Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: pinnah on August 14, 2012, 02:26:37 PM

Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: pinnah on August 14, 2012, 02:26:37 PM
So you are backpacking the wilderness and want to have a beer in the evening.

The availability of good beer in cans is nice for car camping or boating or rafting or wheeling or some other mode of travel.....but backcountry walking or skiing sometimes will not allow the weight of a six pack!

How about some beer concentrate (http://www.patsbcb.com/beer/43-beer/85-beer.html) to slake your yearning?   

patent pending  :o

Would you try it?  I guess they are going to make it available next year....
meanwhile, buy a tee shirt please ::)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Pinski on August 14, 2012, 02:44:24 PM
Sure, I'd try it.  My expectations would not be high. Curious.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: gymrat on August 14, 2012, 02:57:55 PM
In the mean time just drink it before you leave. It is much more ergonomic to carry your beer in your stomach.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Joe Sr. on August 14, 2012, 03:19:23 PM
The availability of good beer in cans is nice for car camping or boating or rafting or wheeling or some other mode of travel.....but backcountry walking or skiing sometimes will not allow the weight of a six pack!

I believe this is why they make whiskey.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: jmmcfarland on August 14, 2012, 03:51:57 PM
The availability of good beer in cans is nice for car camping or boating or rafting or wheeling or some other mode of travel.....but backcountry walking or skiing sometimes will not allow the weight of a six pack!

I believe this is why they make whiskey.

Absolutely!!!
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: euge on August 14, 2012, 05:20:05 PM
I would try it. What I want to figure out is how the "concentrate" is done. I can think of a few ways. One is to use one part of very strong beer (such as an IPA) and 2 parts of liquor blended. Dilute 2oz of that with 14oz cold water and force carbonate.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: erockrph on August 14, 2012, 05:28:09 PM
I'm very curious what the spin is on this. The "start with almost no water" phrase seems rather dubious to me. Too many secrets here - my BS detector is going apes*** right now.

I'd give it a try if I was offered a free sample, but I definitely wouldn't spend any money on it unless I had more info.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 14, 2012, 05:36:27 PM
I thought the point of backpacking was to simplify and leave all your stupid s*** at home. Taking along a beer concentrate and a force carbonator seems really silly to me, but I'm in the 'just drink whiskey or water' camp.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Delo on August 14, 2012, 06:03:21 PM
It's funny, I thought the point of backpacking was to spend an ungodly amount of money on ultralight equipment so you can carry more unnecessary s*** that you should have left at home. At least that's how someone I know thinks of it.

I would be interested in seeing this.  Until its like one of those space age food pills where all you have to add is a drop of water and a carbonated pint of beer is produced, I don't think I would buy one.
Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 14, 2012, 06:05:00 PM
The availability of good beer in cans is nice for car camping or boating or rafting or wheeling or some other mode of travel.....but backcountry walking or skiing sometimes will not allow the weight of a six pack!

I believe this is why they make whiskey.

+1. I don't leave home without it!
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: firedog23 on August 14, 2012, 06:50:19 PM
I thought the point of backpacking was to simplify and leave all your stupid s*** at home. Taking along a beer concentrate and a force carbonator seems really silly to me, but I'm in the 'just drink whiskey or water' camp.

+1

Just take some really good whiskey and a couple of cans of something you like.  Hiking doesn't have to be a bender.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 14, 2012, 06:58:24 PM
Most of my backpacking experience was in the high country in CO. I was usually fighting dehydration so much I didn't drink liquor anyway, because when I did I felt like crap. But on the plus side at 10k+ feet it doesn't take much booze to get pretty loopy.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 14, 2012, 07:06:06 PM
In spite of the camera and video equipment that takes up the majority of my pack space I always find room to pack a widget can of Guiness (and homemade smoked tuna jerky) on my trips to photograph the lava flows.  Since SN Torpedo in a can has appeared I hump a can of that into the shoots too.  Kind of a inpromptu black & tan, as it were.

Whiskey-wise, it is too dangerous out on the lava to be drinking spirits.  Besides, Pele prefers gin.  However, tradition has it that there is a tailgate feast upon returning to the truck, to celebrate a safe return from another visit with Pele.  At the tailgate feast anything goes.  It's all packed into a cooler awaiting my/our return.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: weazletoe on August 15, 2012, 03:09:00 AM
Hiking doesn't have to be a bender.


It doesn't HAVE to be, but it CAN be.  ;D
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: jamminbrew on August 15, 2012, 04:53:22 AM
Hiking doesn't have to be a bender.


It doesn't HAVE to be, but it CAN be.  ;D
What if I took this guy along?
(http://www.superbwallpapers.com/wallpapers/cartoons/bender-futurama-8299-1920x1200.jpg)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: jamminbrew on August 15, 2012, 05:04:23 AM
I will admit, I am skeptical. None of the quoted advocates was a brewer or BJCP judge, or anyone even related to beer making.  I would try it, though, just to see what it was like... But it seems like one of those "too good to be true" type of deals.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Kaiser on August 15, 2012, 12:52:00 PM
I started carrying beer on hiking trips. This one is from a hike on IPA day

(http://braukaiser.com/images/misc_forum/IPA_on_trail.jpg)

What I found challenging is chilling the beer before drinking it. Sure it can be put into a stream for a few hours. But what if set up camp late at night and just want to eat have the beer and go to bed.

Stashing beer in streams that I will pass on the way out can work very well too.

Kai
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 15, 2012, 01:24:08 PM
I once drank a Steel Reserve warm out of my pack on a 100 degree day. Yes, it was every bit as nasty as you would expect.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: erockrph on August 15, 2012, 05:57:56 PM
I started carrying beer on hiking trips. This one is from a hike on IPA day

(http://braukaiser.com/images/misc_forum/IPA_on_trail.jpg)

What I found challenging is chilling the beer before drinking it. Sure it can be put into a stream for a few hours. But what if set up camp late at night and just want to eat have the beer and go to bed.

I have a hard time drinking Green Monsta ice cold - I can't imagine how it is warm. It's just way too sweet for me. Last time I was at Fenway I was hunting all over for the Harpoon IPA, but I settled for one of these and was sadly disappointed. Way too much caramel to me for a hot summer day.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Kaiser on August 15, 2012, 06:34:42 PM
I have a hard time drinking Green Monsta ice cold - I can't imagine how it is warm. It's just way too sweet for me. Last time I was at Fenway I was hunting all over for the Harpoon IPA, but I settled for one of these and was sadly disappointed. Way too much caramel to me for a hot summer day.

Yea, that heavy IIPA was't exactly the best choice for a hiking beer, but it was IPA day and the other canned IPAs I picked up (Red Hook and Snapperhead) weren't easy drinkers either.

Kai
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: bluesman on August 15, 2012, 08:05:02 PM
I would give it a try, although I have to say that whiskey or Bourbon is very packable.  ;)

It's a great idea though.  :)
Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 16, 2012, 11:38:15 AM
I don't drink beer while hiking, usually if I am going to drink beer it is when we stop to set up camp. I like something easy drinking. And since I'm "roughing it" I tend to stay away from fancy beers. If SPAM tastes like filet mignon after a 12 mile day with 35 - 40 lbs on my back then Miller High Life in the can tastes like pure gold as well. Though, I admit, last couple times I went I took SNPA and now am eyeing Mammas Yella Pils from OB.

The other thing I have done is fill plastic bottles with my beer. This works fine though I've had it leak on occasion. Las time I went on an overnighter canoe trip I took a plastic water jug growler of my IPA and that was awesom.

And of course, I only ever take two beers because they are heavy. So if it is a twi nighter I have beer on the first night and the second night I just wish for beer. Always have whiskey though.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: pinnah on August 17, 2012, 02:49:11 AM
If SPAM tastes like filet mignon after a 12 mile day with 35 - 40 lbs on my back then Miller High Life in the can tastes like pure gold as well.

Hells yes.  Perhaps I have already told you that I found an old ass can of spam in a horse camp once,
deep in the wilderness on day 6.  It was amazing. :)

My current belly needs a beer break when I head to the hills.
Might consider some sippin whisky...what do you tote it in?  Titanium flask?  ;D
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 17, 2012, 04:06:31 AM
If I hiked 20 miles with 100lbs in my pack and had a choice between a can of MHL or muddy water from a horse hoof print I'd have to go Texas Ranger style.

"Life's to short to drink s***ty beer!"
- Carrie Nation

Spam musubi and Guiness?  Now that's worth hiking 20 miles with 100lbs in your pack for!
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 17, 2012, 11:20:14 AM
Titanium flask!!! Now I know what to ask for for my birthday! I carry around Nalgene flasks, one or two depending on how long the trip is. ;D

Punatic: Obviously, living in Hawaiiiiwaii has made you soft as soggy pineapple pizza. Amazing how good s*** beer tastes after a serious day of roughing it. I've told this story before, I'll tell it again. The best beer I ever drank was after a 3 night back packing trip through bone dry, hard ass mountains on the Pinhoti trail along the Alabama and Georgia border. We stopped at some out bumf##kegypt gas station and the best beer they had was Miller Genuine Draft. I turned my nose up at first but I was thirsty and it was ice cold. Half way through my second one I started to lose some interest but that first one and a half was quite possibly the best beer I ever drank.

Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Jimmy K on August 17, 2012, 12:19:41 PM
How about some beer concentrate (http://www.patsbcb.com/beer/43-beer/85-beer.html) to slake your yearning?   

I think the correct answer is Russian Imperial Stout, American Barleywine, etc. Carry one bottle instead of six! (or even better - get one in a can.)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 17, 2012, 12:50:58 PM
Half way through my second one I started to lose some interest but that first one and a half was quite possibly the best beer I ever drank.

Wow. You need to try more commercial beers. ;)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 17, 2012, 01:09:23 PM
Half way through my second one I started to lose some interest but that first one and a half was quite possibly the best beer I ever drank.

Wow. You need to try more commercial beers. ;)

 :D Touche but the point of the matter is that when you are really, really thirsty for a beer you will be surprised how low you will stoop.  ;)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 17, 2012, 03:32:02 PM
:D Touche but the point of the matter is that when you are really, really thirsty for a beer you will be surprised how low you will stoop.  ;)

When you say it like that, it makes you sound like a crack head.  It reminds me of a certain quote from Bob Saget in Half Baked. . .
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 17, 2012, 03:59:31 PM
I draw the line at rubbing alcohol and Mich Ultra. Well, definitely at the Mich Ultra.  ;)

I'd love to see one of you beer snobs turn your nose up to an ice cold beer after scorching beerless on the trail for 3 or 4 days. Guarantee you would be surprised what you think tastes delicious. Would I prefer a good German style pils? Oh, absolutely. But in reality MGD is not such a bad beer. One of the better mass produced lagers along with regular old Michelobe.

I do usually draw the line at "Lite" beer though. I'd rather have ice tea at that point. But .... on the trail I have been offered a Miller Light from time to time and I am not too ashamed to say I drank it and actually wished I had another.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 17, 2012, 04:45:16 PM
Keith - If I don't give you a hard time, who will?

I never turn my nose up at beer if someone offers it to me, but I think that's just courtesy. I've drank a lot of PBR at trailheads because people offered them. I have no problem drinking macro lagers. I drink Bud at the golf course because it's either that or Bud lite, or, heaven forbid, water. What kind of a jerk drinks water while they golf?
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 17, 2012, 05:58:34 PM
s*** beer is s*** beer, it has no appeal for me.  But hey, it looks good on you major.   ;)
Personally, I'd prefer muddy hoof water to MHL. 
(nobody gets my references to True Grit or the Temperance Movement)

If your pineapple pizza is soggy you need to find a better pizzaria!
Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 17, 2012, 06:38:59 PM
Oh, you won't drink an MGD but you will put pineapples on your pizza. Now I see we will never see eye to eye. ;)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 17, 2012, 09:30:13 PM
Oh, you won't drink an MGD but you will put pineapples on your pizza. Now I see we will never see eye to eye. ;)

Obviously you've never had a properly prepared Hawaiian pizza.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 18, 2012, 12:03:36 AM
Every islander I've met has been a bit off. . .
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 18, 2012, 01:33:02 AM
Every islander I've met has been a bit off. . .

I knew it was only a matter of time before we found something we agreed on.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: erockrph on August 18, 2012, 01:34:01 AM
Oh, you won't drink an MGD but you will put pineapples on your pizza. Now I see we will never see eye to eye. ;)

Obviously you've never had a properly prepared Hawaiian pizza.

Hell, I'll even take a lousy Dominoes Hawaiian pizza over MGD, let alone a properly prepared one...
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 18, 2012, 01:38:19 AM
Every islander I've met has been a bit off. . .

Especially ones from Rhode Island!    ;)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 18, 2012, 01:51:12 AM
"It's only an island if you look at it from the water."
- Chief Brody
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: pinnah on August 18, 2012, 04:26:27 AM
Every islander I've met has been a bit off. . .

I knew it was only a matter of time before we found something we agreed on.


Cracked
me up. ;D



Round here
we are able to wander the largest area of "wilderness" in the state of Colorado.
No motos allowed.  Not even a chainsaw to clear the trail
brother.


Just wondering if you can actually claim back-country on an island anymore? ???

Seems like if thirsty
you could just head down hill
and yer chances of crossing a beer might be pretty good?


heh.
Beer in the backcountry
nice
no matter your persuasion.


Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: el_capitan on August 18, 2012, 05:43:13 AM
I went on a 3-day trip this summer and thought long and hard about bringing some Torpedo or Furious in cans, but decided to pack some dry goods instead...

That said, if I was going to pack in booze, I'd go for a flask of port.  A buddy of mine brought some on last year's canoe Manventure, and it was awesome at any time of the day.  Just smooth, rich, delicious and boozy. 

That link looks like total BS to me!  Not enough info to make a true judgment though.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 18, 2012, 07:35:49 AM
Just wondering if you can actually claim back-country on an island anymore? ???

The island I live on, Hawaii Island (aka the Big Island) is the size of Connecticut.  85% of the island is inaccesable by car.  65% is only accessable on foot or by helicopter.  The island contains the largest mountain in the world (Mauna Loa - an active volcano)  which is also the tallest mountain in the world when measured from its base to its peak.  The island is comprised of 5 volcanoes, one extinct, one dormant, two active, and one erupting (the one I live on - Kilauea)   

There are 13 climatic zones in the world.  Hawaii Island has 11 of those 13 climatic zones.

When I travel across the island from Hilo to Kona I take the Saddle Road which crosses the saddle between Mauna Kea (13,796ft.) and Mauna Loa (13,679ft.).  I go from sea level to the high spot on the Saddle Rd. in 45 minutes.  That high spot is at 7,369ft, which is higher than the Flatirons in Boulder.

I thought about living in Colorado, but decided it is too urban for me (and WAAAY to f-ing cold!).   ;)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 18, 2012, 07:41:33 AM
Oh, you won't drink an MGD but you will put pineapples on your pizza. Now I see we will never see eye to eye. ;)

Not true.  We both agree that boiled peanuts are the food of the gods, no?
Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 18, 2012, 01:33:12 PM
boiled peanuts are ambrosia, they especially do it right in Georgia. But I can not abide pineapples on a pizza. Ever.

Granted, I'm sticking up for sh!t beer more than I have a heart to drink it, but I'll take an MGD over a pineapple pizza an day.

And to all you naysayers, I guarandamntee you that if you had been in 90-100 degree heat for 3-4 days on bone dry mountains and you were handed a dripping wet, ice cold beer .... ANY BEER .... you'd drink it. And for most of you pansy boys I bet the circumstances would,'t even need to half ... no, a quarter as tuff. ;)
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: nateo on August 18, 2012, 04:08:05 PM
Granted, I'm sticking up for sh!t beer more than I have a heart to drink it, but I'll take an MGD over a pineapple pizza an day.

A small-batch IPA is not inherently better than a macro lager. If you like one better than the other, that's fine, but that's just like, your opinion, man. I wish my opinions were objectively true, but I can't prove them yet. In the meantime I'll keep telling people YDIW.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: repo on August 18, 2012, 05:05:42 PM
Just wondering if you can actually claim back-country on an island anymore? ???

The island I live on, Hawaii Island (aka the Big Island) is the size of Connecticut.  85% of the island is inaccesable by car.  65% is only accessable on foot or by helicopter.  The island contains the largest mountain in the world (Mauna Loa - an active volcano)  which is also the tallest mountain in the world when measured from its base to its peak.  The island is comprised of 5 volcanoes, one extinct, one dormant, two active, and one erupting (the one I live on - Kilauea)   

There are 13 climatic zones in the world.  Hawaii Island has 11 of those 13 climatic zones.

When I travel across the island from Hilo to Kona I take the Saddle Road which crosses the saddle between Mauna Kea (13,796ft.) and Mauna Loa (13,679ft.).  I go from sea level to the high spot on the Saddle Rd. in 45 minutes.  That high spot is at 7,369ft, which is higher than the Flatirons in Boulder.

I thought about living in Colorado, but decided it is too urban for me (and WAAAY to f-ing cold!).   ;)

It is bigger than all the other islands combined. Rental car companies forbid you from driving on saddle road.
And when you get out there in a lava field you understand why there are lava rock grills. Parker ranch is the largest private ranch in the country. I think Bear Grylls did a survival episode on Hawaii too.

As far as majors mgd/pineapple -I don't like either. But I could eat the pizza- the mgd would have to be chugged not drank, and no other optiion could be available. There are several other macro lagers I would rather have(chug). I call it "field beer" and its not meant for drinking.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 18, 2012, 06:40:36 PM
And to all you naysayers, I guarandamntee you that if you had been in 90-100 degree heat for 3-4 days on bone dry mountains and you were handed a dripping wet, ice cold beer .... ANY BEER .... you'd drink it.

Obviously you've never had muddy hoof print water...
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Jimmy K on August 19, 2012, 08:29:43 PM
I'd love to see one of you beer snobs turn your nose up to an ice cold beer after scorching beerless on the trail for 3 or 4 days. Guarantee you would be surprised what you think tastes delicious. Would I prefer a good German style pils? Oh, absolutely. But in reality MGD is not such a bad beer. One of the better mass produced lagers along with regular old Michelobe.

I do usually draw the line at "Lite" beer though. I'd rather have ice tea at that point. But .... on the trail I have been offered a Miller Light from time to time and I am not too ashamed to say I drank it and actually wished I had another.

I once sprinted down to a lake after reading in a hiker log that someone had left a sixer of Miller Sharp in the water under the dock.  I'd been backpacking over a week during a heat-wave. Non-alcoholic? Didn't care.
Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 20, 2012, 11:28:20 AM
I'd love to see one of you beer snobs turn your nose up to an ice cold beer after scorching beerless on the trail for 3 or 4 days. Guarantee you would be surprised what you think tastes delicious. Would I prefer a good German style pils? Oh, absolutely. But in reality MGD is not such a bad beer. One of the better mass produced lagers along with regular old Michelobe.

I do usually draw the line at "Lite" beer though. I'd rather have ice tea at that point. But .... on the trail I have been offered a Miller Light from time to time and I am not too ashamed to say I drank it and actually wished I had another.

I once sprinted down to a lake after reading in a hiker log that someone had left a sixer of Miller Sharp in the water under the dock.  I'd been backpacking over a week during a heat-wave. Non-alcoholic? Didn't care.

No you didn't.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: pinnah on August 20, 2012, 03:19:59 PM

No you didn't.

majorvices,  I could have used your vote in THIS (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=10669.0) thread. ;D
Title: Backcountry beer
Post by: majorvices on August 21, 2012, 12:26:05 AM

No you didn't.

majorvices,  I could have used your vote in THIS (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=10669.0) thread. ;D

I remember that thread. Meant to vote but forgot.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 21, 2012, 02:32:58 AM
I remember that thread. Meant to vote but forgot.

See!  Unnecessary killing of brain cells with s*** beer!   :P
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: hopfenundmalz on August 21, 2012, 02:50:36 AM
Just wondering if you can actually claim back-country on an island anymore? ???

The island I live on, Hawaii Island (aka the Big Island) is the size of Connecticut.  85% of the island is inaccesable by car.  65% is only accessable on foot or by helicopter.  The island contains the largest mountain in the world (Mauna Loa - an active volcano)  which is also the tallest mountain in the world when measured from its base to its peak.  The island is comprised of 5 volcanoes, one extinct, one dormant, two active, and one erupting (the one I live on - Kilauea)   

There are 13 climatic zones in the world.  Hawaii Island has 11 of those 13 climatic zones.

When I travel across the island from Hilo to Kona I take the Saddle Road which crosses the saddle between Mauna Kea (13,796ft.) and Mauna Loa (13,679ft.).  I go from sea level to the high spot on the Saddle Rd. in 45 minutes.  That high spot is at 7,369ft, which is higher than the Flatirons in Boulder.

I thought about living in Colorado, but decided it is too urban for me (and WAAAY to f-ing cold!).   ;)

It is bigger than all the other islands combined. Rental car companies forbid you from driving on saddle road.
And when you get out there in a lava field you understand why there are lava rock grills. Parker ranch is the largest private ranch in the country. I think Bear Grylls did a survival episode on Hawaii too.

As far as majors mgd/pineapple -I don't like either. But I could eat the pizza- the mgd would have to be chugged not drank, and no other optiion could be available. There are several other macro lagers I would rather have(chug). I call it "field beer" and its not meant for drinking.

I don't know about Parker ranch, but the King Ranch is big, but it may not be private anymore. Had to google the largest private ranch and it turns out it is this one.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermejo_Park_Ranch
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: hopfenundmalz on August 21, 2012, 02:53:14 AM
A second trip down the Colorado through the Grand Canyon is one my bucket list. The nice thing about a river trip is that the beer floats with you. The river is cold coming out of the Glen Canyon dam, so no warm beer. Might have to take a corny or 2 the next time. That would make us the guides friends.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: repo on August 21, 2012, 04:09:15 AM
Just wondering if you can actually claim back-country on an island anymore? ???

The island I live on, Hawaii Island (aka the Big Island) is the size of Connecticut.  85% of the island is inaccesable by car.  65% is only accessable on foot or by helicopter.  The island contains the largest mountain in the world (Mauna Loa - an active volcano)  which is also the tallest mountain in the world when measured from its base to its peak.  The island is comprised of 5 volcanoes, one extinct, one dormant, two active, and one erupting (the one I live on - Kilauea)   

There are 13 climatic zones in the world.  Hawaii Island has 11 of those 13 climatic zones.

When I travel across the island from Hilo to Kona I take the Saddle Road which crosses the saddle between Mauna Kea (13,796ft.) and Mauna Loa (13,679ft.).  I go from sea level to the high spot on the Saddle Rd. in 45 minutes.  That high spot is at 7,369ft, which is higher than the Flatirons in Boulder.

I thought about living in Colorado, but decided it is too urban for me (and WAAAY to f-ing cold!).   ;)

It is bigger than all the other islands combined. Rental car companies forbid you from driving on saddle road.
And when you get out there in a lava field you understand why there are lava rock grills. Parker ranch is the largest private ranch in the country. I think Bear Grylls did a survival episode on Hawaii too.

As far as majors mgd/pineapple -I don't like either. But I could eat the pizza- the mgd would have to be chugged not drank, and no other optiion could be available. There are several other macro lagers I would rather have(chug). I call it "field beer" and its not meant for drinking.

I don't know about Parker ranch, but the King Ranch is big, but it may not be private anymore. Had to google the largest private ranch and it turns out it is this one.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermejo_Park_Ranch

Sorry, guess I have to be more specific. It's the largest cattle ranch.

http://hawaiicam.com/2011/05/quick_wheres_the_largest_cattle_ranch_in_the_us/
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: hopfenundmalz on August 21, 2012, 11:43:44 AM
Just wondering if you can actually claim back-country on an island anymore? ???

The island I live on, Hawaii Island (aka the Big Island) is the size of Connecticut.  85% of the island is inaccesable by car.  65% is only accessable on foot or by helicopter.  The island contains the largest mountain in the world (Mauna Loa - an active volcano)  which is also the tallest mountain in the world when measured from its base to its peak.  The island is comprised of 5 volcanoes, one extinct, one dormant, two active, and one erupting (the one I live on - Kilauea)   

There are 13 climatic zones in the world.  Hawaii Island has 11 of those 13 climatic zones.

When I travel across the island from Hilo to Kona I take the Saddle Road which crosses the saddle between Mauna Kea (13,796ft.) and Mauna Loa (13,679ft.).  I go from sea level to the high spot on the Saddle Rd. in 45 minutes.  That high spot is at 7,369ft, which is higher than the Flatirons in Boulder.

I thought about living in Colorado, but decided it is too urban for me (and WAAAY to f-ing cold!).   ;)

It is bigger than all the other islands combined. Rental car companies forbid you from driving on saddle road.
And when you get out there in a lava field you understand why there are lava rock grills. Parker ranch is the largest private ranch in the country. I think Bear Grylls did a survival episode on Hawaii too.

As far as majors mgd/pineapple -I don't like either. But I could eat the pizza- the mgd would have to be chugged not drank, and no other optiion could be available. There are several other macro lagers I would rather have(chug). I call it "field beer" and its not meant for drinking.

I don't know about Parker ranch, but the King Ranch is big, but it may not be private anymore. Had to google the largest private ranch and it turns out it is this one.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermejo_Park_Ranch

Sorry, guess I have to be more specific. It's the largest cattle ranch.

http://hawaiicam.com/2011/05/quick_wheres_the_largest_cattle_ranch_in_the_us/

Having spent a lot of vacation time in Utah, I larned that the largest cattle ranch when measured by the number of cattle, is owned by the Mormon church. It is in Florida because there is more grass there than in Utah. I remember my farmer uncles explaining that they need big ranches out west because it takes a lot of acres to support one cow, but in the east they could have many cows per acre.

Sorry for the thread jack.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 21, 2012, 01:34:59 PM
Parker Ranch used to be the largest, but it is being sold off by the heirs.  The US military recently bought a huge piece of it and annexed it into their ajacent Pohakuloa Training Area.  Because of the high altitude in the saddle between Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa and Hualalai, the training area can simulate the battle fields in Afganastan.  High altitude helicopter flying is challenging.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: punatic on August 21, 2012, 02:04:30 PM
The Deseret Ranches is a huge tract of undeveloped land between Orlando and Cape Canaveral owned and operated by the LDS church.  The power plant property where I worked for 15 years was next to it.  That is the power plant you see when you fly into OIA.
Title: Re: Backcountry beer
Post by: Jimmy K on August 22, 2012, 01:14:43 PM

No you didn't.

majorvices,  I could have used your vote in THIS (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=10669.0) thread. ;D

In my defense, I had just turned 21 and didn't know much better.