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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: therealmccoy on July 11, 2012, 07:11:16 pm

Title: Does it matter?
Post by: therealmccoy on July 11, 2012, 07:11:16 pm
Does it matter if i add my grain to the water or the water to my grain?

Thanks
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: gmac on July 11, 2012, 07:19:26 pm
I found water to grain made for nasty dough balls. Grain to water seems to let you stir better.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: hopfenundmalz on July 11, 2012, 07:21:42 pm
I have added water to grain, grain and water together, and grain to water.

Grain to water is much easier on the homebrew scale.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: narcout on July 11, 2012, 09:52:14 pm
I've never noticed it to make any difference.  Whichever way is easiest on your system will be fine.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: garc_mall on July 11, 2012, 11:41:36 pm
I don't think it matters that much, but I add the water to my cooler first to pre-heat the cooler. That way my mash temperatures are right on.
Title: Does it matter?
Post by: ajk on July 12, 2012, 03:49:51 am
My favorite way is to "underlet" the grain bed—put the grain in the cooler first, then pump- or gravity-feed water in from the spigot.  Never had a doughball that way!
Title: Does it matter?
Post by: brushvalleybrewer on July 12, 2012, 05:18:29 am
I find if I do grain to water it gives me an extra chance to adjust my mash temp. In single infusion in an unheated vessel (igloo cooler) you have to account for the temp loss to the vessel and the grain. If you add the water by itself first, you can make sure you have precisely accounted for the vessel temp before adding the grain.

I also agree with the other posters that I find I have fewer grain balls this way as well.


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Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: nateo on July 12, 2012, 05:49:54 am
Adding wet to dry ingredients cuts down on dust, but you're more likely to get dough balls. Dry to wet makes doughballs less likely.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: davidgzach on July 12, 2012, 05:52:30 am
Add me to the grain to water list.....
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: bwana on July 12, 2012, 06:05:46 am
I let my strike water run freely then after it is above my false bottom I start scouping in my grain and stiring along the way.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: narvin on July 12, 2012, 06:09:08 am
Doesn't matter, do whatever is easier for your system.  I pump water in to a tun already full of grain, and I've never had doughballs that a little stirring didn't take care of.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: theDarkSide on July 12, 2012, 06:25:30 am
Doesn't matter as long as your cooler is blue  ;)

I add a couple gallons of water, some grain and stir.  Add more water, grains, stir...repeat until I'm doughed in.  This method works well for me with no dough balls.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: weithman5 on July 12, 2012, 06:59:26 am
i recently have been adding my grain to a bag first then putting this in the tun then adding water.  had not been a problem until recently i realized my temperature was way too hot. then i tried to cool it down, thought i had but due to poor mixing went back an hour later and my temp actually had gone up due to equilibrium. end result poor efficiency.  low og. new session beer. 
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: Delo on July 12, 2012, 07:10:28 am
I've done both without problems. If you do water to grain make sure the mash tun is heated.   I started off mashing in a cooler(blue of course) and I did water to grain.  The first few times I did it without warming the cooler and I had to play catchup to get it to mash temp. Warming the cooler first made a big difference.
Title: Does it matter?
Post by: ajk on July 12, 2012, 07:30:23 am
Adding wet to dry ingredients cuts down on dust, but you're more likely to get dough balls. Dry to wet makes doughballs less likely.

I don't like the bacteria-laden dust floating around, so I fill the tun with grain in another room before wheeling it into the brewery. Then I underlet.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: gmac on July 12, 2012, 07:38:32 am
So to summarize:  Do what works for you.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: micsager on July 12, 2012, 08:28:43 am
I let my strike water run freely then after it is above my false bottom I start scouping in my grain and stiring along the way.
+1
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: Slowbrew on July 12, 2012, 09:38:57 am
I've done both.  I really haven't seen any difference in dust or dough balls. 

When adding water into grain, I have learned to add the grain, then add almost all my strike water and let it all sit for a couple of minutes.  This seems to give the grain time to absorb the water before I start stirring.  This is kind of like adding water from the bottom and produces fewer dough balls.

Paul
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: jmcamerlengo on July 12, 2012, 09:42:52 am
Im a grain to water guy. I brew on a Brutus system and found that adding my water to my mash tun, starting the re-circ process with jsut water and adding the grain slowly from there not only cuts down on doughballs, but since doing things this way, I haven't experienced any pump clogs since I re-circ for the duration of the mash.
Title: Does it matter?
Post by: ajk on July 12, 2012, 09:50:39 am
When adding water into grain, I have learned to add the grain, then add almost all my strike water and let it all sit for a couple of minutes.  This seems to give the grain time to absorb the water before I start stirring.

Good point.  Even when underletting, I wait until all the water is in the tun to start stirring.  Stirring early equals doughballs.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: tcanova on July 12, 2012, 08:28:54 pm
I've always added grain to water, may have to give the other way around a shot.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: dbarber on July 13, 2012, 06:41:58 am
I've always added water to grain.  Why, I'm not sure, it's just the way I learned. I just make sure I break up all the dough balls.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: mmitchem on July 13, 2012, 07:05:16 am
I add grain to water as well. When you add the water first into the vessel, I assume a cooler mash tun, you can use that water to heat the entire mash tun. Any temperature swings will have taken place before you add grain, so there aren't any surprises.
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: DrewG on July 13, 2012, 07:41:47 am
I open the ball valve on my HLT and stir while she pours the grain in.

So I guess we add it all at the same time  :o
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: coastsidemike on July 22, 2012, 10:36:34 pm
If you do water to grain make sure the mash tun is heated.   I started off mashing in a cooler(blue of course) and I did water to grain.  The first few times I did it without warming the cooler and I had to play catchup to get it to mash temp. Warming the cooler first made a big difference.

Depending on a couple factors, I add ~4 degrees to the strike water and I hit the temp I need without the cooler warm-up.  Orange also helps...  ;)
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: punatic on July 23, 2012, 01:14:59 am
My favorite way is to "underlet" the grain bed—put the grain in the cooler first, then pump- or gravity-feed water in from the spigot.  Never had a doughball that way!

+1 on that.  "A rising tide lifts all ships."

I open the ball valve on my HLT and stir while she pours the grain in.

So I guess we add it all at the same time  :o

Yeah baby!  I like the sound of that!!   ;)
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: Pi on July 23, 2012, 01:10:10 pm
I was wondering if you are adding grain to hot water (or hot water to grain) will the all that hot water initially coming in contact with a small amount of grain be denatured? or is the amount trivial?
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: gmac on July 23, 2012, 03:23:11 pm
Here's an old Canadian song that just sort of seems applicable.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4SOnBDe7qs
Title: Re: Does it matter?
Post by: denny on July 23, 2012, 03:57:00 pm
I was wondering if you are adding grain to hot water (or hot water to grain) will the all that hot water initially coming in contact with a small amount of grain be denatured? or is the amount trivial?

Not on;ly is it a trivial amount, it takes time to denature enzymes.  It doesn't happen instantly.