and then do the shake and bake kinda thing to coat the fries with some bone sucking sauce or something like that. then just bake em.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 26, 2010, 01:55:30 PM
I have an old coffee grinder that I don't use much anymore and there is an Indian grocery store not too far from me. I think I'd like to start with the basic spices need to make some fresh curry powder.

Step 2... :-\
What are you looking for here blues, a recipe for curry powder?  My wife's favorite is this Madras curry powder from Tony's book.

1/4 cup coriander seeds
2 Tbs brown mustard seed
2 Tbs ground turmeric
1 Tbs fenugreek seeds
1 Tbs cumin seeds
2 tsp ground ginger
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tsp black peppercorns
1 tsp cardamom seeds

You can also add red chile flakes to it to suit your taste.  The original recipe calls for 1 Tbs, but I typically leave it out of the blend and add it at the table so the rest of the family can tolerate it :)

Good luck cleaning the old coffee grinder.  :-\ Grinding up some salt and then dumping it helps to get some of the stuff out, but mostly it just takes time.  It might be mild enough to give a really interesting flavor to your spice blends.


I want to make my own curry powder.  Thanks for the recipe. There are probably a million or more variations out there.  I also want to try some simple Indian dishes, i.e. curried chicken with some accompanying sides and maybe some freshly made roti or naan bread.

I'm undecided on what to do with the coffee grinder.  They're cheap enough that maybe I'll buy a grinder dedicated to spice grinding.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 26, 2010, 04:25:01 PM
I'm undecided on what to do with the coffee grinder.  They're cheap enough that maybe I'll buy a grinder dedicated to spice grinding.

Do this...the basic coffee grinders are perfect and you won't want to clean it as thoroughly as you would have to to make coffee with it.

Right now, I have a dedicated spice grinder and no coffee grinder!  I guess I'd rather drink stale preground coffee and have fresh spices! :D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 26, 2010, 04:48:58 PM
I'm undecided on what to do with the coffee grinder.  They're cheap enough that maybe I'll buy a grinder dedicated to spice grinding.

Do this...the basic coffee grinders are perfect and you won't want to clean it as thoroughly as you would have to to make coffee with it.

Right now, I have a dedicated spice grinder and no coffee grinder!  I guess I'd rather drink stale preground coffee and have fresh spices! :D
Me too - spice grinder, no coffee grinder.  The blade grinders are fine blues, and last a long time.  I've had mine for more than 10 years.  It was $20 from Starbucks when I got it.

You're right too, there's a ton of variations and you can add or remove spices until you find a mix you like.  I like to add curry powder to tuna salad, it's delicious :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 26, 2010, 04:51:46 PM
I'm undecided on what to do with the coffee grinder.  They're cheap enough that maybe I'll buy a grinder dedicated to spice grinding.

Do this...the basic coffee grinders are perfect and you won't want to clean it as thoroughly as you would have to to make coffee with it.

Right now, I have a dedicated spice grinder and no coffee grinder!  I guess I'd rather drink stale preground coffee and have fresh spices! :D
Me too - spice grinder, no coffee grinder.  The blade grinders are fine blues, and last a long time.  I've had mine for more than 10 years.  It was $20 from Starbucks when I got it.

You're right too, there's a ton of variations and you can add or remove spices until you find a mix you like.  I like to add curry powder to tuna salad, it's delicious :)
I like tumeric. Depends what's in your tuna salad though - I guess. celery, apple and maybe raisins for me.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 26, 2010, 05:01:28 PM
You're right too, there's a ton of variations and you can add or remove spices until you find a mix you like.  I like to add curry powder to tuna salad, it's delicious :)
I like tumeric. Depends what's in your tuna salad though - I guess. celery, apple and maybe raisins for me.
I would add curry powder to that :)  I don't do it every time though, and when I do I leave out the pickle relish that normally goes in my tuna salad.  When I make curried chicken salad it's got raisins, pine nuts, and chutney in it, the flavors go really well.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 27, 2010, 10:42:04 PM
garam = (hot)  Masala= (mix) , not sure why they call it hot. cause it usually isnt.

Sounds like you guys know your Indian food.

Tonight we had some typical Indian fare. In various combination this meal is probably the most common eaten in India. They have all different ways of cooking rice and different types of legumes.

It is their version of rice and beans.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07784.jpg)
Lemon Rice and masala dal.

Probably a good thing to start with while learning Indian cooking. It will give you a good grasp of the Indian flavors and how to use them.

These lentil dishes and the biryani rice dishes will get you going for sure.

Now for dessert Im gonna make a nice masala chai.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 27, 2010, 11:14:59 PM
I think the idea behind "garam" is hot as in warming, from the warming spices that we normally use in desserts (cinnamon, etc), not hot as in mirch, chili spicy.  You know what's funny, you read enough Indian cookbooks and you start substituting the Indian names for ingredients.  Mirch, saunf, jeera, hing, etc!  Can get confusing.

I love dal.  One of the most forgiving dals to cook into a puree is the red/salmon colored masoor dal.  Cooks quickly.  Toor dal I've sometimes had troubles with!  Chana dal (chickpeas) is more common for things like masala dal, where the chickpeas are not mashed.

Basmati rice really isn't negotiable, its quite unique...you can get it for larcenous, outrageous prices at many grocery stores as a specialty rice, but you can get it quite reasonably at an Indian market.  I pay $5.99 for 4lbs, which I'm sure I could get a better price if I bought in larger bulk, but its much cheaper than my supermarket...

I once made masala chai and it freaked me out.  I still don't get why...I drink cup after cup of black coffee every day and never notice any effect of caffeine, then I drink a few cups of masala chai and it totally sends me into a caffeine fit, felt sick and jittery for hours.  Maybe because the recipe has you boil the leaves instead of steeping them?  Ah well.  Tasty though.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: dj99 on September 27, 2010, 11:47:04 PM
I love the Indian markets for getting conehead amounts of spices for cheap!

One small correction/clarification to above.  Chana dal is a smaller relative of the chickpea (garbanzo).  Thanks for reminding me about it because I bought 10 pounds of this a while back, and have yet to figure out why it's the most popular in India.  I think I didn't cook it enough to bring out its "sweet and nutty" flavor when I cooked it up.  I'll give it another try.

http://www.foodsubs.com/Lentils.html
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 27, 2010, 11:47:39 PM
If things were not confusing enough with dal, there are several varieties of channa dal. http://www.foodsubs.com/Lentils.html

Yeah they are masoor dal above.

We buy the rice in the 10 lb bags of basmati.I think we pay $8 for the top of the shelf long grain stuff. I usually keep a large bag of basmati that I get from the Indian store and a 20 lb bag of jasmine rice from the Vietnamese

Recently learned a way to cook basmati very quickly. The guy at the Indian grocery store told me. Doesnt work if you are making byryani or a plov but it works great for plain rice. He told me you can cook rice like pasta. I was confused then he explained.

Use 5 cups of water for every one cup of rice. (crazy I know) First bring the salted water to a boil, then add the rice. boil on med for about five mins and then try some to make sure it is tender to your liking. then strain it well like pasta. Works great.

Hey bluesman, next time you are up we should go to the Subzi Mandi. Its a great Indian store. It is the size of a regular grocery store.It has three isles dedicated to spices. Many that I have never heard of.

Different subject, we went to Long Beach Island for the weekend.Loads of fun.We went to this landmark German restaurant there called Dutchman's Brau haus. It was a really nice place with great vies, the staff was very nice but I have never been to a worse restaurant in my life. I had the saur braten it was just awful. It was just over cooked roast beef with a gravy that tasted like it was instant gravy mix made with vinegar. The mashed potaotes were instant.  :o I cant believe it. My wife had a pork stew that was over cooked pork in can tomatoes. I have never been so disappointed in my life. We were going to complain and leave without paying but we were starved and regrettably stayed to eat. Awful! Prices were high too.

If you are ever in LBI stay away from this restaurant.  I wont say stay away completely cause there is a great beer bar out side on the dock called Quell .Great selection of beers and nice crowd. Just dont go inside the restaurant.

I have to make some saur braten soon cause damn, I feel dirty.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: dj99 on September 27, 2010, 11:56:59 PM
I'll have to try that way to make rice italian style!

I make my basmati and jasmine rice in the microwave since I found out how with a recipe from the cookbook "Moghul Microwave".

Take cups of rice & water, 1 cup rice to 2 cups water ratio, in a microwave dish with a dash of salt.  Cook, uncovered 15-18 minutes on high, or until most of the water is evaporated or absorbed.  Cover and cook on high 4 minutes more.  Fluff with a fork.  I have done this many, many times.  I have only cooked 2 cups of rice at a time this way.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on September 28, 2010, 01:13:38 AM
Different subject, we went to Long Beach Island for the weekend.Loads of fun.We went to this landmark German restaurant there called Dutchman's Brau haus. It was a really nice place with great vies, the staff was very nice but I have never been to a worse restaurant in my life. I had the saur braten it was just awful. It was just over cooked roast beef with a gravy that tasted like it was instant gravy mix made with vinegar. The mashed potaotes were instant.  :o I cant believe it. My wife had a pork stew that was over cooked pork in can tomatoes. I have never been so disappointed in my life. We were going to complain and leave without paying but we were starved and regrettably stayed to eat. Awful! Prices were high too.

It'd be so cool to own a business that didn't give a damn about repeat business. I got hit like that last time I was in Toronto at a seafood restaurant. Pier XX something or another alluding to left coast fish type places. Lot's of glossy ads in the travel mags, in the hotel directory, in the coupon books, just everywhere. Man it sucked!

There was a Balkan bistro though that made up for it. Mom and Pop shop - it was cool.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 28, 2010, 01:27:55 AM
The German place was packed too. Guess the masses just dont care.


Wow that reminds me, I should make some risotto soon. Need that round Aborio rice for that.  

Yeah, I love my Indian grocery store. They have a whole section of cookware. I could go nuts in there.

I got a Indian bicycle there too. Its a Hero. Largest bicycle manufacturer in the world. Bigger than all the others put together I here.

Its one of these.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoxS0IDiv7Y i

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 28, 2010, 01:35:38 AM
Hey bluesman, next time you are up we should go to the Subzi Mandi. Its a great Indian store. It is the size of a regular grocery store.It has three isles dedicated to spices. Many that I have never heard of.

Sounds like a plan!

I need to get some welding done soon.  ;)

Hey that Lemon Rice and masala dal looks like something for me to start out with.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 04:43:55 AM
Different subject, we went to Long Beach Island for the weekend.Loads of fun.We went to this landmark German restaurant there called Dutchman's Brau haus. It was a really nice place with great vies, the staff was very nice but I have never been to a worse restaurant in my life. I had the saur braten it was just awful. It was just over cooked roast beef with a gravy that tasted like it was instant gravy mix made with vinegar. The mashed potaotes were instant.  :o I cant believe it. My wife had a pork stew that was over cooked pork in can tomatoes. I have never been so disappointed in my life. We were going to complain and leave without paying but we were starved and regrettably stayed to eat. Awful! Prices were high too.

If you are ever in LBI stay away from this restaurant.  I wont say stay away completely cause there is a great beer bar out side on the dock called Quell .Great selection of beers and nice crowd. Just dont go inside the restaurant.
I grew up on LBI, but left after high school and never went back for very long.  Never went to the Dutchman, but I know it was pricey.  Next time try the Owl Tree, if it's still there.  Great food.  Kind of pricey but worth it, or at least it was 20 years ago or so.  Saw Ray Liotta there once.  A bit far from the Dutchman though.

That rice trick is cool, it makes perfect sense but I never thought of that.  I like the rice cooker I have though, I can set the timer in the morning and have cooked rice when I get home.  So it's like it's done in no time at all :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 28, 2010, 11:51:50 AM
Get out, what part of LBI? We stay in Beach Heaven. But I like Barniget much better. Thats where Old Barney is. And Mustache Bills diner. There are lots of really great restaurants on LBI, I picked the Dutchman cause of beer. Still a mistake though. Should have eaten and then gone there.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07772.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07740.jpg)

The squirt did all 340 steps herself.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07678.jpg)

Sorry for the diversion.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 28, 2010, 12:08:13 PM
The German place was packed too. Guess the masses just dont care.

The masses like instant mashed potatoes!  The idea of a bad sauerbraten though, just sounds stomach turning.  Sauerbraten is one of those dishes that hangs in the balance between excellence and abhorrent vomitousness, with all the vinegar in it.  Someone doing it badly, I can just see that bypassing just being unacceptable or lackluster and going straight to terribly, ungodly bad.

Yeah, that'd be really disappointing, particularly because German food can be so good when done right...its very hearty homestyle food.  Our local German place isn't cheap, but I leave there each time thinking that I could come close to cooking a meal that good...but not quite there, yet.  The schnitzel is perfect.

Maybe their problem is that its a German place that was started by a Dutchman! 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 04:07:02 PM
Get out, what part of LBI? We stay in Beach Heaven. But I like Barniget much better. Thats where Old Barney is. And Mustache Bills diner. There are lots of really great restaurants on LBI, I picked the Dutchman cause of beer. Still a mistake though. Should have eaten and then gone there.
We lived in Surf City.  Summer job was at Farias's rentals until I was old enough for a year round job, then I worked at the Surf City pharmacy.  Lots of good memories.  I was back about 10 years ago and the place had really changed, but haven't been back since.

And since this is supposed to be about regional cooking, there's lots of great seafood shops to get fresh fish and clams.  Flounder, lightly breaded and pan fried, or steamed littlenecks . . . delicious.  Fresh bluefish, also excellent.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 28, 2010, 09:57:02 PM
Yeah, I dont know what I was thinking. Should have just gone out for seafood. There were still a few places open but it looked like most wrapped it up for the season.

Pinky's was still open should have just gone there.

Stopped at Surf City Fishery on the way home. Got some beautiful scallops that Im pretty sure were not local and some local flounder.

I lightly chopped the scallops and made sort of a stuffing for the flounder, mixed it with a little butter white wine and old bay. then broiled it. Squeezed lemon on it before serving. WOW. Guess that made up for it.

I love the land lubber pirate stories of long beach island. Ya know the ones with many of the early residents said to walk an ass in circles on the beach with a bright lantern on it to try and trick the ships into thinking that it was the light house. The ships thinking it was the inlet would turn in and crash on the sholes and then the booty and the dead would wash on shore to be plundered.

The locals claim there is no validity to these stories. Yet it is documented that when there was a wreck and the sirens sounded lots of people flocked to the beach to see what was going to wash ashore. HMMM.
If you ask me they are all still pirates, at least at the Dutchman they are.  :D

I have a couple of blue fish that were caught by a friend up in Cape Cod. gonna smoke them for sure.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 10:09:43 PM
I really miss the smoked whiting.  But then I can get really good smoked salmon now.  There are tradeoffs.

Here's a question - Maine lobster, or Dungeness crab?  I honestly can't decide which I prefer, both are so good fresh.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: jeffy on September 28, 2010, 10:25:48 PM
I had a crab roll at lunch today at Gritty mcDuff's in Portland, Me.  Although it was pretty good I think I'd have to say I prefer Dungeness crab.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 10:32:01 PM
I don't know if Gritty's has the best lobster roll in ME, but never really liked lobster rolls anyway.  Whole lobster for me.  Whole Dungeness too.  Steamed either way.  So good.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: jeffy on September 28, 2010, 10:38:39 PM
Best crab I ever had was just a bunch of Dungeness piled on a bun, somewhere on the Oregon coast.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 28, 2010, 10:44:41 PM
Ill take Maine lobster!!

Never had a lobster roll.

I like king crab legs better than Dungenss. Hey, how did those crabs get that name anyway?

Have to say my favorite seafood dish is a broiled seafood combo. Lobster, shrimp, scallops, clams, mussels and flounder. Some corn on the cob, baked potato. the suff od dreams.

Second favorite would be a chippino fra diavalo.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 29, 2010, 12:22:37 AM
I live in KC...our seafood scene is, well....never mind.

I did snag a 10lb box of pollack for 1.89 a lb.  Scoff at the cheap fish, you may, but I take what I can get and thats an insanely good price around here.  Nice for pan-frying.

This Friday I am planning to go to a nice little sushi place.  Some nigorizake, tempura, and lots of sashimi.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on September 29, 2010, 01:01:46 AM
Quote
I have a couple of blue fish that were caught by a friend up in Cape Cod. gonna smoke them for sure.

If you do, save some and make smoked bluefish pate.  They make that at Legal Seafoods and it's wonderful.  I can dig out the recipe if you need it; it's in their cookbook.

Quote
Here's a question - Maine lobster, or Dungeness crab?  I honestly can't decide which I prefer, both are so good fresh.

Damn, that's hard.  I used to get Maine lobster every year on vacation at Cape Code growing up.  Love the lobster rolls too.  Dungeness crab is probably my favorite, though.  I took one trip to the PNW for a week with the wife and think we had crab or salmon for every meal.  Best Dungeness I ever had was at Scott's Seafood Grill in San Francisco, though.  Whole crab, served cold, with mayo on the side.  Some warm sourdough bread.  Yum.  Their seafood saute is great too.  Those big Dungeness knuckles sauteed whole with other seafood in a beurre blanc.  Decandent.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 29, 2010, 01:19:47 AM
I have to agree with Gordon...Maine Lobster or Dungeness Crab is a toss up.  :-\

Here's one of my favorites.

Bouillabaisse - a traditional Provencal fish stew originating from the port city of Marseille.
It's a fish soup containing various kinds of cooked fish and shellfish and vegetables, flavored with a variety of herbs and spices such as garlic, orange peel, basil, bay leaf, fennel and saffron.
There are at least three kinds of fish in a traditional bouillabaisse, typically scorpionfish, sea robin and European conger and it can also include gilt-head bream turbot, monkfish, mullet or silver hake. It also usually includes shellfish and other seafood such as sea urchins, mussels, velvet crabs, spider crab or octopus. More expensive versions may add langoustine. Vegetables such as leeks, onions, tomatoes, celery and potatoes are simmered together with the broth and served with the fish. The broth is traditionally served with a rouille, a mayonnaise made of olive oil, garlic, saffron and cayenne pepper on grilled slices of bread.

I like it with a rich fish stock containing a spicy and herbal quality.  I had it most recently in New Orleans. I prefer it with alot of shellfish like crab, mussels, and clams. The rich stock raises this dish up to levels beyond savory. This dish has a thousand variations but is best served on three plates. One with the fish stock, the second with the assortment of sea creatures and the third with hearty bread.


(http://www.travelsignposts.com/France/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/bouillabaisse_588.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on September 29, 2010, 05:10:33 AM
Again with the making me hungry. How about Bouillabaisse's poor cousin Cioppino (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cioppino)?

I had it in Santa Barbara down at the wharf. Thinking about a trip to NO just to hit some restaurants. Where did you find the Bouillabaisse there bluesman?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on September 29, 2010, 05:41:24 AM
I can't hear 'bouillabaisse' without thinking of the movie "Our Man Flint" (a Bond spoof starring James Coburn). He goes around tasting every bouillabaisse in Marseille trying to match what someone ate who used a poisoned dart.  It's amusing to watch him take one taste and start rattling off the recipe. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on September 29, 2010, 06:00:36 AM
That movie had some influence on Austin Powers I think. It plays all the time. Haven't finished watching it tho.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: narvin on September 29, 2010, 02:51:43 PM
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs157.ash2/41184_416850281019_531731019_5359248_7170566_n.jpg)

We steamed some 2.5 pound lobsters up in Cape Cod this summer.  Delicious.  I'll still take blue crab as my favorite, though  :-X
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 29, 2010, 04:05:42 PM
[img width=640 height=383]http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs157.ash2

We steamed some 2.5 pound lobsters up in Cape Cod this summer.  Delicious.  I'll still take blue crab as my favorite, though  :-X
We got a bushel of blue crab when we were in NC this past summer, it was awesome!  But it's still no Dungeness.

Nice icon narvin, Mr. Boh!

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 29, 2010, 04:26:38 PM
I'll still take blue crab as my favorite, though  :-X

Blue crabs are my favorite shellfish.  The flavor is second to none IMO.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on September 29, 2010, 05:17:52 PM
I'll eat most seafood, if it's done right.  We have a house bouillabaisse recipe that is out of this world.  My wife makes the stock and I'm not sure what all goes into it except clams, mussels, rockfish or some other firm white fleshed fish, scallops, andouille, tomatoes, garlic, onion.  The broth is very rich.  I don't know what herbs and spices she uses, but I must say I can eat the crap out of that stuff.  Especially with some crispy homemade bread.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: jeffy on September 29, 2010, 08:14:44 PM
I can't hear 'bouillabaisse' without thinking of the movie "Our Man Flint" (a Bond spoof starring James Coburn). He goes around tasting every bouillabaisse in Marseille trying to match what someone ate who used a poisoned dart.  It's amusing to watch him take one taste and start rattling off the recipe. 
I think that one was "In Like Flint"
I love the bouillabaisse scene.  As soon as he tastes the right batch he eyes the room for the bad guys.

I've been perfecting shrimp and grits over the last year.  Maple-wood smoked bacon is the key, with red, yellow and poblano peppers for flavor and color before sautéing the shrimp.  Creamy cheese grits make it divine.

I make some darned good mussels, too.  Chorizo, garlic, shallots and whatever homebrewed Belgian beer I happen to have on tap.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 29, 2010, 09:58:56 PM
I make some darned good mussels, too.  Chorizo, garlic, shallots and whatever homebrewed Belgian beer I happen to have on tap.
No offense Jeff, but how could you make anything bad with those ingredients? :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on October 05, 2010, 05:01:20 PM
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/th_Photo0133-1.jpg?t=1286297663)
Scallops fra diavolo
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/th_Photo0136.jpg?t=1286297663)
With crusty bread on pasta with loccatelli on top.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on October 06, 2010, 12:46:02 AM
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/th_Photo0133-1.jpg?t=1286297663)
Scallops fra diavolo
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Mobile%20Uploads/th_Photo0136.jpg?t=1286297663)
With crusty bread on pasta with loccatelli on top.

That's just the brand name, right? Or is it like Ben and Jerry's is to ice cream where it's considered above grade.
Bigger pics next time, looks good from what I can see (tons of scallops). But I have no clue what's actually in the dish - aside from .... scallops.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 06, 2010, 02:30:30 AM
Good fra di avolo (The devils) sauce is a spicy fresh tomato and fish stock marinara. One of my very favorites.

While we are talking seafood here is a strange combination.

Portuguese style Roast pork and clams.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009091-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 06, 2010, 03:03:33 AM
Good fra di avolo (The devils) sauce is a spicy fresh tomato and fish stock marinara. One of my very favorites.

While we are talking seafood here is a strange combination.

Portuguese style Roast pork and clams.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009091-1.jpg)

I like Fra di avolo with lobster or shrimp. I don't see anything wrong with eating pork and clams together either. More people should.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 06, 2010, 04:42:47 AM
I like Fra di avolo with lobster or shrimp.
I love fra diavolo, I used to go to a place in NJ that served it with calamari, clams, and mussels.  Excellent!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 06, 2010, 06:05:16 AM
I guess this could be ethnic. Salsa Verde.

Easy to make it's basically a chimchurri sauce made additionally with bread, capers and anchovies. Make the sauce in the processor or blender. Based it upon Christopher Kimball's recipe, with a few minor adaptations.

I used fish sauce instead of anchovies. This sauce is unbelievable.

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TKwN5E5KB_I/AAAAAAAAASg/ktnBiILZQKE/s640/2010-10-05%2013.21.35.jpg)

Oh what to do with this roasted pork loin...?

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TKwN5U4w_LI/AAAAAAAAASk/c7cBifhPsHc/s640/2010-10-05%2013.21.14.jpg)

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TKwN5u5vsdI/AAAAAAAAASo/dJqMe4qBryg/s640/2010-10-05%2013.27.48.jpg)

And some fresh Atlantic salmon pan steamed in chardonnay.

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TKwN51Y2zHI/AAAAAAAAASs/eip2Xcx6l1Q/s640/2010-10-06%2000.23.37.jpg)

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TKwN6ah2NuI/AAAAAAAAASw/I3bHUO2Kx0g/s512/2010-10-06%2000.27.46.jpg)




Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 06, 2010, 06:43:34 AM
Looks awesome - my salsa verde is more tomatillo/avocado based, I haven't made that kind of sauce before.  Then again I generally despise capers due to a bad bagel w/lox and capers I had once.  I had good fried capers more recently, so I might be willing to try them again.  They're currently ranked somewhere above beets on the delicious food scale, but are still below the edible line. :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on October 06, 2010, 12:57:45 PM
My sauce was olive oil, fresh tomatoes, garlic, onion, hot peppers (lemon peppers), salt, pepper, fresh parsley, juice from scallops, some sechuan peppers, too.  I will work on the photography, I used my phone, not the best, I'll admit.  The scallops were very big and tasty too. ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 07, 2010, 03:05:41 AM
When you say juice from the scallops do you mean you had live scallops in the shell? Cause if you did I am gonna just die with envy.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on October 07, 2010, 05:22:05 PM
Cap, they were fresh shucked, but not by me. :) And the flavor was heavenly.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 07, 2010, 05:35:02 PM
Oh Im sure.

Is there somewhere down there to get them live? I have never been able to find that here. I had them frseh shucked in Belgium, ate them raw.they were awesome. Better than the muscle itself was this other orange pice that was in there. Cant remember what that part was called but it was fantastic.

Here is what they looked like.

(http://www.barratlantic.co.uk/templates/barratla2010/images/items/scallops.jpg)

And all the restaurants and sea food stores there had them like this with the orange piece still attached. I dont know why we dont get them that way here.

(http://www.aliciachang.ca/uploaded_images/20090306_scallops_coral_cooked-719722.jpg)

But then again I was eating raw mussels in Belgium and they were delicious, tried doing that here and they tasted awful.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tumarkin on October 07, 2010, 07:23:15 PM
We can drive over to the FL gulf coast (about an hour or less from Gainesville depending where you go) and go out snorkling on the flats for scallops, Easy depth of 3-6'. They are so cool as they spurt across the sand trying to escape, but still pretty easy to get your limit. They are the smaller bay scallops.... my niece calls them sea marshmallows. Lots of yummy things you can do with them.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 07, 2010, 10:15:47 PM
Might be nice to do some kind of a clams casino out of those live bay scallops. Are they hard to shuck? I image they are with those ridges.

I wish there was somewhere around here to get Calamari Steaks. I have only seen it around northern California. They are slices of giant squid.  Sometimes called Grande Calamari.

I had it a couple of times at Dorns in Morro Bay.

Man they are delicious. I googled these images.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_1-RL5laVxJ8/S9x_wTCNgvI/AAAAAAAAC_M/PnicUIkKYh0/s1600/Calamari+steaks.jpg)

(http://www.fullspeedfishing.com/gallery/data/500/medium/DSCN56381.JPG)

(http://behindblondiepark.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/colossal-squid-2.jpg)

I would even have them shipped. Any California people know a local seafood place that ships?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on October 07, 2010, 11:45:49 PM
Better than the muscle itself was this other orange pice that was in there. Cant remember what that part was called but it was fantastic.


I thought, if I remember a few episodes of New Scandinavian Cooking correctly, that's the roe.  Supposed to be quite rich.  On an episode or two they would serve fresh out of the ocean (in fact on the boat!) scallop sliced very thinly, drizzled lightly with salt and oil, and garnished with the roe.  rarely gets fresher than that!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 08, 2010, 03:28:46 AM
I havenet seen that show in a while. I even forget what station it is on.

We made a sevichi with scallops that was really really good. This winter I want to try and cold smoke some scallops. Try to get them around the consistency as nova lox.

I want to cold smoke some lobster tail meat too. I dont think that would come out like lox though, its a pretty tough muscle.

I still want to make that cold smoked lobster bacon club sandwich.

Still havent order the cold smoke thing yet. I will for sure though.

What was it called again?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 08, 2010, 05:48:46 AM
Still havent order the cold smoke thing yet. I will for sure though.

What was it called again?
ProQ.
http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/Order%20USA.html

I've still only done one trial, but picked up a 5 lb loaf of Tillamook cheddar today.  I'll be doing some more testing this weekend  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 08, 2010, 06:05:46 AM
Gonna be a lot of cheese eating going on too. :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 08, 2010, 07:00:39 AM
 ;D

I'm already mentally compiling a list of recipes.  Smoky mac-n-cheese, cheese bread, cheese soup, poppers . . .

I'll probably give a lot of it away though, I can't eat that much cheese.  I'll have to have the neighbors over.  :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 08, 2010, 10:23:21 AM
;D

I'm already mentally compiling a list of recipes.  Smoky mac-n-cheese, cheese bread, cheese soup, poppers . . .

I'll probably give a lot of it away though, I can't eat that much cheese.  I'll have to have the neighbors over.  :)

I am a cheese lover and when you can add some smoke to it....well it's heavenly.

I want to try a smoked mac-n-cheese someday...that sounds really good.

I'm also thinking about a smoked lobster mac-n-cheese.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 08, 2010, 04:46:08 PM

I'm also thinking about a smoked lobster mac-n-cheese.  ;D
Yum!  I'll have to get some dungeness to throw in the mix :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 01:05:10 AM
Puerto Rican

Arroz amarillo y frijoles con alitos de pollo frito.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC08027.jpg)

Easy to do with the presure cooker. Brown some onions, garlic, green pepper, cumin seeds, oregano,paprika, bay leaf, salt and pepper. Add fresh or can tomatoes, dried kidney beans or other. and pour in chicken stock or water till beans are just covered. Add a splash of white wine and a splash vinegar. Close up the pressure cooker lid and bring to temp until the pressure release valve is rattling. Then turn to med-low for about twenty mins a half hour.

For the rice while the beans are in the presure cooker. Just brown some onions, and garlic in oil, add chopped green peppers, chopped tomatoe, chopped carrot, peas cumin seeds, ground anato seeds, salt pepper, oregano, a little tomato pasteand stirr. Add the washed rice toss a little and then add water. Bring to a boil,cover and then simmer on low till all of the water is absorbed. Uncover right away and let it breath for a little while before serving.

For the chicken wings. De-articulate them and discard the tips or cut them prior to making beans and make a chicken stock with them. Thats what I do. Wash the wing pieces and pat them dry now sprinkle them liberally with Anato seed powder, paprika, salt and pepper.

Pan  fry over med heat in a half inch of oil till crisp, turn over and do the same.

Man, I really really love Puerto Rican food. I dont know why it gets such a bad rap.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on October 09, 2010, 01:11:22 AM
Puerto Rican
Pan  fry over med heat in a half inch of oil till crisp, turn over and do the same.
Man, I really really love Puerto Rican food. I dont know why it gets such a bad rap.

How long do you keep your oil? Keeping it in a dutch oven, would that work?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 01:21:08 AM
They would fry great in a dutch oven. That is the best fryer in the world. Deep fried is the way to go with these wings. Or any recipe for that matter. I cheated and pan fried them.

I put my used oil in a can that I use to brush on my outdoor cooking equipment. 

I have a big electric fryer in the basement. Just dont use it much. It takes a lot of oil and if you are not using it a lot it becomes rancid.

I also buy frying oil in five gallon jugs so it lasts a long time and costs less.

One of the PR specialties is deep fried pork ribs. Wow are they good. haven't tried it at home yet.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 09, 2010, 03:17:26 AM
Latin cusine is very colorful.  I am a big rice and beans fan...if done right, not to mention fried plaintains.

Very nice dish Cap...

Black Bean Soup would round out that meal nicely.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on October 09, 2010, 01:40:25 PM
I have a big electric fryer in the basement. Just dont use it much.

Thanksgiving is coming up - here comes your chance to use it.
Then maybe the following week you have fish - and then toss the oil.

Oh btw: no fanfare for hitting 1000? Congrats.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 02:32:45 PM
I am hole.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on October 09, 2010, 09:02:18 PM
I'll leave that alone ^^^^^^^^.  ::)


Anyone use file' for more than just gumbo? Or is it automatically gumbo because you used it?
I got beans(11mix) going right now with the leftover ham I smoked last week.
Maybe just a big teaspoon makes it just come alive for me.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 11:24:26 PM
We are all just holes to fill with posts.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 09, 2010, 11:46:18 PM
We are all just holes to fill with posts.

Nice pun! :D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 10, 2010, 01:40:34 AM
We are all just holes to fill with posts.

 :o

Speaking of File Gumbo

(http://img.foodnetwork.com/FOOD/2003/12/31/em1d31_mr_johns_chorizo_gumbo2_lg.jpg)

I want to prepare this American treasure soon.  ;)

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 13, 2010, 05:32:09 AM
My colleague made posole or pozole and we fed probably 20 people if not more.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TLVAJP5m5KI/AAAAAAAAATs/NIjthbCXBIo/s640/2010-10-12%2018.19.06.jpg)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TLVAJaZ-35I/AAAAAAAAATw/e1mpCTRu_2Q/s640/2010-10-12%2018.18.43.jpg)

It was delicious. Not very spicy which surprised me. More of a delicately seasoned red broth. Comments were: "just right" and "spiced perfectly!" Contrary to popular perception, Mexican cuisine is flavorful but is rarely picoso or hot. One can add hot ingredients if they want to, but grandma might not like it made in the dish. I'm the only anglo on my shift and usually I make the salsa!

Chopped ice-berg lettuce and the soup on top. Hominy, chicken breast and pork neck-bones. Squeeze of lime and eaten with a thick tostada. I think it was missing a little fresh cilantro and aguacate as a garnish, But maybe that was an oversight.

There wasn't a drop left.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Robert on October 14, 2010, 02:20:34 PM
I love pozole. A little hole in the wall Mexican restaurant (should there be any other kinds???) makes an awesome one and gives you a small plate with turnips, white onions, fresh jalapenos and a seasoning blend to add to the soup at you own choosings. I may have to search out a recipe and try it at home.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on October 18, 2010, 12:48:39 AM
I love pozole!  Somewhere buried in this thread are some photos of my pozole verde.  Mine isn't spicy either -- just flavorful.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: deepsouth on October 19, 2010, 01:41:59 PM
not sure where to put this, so i'll put it here....

shrimp and crabmeat alfredo i made from scratch....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1e9bd48d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/4c368a2d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2d1ff267.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/145f6a78.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5292fd76.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 03:58:25 PM
Awesome, that looks so good!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 19, 2010, 05:30:51 PM
Salivating! ;D

Cooking my lunch right now. Bean soup... :-\ Wish I had some shrimp right now!

I like making my own pasta, but don't find it to be significantly better than dried, with the exception of gnocci. They are alway better fresh.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 19, 2010, 06:47:33 PM
Oh man, that looks awesome.

I wish we all lived closer together. Imagine the pot lucks we could have!!!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: deepsouth on October 19, 2010, 06:57:27 PM
Oh man, that looks awesome.

I wish we all lived closer together. Imagine the pot lucks we could have!!!

those would be some fine pot lucks!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on October 21, 2010, 08:21:15 PM
Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West, currently in Zion N.P....I have to say, I miss cooking!  Tired of paying through the nose for lackluster restaurant food.  I grilled peppers and Italian sausages last night, but with my extremely limited implements, being on a road trip and all, it is sort of like riding a bicycle with a broken leg in a cast.  Nice view though.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/20Oct10/Oct21041.jpg)

I did manage to pick up a couple bottles of slivovitz for a very low price of 11.99 in California at Trader Joes.  The Zwack brand, from Hungary...retails online closer to $30 so I happily bought three to take home!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 21, 2010, 08:26:29 PM
Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West

I was wondering what happened to you. 

C'mon Nic....Don't you know you have to let us know when your going on vacation.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 21, 2010, 08:29:22 PM
Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West

I was wondering what happened to you.  

C'mon Nic....Don't you know you have to let us know when your going on vacation.  ;D
He did, you just weren't paying attention.   ;D

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=165.msg46636#msg46636

Those look great!  I think the most I've smoked is 4 hours and I didn't see much coloring, except for maybe a slight darkening of the pepper jack (that may've been my imagination).  These pics make me want to do some straight away, but alas, I have to go on a lovely two week vacation this morning, at 6AM, driving across the southwest to california and back, seeing 5 national parks and generally relaxing, so it will have to wait til I get back, for shame.   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 21, 2010, 08:33:00 PM
Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West

I was wondering what happened to you.  

C'mon Nic....Don't you know you have to let us know when your going on vacation.  ;D
He did, you just weren't paying attention.   ;D

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=165.msg46636#msg46636

Those look great!  I think the most I've smoked is 4 hours and I didn't see much coloring, except for maybe a slight darkening of the pepper jack (that may've been my imagination).  These pics make me want to do some straight away, but alas, I have to go on a lovely two week vacation this morning, at 6AM, driving across the southwest to california and back, seeing 5 national parks and generally relaxing, so it will have to wait til I get back, for shame.   ;D

Tom ...I knew I could count on you to keep me straight.  Thanks.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: jeffy on October 21, 2010, 09:00:35 PM
"Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West, currently in Zion N.P."

I had a great time at Zion a few years ago.  Hiked Angels Landing and the Narrows.  Nice Park!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 21, 2010, 10:35:58 PM
Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West, currently in Zion N.P....I have to say, I miss cooking!  Tired of paying through the nose for lackluster restaurant food.  I grilled peppers and Italian sausages last night, but with my extremely limited implements, being on a road trip and all, it is sort of like riding a bicycle with a broken leg in a cast.  Nice view though.

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/20Oct10/Oct21041.jpg)

I did manage to pick up a couple bottles of slivovitz for a very low price of 11.99 in California at Trader Joes.  The Zwack brand, from Hungary...retails online closer to $30 so I happily bought three to take home!

Hey nic, good to have ya back.When do you get home? Come on man, get back to work they cant survive without you!

I didnt know Zwack made slivovica. Interesting.

Here is an interesting tid bit. In Hungary Zwack is called Unicum. Dont know why they change the name for US distributions.

Was it szilva palinka? or did it say Slivovitz or some other Hungarian word. I think the palinka is different no, not clear?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on October 22, 2010, 12:38:01 AM
"Logging in after a couple weeks travelling the West, currently in Zion N.P."

I had a great time at Zion a few years ago.  Hiked Angels Landing and the Narrows.  Nice Park!

Maniac!    ;D   I think if I got in better shape and prepared properly I could do the Narrows, but Angels Landing, all the way to the top, good lord, I don't think I could ever do that.  But then, even me saying that is the sort of thing that makes me almost subconsciously resolve to do it.  My wife may want to bolster my life insurance before, though...


Cap, the slivo is marked slivovitz but I'm not sure if it has the palinka notation as well.  It's marked kosher and 3 years old, and is 47% ABV.  Here's the bottle for German markets, I think...the bottle shape is about the same.  My guess is that the imported label doesn't bother with Hungarian terminology to avoid confusion, it seems slivovitz has won out in America as the standard term for East/Central European plum brandy.

(http://www.paprikaland.de/catalog/images/big/kosher-szilva.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 22, 2010, 02:07:34 AM
Tom ...I knew I could count on you to keep me straight.  Thanks.  ;)
Someone has to, right? :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 22, 2010, 11:46:40 AM
Kosher? that is strange.

I didnt think you cared that much about kosher being the slutty shikza you are, nic.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on October 23, 2010, 03:03:41 AM
I would reply with some humorous banter but my comic yiddish is woefully inadequate.

I gather that the Zwack company may be run by Jews?  Read it somewhere.  Although I cringe from even writing "run by Jews" as it makes me sound like I'm about to quote from the Protocols of the Elders of Zion and go all apes*** crazy but I just mean it in a literal, precise sense that it may be a somewhat Jewish company...at least by my vague recollection.  I care not a whit as pork products are not particularly necessary for me in alcoholic beverages.  My smoked weizenbeer may have smelled like a bacon beer but it was only an olfactory hallucination.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 24, 2010, 11:26:13 PM
Interesting History. Nothing about them being Jewish though.

From Wiki.

Unicum was created by Dr. József Zwack, the Royal Physician to the Habsburg Court, for Emperor Joseph II in 1790. It was not until 1840 that his 20-year-old son, Jozsef Zwack founded J. Zwack & Co., the first Hungarian liqueur manufacturer. By the early 1900s, the Zwack company had become one of the leading distilleries in central Europe, producing over 200 liqueurs and spirits, exported all over the world.

In 1915, Jozsef’s son, Lajos, took over the factory and left it to his two sons, Bela and Janos, upon his death. During World War II, Budapest and the Zwack factory were completely destroyed. After the war, with the Communist regime, the factory was nationalized in 1948. The Zwack family fled the country. Janos Zwack with his son Peter, great grandson of József, was able to escape with the original Zwack recipe in his pocket. Bela Zwack remained behind to give the communist government a “fake” Zwack recipe and went on to become a regular factory worker.

Meanwhile, Janos and Peter migrated to the United States and after several months in Ellis Island’s refugee camp were granted US entry purely because they possessed the Zwack recipe. They later settled in the Bronx in 1949 when Peter was 22 years old. It was in the US that Peter learned all the ins and outs of the spirits industry.

In 1988, just one year before the fall of Communism, Peter Zwack returned to Hungary and resumed production with the original Zwack formula. He repurchased his family business from the State in the summer of 1989, and by the spring of 1990, the original Zwack product was reintroduced to the Hungarian market. That same year, Peter was named Hungarian Ambassador to the United States[2].

The Zwack Company has since resumed its position as the leading distillery in eastern Europe. In 2008, Peter Zwack handed over the company’s leadership to the family’s 6th generation, his own children, Sandor and Izabella Zwack, to continue the family tradition. One of their first initiatives was to launch Zwack in the US, a landmark in the history of the company and for any internationally revered brand.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwack_liqueur

Here is how you will find the label in Europe.

(http://www.mult-kor.hu/attachmets/10274/unicum_big.jpg)



For no real reason it seems that Zwack and Becherovka are Christmas things around our house.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on October 24, 2010, 11:53:01 PM
Just uncapped a bottle, and wow!  The first thing I thought was, hmm...some parallels to other kosher alcohols (manishewitz!) because this smelled like Welch's concord grape juice!  Extremely fruit forward and sweet smelling.  I thought I had a grape juice liqueur on my hands but thankfully the sweetness abates in the taste.  I don't know that its my favorite slivovitz by any stretch, but it sure is interesting.  And with substantial kick, too.  Probably not a Jewish company then, I don't recall where I read that.

Got some kajmak, ajvar, and suva govedja today. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on October 31, 2010, 12:16:04 AM
Not sure if this should really go in this thread, because I think pot pie is pretty ubiquitous (and, thus, not necessarily "regional").  But, we made some really good chicken pot pie tonight with a biscuit crust.

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/photo-2.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 01, 2010, 12:50:25 AM
Man those look good. May have to give it a try.My wife does not really like pot pie, but she does like biscuits.

Ethiopian tonight.

I fermented my injera batter for a week. Seemed to work out well still not a fluffy and resilient as I would like them to be.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC08736.jpg)

Clockwise from left to right starting at 9:00 :

Yesiga t'ibs

ye'atakilt alich'a

ye'abesha gomen

yemisir kik we't
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 01, 2010, 12:56:03 AM
Beef, chicken, greens then beans? Looks tasty!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 01, 2010, 01:19:26 AM
Very nice work gents. Makin' me hungry.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 04, 2010, 12:35:54 AM
Tajikistan

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC08827.jpg)

Pumpkin stuffed with rice onions, quinces and almonds served on top of meat sauce and kefir.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 04, 2010, 01:05:48 AM
I see your putting those kefir grains to good use.  Looks tasty.  I like the pumpkin twist.
It's rapidly approaching Pho time.  By the time I get up your way to do some more brewstand welding  8)
...which will be sooner than later I hope
we need to go for some Pho.  Unless of course, you have something else in mind.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 04, 2010, 01:14:13 AM
Thang Long Pho works for me, haven't been there in a while.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on November 04, 2010, 07:28:03 AM
Tajikistan

Pumpkin stuffed with rice onions, quinces and almonds served on top of meat sauce and kefir.
What's the thing to the right of the plate?  :)

Thang Long Pho works for me, haven't been there in a while.
Try Pho King.  It's excellent.  :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 04, 2010, 07:36:14 AM
Is Pho King a chain? BTW the pho soft tendon and bible tripe with rare beef is probably my favorite combo. But just give me the tendon and I'm good. It's getting colder. Noodle soup.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on November 04, 2010, 03:53:58 PM
Is Pho King a chain?
I don't know, there's a few in this area so a small chain at least.  I don't know if they exist in other areas, but you can't beat the name.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: ryang on November 04, 2010, 04:26:36 PM
(http://www.hewnandhammered.com/pho/images/phokinggrandopening.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: narvin on November 04, 2010, 04:29:29 PM
Thang Long Pho works for me, haven't been there in a while.
Try Pho King.  It's excellent.  :)

The result of Pho King is often unicum...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 04, 2010, 04:53:01 PM
Pho (pronounced "phir" in English) is influenced by the Chinese and French cuisines, and was believed to have originally derived from a French soup, "pot au feu",(pot on fire) which Wikipedia defines as a French beef stew. This is usually a mixture of cuts of beef, vegetable, and spice.

I love this dish on a cold winter day.

Here's the basic ingredients.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/dinolle/SDNtoP6Q2gI/AAAAAAAAA5E/3Gl6DyUWJV0/IMG_6792_vietnamese_pho_soup_ingrediants.jpg)

And to the bowl... ;)

(http://www.thesunblog.com/gourmetgal/pho.jpg)

photos taken from the web.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 04, 2010, 05:44:51 PM
That's it! Don't have time today but tomorrow- oh tomorrow. And I'll drive the extra miles to Pho Cong Ly. We do the basil-cilantro-bean sprout here but mint sounds nice. I might have even had it though my memory escapes me.

And a half order of fried spring-rolls.

Here's an example off the web. I actually judge a Vietnamese place by how they handle and prepare their spring-rolls not their pho. If they get that wrong (many do incidentally) odds are their pho is substandard too.

(http://bp0.blogger.com/_yAkOoaUjzNs/RzsQcQUCEWI/AAAAAAAABRs/bkKxj_sNdTs/s400/P1050016.JPG)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 04, 2010, 07:10:48 PM
Pho (pronounced "phir" in English) is influenced by the Chinese and French cuisines, and was believed to have originally derived from a French soup, "pot au feu",(pot on fire) which Wikipedia defines as a French beef stew. This is usually a mixture of cuts of beef, vegetable, and spice.

I love this dish on a cold winter day.

Here's the basic ingredients.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/dinolle/SDNtoP6Q2gI/AAAAAAAAA5E/3Gl6DyUWJV0/IMG_6792_vietnamese_pho_soup_ingrediants.jpg)

And to the bowl... ;)

(http://www.thesunblog.com/gourmetgal/pho.jpg)

photos taken from the web.

nice...

No Phoking around here. But we call Thang Long, Long Thang

Pho King. Thats great. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgX2q9WPoqo
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on November 05, 2010, 03:53:58 AM
Phir?  Always sounded like "fuh" to me.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on November 05, 2010, 07:19:14 AM
Phir?  Always sounded like "fuh" to me.
I used to work with a Vietnamese woman.  She definitely pronounced it "fuh".  How is "phir" different from "fur" anyway?   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 07, 2010, 10:06:07 PM
Ghanna for lunch today.

Groundnut stew with a chicken thigh and egg. Served with a fu fu of cassava root and cornmeal.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC08983.jpg)

I was looking all over for ground nut paste, couldnt find it. Finally went to a Senegalese store in West Philly. Walked in and the guy looked at me like I was crazy, I almost asked, what? Then he looked at me like I was even crazier when I asked him for some ground nut paste. He chuckled and went to the shelf to get a jar of peanut butter.  ::) Yep, Africans call peanuts groundnuts. Makes sense I guess.

Anyway, nice creamy spicey sauce, goes well with the fu fu. If you ever try to make this stew use real peanut butter , not skippy or something like that. I get the fresh ground stuff from Trader Joes.  

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on November 07, 2010, 10:53:05 PM
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 08, 2010, 01:03:10 AM
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

I don't know...but if I went to a vietnemese restaurant and asked for some Pho Que
they would probably look at me funny...and give me the finger.  ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 08, 2010, 01:28:21 AM
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

LMAO!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 08, 2010, 02:06:09 AM
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

It's a slow cook process - pho que long time...

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: phillamb168 on November 08, 2010, 09:57:54 AM
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?

It's a slow cook process - pho que long time...



http://www.hiyoooo.com/
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 08, 2010, 01:46:34 PM
I hear pho que is very popular with the Fugowee indians.

(man, I sure do miss Johnny and Ed!)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 08, 2010, 02:52:47 PM
If you made Pho with barbecued beef, would you call it Pho Que?
It's a slow cook process - pho que long time...

I thought that was love you long time...or is that the translation.

Ramen Noodles is a noodle soup that was originally imported to Japan from China in the Meiji Period. The Japanese adopted this dish in the 19th century and started calling it as Ramen. Ramen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese (la mian), which mean hand-pulled noodles.

After World War II, cheap flour imported from the U.S. swept the Japanese market and an intense food shortage in Japan, Ramen was became a popular food after World War II in Japan. Eventually, Ramen was voted the country’s national dish.



Have you ever had Shoyu Ramen-Shoyu Ramen is noodles in soy sauce flavored soup. Shoyu Ramen has typically a brown and clear color broth, based on a chicken/vegetable/fish/beef stock with plenty of soy sauce.

(http://www.1bestcuisineguide.com/images/ramen-noodles-shoyu-ramen.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 17, 2010, 01:08:39 AM
All right, enough Pho King around.

Lets talk Uzbek.

Plov.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09127.jpg)

All kinds of variations on this dish. This one is made by starting a stew. A mixture of chicken, carrots, onions, garlic, peas, zucchini, preserved lemon, tomato puree, a little wine and water. cumin seeds, fenugreek, oregano, cinnamon,  salt and pepper.

After the chicken is tender, estimate the liquid amount and then add an equal amount of basmati rice poured right on top of the simmering stew. Then turn it on low and cover. After about  15-20 mins it will be done. Try to keep it covered through out cooking the rice. of coarse you have to check it once or maybe twice.
Its garnished with golden raisins and cinnamon sticks.

THere are a lot of different variations on this rice dish all over the world. All kinds of different nuts and dry fruits are added. In Persian cooking they even use rose pedals.

Easy to cook too, one pot.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on November 17, 2010, 01:27:56 AM
Easy to cook too, one pot.

Crock?  ::)

Plov = Pilaf , funny how when you get something down in one language you start to understand others too. (except English - it's totally f##ked up)

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2010, 01:39:39 AM
Easy to cook too, one pot.

Crock?  ::)



I think  you meant say crockpot...oops. ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 17, 2010, 02:12:13 AM
Easy to cook too, one pot.

Crock?  ::)

Plov = Pilaf , funny how when you get something down in one language you start to understand others too. (except English - it's totally f##ked up)



Dont you mean Plov = Pilav?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 17, 2010, 02:28:28 AM


 It doesn't understand "preserved lemon".
 Please explain.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on November 17, 2010, 02:33:31 AM
Dont you mean Plov = Pilav?

Yeah, that's what I said...  ;)
Pilaf, also called poloپلو , polao, pilau, pilav, pilaff, plov or pulao

edit: yeah I blew it, we coulda just gone back and forth on plov variations for probably a page worth of posts.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on November 17, 2010, 02:38:22 AM
It doesn't understand "preserved lemon".
 Please explain.

I'm guessing pickled, based on what Cap usually cooks.
But you can preserve them just like "strawberry preserves" too. Except it'd still be sour... and yellow.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 17, 2010, 02:41:47 AM
I've made preserved lemons before.  It's basically lemons packed and pickled in LOTS of salt, sometimes with extra spices.  Very common in moroccan food.  In my experience, the fruit inside all but disintegrates, leaving a salty, lemony brine with the peels remaining and being a strong flavoring for dishes.

Not sure, by the time they migrate all the way east to Uzbekistan, if preserved lemons are the same thing over there.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 17, 2010, 03:13:17 AM
They are pretty much the same. In Uzbek, Tajik, even northern indian they do it a little different. The lemon is cubed and not whole. Then it is heavily salted and spiced, sometimes with loads of chili powder and/or garlic.

I have never tried to make the preserved lemons. Im gonna try that soon.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 17, 2010, 03:49:06 AM
Preserved lemons rock!

You don't remove the chicken while the rice cooks?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 17, 2010, 04:05:16 AM
I dont but I suppose it wouldn't hurt.

 I know some like to set aside the meat and some of the stew so to sauce the top of the rice when serving. Im not sure that is authentic though.

TO explain the preserved lemon. It is basically pickled lemons. They are packed in salt and left to ferment just like sauerkraut. Sometimes spiced with clove or cinnamon or garlic. Once you try using them you will find yourself using them in all kinds of cooking. They are great.

Preserved lemons are the secret ingredient in My chicken cacciatore. So dont tell anybody.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 17, 2010, 04:40:21 AM
Preserved lemons are the secret ingredient in My chicken cacciatore. So dont tell anybody.

HA! I knew you are Julia Child!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2010, 12:04:22 PM
Pickled lemon....never would have thought of doing that but...sounds good though.

(http://www.awesomepickle.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/pickled-lemon-shaken2.jpg)

Here'a a pretty interesting website of interest.

http://awesomepickle.com/archives/533
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on November 17, 2010, 12:49:27 PM
They are pretty much the same. In Uzbek, Tajik, even northern indian they do it a little different. The lemon is cubed and not whole. Then it is heavily salted and spiced, sometimes with loads of chili powder and/or garlic.

I have never tried to make the preserved lemons. Im gonna try that soon.

The Moroccan way, which is the only way I've done it, you slice the lemon and cover it with sea salt and let it sit for a few days.  I use them in a lemon and olive chicken dish.  I use the preserved lemons and about 5 different kinds of olives (with the pits, please),  There is salt, pepper, cumin, hot paprika, and some other stuff that I can't remember off the top of my head.  Very tasty.  Cooked on the stove top in a heavy skillet.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 17, 2010, 02:19:44 PM
When I did it I used Meyer lemons (from my grandmother's tree) which had a nice flavor.  But I don't think mine actually fermented, at least I didn't note any fermenting stank to it.  With all that salt and lemon juice, the acidity and such, I'd be surprised if it could ferment, almost! 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 17, 2010, 09:31:35 PM
The ones I have are a little different. They are all cubed up, brown in color and kinda dry. I think this is the way they do them in most of central Aisa.  Ill post a pic when I get home. The Cambodians (I think) do it the same as Moroccans but they use limes.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 18, 2010, 01:09:48 AM
Jar - check
Salt - check
Lemons -  :(

Stop by the grocery on the way home tomorrow - check
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 18, 2010, 03:03:15 AM
Oh yeah, after your pickles are done in about six months you have to make some Moroccan food.Its fantastic.

You have to make that famous Moroccan whole chicken dish. Cant remember what it is called. Ya need those lemons and good cured green olives though. I have a great recipe for it. My Chicken Caccitore is kinda the same. 

Gotta get some real couscous. Dont by the stuff at the grocery store.

Hey tubercle, maybe you will want to make your own couscous?

http://www.starchefs.com/events/studio/techniques/MLahlou/index.shtml

Here is another good method for doing the lemons.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_preserved_lemons/

Here are the North Indian ones. I get these at a deli counter at the Indian grocery store.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09154.jpg)

Asked them today, they said the only ingredients are, lemons, salt, fenugreek, chili powder, bay leaf. They are first pickled in a brine the same as the Moroccan, But that they later remove them and dry them after the stuff looses a lot of moisture it is packed into crocks and then aged a little longer.

These are not spicy at all though, I think it is just paprika they are talking about not hot chili powder as we know it.

I think that is where the word "preserved" comes from, instead of calling it pickled or fermented. Because there are further poducts you can make after the lemons have been preserved. This is what the Indians make lemon and lime pickles with. They dro the same preservation method then they take those lemons and pack them into jars with all kinds of spices and stuff. Garlic.

If you have ever had Indian pickles you know they are not for everyone,also a bit of an acquired taste. The flavor i s explosive. First time I had them I hated them, now I love them.





Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on November 18, 2010, 03:23:55 AM
Here are the North Indian ones. I get these at a deli DELHI counter at the Indian grocery store.

can't help it sometimes...

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 18, 2010, 03:35:17 AM
First time I had Indian "pickle" I could have sworn it was made by mixing up limes, mangos and comet with a dash of drano. 

Chutney on the other hand is to die for.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 18, 2010, 03:38:17 AM

Here are the North Indian ones. I get these at a deli counter at the Indian grocery store.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09154.jpg)

Hey!  I saw some of those on the trail today while I was out horseback riding!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 18, 2010, 09:40:54 PM
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: morticaixavier on November 18, 2010, 09:45:40 PM
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 

Not a saag recipe per se but I am working on an appetizer of paneer dusted with saag spices, wrapped in spinach or similar leaves and tempura fried. It's okay at this point but I still have to work on the spice level. I ussually use cumin, coriander, chili flakes a little tumaric for color and that's about it. maybe some black pepper. Whole spices, heat the oil (or ghee) up till shimmery, add the spices (Put a lid on and turn the vent fan to high) move the pan till the spices start to pop and then add the spinach and cream.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 18, 2010, 09:50:45 PM
Hey Nic, we make a lot of saag. Mostly Saag aloo.

You can put just about anything in there, other veg. Shrimp, chicken.

Ill post my recipe a little later. Vah Reh Vah has a good one. It is simpler than mine.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: jeffy on November 18, 2010, 10:03:30 PM
Hey Nic, we make a lot of saag. Mostly Saag aloo.

You can put just about anything in there, other veg. Shrimp, chicken.

Ill post my recipe a little later. Vah Reh Vah has a good one. It is simpler than mine.

I like saag ghost but have never ever considered making it.  Looking forward to your recipe.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 18, 2010, 10:46:07 PM

I like saag ghost but have never ever considered making it.  Looking forward to your recipe.

You mean saag gosht?  Gosht meaning meat (usually lamb or goat, depending whether in India or the west).  I think I have a recipe for that too, but I wasn't planning on a meat dish.

I think I'm just going to stick simple...chilies, garlic, ginger, fried onions, and an eyeballed mix of spices (cumin, fenugreek, coriander, black mustard seeds, etc.).  A bit of heavy cream in it though would be lovely!  I usually end up making the pureed things like this (and the dal) very very spicy and use them more as dips for bread.  My dal is too seasoned to reasonably just eat a bowl of it.  Though I have tried.  And suffered the consequences....
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 19, 2010, 02:46:24 AM
For my saag I only use fresh spinach. YOu can use frozen but it changes the final consistancey. I n a food processor I put a small onion, a few cloves of garlic, a finger of ginger skin on, then I puree it.

Then I heat up some ghee or oil in a sauce pan big enough to receive the raw spinach leaves. When the oil is med hot I add a healthy pinch of cumin seeds, another of mustard seeds, and another of fenugreek.. salt and pepper

When the seeds start to crackle and release their essential oils then pour in the puree onion mixture,stir it constantly until it browns a little.

Then throw in the spinach whole, or you can chop it a little. Add more oil or ghee if it is needed.

Put it on low and let it simmer for a half hour. Check it frequently. The leaves should release moisture to simme for that long. If not just add a little water at a time so it can cook till it is tender.

After about a half hour the leaves are soft but still have some body to them, thats how I like it. Some people like it the consistency of a thick sauce. If you want it that way just simmer for another half hour or more. It will turn to mush. I mean a silky creamy consistence.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 19, 2010, 06:36:23 AM
Quick switch-up. ;)

If anything is ethnic or regional then this has to be it.

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TOXrkKgf79I/AAAAAAAAAW8/H16s8s_aHGo/s640/2010-11-18%2013.56.15.jpg)

Got this today at a Hawaiian place down the road. They greeted me with a smile and said Aloha!

So I ordered me two spam musubi to go. They were served warm wrapped in foil. There's what appears to be furikake in there. Not sure what that is but it tastes good. The spam was grilled but didn't appear to be sauced.

Found I can't take a huge bite or it ruptures out the other end- so careful bites. I was surprised to actually hear myself emitting little moans of pleasure as I ate the things. These are so good. The nori, rice and the seasoning have a very forward flavor with the spam coming through lightly in the finish...

I have all the ingredients except the furikake and finding that should be easy.

Thanks punatic I would never realized these existed!

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 19, 2010, 06:55:42 AM
You are welcome!  It is pretty amazing that spam can taste so good.  Here on Hawaii Island we don't usually put furikake on our spam musubi, but I'm definetly going to try it that way.  Good idea!  It is often served with scrambled egg wrapped inside with the spam.

Musubi are sold everywhere here, including 7-11.  A buck a roll is the going price.  Cheap, easy to carry, and definetly hits the spot!  Hawaiian kine grinds to da max...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 19, 2010, 05:10:43 PM
Jar - check
Salt - check
Lemons -  :(

Stop by the grocery on the way home tomorrow - check

 Sliced, salted & in the jar. ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 19, 2010, 05:17:26 PM
Damn, I better get movin.  ::)

Ya gotta love a man who quotes himself.  :P
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 19, 2010, 05:29:41 PM
Damn, I better get movin.  ::)

 You behind, dude ;D

 OK, how long do they sit?
And then...I guess to test them out bake them on some chicken breast or something?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 19, 2010, 05:53:00 PM
At least a mointh I think. Longer is much better.

Dont bake them. They are mostly used like a flavoring component in sauces and stews. Caleed tangines in Morroco. Cook them in tomato sauce or some other sauce. Just wait till you smell them when they are done, very powerful. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 19, 2010, 05:58:57 PM
Gotcha
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on November 19, 2010, 09:03:03 PM
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 

I have a pumpkin saag recipe that's quite good, if you'd like it.  Let me know and I'll dig it out.  I got it from a vegan friend's cookbook, Veganomicon (I think).  We joined a CSA program this year, and we went a month or so where we got a sugar (pie) pumpkin every week.  Didn't feel like pumpkin pie in August, so we made saag.  Just got another one yesterday; this one will be made into a pie.  $25 for a crate of random veggies, delivered, every week.  Very happy with that deal.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 19, 2010, 10:34:08 PM
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 

I have a pumpkin saag recipe that's quite good, if you'd like it.  Let me know and I'll dig it out.  I got it from a vegan friend's cookbook, Veganomicon (I think).  We joined a CSA program this year, and we went a month or so where we got a sugar (pie) pumpkin every week.  Didn't feel like pumpkin pie in August, so we made saag.  Just got another one yesterday; this one will be made into a pie.  $25 for a crate of random veggies, delivered, every week.  Very happy with that deal.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 19, 2010, 10:35:40 PM
Who has a great saag recipe?  I love saag paneer but can do without the paneer, myself (the wife dislikes the texture) so I'm wanting a nice blended spinach curry.  Maybe going to make some this weekend along with some thawed out dal and naan and basmati.  I have some frozen micro-scallops and have a recipe for Indian chili scallops, but my wife wasn't any too keen on the idea.  Last time I used these scallops it almost ruined a pasta dish. 

I have a pumpkin saag recipe that's quite good, if you'd like it.  Let me know and I'll dig it out.  I got it from a vegan friend's cookbook, Veganomicon (I think).  We joined a CSA program this year, and we went a month or so where we got a sugar (pie) pumpkin every week.  Didn't feel like pumpkin pie in August, so we made saag.  Just got another one yesterday; this one will be made into a pie.  $25 for a crate of random veggies, delivered, every week.  Very happy with that deal.

 Yes, please give us the recipe so I can try out the lemon thing.

I have nothing against vegans,,,except that they are made out of meat :'(
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on November 20, 2010, 01:22:00 AM
Cool, found the actual recipe page in google. Saves me some typing. http://books.google.com/books?id=npWKWdSc-gMC&pg=PT205&lpg=PT205&dq=pumpkin+saag+veganomicon&source=bl&ots=ihRVi8JFTS&sig=P9g_mP6mBF6O0Gmq-pH3y-R6wsY&hl=en&ei=pCHnTKbJDoSClAfwvoGPDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCMQ6AEwBA (http://books.google.com/books?id=npWKWdSc-gMC&pg=PT205&lpg=PT205&dq=pumpkin+saag+veganomicon&source=bl&ots=ihRVi8JFTS&sig=P9g_mP6mBF6O0Gmq-pH3y-R6wsY&hl=en&ei=pCHnTKbJDoSClAfwvoGPDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCMQ6AEwBA)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 24, 2010, 02:23:19 AM
Italian

This was a dish that I used to hate with a passion. We would go to my Grandma Capozzoli's for dinner and she would make stuff like this. This dish particularly terrified us grand kids, but we had to "clean our plates" In fact we were not allowed to leave the table till all of the food was gone.

On more than one occasion I filled my pockets with tripe just to get away from the table. Then when home I would have to pull it out and rinse my pants before my parents discovered my trick. I discovered early on that the hand is quicker than the eye.

Now, long after my grandma has gone on ahead I have learned to love this dish, it brings back memories. Only difference is I eat it and really enjoy it instead of stuffing it into my pockets.

Neapolitan style tripe and fried peppers on capelini.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09199.jpg) 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09201.jpg)

Nothing says grandma Capozzoli like cows stomach.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 24, 2010, 02:46:41 AM
Italian

This was a dish that I used to hate with a passion. We would go to my Grandma Capozzoli's for dinner and she would make stuff like this. This dish particularly terrified us grand kids, but we had to "clean our plates"

Nothing says grandma Capozzoli like cows stomach.


That is just wrong Cap! 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 24, 2010, 03:08:58 AM
Tubercle will eat just about any type of plant matter and muscle tissues from fish, fowl, reptiles and mammals but tends to shy away from internal organs.

 Unless its ground into potted meat, wieners or (one of the major food groups) Vienna Sausages ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 24, 2010, 03:14:38 AM
The only organ I like is the Hammond B3...jazz organ.

That cow stomach is making me sick.  ;)  ;D

(http://planetsmilies.net/vomit-smiley-31.gif)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 24, 2010, 03:20:51 AM
You guys dont know what you are missing.

I will eat almost anything. Just has to taste good.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on November 24, 2010, 03:29:12 AM
The only organ I like is the Hammond B3...jazz organ.

That cow stomach is making me sick.  ;)  ;D

(http://planetsmilies.net/vomit-smiley-31.gif)

 That's funny
Actually, that's real funny

 But, I have eat chittlins and they are pretty good. Just got to make sure all the pig $h^t is rinsed real good.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 24, 2010, 03:36:17 AM
The only organ I like is the Hammond B3...jazz organ.

That cow stomach is making me sick.  ;)  ;D

(http://planetsmilies.net/vomit-smiley-31.gif)

 That's funny
Actually, that's real funny

 But, I have eat chittlins and they are pretty good. Just got to make sure all the pig $h^t is rinsed real good.

Sorry if I offended you Cap.  :-[


Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 24, 2010, 03:45:15 AM
No offense taken here. Im just here to share.

I just think that if you are gonna kill an animal you should eat it all.

I dont know if they still have them but a few of the sandwich places of the Italian market used to have tripe sandwiches.Man they are good.

Tripe is also an ingredient in Pho, as well as tendon and other connective tissue. I love it.

Isnt tripe the main ingredient in Boudin sausage too?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 24, 2010, 03:54:00 AM
Tripe is also an ingredient in Pho, as well as tendon and other connective tissue. I love it.

Oh man, now you done it - you've set off another round of pho jokes

Tripe stew is a local fav here (I pass).

Isnt tripe the main ingredient in Boudin sausage too?

Not in this man's boudin!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on November 24, 2010, 09:34:14 AM
Speaking of pho . . .

A couple of days after our comments about pronunciation I was talking to a guy I know about pho.  He said that the correct pronunciation in the south of Vietnam is "fuh", but in the north it is more like "fur".  So this explains the discrepancy. :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: gordonstrong on November 24, 2010, 05:30:34 PM
Quote
The only organ I like is the Hammond B3

Oh, definitely!  Cranked through a Leslie speaker, preferably.  Now I have the urge to pull out Meddle and listen to Echoes.  On vinyl.

Quote
A couple of days after our comments about pronunciation I was talking to a guy I know about pho.  He said that the correct pronunciation in the south of Vietnam is "fuh", but in the north it is more like "fur". 

Talk about a target rich environment.  OK, what do you call the line of people waiting to buy this?  A pho queue.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: andrew on November 24, 2010, 05:50:40 PM
Quote from: capozzoli
Isnt tripe the main ingredient in Boudin sausage too?
[/quote

I think it's more a liver and heart deal. Just like dirty rice.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 24, 2010, 07:09:13 PM
Cool avatar andrew.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: andrew on November 24, 2010, 07:36:38 PM
Cool avatar andrew.

thanks!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 24, 2010, 09:20:13 PM
Quote
The only organ I like is the Hammond B3
Oh, definitely!  Cranked through a Leslie speaker, preferably.  Now I have the urge to pull out Meddle and listen to Echoes.  On vinyl.

Rick Wakeman's searing solo towards the end of "Close to the Edge", another great Hammond moment...he might have played a C3, but hey, a tonewheel is a tonewheel.  Now, for another sort of good organ, listen to "Awaken" by Yes.  Recorded in some Swiss cathedral.  Thunderous!

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 24, 2010, 10:44:10 PM
Hammond and Shirley Scott.Two names that belong together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpmqiAvZ48Y

Good dining music too.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 24, 2010, 10:47:23 PM
Hammond and Shirley Scott.Two names that belong together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpmqiAvZ48Y

Good dining music too.

A big thumbs up for Stanley Turrentine!

Love that jazz.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 24, 2010, 11:07:15 PM
OK, Im posting my dinner in the brewing music thread.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 25, 2010, 06:35:08 AM
Rick Wakeman's searing solo towards the end of "Close to the Edge", another great Hammond moment...

I saw Rick Wakeman with Yes at the Merriweather Post Pavillion in Columbia, Maryland in 1972.  It was a life experience. 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on November 25, 2010, 06:50:46 AM
Talk about a target rich environment.  OK, what do you call the line of people waiting to buy this?  A pho queue.
I'm totally using this next time we go for pho ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 25, 2010, 01:20:04 PM
I saw Rick Wakeman with Yes at the Merriweather Post Pavillion in Columbia, Maryland in 1972.  It was a life experience. 

I saw him in about 2002 with Yes...great as always, albeit with a few more decades behind him then!  Saw his son a year or two ago, touring with Yes, actually he struck me as good a performer, almost, as his dad, certainly was more dedicated to the original than his father, who seemed a little more casual and apt to wander.  Rick has a few great solo albums, and a lot of mediocre ones.  I like Six Wives of Henry VIII and his piano albums.

Today, ethnic American food at its highest.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 25, 2010, 07:32:15 PM
OK, Im posting my dinner in the brewing music thread.

 :D

The late great Jimmy Smith straight out of Philly on the Hammond B3

"The Master of the B3"

Here's some awesome organ!  8)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xc1OK1eTH60&feature=related
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 26, 2010, 01:26:29 AM
I love Philly Jazz. I was a bartender at Ortliebs Jazzhaus for about 8 years. What a blast.

Here is some Video shot at Ortliebs, what great memories. And I mean GREAT!. Great place for ethnic food too!!!

(http://www.philebrity.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/DSC_4145.jpg)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKrWZnAz5ng

RIP Sid Simmons.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPEZCR0VtVY

(http://jazztimes.com/images/content/articles/0006/9969/SidSimmons_depth1.jpg?1289247919)

Not just one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time but a dear friend. I will miss him. Its crazy, Im not THAT old but I am starting to realize that the older you get the more friends and loved ones you loose. I have a tear in my eye watching these videos. Especially the one with Sid looking thin and week.

Be thankful for what you have and enjoy every min with the people you love, this is what is important. Nothing else.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 26, 2010, 04:06:31 AM
A truly remarkable jazz rythym section and one that really developed over time like a fine beer or wine.

A great influence for myself as a bass player who can really relate to the chemistry that existed on that stage.

One of Phillies greatest Jazz trios to grace the stage.  8)

Thanks Cap!

What kind of ethnic food did Ortiebs serve?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 26, 2010, 04:28:40 AM
Well, first off there is the "Old" Ortliebs. Where I first started working as a cook, (Later became a bartender and manager) Back then they served "soul food with a creole flare". 10 taps of great beer. Not sure what the new Ortliebs is serving may be the same. I heard the food is pretty good. I havent been there in several years. Mickey Roker still plays there and Bootsie Barnes. The place is a treasure, its a little place and you can see world famous jazz musicians, even meet them. I loved that place even before I worked there.  

Im reading now that Ortliebs closed its doors in April of this year. I havent been by it in a while. If it really stayed closed I am shocked. What a loss. Their website is still up though.

Oh man, its gone, I just tried to call there, phone disconnected. I am bummed. It is like part of me has died.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 26, 2010, 04:48:33 PM
Well, first off there is the "Old" Ortliebs. Where I first started working as a cook, (Later became a bartender and manager) Back then they served "soul food with a creole flare". 10 taps of great beer. Not sure what the new Ortliebs is serving may be the same. I heard the food is pretty good. I havent been there in several years. Mickey Roker still plays there and Bootsie Barnes. The place is a treasure, its a little place and you can see world famous jazz musicians, even meet them. I loved that place even before I worked there.  

Im reading now that Ortliebs closed its doors in April of this year. I havent been by it in a while. If it really stayed closed I am shocked. What a loss. Their website is still up though.

Oh man, its gone, I just tried to call there, phone disconnected. I am bummed. It is like part of me has died.

This is too bad.  :(
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 29, 2010, 02:00:39 AM
Goan Cooking.

Whats was interesting tonight; we had steamed green fresh chick peas. Very good.If I had to describe them I would place them somewhere between edamame and boiled peanuts.Which are two of my favorite snacks. These are going on the top of my snack list too.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09369.jpg)

Also made the Goan classic pork vindaloo. A nice raita of cucumbers, carrot, onion, cilantro  and a dash of coconut milk. I used heavy kefir instead of yogurt. (Most likely not authentic but worked just the same). Im not sure if Indians use kefir.

Another treat with the meal tonight was the Coconut podi. It is a batter of rice flour and yeast left to ferment a few days.I started it on Thur..Then tonight thinned it out with coconut milk before putting it to the pan.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09371.jpg)

Pork vindaloo is one of my very favorite dishes. It is wonderfully sweet and sour and spicy. If anyone want the recipe for the vindaloo just let me know and Ill type it out. Settling in to watch The Walking Dead now.  ;D


Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on November 29, 2010, 02:04:42 AM
depends, how complicated it is...

Looks great - I'd eat it, not sure I'd cook it. You get a little more involved with your dishes than I care to...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 29, 2010, 02:17:43 AM
Very nice looking dish Cap. This is a new one to me but I think I would like it.
Looks like a comfort food type dish...well rounded.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 29, 2010, 02:32:48 AM
Whats was interesting tonight; we had steamed green fresh chick peas. Very good.If I had to describe them I would place them somewhere between edamame and boiled peanuts.Which are two of my favorite snacks. These are going on the top of my snack list too.

Also made the Goan classic pork vindaloo. A nice raita of cucumbers, carrot, onion, cilantro  and a dash of coconut milk. I used heavy kefir instead of yogurt. (Most likely not authentic but worked just the same). Im not sure if Indians use kefir.

Another treat with the meal tonight was the Coconut podi. It is a batter of rice flour and yeast left to ferment a few days.I started it on Thur..Then tonight thinned it out with coconut milk before putting it to the pan.


Amazing turkey leftover ideas Cap!  Yum!   :D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 29, 2010, 02:46:00 AM
Vindaloo is one of my favorites too, Capp. I'd like to see your recipe to compare (I can post mine if you'd like).  Yours looks mighty tasty!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 29, 2010, 04:29:00 AM
Oh yeah,I would love to see your recipe. I use my accidental homemade beer vinegar. ;)

The pork is great, a hunter frriend just brought it back from a hunting trip in GA.

First, heat pot over med heat, brown a small chopped onion dry.

After they start to get a little dark add  whole seed masala of kalongi, black mustard seed, fenugreek black pepper,bay leaf,a little gee or cooking oil. When the seeds start to crackle,get all toasty and release their yummy essential oils. Add the cubed pork and stir. Then add a small amount of chopped fresh garlic,and about three fresh curry leaves.Then add some chopped fresh tomatoes,green chilies (to taste). Add a small amount of turmeric, a cinnamon stick or a pinch of cinnamon, a healthy amount o fpaprika.Stir again,

At this time add sea salt (I like to use sea salt in Indian cooking cause basically Gandhi dealt the final blow to the English by making salt from the sea)

Then add malt vinegar and jaggery. to taste. or Reg vinegar and brown sugar.

Simmer till the meat is tender.

Im sorry I am not good at communicating amounts of ingredients. Depends on how much one is going to make; I dont measure, plus I would never tell another chef how much of an ingredient to use.

My father always calls me with cooking questions and just does not understand this. Or he will ask how long to cook something, I always tell him to cook it till it is done. He thinks I am f-ing with him.  ::)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 29, 2010, 01:34:07 PM
Coconut podi?  I've heard "podi" used to mean powders, as in powdered spices and such (jeera podi, etc).  You mean the bread, right?  I'm trying to think of a similar word...there's roti, and puri...one of them, or some new bread I haven't heard about?

Been a while since I've made vindaloo.  I find it funny the misconceptions about the dish...all the Indian places around here serve it with potatoes!!!!  Just because "aloo" means potatoes.  The etymology comes from vin d'alho or something like that....something to do with wine (vinegar) and garlic.  A very portuguese dish, with a Goan kick to it!

I've just been making naan recipes, recently, I need to get back to trying other pan-fried brieds, like chapati and roti again.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 29, 2010, 01:52:28 PM

I've just been making naan recipes, recently, I need to get back to trying other pan-fried brieds, like chapati and roti again.


Me too. I want to get back into making Roti this year.  I was making it for a while last year but got away from it.
It's great hot off the griddle.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on November 29, 2010, 08:58:49 PM
OOps, Thanks nic.

The pancakes are called Palappam. or Vellappam. They are made with Ari podi. 

Just goes to show you that I can not read Hindi.  ::)

Now if you will excuse me I have to use the podi.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on November 29, 2010, 09:21:45 PM
Now if you will excuse me I have to use the podi.

A-Hah!  I suspected you to be a body snatcher!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 30, 2010, 03:10:05 AM
Oh yeah,I would love to see your recipe. I use my accidental homemade beer vinegar. ;)

The pork is great, a hunter frriend just brought it back from a hunting trip in GA.

First, heat pot over med heat, brown a small chopped onion dry.

After they start to get a little dark add  whole seed masala of kalongi, black mustard seed, fenugreek black pepper,bay leaf,a little gee or cooking oil. When the seeds start to crackle,get all toasty and release their yummy essential oils. Add the cubed pork and stir. Then add a small amount of chopped fresh garlic,and about three fresh curry leaves.Then add some chopped fresh tomatoes,green chilies (to taste). Add a small amount of turmeric, a cinnamon stick or a pinch of cinnamon, a healthy amount o fpaprika.Stir again,

At this time add sea salt (I like to use sea salt in Indian cooking cause basically Gandhi dealt the final blow to the English by making salt from the sea)

Then add malt vinegar and jaggery. to taste. or Reg vinegar and brown sugar.

Simmer till the meat is tender.

Im sorry I am not good at communicating amounts of ingredients. Depends on how much one is going to make; I dont measure, plus I would never tell another chef how much of an ingredient to use.

My father always calls me with cooking questions and just does not understand this. Or he will ask how long to cook something, I always tell him to cook it till it is done. He thinks I am f-ing with him.  ::)

Sounds pretty similar to mine, actually.  I sprinkle some salt, turmeric, and kashmiri chile powder on cubed meat (chicken, pork, or lamb, usually) and set it aside.

Then I slice onion into 1/4" half moons and cook over moderate heat until they're a deep golden brown.  Then I remove the onions and puree them with a little water.  I add the onion puree to a spice mixture of freshly ground dried red chiles, black pepper, black mustard seeds, cardamom seeds, fenugreek seeds, cumin seeds, and cinnamon stick.  I add a little brown sugar (jaggery, when I've got it) and some white wine vinegar -- BAM, there's my spice paste.

I reheat the oil in which I cooked the onions and add a mixture of freshly minced garlic and ginger, along with some freshly ground coriander.  When it's aromatic and a little toasty, I add the meat and lightly brown it.  Then I add the spice paste, some tomato sauce, and enough water or stock to cover the meat.  Sometimes I'll also add some diced potatoes.

When it's simmering nicely, I put it all in a preheated 300 degree oven, covered, and basically braise it until the meat is tender.  Serve with basmati and naan...mmm.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on November 30, 2010, 05:22:02 PM
That sounds pretty close to mine.  The use of deeply browned onions in the spice paste gives a nice caramelized "dark" flavor to the dish that I love.  I've only ever made it with chicken, I should do the traditional Goan pork.  Goa is one of the very few places in India where pork consumption is traditional, due to Portuguese Christian influence.

The worst vindaloo I have ever had was...well, it was at a Chinese restaurant.  I don't what possessed them to have it on their menu (it was across the street from my university which had not a few south asians, maybe that's why), nor what possessed me to order it, but it was a bland, limp yellow concoction with undercooked onions and the sort of blandness that comes from using store-bought american "curry powder", in mild measure.  The worst part?!  Because it was a "vindaloo" the damn thing had formerly frozen crinkle cut french fries mixed in it!!! 
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: andrew on December 11, 2010, 04:05:38 PM
Chicken and sausage gumbo.   Perfect for the cold weather

(http://i1229.photobucket.com/albums/ee479/andyet/IMG_1082.jpg?t=1292083353)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on December 11, 2010, 06:48:11 PM
Very nice!  Did you bring some for everybody?

Looks like it's made with a two-beer roux.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: andrew on December 11, 2010, 10:45:39 PM
Very nice!  Did you bring some for everybody?

Looks like it's made with a two-beer roux.

yeah the roux was a little dark. I made a bunch of it a while back... you turn your head just a second and thats what you get.

...If could fax or email some I would, but I think it would be missing something in the transmission
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on December 12, 2010, 12:27:59 AM
I like my roux and gumbo extra dark like chocolate.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 12, 2010, 02:04:24 AM
I like roux ark too. At least brown. Thats how you get that nutty toasted flavor. You have to use more of it to get thickness though.

So, I got more wild pork from Georgia and somebody gave me a whole deer. I went to Sears and got a nice new chest freezer for the basement.

Well, I started shopping for freezer pleasers from the different butchers around here and in my search this place popped up.

http://puppybeef.com/index.php

Is it real? I cant believe it.

Well maybe now I can make some really authentic Korean food.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/31/Dog_meat.jpg)

Woof Woof.

This cant be real. Its gotta be a joke. http://www.kittybeef.com/
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on December 12, 2010, 02:14:05 AM
That'd be  cool to get a miniature or "toy" sized dog and put him on the SHOWTIME grill!
Set it and forget it!

Or season it really good and smoke it for a long time.... it will develop a real nice.......


BARK!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 12, 2010, 02:48:46 AM
It reads this at the bottom of their products page.

"More products such as our premium Puppy Beef spit roasts and gourmet Puppy Beef Sauages are available in our customer login area! Coming Soon by demand is PuppyVeal. Join our mailing list to find out more about PuppyVeal."

This has to be some kind of joke. I dont know, maybe not. I am not opposed to people eating dogs. If thats what they want to do it is no different than eating cows or pigs in my opinion. Dogs and cats are not people.

I think it is illegal to sell dog for the purpose of human consumption or even eat dog meat in this country.  
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: markaberrant on December 13, 2010, 09:27:49 PM
Just started prepping a meal for next Sunday night (an early xmas dinner with my parents before they head to my sister's place in Dallas).

Trying my hand at an all German meal.  Started the Sauerbraten yesterday, it alreadys smells awesome, can't wait!  Gonna serve with red cabbage, poppy seed egg noodles, brussel sprouts, and stollen (store bought, but made from scratch) for dessert.

Then when the inlaws get into town the following week, I'm switching gears to Greek.  I've been working on a killer souvlaki marinade, and I like my scratch tzatziki too.  Serve with pita, some sort of rice with olive oil and aromatics, and a rough chop greek salad (no lettuce, that aint a greek salad).  Also gonna make a tray of Moussaka, which I really dig when done right.  And I always have some of my homemade hummous in the fridge, so that goes without saying.

Not as crazy as some of the stuff you guys attempt, but still really looking forward to it!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on December 13, 2010, 09:36:34 PM
Not really actual authentic Greek, but I took star anise (which I know is unauthentic) and dumped rather a lot of it in a half bottle of Sobieski vodka...let it steep a couple weeks and decanted.  I know ouzo is actually distilled rather than infused, but dang, this darker brown cousin could stand in for the spirit in a pinch!  The anise is high-powered, leaves you with an almost methol like coolness, like you just brushed your teeth.

Next up, another bottle of the same, but with akvavit spicing (caraway, dill, coriander, etc).
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 19, 2010, 11:27:25 PM
Polska

Venison and rice Stuffed Cabbages served with a monster perogie. A dollop of homemade sour cream/ full cream kefir 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09898.jpg)

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 20, 2010, 02:35:50 AM
Now that's good eatin' there Cap!

That looks fantastic. I love good Polish Food. Kapusta...pierogi and Kielbasa. It's that time of year again.

I want to make some Kapustnica. Serve it up with a Baltic Porter.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on December 23, 2010, 03:03:06 PM
Now that's good eatin' there Cap!

That looks fantastic. I love good Polish Food. Kapusta...pierogi and Kielbasa. It's that time of year again.

I want to make some Kapustnica. Serve it up with a Baltic Porter.  8)

+1  I will be having pierogi and fresh (or smoked, depending on the weather) Kielbasa over the weekend.  No sauerkraut though. Well, maybe a little. :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 31, 2010, 01:49:09 AM
Placky

Slovakian style potato pancakes.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00028.jpg)


Easily made with a mixture of mashed potatoes, grated raw potatoes, grated onion, grated garlic, flour, eggs, yogurt, (i use kefir). baking soda, salt, marjoram, salt and pepper.

These are great comfort food and they really stick to your ribs. I have them with apple sauce although that is not true to Slovakian tradition. In fact most of them think it is crazy.

I also make the Polish style that is more like hash browns. Grated potatoes, onions, garlic, eggs. salt and pepper. They are awesome with apple sauce.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 31, 2010, 03:30:19 PM
The potato pancake has to be one of the most universal recipes on the planet. I think it's because the potato can be grown almost anywhere and is loved by most.

Nice and simple...I like it!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 02, 2011, 01:18:48 AM
My Grandpa grew up on an egg farm in the  western Lombardy region of Italy. He moved to Philadelphia during WW2. He brought this very recipe with him and made it every New Year for all of his life. Its simple but Im Lucky I learned it before he checked out. I apply the cooking technique to lots of other meat dishes.

It is now our family tradition to make it on New Years Day.

Braised Breast of Veal

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00080.jpg)

We usually serve it with fried Parmesan polenta  or risotto. This year we served it with a wild mushroom risotto mantecato. Mantecato means a creamier version of risotto that actually has cream in it.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00078.jpg)


I usually dont eat veal cause it is expensive and a bit of a thought for me. But I cant resist this dish and breast of veal is usually pretty inexpensive. Pork rib roast can serve as a substitute.

Anyone want the recipe? I will write it out if so.

Risotto is kind of a strange time consuming cooking process but it is worth it.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on January 03, 2011, 10:36:15 PM
Yes please!  I would love that recipe.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: EHall on January 03, 2011, 10:40:06 PM
finally! someone who seems to have a grip on plating... especially when they're going to post pics of it.. thank you!

That risotto sounds great, you can definately put that recipe down too!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on January 04, 2011, 12:00:57 AM
Man Cap!

That has got to be one of the most impressive looking dishes I've seen you post.

Recipe please.  8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 04, 2011, 02:59:51 AM
Braised Breast of Veal Lombardy style.

Take a large enough oven safe pot with a lid and get it hot over med. high. Just before adding the veal breast add veg or the like oil. (remember this, hot pot cold oil food wont stick) Olive oil will burn. Place the veal breast in bones up fat side down and brown, then turn to the bone side and brown. Remove the breast and set aside.

Then add Veg.to the hot pot: One small diced onion, a few sliced thick carrots, one stalk of diced celery, one head of garlic chopped fine, a fist full of peas (frozen work great). Add a chopped fine stalk of celery then toss and brown a little. Add some kosher salt, toss for a little while longer. (Need a good caramelizing action.) Deglaze with about a cup or so of hearty red wine. Then add about six or eight chopped tomatoes. Stir till the tomatoes start cooking. Then add a healthy pour of extra virgin olive oil to taste.

Add the herbs and spices, a couple of tablespoons each of oregano and basil. Add a teaspoon each of celery seed, grated nutmeg and black pepper. Then throw in a couple of bay leaves. Now, this is important; add a few stalks of fresh rosemary. You can use dry rosemary but I think the fresh rosemary is key. it definitely takes it up to the next level. Its good to use all fresh herbs but dry works great for everything but the rosemary. Turn the burner down to med low.

Turn the oven on and preheat to 350. With the ragu still at a simmer place the veal breast back in bone side down. Add some water till it comes up the about half way to the top of the veal breast leaving the fatty side exposed.

Taste the ragu and adjust salt and other flavors to your liking.

Cover the pot with the lid and put it in the oven. Roast it in the oven for three hours or until the meat starts pulling away from the bones and the top is all brown and roastylicious. Times may vary depending upon the size of your veal breast. 
Oh and after about two hours carefully take the pot out of the oven and add several peeled and cubed potatoes. Caution! Be very careful when the pot is sitting out on the stove. Keep a towel or oven mit on the lid cause at this point your house will smell most wonderful and passers by will be overwhelmed with the temptation to remove the lid and look in. If the touch lid with bare hands they will certainly leave some skin on it. Put the taters in and put the pot back in for the last hour or so. They are added late cause they will turn to mush if you add them to early.

You have my personal guarantee that this simple rustic dishh is a little slice of the real Italy and your house will smell that way.

This following recipe is exactly how I do risotto. It is the only way to make it correctly. The two most important rules are only use Aborrio or similar rice and  remember to add only hot liquids to the cooking rice, even heat the wine, cold or even room temperature liquids will ruin the rice.There are all different types of other things added but this is the basics. The above rice dish is cooked this way with chopped fresh, or dried and reconstituted wild mushrooms added early. After the rice is just about aldente shortly before it is finished add a couple of fist fulls of grated Locatteli and about a half cup of cream.

http://italianfood.about.com/od/tipstricks1/a/aa091697.htm

I think I covered everything.

















Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 05, 2011, 03:28:16 AM
finally! someone who seems to have a grip on plating... especially when they're going to post pics of it.. thank you!

That risotto sounds great, you can definately put that recipe down too!

Thanks!. There are some nicely plated dishes in this forum section for sure. But me, Im the master plater.
Title: Re: Ethnic Cooking
Post by: phillamb168 on January 05, 2011, 10:47:40 AM
Peking Roast Duck...

I took a duckling, halved it by removing the backbone, and dried it overnight on a rack in the refrigerator.  Tonight I took it out, applied a coating of sesame oil and a rub of salt, sugar, pepper, and five spice powder.  I roasted this in a very hot kettle grill around 475-500 degrees until it was 180 degrees internally.  To serve, my wife made the mandarin pancakes out of hot water dough and sesame oil, and I made a sauce with hoisin, green onions, honey, ginger, garlic, rice vinegar, wine, and soy sauce, accompanied with some green onion and cucumber slices.  It was great!

(http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k2/nicneufeld/PekingDuck.jpg)

Sorry to dig this up, but what rations did you use for the salt/sugar/pepper/five-spice? Thinking about doing this for next month sometime.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 05, 2011, 01:39:24 PM
Excellent question!  LOL I really have no idea!!!

Well, my best guess is its a derivative of a Steven Raichlen recipe...gimme a sec, I'll see if I can dig it up.

Edit:  Turns out that I was being "creative"....Raichlen's original has just salt and pepper seasoning (no amounts) and the 5 spice is in the sauce only.  So I'm sure I just eyeballed it.  Hard to go wrong though...5 spice is potent stuff, but I probably used a pretty heavy hand with it, because I love the aroma so much.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2011, 12:25:20 AM
More from the Master Plater.

Portuguese

Moela (Chicken Gizard Stew) served with rice.

 (http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00348.jpg)

For desert, Trutas, a small fried sweet potato pie.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00349.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 12:50:10 AM
The offal should have gone on the white plate since it has color, the White rice on the colored plate.
But you're still the Masterplater. You do it more than anyone else here. You even take pics.

I'm being kinda Irish tonight. Potatoes for dinner. I got a case of 40 count potatoes, they're pretty massive.
Topped with Chili, sour cream, butter, maybe some hot sauce.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2011, 01:24:46 AM
The rice is off white.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 01:25:43 AM
The rice is off white.

My bad.   :-[
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 13, 2011, 01:32:16 AM
I'm going to try something that I can't find an instance of it existing, but it sounds like it would be good...

So ajvar is a Balkany mash of roasted red peppers, eggplant, and seasonings (I am a recently converted devotee!! of this stuff).  Baigan bharta is a name applied to a number of Indian roasted eggplant curries, mashes, and dips.

Soooo...A "Bhartvar" if you will...a bunch of red peppers and an eggplant or two...roasted over charcoal, peeled, mashed or blended, and then spiced with classic indian spices (ginger, garlic, cumin, coriander, turmeric, etc), and cooked down until a thick puree.

Seems like it would be a nice condiment with rotis or other breads.  A bit like a pickle, except, well, I'm not into Indian achars as much, at least the ones I've tried.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 01:39:34 AM
Before you do that to the whole batch, have you just added your spices to the stuff out of the jar to make sure they play nice together?

And the blender will probably make it too much of a mush - or even soup depending on what blender you have. We always used a meat grinder on coarse for the peppers and eggplant.

I am interested to hear about how it turns out, but I don't think I can do that to ajvar. One last thing, saute garlic in olive oil and then dump ajvar on top of it and just cook it until it turns a much darker red, stirring occasionally. Eat it warm on fresh bread.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 13, 2011, 01:44:14 PM
Before you do that to the whole batch, have you just added your spices to the stuff out of the jar to make sure they play nice together?

And the blender will probably make it too much of a mush - or even soup depending on what blender you have. We always used a meat grinder on coarse for the peppers and eggplant.

I am interested to hear about how it turns out, but I don't think I can do that to ajvar. One last thing, saute garlic in olive oil and then dump ajvar on top of it and just cook it until it turns a much darker red, stirring occasionally. Eat it warm on fresh bread.

I dare not waste the stuff in the jar!  Really, its not much different than an eggplant curry, except with peppers added.  Pureeing it does "wet it up" a bit but cooking it down works to remove moisture from my one experiment.   
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on January 13, 2011, 06:38:27 PM
The rice is off white.

He was stuck on her like off-white on rice? 

I don't think so... It doesn't work.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: phillamb168 on January 17, 2011, 12:41:03 PM
How much (by weight) of masa dough do you typically use for each corn tortilla? I've got 500 g of masa harina and the sister-in-law and her family are coming for dinner next weekend.. Just need to make sure I've got enough.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 01:23:48 PM
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: phillamb168 on January 17, 2011, 02:50:13 PM
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.

If one does not have a tortilla press (they don't have them even in GERMANY, which is where they usually have everything) can one use a rolling pin and/or an astrophysics textbook?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 06:25:41 PM
Text book I would say no. Cause it will be hard to distribute even pressure.

Rolling pin works great, I meqnt to say that in the last post. The press only offers evenly round tortillas, with a rolling pin they are a little wonky, more rustic.

Try some homemade flour tortillas. they take a little practice but man they are awesome.

Here is the way of making flour tortillas by one of the best Mexican chefs out there. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBgsLmDcL78
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: deepsouth on January 17, 2011, 06:32:52 PM
damn, just caught up on the last three pages.  you guys are off the hook.  i'm going to put my training wheels back on!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on January 17, 2011, 07:02:28 PM
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.

If one does not have a tortilla press (they don't have them even in GERMANY, which is where they usually have everything) can one use a rolling pin and/or an astrophysics textbook?

Rolling the dough out between wax paper or plastic wrap might help. Locally we use plastic wrap in the presses to keep the dough from sticking.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 07:41:37 PM
Oh yeah, have to use wax papper or wrap.

Here is good instruction on corn tortillas with a rolling pin. From an Indian cook no less.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VToLFw-eH2s
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on January 18, 2011, 06:56:50 PM
I just roll out a golf ball size piece of dough and then put it in the tortilla press. It will be the same if you roll it out. You can make really big flour tortillas but the corn is less resilient. Best to keep them small.

If one does not have a tortilla press (they don't have them even in GERMANY, which is where they usually have everything) can one use a rolling pin and/or an astrophysics textbook?

I've had luck using my Fluid Mechanics/Hydraulics textbook.  I can control and apply the pressure evenly.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on January 22, 2011, 12:06:32 AM
OK.

  Tubercle has two pint jars of lemons pickled in salt like Cap said. Been curing since mid-November.

Now what? How are they used? I believe cutting off the rinds and using them in soup was mentioned.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 22, 2011, 07:21:35 PM
I'm in the midst of a whole lot of indian cooking.  Got some tandoori chicken marinating for the grill, just finished a batch of naan done under the broiler, yesterday I made the pastry and filling for aloo samosas, and premade (but haven't fried) them.  Last weekend I made a (probably referenced) red pepper baigan bharta, which I'll have to warm up for tonight.  Later tonight, frying the samosas, grilling the chicken, and then a batch of boneless chicken pakoras (bits of chicken in a spicy gram batter).  Oh, and I made a batch of dal this morning, which took a few hours...red pepper, masoor dal, and a chicken yakhni broth, lots of onions and spices.  Will reheat tonight.

On top of all that, my brother in law is bringing his specialties, I believe a rice dish, tikka masala, and kheer.

Going to be a ridiculous amount of food.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 22, 2011, 08:41:48 PM
Hey tubercle are you sure the lemons are ready? Im not sure cause I have never done it. But I heard it takes a looonnnggg time.

MAybe not, if they are done they are done. They should smell crazy strong and perhaps more like something you would clean the floor with rather than food.

Anyway here is my Recipe for Moroccan Chicken tangine with preserved lemmons.

Take a pot that you can put in the oven.It has to have a lid and be big enough to fit a whole chicken.

Put the pot on the stove and get it hot over med high heat. Put in one whole onion chopped and let the onions brown dry with no oil. Then put in some chopped garlic. When the onions are starting to brown put in some oil. Then add salt, pepper. Then add a sliced green pepper, a sliced zuccinni, a sliced large carrot, a small amount of peas (frozen are great.
Toss and let the veg brown.

Add two sliced up preserved lemons.  Then whole stick of cinnamon or a teaspoon of ground. A teaspoon of cumin seeds, a bay leaf, some fresh chopped mint or dry mint or basil. four or five chopped fresh tomatoes or a pint can of tomato (whole or chopped or puree is fine) Add a teaspoon of honey, a few splashes of red wine. Go easy on the wine. Then add a bunch of green cured olives. Black olives work fine too.

Simmer while you taste and adjust spices.

Then put the chicken in the por breast up and wait for it to come back up to a simmer. Cover and and put it into a 350 degree oven. Let it cook in the oven four two hours or more.

Serve with cous cous made with quinces and raisins. Or just plain cous cous or rice. BAsmati would be awesome.

Seems like a long time for a chicken. But this recipe is very very old. It comes from back when the Moroccan people were nomadic. They cooked the food they had with them in saddle bags so many dishes are cooked for a very long time to ensure that any bacteria is killed.

They had with them, kefir or yogurt, preserved lemons ( a good source of vitamin c) dried meats or partially dried meats.

Let capozzoli know if it has any Q's.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on January 22, 2011, 09:22:45 PM
I need to make some more preserved lemons.  Last time I used meyer lemons.  Should I do that again or would you recommend normal "eureka" style lemons?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on January 22, 2011, 10:22:57 PM
Thanks capozzoli. Most ingredients are on hand and a big cast iron dutch oven is ready for service.

 The lemons still smell lemony so it may wait another month or two to see how they progress.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on January 22, 2011, 11:18:56 PM
Thanks capozzoli. Most ingredients are on hand and a big cast iron dutch oven is ready for service.

 The lemons still smell lemony so it may wait another month or two to see how they progress.

All the real Indian "pickle" I've ever had smelled like the cleaning products under the sink. So when you smell Comet it's probably ready.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on January 23, 2011, 12:08:00 AM
yep, they should have that lemmony pledge smell.  ;D

But man they make sauces taste great.

There are some rules being broken with cooking these lemons. Ordinarily you would never want to cook the white part of the lemon rind. When zesting only grate off the yellow part and stay above the white. It will leave off flavors, astringent, and tannin. ;
But with preserved lemons it is not the case, for some reason these off flavors are dispersed when the lemons ferment.

Cook the whole lemon, rind and all, the rind will have the most flavor.

Also meant to say add some water or broth to that above Chicken Tangine recipe. It will be a little thick. It should be slightly thick but still a little brothy. It will get thicker as it cooks and some of the liquid evaporates.

Nic, I think I remember reading that myer lemons are ideal.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on August 05, 2011, 03:41:32 AM
Hey tubercle are you sure the lemons are ready? Im not sure cause I have never done it. But I heard it takes a looonnnggg time.


 Lemons have been pickling for 9 months.

Think they are ready now?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 05, 2011, 03:50:40 AM
Might try my hand at this pickled lemon deal.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on August 05, 2011, 08:30:54 AM
Might try my hand at this pickled lemon deal.

Didn't Led Zeppelin do a song about that?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on August 05, 2011, 09:53:12 PM
Might try my hand at this pickled lemon deal.

Didn't Led Zeppelin do a song about that?
Yeah, Then they did it again just to be sure...."Travelin Riverside Blues"
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 08, 2011, 01:43:32 AM
Im sure they are ready now.

Do they smell absolutely awful? Like something you would clean your floor with? Thats a pretty good indication of their readiness.

Now you have to make the Moroccan tangine of chicken preserved lemons, green olives. Can you get your hands on some good cured green olives?  

Did I post that recipe in here?

Post pics!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on August 08, 2011, 02:19:24 AM
You ever get your Tandoor Oven happening?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 08, 2011, 03:57:57 PM
Im sure they are ready now.

Do they smell absolutely awful? Like something you would clean your floor with? Thats a pretty good indication of their readiness.

Now you have to make the Moroccan tangine of chicken preserved lemons, green olives. Can you get your hands on some good cured green olives?  

Did I post that recipe in here?

Post pics!

Olives are something I'd like to try someday...have you ever tried your hand at curing olives?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on August 11, 2011, 10:49:13 PM
Never cured olives.I would love to. I think it is pretty simple but finding the fresh olives is tough.

No Tandoor yet. I have the old cement mixer cut up and Im looking for a big truck break drum to serve as a base. But havent done much to it. I was on a couple of pizza/hearth cooking sites and the experts there recommend "raku" clay. Just have to find some and get busy.

Coarse I have another giant grill in line before that, a six by eight foot "festival" grill Im making for a charity. That is sitting in a pile of parts waiting. Then there is my smoker prototypes. Wait till you guys see those. I will surely post them. Just have a few more details (hard ones) to work out before I debut what is sure to be the best BBQ/smoker rig in the world....THE WORLD!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 11, 2011, 11:01:42 PM
Olives grow down here. Gonna plant a tree. There's an olive farm about an hour away towards Mexico. Might see if I can get some from them and try my hand at curing the olives. I do have the lye...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2011, 12:13:07 AM
Olives grow down here. Gonna plant a tree. There's an olive farm about an hour away towards Mexico. Might see if I can get some from them and try my hand at curing the olives. I do have the lye...

Keep us posted. I love Greek Kalamata Olives.

http://www.olives101.com/2006/11/13/curing-kalamata-olives/

and they even have a forum... :o

http://www.olives101.com/forum/
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on August 12, 2011, 02:01:52 AM
I planted one of these this spring

 http://www.willisorchards.com/product/Manzanilla+Olive+Tree?category=271

 It was about 12 inches tall and a pencil width but it has been putting out new growth very well.

 I read up on them and basically no fertilizer or mulch, just plant them in the soil and poor soil is really better. Plus they are draught hardy. The cruel red clay of upstate SC should be ideal then.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 16, 2011, 04:49:47 PM
Last night I made my third attempt at tamales and I think I've got a winner.  Masa, spices, water, and...wait for it...rendered bacon lard.  Stuffed with leftover chicken taco meat (various peppers, onions, and grilled chicken), steamed for an hour and a half, and served with a red sauce, cheese, and olives.  Ay carumba!

The smell of corn masa and bacon fat steaming together is relatively intoxicating, especially with the windows open last night because of the unseasonably cool weather.  It may be a newish dish to me as a cook but it definitely is comfort food!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 16, 2011, 05:32:16 PM
I think leftovers make a great tamale filling. Are you making big Bobby Flay style tamales or more conventional sized ones?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on August 16, 2011, 06:22:07 PM
Smallish ones...have to fit in my modest sized steamer.  Only problem about making them in a small steamer pot is that by lunchtime the next day, they are gone, in my house!   ;D

Ah well, such a delightful combination of carbs and fat should probably not be eaten to excess anyway!!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on August 16, 2011, 06:35:42 PM
Smallish ones...have to fit in my modest sized steamer.  Only problem about making them in a small steamer pot is that by lunchtime the next day, they are gone, in my house!   ;D

Ah well, such a delightful combination of carbs and fat should probably not be eaten to excess anyway!!

True words. All in moderation. Except beer. :D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: morticaixavier on August 17, 2011, 05:37:21 PM
I love tamales. i somtimes make them in those paper muffin cups, shape them in a muffin tin and then take them out and steam. Great for presentation. Although (for those of you in Avacado lands, or with Avacado trees in pots) try using the biggest leaves you can get, it makes pretty patterns and gives just a hint of bay leaf like aroma. Banana leaves work to but don't have the pretty patters quite as much
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 15, 2011, 10:45:43 PM
Check this out.

I didnt make this, but at our favorite Vietnamese lunch spot thry brought us out one of their specialties that is not on the menu.

Ti'et Cahn

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/photo.jpg)

Its a mixture of raw fresh squeezed duck blood and chopped raw organs. Its flavored with lime, ginger, fish sauce. I suppose it could be said that it is "cured" with lime but...

The blood was from the fresh killed duck that was used to make our soup.

Fresh. 

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tygo on September 15, 2011, 11:25:28 PM
So, how was it?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 16, 2011, 12:04:10 AM
I'm going to go out on a limb here and be closed-minded about this! 

Raw bird organs in fresh blood is a bridge too far for me.  Hope you at least enjoyed it, though!  Nice of the place to share it with you. Unless this was their Vietnamese practical joke for the credulous American foodie that keeps visiting them!   ;D
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 16, 2011, 01:03:09 AM
They were laughing at us. But only at the  tiny little amounts we were taking on the spoon. They convvinced us eventually to take a full size mouthfull  

I was nervous about what it might tate like. But, it wasnt terrible, the lime and ginger the predominant flavors, it was very rich with a mineral after taste.kinda earthy.But I thought, raw duck blood and chopped organs would be nasty. But fresh is different for sure. The heart that was in with the organs had been beating only moments before and it tasted that way. Not bad at all. Just not what I would rave about. The texture was a little chewy with and a mildly resistat crunch from time to time.

Good for novelty if some guests are at the table.

They did however commend us on the fact that we were the only westerners to taste and eat the dish. Others hve tried and were not able.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 16, 2011, 02:15:04 AM
Are you talking about Thang Long Restaurant around the corner from your shop?

Great Vietnamese food there.

...but I have to agree with Nick that raw blood and organs is nasty. I wouldn't be able to get it past my lips. Kinda like the chick eggs you were thinking about trying. Just can't seem to get past the thought of eating it.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 16, 2011, 02:29:47 AM
Yep, Thang Long. Indeed a great place.

The belut, I dont think I could do that.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on September 16, 2011, 05:11:01 AM
If it were given to me guess I'd try it since I'm the adventurous type. Sounds nasty but consider that hunger is the best spice and I doubt that traditionally the Vietnamese would waste anything. Bring a duck in- you get dishes prepared from every part of the fowl including the nasty bits.

On the flipside that's a bit outre for me. Especially since I spent an evening earlier this week in the Emergency Dept with food poisoning that I got from a chilaquiles taco a colleague brought me. Bird guts. :P
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on September 16, 2011, 07:05:27 AM
Yep, Thang Long. Indeed a great place.

The belut, I dont think I could do that.

You gotta hava Long Thang to eat belut...   :o
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 16, 2011, 12:17:41 PM
Yeah, thats what we call that place; Long Thang.

I think I could eat anything except belut. That and I wont eat penis either.

I would say I wont eat testicles, but its too late for that. Someone already got a couple of those balls past the goalie.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: corkybstewart on September 16, 2011, 01:28:35 PM
My wife was raised on a farm in post WWII France, they couldn't afford to waste anything.  I've learned to not turn anything down  not matter how disgusting it may sound to an old white-bread American like me.  I discovered over the years that I truly love pig hearts and lungs in a nice red wine sauce, and grilled blood sausage is fantastic.  Horse meat, donkey meat, snails, pretty much everything I've eaten over there is great with one exception.  One of their regional specialties is grilled tripe sausage, and for years I tried to develop a taste for them but it ain't happening.  After about 15 years I finally had to refuse to eat them.  My youngest BIL explained the best way to eat them-chop them in small pieces, cover those with fiery Dijon mustard and swallow it without chewing.  I used his technique for the last 5 years I pretended to enjoy them but even that failed eventually.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 16, 2011, 01:29:43 PM
Ever had hakarl?  Heard it is pretty horrendous.  Icelandic rotten sharkmeat.  

I'm all for using as many of the "nasty bits" as I can, because (drawing on my experience as a father of a 3 year old) I am every bit as cheap as Mr. Krabs, but what I usually do is boil them with bones and then discard, making stocks.  I would have a real hard time eating raw poultry innards unless that duck had undergone a serious veterinary examination including blood tests before being dispatched!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 17, 2011, 01:31:18 AM
I would share your fear, but I took comfort in the fact that there were others eating it next to us, and they sell it like hot cakes, they have a frige by the regisiter where they stack in containers of it. It is apparently ordered n advance and when you go to pick it up it is waiting in the fridge. There is is a constat flow of people picking it up every time we go there,

Also the idea is that it is cured with lime so it is sort o chemically cooked. Still it is raw.

There is another tastey Vietnamese dish made with thin slices of raw beef marinated in lime garlic and fish sauce. Its really good, sorta a beef seviche.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tubercle on September 17, 2011, 12:15:41 PM
That and I wont eat penis either.

 I haven't tried tthat but they sell the bovine variety around here both frozen and "fresh". Its called pizzle.

I would say I wont eat testicles, but its too late for that. Someone already got a couple of those balls past the goalie.

 Done that. We call them mountain oysters. Bull, pig & goat. Pig parts are big round here;chittlins, snout, ears, stomach, kidneys, brains...from the snoot to the toot.

 We tend to cook our food though.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on September 17, 2011, 12:43:22 PM
Molefest 2011

These were taken at our family's annual Molefest (now in its third year) a few weeks ago.  We made three moles (black, red, and green), salsa, guacamole, poblano rice and poblano corn, tortillas, chile-rubbed tenderloin with a chimichurri sauce, puerco verde, and margaritas (I may be forgetting something).

First, the drinks.  Bells Oberon clone on tap in the portable kegerator.
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Portablekegerator-front.jpg)
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Portablekegerator-back.jpg)

Margarita bar
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Margaritabar.jpg)

Salsa verde and chipotle/cascabel/pulla salsas
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Salsas.jpg)

Guacamole in the molcajete
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Guacinthemolcajete.jpg)

Chicken braising in black mole and beans in red mole over an open fire
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Molesroastingonanopenfire.jpg)

Finished chicken in black mole
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Blackmole-finished.jpg)

Chile-rubbed beef tenderloin on the grill
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Chilerubbedtenderloin.jpg)
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Chilerubbedtenderloin-finished.jpg)

And here's my first plate...one of many ;D  That's a chimichurri sauce on the beef.
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/Myplate.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on September 17, 2011, 01:54:36 PM
matt, that looks wonderful.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on September 17, 2011, 05:44:29 PM
MMMMMMMM. Looks like Molefest was a success!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 17, 2011, 09:11:12 PM
Oh holy crap!  Where was my invitation?!   ;D  Looks fantastic.  And a great time of year to cook outdoors.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 17, 2011, 11:05:56 PM
Man, that is a beautiful spread right there. (wipes the tears from his eyes)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on September 18, 2011, 02:24:03 PM
Hey thanks!  The black mole was probably the best iteration so far.  And the salsas were perfect.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: narvin on September 18, 2011, 03:43:02 PM
Hey thanks!  The black mole was probably the best iteration so far.  And the salsas were perfect.

Looks absolutely delicious.  Care to post a recipe?   :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on September 18, 2011, 04:54:55 PM
Hey thanks!  The black mole was probably the best iteration so far.  And the salsas were perfect.

Looks absolutely delicious.  Care to post a recipe?   :)

No problem. ;)

http://www.bravotv.com/foodies/recipes/oaxaca-black-mole-with-braised-chicken-plantain-tamal-and-grilled-nopales
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: nicneufeld on September 19, 2011, 12:30:26 AM
Rick Bayless has done really well in convincing the unwashed masses (particularly, me) that Mexican food is more than just red sauce, cheese, and "taco seasoning".  That mole sounds awesome.  It's one of those recipes that would consume an entire day probably (at least for me) but I may have to try it.

Tonight, refried black beans, guacamole seasoned with lime and cilantro, and a pot presently steaming, full of tamales.  Dough made with bacon lard, masa, and spices, and filling is made from diced trimmings of a spare rib smoke I did a few days ago, with fried onions, tomatoes, chilies, cumin, oregano, etc.  Then tomorrow with the leftover filling I'm going to panfry some quesadillas using the smoked pork filling.

OK, so I'm still in the unhealthy realm of probably inauthentic Mexican food, but hey, it IS good.  Hard to beat the smell of cooking tamales, especially now that there's a bit of nip in the air.  Comfort food from down south.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on September 19, 2011, 12:44:52 AM
Awesome presentation Matt!  :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on September 30, 2012, 01:48:10 AM
I have been warned that this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days. Come on guys, uis it all about brewing and BBQ. Trade it up once in a while.  ;D

Just thought I would stop in and see whats new here. Look like just the same old boring crap. Beer and BBQ.

Haven't brewed in a while but I am considering joining a brew club in my hood. These guys are after me hard to join. Jeez, its not like I can really brew or anything like that. Sure I am handsome and I have good taste in beer but I wonder what else they want me for? Im gong to my first brew session there on Tuesday.

I hope someone doesn't start putting pumpkin in it or some stupid s*** like that.

Im making pumpkin pies tomorrow. Maybe Ill post some pics.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on September 30, 2012, 02:18:02 AM
Made any cool pizza ovens lately Cap?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: deepsouth on September 30, 2012, 02:23:08 AM
that molefest looks like the dizzle.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on September 30, 2012, 03:12:22 AM
Hey Bill, W.B.  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on September 30, 2012, 06:41:54 AM
What have you been up to Cap?

The most ethnic thing I've made lately has been Thai curry soup.  But there's not much new to say about it. :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on September 30, 2012, 01:59:19 PM
Think about ya all the time! Really.

Was making Spanish chorizo couple days ago and thought- wonder where cap has been...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on October 02, 2012, 01:14:52 AM
Funny, yeah, been real busy the last, hmm. Year or so? Wow. Trying to turn the business around and get the shop fixed up after the disaster of 2008 and 9 and 10 and 11. Things are much better now that I have put much effort into a website, SEO and SMO and a few other letter acronym type things.
been doing some cooking as always but haven't had much time for ANYTHING else.

I want to get back into the cooking blog because that is all attached to the website and all. MAy be a fun for me way of updating my stuff.

Ill post some stuff soon.

I did make pumpkin pie yesterday with a Long Island Cheese pumpkin. WE went to the orchard to pick apples. Also made an apple crumble top apple pie with some wine sap apples thatr were on the tree only hours before.

I puts some walnuts in the food processor and chopped them a little to mix into the crumble top. very nice. 

For a good nutty crumble top.

Mix 1/2 cup butter, cup and a half flour, cup and one half brown sugar, one cup chopped walnuts or almonds etc. Pinch and mix with fingers until well blended but still kind of dry. Add flour as needed. Keep cold until you top the pie and keep it loose, dont pack it down when you top the pie just kind of sprinkle it on in layers until its even on top.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 02, 2012, 04:32:29 PM
Long time no see...glad to see you making some beer.  Love this time of year...fall harvest is the best. Made some fresh corn and potato chowder Sunday and Chorizo chili last night.  I wish there were more days in the week to do some more cooking and baking. :)
Title: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on October 14, 2012, 11:48:31 PM
Tonight's meal: smoked schweinshaxe, rotkohl (cabbage salad), and homemade pretzel. Orange blossom mead to wash it down.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/12/10/15/9ebynyhu.jpg)

Great to hear from you, Cap!!  Hope the business is doing well.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 15, 2012, 12:47:20 AM
Man that looks excellent! Smak-smak!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Alewyfe on October 15, 2012, 01:27:31 AM
Takes me back to many pleasant meals at the Black Forest Inn in your neck of the woods.
Prohst!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 19, 2012, 06:55:41 PM
Tonight's meal: smoked schweinshaxe, rotkohl (cabbage salad), and homemade pretzel. Orange blossom mead to wash it down.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/12/10/15/9ebynyhu.jpg)

Great to hear from you, Cap!!  Hope the business is doing well.

OK I've been fascinated with this dish after seeing No Reservations' Berlin and Czech Republic shows. Wasn't sure if it was hocks or not since they appear so huge in the episodes and so pathetically little at the store.

I guess we don't let our pigs get that large...

Anyway I got the largest hocks I could find and am brining them in a liter salt/cure#1 solution for up to 5 days. The recipes on the web are leaving something to be desired.

Most say boil/simmer at least 1.5 hours- which can't nearly be long enough? Then some suggest crisping them up afterwards in a hot oven. Others skip the boiling and roast in liquid in the oven.

I want the goo. Tender unctuous pork nearly falling apart. Crispy skin would be ok... Thinking about using some Shiner Bock as the braising liquid.

Any ideas? I'm probably gonna smoke one of them but not even sure how to approach that. BTW these things don't smell too great when you get them out of the package. In fact they smell like what they've been standing in! Took some scraping and washing before they went into the brine!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 20, 2012, 05:04:33 AM
The best schweinhaxe I've had are always roasted.  Some were smoked and were delicious, but the boiled ones I don't especially like.  I might braise them for a while and then crisp them up, like you were talking about.  No recipes though, sorry.  You might check Raichlen's books for one :-\
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 22, 2012, 12:45:31 AM
OK here are my initial findings:

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-KBl2yPXoQN8/UISQT_p6RXI/AAAAAAAAAjQ/jVbF4XIu7Bg/s640/2012-10-21%252017.15.07.jpg)
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-G3zEIx98J3c/UISJlYPzreI/AAAAAAAAAi0/vUkULENtM08/s640/2012-10-21%252017.16.23.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-146i3dtbk20/UISPsLoSOII/AAAAAAAAAjI/_G6n6NV04Yk/s640/2012-10-21%252018.26.43.jpg)

Hocks went into dutch-oven (uncovered) with a bed of shredded cabbage, carrots and onion. One bottle of Shiner Bock and 12oz of water. Caraway, juniper, bay leaves, cracked peppercorns and dried garlic. Went into a 450* wood burning oven for 3.5 hours where the hocks were removed and placed into a small roasting pan on a raft of carrots seasoned with butter, salt, pepper and nutmeg for another 45 minutes. Bavarian sauerkraut from a can heated separately. ;) Served with house 50 IBU IPA hopped with columbus and cascade.

Very tasty if not a bit salty... Regardless, quite yummy gooey and tender! More fat and collagen was rendered out than expected or desired. Skin got a bit crispy- not as much as I'd like but a tease of what it could be! Overall demonstrates a good flavor.

I learned two main things: Eisbein and Schweinhaxe techniques are not interchangeable though at first was not sure if they were different dishes. Obviously they are.

Eisbein is boiled and Schweinhaxe is roasted, and the Shweinhaxe need not be brined/cured and is done in a shallow roasting pan.

Have some blackeyed peas soaking in which the the remaining roasted hock will simmer and season tomorrow. I'll thaw out some braised mustard greens to make a fine Southern meal!

Thanks Pawtucket for the inspiration!

Prosit!

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: deepsouth on October 22, 2012, 01:27:24 AM
that looks great.

Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2012, 02:11:22 AM
that looks great.

+1

I love using ham hocks in soups and stews...metric tons of flavor.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on October 22, 2012, 02:15:41 AM
OK I've been fascinated with this dish after seeing No Reservations' Berlin and Czech Republic shows. Wasn't sure if it was hocks or not since they appear so huge in the episodes and so pathetically little at the store.

Those hocks look great, euge!  Funny, I was also turned on to schweinshaxe and other hock dishes after watching this same episode. 8)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on October 22, 2012, 06:12:59 AM
Awesome euge, well done!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: punatic on October 22, 2012, 06:48:53 AM
I'm guessing that you made your sauerkraut the correct way - with a Krauthammer!  ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on October 22, 2012, 02:19:12 PM
Thanks guys! I think these are going to become part of my repertoire. So cheap. So good. Just takes some preparation and you have something nice to eat.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on November 19, 2012, 02:06:41 PM
Schwenkbraten mit blaukraut und Kartoffelbrei

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/056.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 19, 2012, 05:47:42 PM
Prepared 9lbs of sauerkraut yesterday.

I use an old ceramic crock. I sliced the cabbage as thin as I could get it, and layered the cabbage in a crock, applying Sea salt and tamping the cabbage with a wooden block as I added each layer. Then placed the crock, covered with a plate and a 10lb weight, in an old fermenter and sealed the bucket leaving the airlock hole just covered with a beer coaster. It will take at least a few weeks but I think it's perfect in six weeks.

Just in time for New Years!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on November 19, 2012, 05:48:06 PM
Schwenkbraten mit blaukraut und Kartoffelbrei

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/056.jpg)

Looks delicious!  :)
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on November 19, 2012, 06:04:30 PM
Prepared 9lbs of sauerkraut yesterday.

I use an old ceramic crock. I sliced the cabbage as thin as I could get it, and layered the cabbage in a crock, applying Sea salt and tamping the cabbage with a wooden block as I added each layer. Then placed the crock, covered with a plate and a 10lb weight, in an old fermenter and sealed the bucket leaving the airlock hole just covered with a beer coaster. It will take at least a few weeks but I think it's perfect in six weeks.

Just in time for New Years!

Save some for me!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on November 19, 2012, 06:32:01 PM
Prepared 9lbs of sauerkraut yesterday.

I use an old ceramic crock. I sliced the cabbage as thin as I could get it, and layered the cabbage in a crock, applying Sea salt and tamping the cabbage with a wooden block as I added each layer. Then placed the crock, covered with a plate and a 10lb weight, in an old fermenter and sealed the bucket leaving the airlock hole just covered with a beer coaster. It will take at least a few weeks but I think it's perfect in six weeks.

Just in time for New Years!

Have you made it before? I plan on making some but maybe one head of cabbage to see how it turns out.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on December 02, 2012, 05:58:52 PM
We have had a six gallon fermentation bucket packed with kraut since october. It is coming along nicely.

Dont just get any cabbage, make sure it is large solid and sound late season cabbage. Late season has lots of natural sugars that make for a good fermentation.

We tried another method that people have told us where you just put it in a jar put the lid on and let it sit. Some even add water. I thought it was crazy because with the lid not much o2 will get in there and I thought maybe the jar could explode but it is working well.
Title: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on December 03, 2012, 12:56:50 AM
Prepared 9lbs of sauerkraut yesterday.

I use an old ceramic crock. I sliced the cabbage as thin as I could get it, and layered the cabbage in a crock, applying Sea salt and tamping the cabbage with a wooden block as I added each layer. Then placed the crock, covered with a plate and a 10lb weight, in an old fermenter and sealed the bucket leaving the airlock hole just covered with a beer coaster. It will take at least a few weeks but I think it's perfect in six weeks.

Just in time for New Years!

Have you made it before? I plan on making some but maybe one head of cabbage to see how it turns out.
I make it every year around October/November so that it's ready by the New Year. It's easy and fun to do. So many dishes can be prepared with this old world food. Try it!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: andrew on May 06, 2013, 12:22:47 PM
A good thread should not die!

I was out mowing the grass about a week ago and disturbed a turtle crawling around the garden fence. I normally just rehome the bigger turtles that i find or my son catches on his rod and reel to the bayou by my office... but this one was not as lucky.

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/390717_10151563189242719_171452970_n.jpg)

Stewed turtle with onions, garlic, and potatoes with a side of small brussel sprouts - all from the garden. Dessert was fresh picked wild blackberries with sweet bread and good ole vanilla Blue Bell ice cream.

All washed down with a homebrewed porter.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on May 08, 2013, 05:37:43 AM
Prepared 9lbs of sauerkraut yesterday.

I use an old ceramic crock. I sliced the cabbage as thin as I could get it, and layered the cabbage in a crock, applying Sea salt and tamping the cabbage with a wooden block as I added each layer. Then placed the crock, covered with a plate and a 10lb weight, in an old fermenter and sealed the bucket leaving the airlock hole just covered with a beer coaster. It will take at least a few weeks but I think it's perfect in six weeks.

Just in time for New Years!

Have you made it before? I plan on making some but maybe one head of cabbage to see how it turns out.
I make it every year around October/November so that it's ready by the New Year. It's easy and fun to do. So many dishes can be prepared with this old world food. Try it!
Ron, I woulda teased in a little caraway seed...just me...
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on May 08, 2013, 05:08:51 PM
I like caraway in mine too. It's called "Bavarian-style" down here.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: 1vertical on May 08, 2013, 05:18:07 PM
I like caraway in mine too. It's called "Bavarian-style" down here.
We have a brand Kuners here, that is where I first tried ^^^^ Bavarian style and won't look back!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: redbeerman on May 08, 2013, 06:41:41 PM
I like caraway in mine too. It's called "Bavarian-style" down here.
We have a brand Kuners here, that is where I first tried ^^^^ Bavarian style and won't look back!

Onion, brown sugar and caraway seed is how I make it.  Sometimes I put a little beer in it too (a German style, course).
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: capozzoli on May 16, 2013, 03:46:44 AM
Hey guys. Nice lookin kraut.

Slovakians put caraway in everything. When people try to put stuff in my kraut now I slap their hand and firmly say "NO!" Like in Conquest of the Planet of The Apes.

What else has been gone on around here? 

Ron did you ever finish the brutus or is it still a work in progress  :P

Where is the weaze, he still brewing?

I may brew a batch this weekend. Wait, no I am working Saturday, looks like I will just get a case of SNPA and suck it down before I get there.
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: tschmidlin on May 16, 2013, 04:01:34 PM
Hey guys. Nice lookin kraut.

Slovakians put caraway in everything. When people try to put stuff in my kraut now I slap their hand and firmly say "NO!" Like in Conquest of the Planet of The Apes.

What else has been gone on around here? 

Ron did you ever finish the brutus or is it still a work in progress  :P

Where is the weaze, he still brewing?

I may brew a batch this weekend. Wait, no I am working Saturday, looks like I will just get a case of SNPA and suck it down before I get there.
What have you been up to cap?  Weaze is MIA, Ron finished the brutus as far as I know.

When was the last time you brewed?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: euge on May 16, 2013, 08:11:51 PM
We miss your insightful input cap!
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 17, 2013, 12:03:10 AM
A good thread should not die!

I was out mowing the grass about a week ago and disturbed a turtle crawling around the garden fence. I normally just rehome the bigger turtles that i find or my son catches on his rod and reel to the bayou by my office... but this one was not as lucky.

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/390717_10151563189242719_171452970_n.jpg)

Stewed turtle with onions, garlic, and potatoes with a side of small brussel sprouts - all from the garden. Dessert was fresh picked wild blackberries with sweet bread and good ole vanilla Blue Bell ice cream.

All washed down with a homebrewed porter.

I love how resourceful this meal was!  Looks very tasty!  I wish I had the balls to stew a turtle that I just found lurking around my yard. :P
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: bluesman on May 17, 2013, 04:46:37 PM
Hey guys. Nice lookin kraut.

Slovakians put caraway in everything. When people try to put stuff in my kraut now I slap their hand and firmly say "NO!" Like in Conquest of the Planet of The Apes.

What else has been gone on around here? 

Ron did you ever finish the brutus or is it still a work in progress  :P

Where is the weaze, he still brewing?

I may brew a batch this weekend. Wait, no I am working Saturday, looks like I will just get a case of SNPA and suck it down before I get there.

What up Cap!

Long time...no post!

Yes, the Brutus 10 is completed. Haven't heard much from Weaze. Miss your food creations and general BS. :)

What's cooking these days?
Title: Re: Ethnic and Regional Cooking
Post by: Annieh on July 21, 2018, 07:09:41 PM
This looks yummy. (https://www.robotance.com/robotic-food-processor/robot-coupe-r2n/)  :)