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General Category => Extract/Partial Mash Brewing => Topic started by: fattony on August 20, 2012, 01:08:05 PM

Title: First Batch
Post by: fattony on August 20, 2012, 01:08:05 PM
Hello all,

Well I brewed my first batch and I do not have high hopes for it, quite a few mistakes.  I cannot wait to get it into bottles so that I can start the next batch.  I do have one question though.  How does one remove the malt aroma out of the house?  When I leave and come back, it hits me hard.  Personally, I like the smell but my wife has other opinions.

Nathan
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: davidgzach on August 20, 2012, 01:15:34 PM
Try Febreeze.  Unfortunate though.  I love that smell.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: Jimmy K on August 20, 2012, 01:23:20 PM
Open the windows for a while.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: erockrph on August 20, 2012, 01:48:06 PM
I feel your pain. Leave some windows open while you're brewing to get some cross-ventilation going. Close the door to your bedroom while you're brewing as well, so at least it doesn't get into your sheets or her clothes. She'll appreciate you for it.

I've been toying with trying my hand at a hops-scented candle using some hop extract. I figure if anything can cover up the smell of malt, it would be hops...
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: mripa on August 21, 2012, 02:26:00 AM
It goes away in about 2 days.. I love the smell but others in the house don't.  I'm in Florida so the a/c is blowing constantly which helps.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: fattony on August 21, 2012, 03:32:00 AM
Opening the windows for a few hours worked.  The smell is gone and all is well.  Thank you all for the tips.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: sch21c on August 21, 2012, 02:13:28 PM
Well I brewed my first batch and I do not have high hopes for it, quite a few mistakes.  I cannot wait to get it into bottles so that I can start the next batch.  I do have one question though.  How does one remove the malt aroma out of the house?  When I leave and come back, it hits me hard.  Personally, I like the smell but my wife has other opinions.

Welcome!  I'm just a few batches ahead of you, and I had the same low hopes for my first batch (pale ale) when I bottled it.  You may be very pleasantly surprised how drinkable it is when it's been bottle conditioned for a few weeks.

I've got the same issues with the malt smell in my house.  My 17 year old son (my brew partner) and I like the smell, but my wife and daughters all hate it.  I haven't tried to do a whole lot yet to deal with it.  We've been brewing in the kitchen, and here in the northeast the air conditioning doesn't get shut off until late august - early september, so windows haven't been much of an option.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: Pinski on August 21, 2012, 02:34:44 PM
Fortunately, everyone in my household likes the "bready" smell.  They come through the front door on starter day when I'm working in the kithchen and holler, "Pin's making beer again!"
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: Joe Sr. on August 21, 2012, 02:52:17 PM
The smell of boiling wort was the only thing that soothed my wife's "morning sickness" with our first child.  It was actually evening sickness, about 7:00 pm or so.  If I was brewing when she came home, she didn't hurl.  If I wasn't...

Needless to say, I had free rein to brew as often as I wanted for awhile.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: fattony on August 21, 2012, 09:43:36 PM
Well I brewed my first batch and I do not have high hopes for it, quite a few mistakes.  I cannot wait to get it into bottles so that I can start the next batch.  I do have one question though.  How does one remove the malt aroma out of the house?  When I leave and come back, it hits me hard.  Personally, I like the smell but my wife has other opinions.

Welcome!  I'm just a few batches ahead of you, and I had the same low hopes for my first batch (pale ale) when I bottled it.  You may be very pleasantly surprised how drinkable it is when it's been bottle conditioned for a few weeks.

I've got the same issues with the malt smell in my house.  My 17 year old son (my brew partner) and I like the smell, but my wife and daughters all hate it.  I haven't tried to do a whole lot yet to deal with it.  We've been brewing in the kitchen, and here in the northeast the air conditioning doesn't get shut off until late august - early september, so windows haven't been much of an option.

I understand your pain.  I live in Oklahoma and the AC might not get shut off until late September early October, which really makes it hard to brew in the summertime.  We just hit a perfect spot where it was cool in the morning and hot in the afternoon and opening the windows in the morning made the smell go away rather quickly. 
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: kgs on August 31, 2012, 05:54:48 PM
Funny, after I brewed my first batch, the LHBS in my former home state asked me what I thought of the smell. I said "we all LOVED it!" I guess they knew I'd be back pretty often!
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: brewmaster_cannon on September 02, 2012, 07:56:36 PM
Welcome to the hobby, I myself have been brewing for a couple years though I am also new to this forum.

The best sure fire way to get rid of the smell is to buy a propane burner to go outside with the brew day, keeps the kitchen cleaner and the wife happy.  Other than that febreze should help and open the windows to air it out.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: gmac on September 06, 2012, 02:50:26 AM
Fry up a whole bunch of bacon.
Should cut the smell with the added benefit of bacon.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: bboy9000 on September 06, 2012, 03:34:57 AM
You could also try cooling up some Thai food.  The curry and fish sauce should get the malt smell out. 

Or try Ozium.  That seemed to work well in my college dorm room.
Title: First Batch
Post by: majorvices on September 06, 2012, 12:09:49 PM
+1 to the buying a propane burner and getting the heck out of the kitrchen comment. You will want to get off your kitchen stove ASAP if you continue in this hobby. Nothing ruins a stove faster than a wort boil over.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: fattony on September 07, 2012, 12:05:49 AM
+1 to the buying a propane burner and getting the heck out of the kitrchen comment. You will want to get off your kitchen stove ASAP if you continue in this hobby. Nothing ruins a stove faster than a wort boil over.

It looks like I will have to brew most of my beer in the winter months due to the hot climate here.  Will the propane still work in the middle of the winter?
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: tygo on September 07, 2012, 12:16:32 AM
+1 to the buying a propane burner and getting the heck out of the kitrchen comment. You will want to get off your kitchen stove ASAP if you continue in this hobby. Nothing ruins a stove faster than a wort boil over.

It looks like I will have to brew most of my beer in the winter months due to the hot climate here.  Will the propane still work in the middle of the winter?

If the tank ices up put it in a bucket or big pot of room temperature water.
Title: First Batch
Post by: majorvices on September 07, 2012, 01:21:37 AM
+1 again to the water submersion trick. I have brewed outside in snowstorms and blizzards and, aside from constructing a rudimentary windshield with aluminum foil have never had a burner problem. If you have a garage you can move the brewery in there to provide a bit more comfort.
Title: Re: Re: First Batch
Post by: In The Sand on September 07, 2012, 02:20:33 AM
+1 to the buying a propane burner and getting the heck out of the kitrchen comment. You will want to get off your kitchen stove ASAP if you continue in this hobby. Nothing ruins a stove faster than a wort boil over.

It looks like I will have to brew most of my beer in the winter months due to the hot climate here.  Will the propane still work in the middle of the winter?

Funny. I just watched an episode of the NB guys brewing in the middle of winter on a frozen lake while ice fishing. Their propane tank froze so the used a smaller propane bottle attached to a heater to heat the frozen tank :-\ It worked.

I have yet to brew in the winter since I've only done 5 batches so far. I'm definitely looking forward to it because I'm in hot @$$ Florida brewing in the garage!
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: philm63 on September 10, 2012, 12:47:50 AM
First batch was brewed inside as well and although I don't really mind the smell too much, it's something I could do without, so the propane burner was the next logical step and out to the garage it went. Besides; going to full-boil with my extract brews pushed me in that direction anyway - my stove couldn't handle a full-boil - win-win!

Luckily my wife also doesn't mind the smell - she brews every other batch, my partner in crime, so to speak. Keeping it out of the wind, even in very low temperatures, shouldn't be a problem for propane - never had one freeze-up during winter BBQs, but then again; I've not yet brewed in my garage during the winter months so I guess we'll see...
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: alcaponejunior on September 16, 2012, 07:51:41 PM
Funny. I just watched an episode of the NB guys brewing in the middle of winter on a frozen lake while ice fishing. Their propane tank froze so the used a smaller propane bottle attached to a heater to heat the frozen tank :-\ It worked.

I have yet to brew in the winter since I've only done 5 batches so far. I'm definitely looking forward to it because I'm in hot @$$ Florida brewing in the garage!

I was like "I want to do that" until I read heated up the propane tank with another propane burner  ::)

Does seem like fun though, I will have to combine fishin' and brewin'.  ;D

I'll soon be brewing in hot texas heat so we'll be in the same boat.  Little chance for combining ice fishing and brewing, that is.  ::) ::)

ETA: my first pieces of texas brewing equipment will be, in this order:

1. a freezer/regulator setup for keeping fermentation temps cool enough and
1.a. a secondary wort chiller so I can run the cooling water for my primary wort chiller through an ice bath in order to get the wort to the right temps before pitching (I will build this myself, btw)

2. kegging equipment and a keg fridge

3. a propane burner setup and a bigger brew pot so I can expand beyond 3.5 to 4 gallon batch size and start doing 5+ gallons of all-grain

4. a clever setup using pipes, tubing, angle iron, and a welder to make the badest-ass-est brewing setup evah  ;D

You'll be hooked beyond belief soon too  ;D
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: anje on October 23, 2012, 09:10:34 PM
Eh, it smells like Grape-Nuts.

I just go with it, since I get the feeling my landlord would pitch a fit if I started a boil out on my patio. Yet another reason to move out of that place.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: weithman5 on October 23, 2012, 09:21:14 PM
i use an electric kettle outside or in the garage.  it is not the smell that drove me outside, it was the evaporation and subsequent condensation on the stove top that i could not get cleaned off easily.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: euge on October 23, 2012, 10:18:38 PM

1.a. a secondary wort chiller so I can run the cooling water for my primary wort chiller through an ice bath in order to get the wort to the right temps before pitching (I will build this myself, btw)


You are better off buying a sub-pump and recirculating ice-water through the wort-chiller. Once you hit the ambient tap-water temp you switch over which may be as high as 90 and as low as 64 depending on the season. Less wasteful and much more efficient.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: Jimmy K on October 24, 2012, 01:16:39 AM

1.a. a secondary wort chiller so I can run the cooling water for my primary wort chiller through an ice bath in order to get the wort to the right temps before pitching (I will build this myself, btw)


You are better off buying a sub-pump and recirculating ice-water through the wort-chiller. Once you hit the ambient tap-water temp you switch over which may be as high as 90 and as low as 64 depending on the season. Less wasteful and much more efficient.

Listen to Euge! I've done this and it works great! One heat transfer is far more efficient than two.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: alcaponejunior on November 03, 2012, 05:28:26 PM

1.a. a secondary wort chiller so I can run the cooling water for my primary wort chiller through an ice bath in order to get the wort to the right temps before pitching (I will build this myself, btw)


You are better off buying a sub-pump and recirculating ice-water through the wort-chiller. Once you hit the ambient tap-water temp you switch over which may be as high as 90 and as low as 64 depending on the season. Less wasteful and much more efficient.

Listen to Euge! I've done this and it works great! One heat transfer is far more efficient than two.

What is this secondary sub-pump/recirculator thingie you speak of??
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: morticaixavier on November 03, 2012, 08:01:03 PM

1.a. a secondary wort chiller so I can run the cooling water for my primary wort chiller through an ice bath in order to get the wort to the right temps before pitching (I will build this myself, btw)


You are better off buying a sub-pump and recirculating ice-water through the wort-chiller. Once you hit the ambient tap-water temp you switch over which may be as high as 90 and as low as 64 depending on the season. Less wasteful and much more efficient.

Listen to Euge! I've done this and it works great! One heat transfer is far more efficient than two.

What is this secondary sub-pump/recirculator thingie you speak of??

basically you have a tub of ice water with the afore mentioned submersible pump in. When you have exhausted your tap waters ability to chill the water you switch the input to the IC to the pump and pump ice water through. By returning the heated water to the pool you get a recirc going on.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: euge on November 03, 2012, 08:15:42 PM
A picture is worth a thousand words!

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-LMAlaYBIlS0/S8_6i0AaURI/AAAAAAAAAGU/yrudkeqz9j0/s512/img_0261.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-SYVwqYJZosg/TWySZsbAlcI/AAAAAAAAAiU/tapogzFkxgk/s640/goosneck.jpg)

This is just an example where I used frozen PET bottles to see how it would work instead of ice. Ice performs much better- but swapping 20oz bottles would work better than the 1&2 liter bottles. I used male and female barbed garden-hose threaded connects that I found at Lowes and soldered them onto the IC. Then I screwed male and female garden-hose quick connects onto these allowing me to switch the sub pump hoses easily and quickly. Sub pump does not have a float.

Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: alcaponejunior on November 03, 2012, 09:21:30 PM
OK so basically I would need to hook that setup onto the wort chiller I already have.  The copper and tubing works I am not worried about.  I am good at working with that type of hardware and could figure it out without issue.  The only issue is the pump... what kind of pump do you need?  What is a "sub-pump" and would the employees at home depot have no issue finding what I need if that's what I asked for? 
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: euge on November 03, 2012, 09:35:56 PM
OK so basically I would need to hook that setup onto the wort chiller I already have.  The copper and tubing works I am not worried about.  I am good at working with that type of hardware and could figure it out without issue.  The only issue is the pump... what kind of pump do you need?  What is a "sub-pump" and would the employees at home depot have no issue finding what I need if that's what I asked for?

You'll pay more at HD than necessary, though I'd price there. Here's a better example: http://www.harborfreight.com/16-horsepower-submersible-utility-pump-68422.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/16-horsepower-submersible-utility-pump-68422.html)
(http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_11141.jpg)

You could buy one with a float but you'd just have to activate it by holding it up somehow.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: alcaponejunior on November 03, 2012, 09:43:52 PM
thanks guys! 
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: neemox on December 03, 2012, 06:04:29 PM

You'll pay more at HD than necessary, though I'd price there. Here's a better example: http://www.harborfreight.com/16-horsepower-submersible-utility-pump-68422.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/16-horsepower-submersible-utility-pump-68422.html)


Sorry to bump a dead post, but do you really need this much pump for this? I'll be setting this up soon as chilling my wort is one of the longest and most wasteful parts of brew day for me, but I was hoping to get away with a tiny aquarium pump (closer to 10 dollars) We do this with the rotovap in my lab, and a relatively low flow of water is all that is necessary. In fact, I thought I read somewhere that the slower your IC flow, the greater your cooling efficiency. Thoughts?
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: morticaixavier on December 03, 2012, 06:17:07 PM

You'll pay more at HD than necessary, though I'd price there. Here's a better example: http://www.harborfreight.com/16-horsepower-submersible-utility-pump-68422.html (http://www.harborfreight.com/16-horsepower-submersible-utility-pump-68422.html)


Sorry to bump a dead post, but do you really need this much pump for this? I'll be setting this up soon as chilling my wort is one of the longest and most wasteful parts of brew day for me, but I was hoping to get away with a tiny aquarium pump (closer to 10 dollars) We do this with the rotovap in my lab, and a relatively low flow of water is all that is necessary. In fact, I thought I read somewhere that the slower your IC flow, the greater your cooling efficiency. Thoughts?

are you after more water efficiency or more time efficiency? it's a trade off. The way I look at it though I am not sure how much trade off it really is. When I have my water going full blast, as long as I keep stirring the wort the whole time the outlet water is more or less the same temp as the wort which means that I could not be chilling any more efficiently by going slower. I am putting as much energy as possible into that water on it's way through the coil and giving each unit of water more time with the wort will not change that.

For what it's worth, with tap water I use ~15-21 gallons of water to chill 6 gallons of wort from a boil to ~80*f and do it in about 15 minutes. Then I let the fridge take it the rest of the way. I am thinking about getting a little sump pump and trying the ice water recirc once I get to 80* to see if I can get to lager pitching temps. although it is also temping to try Euge's method of frozen water bottles first. seems far more efficient.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: euge on December 04, 2012, 12:37:15 AM
I'll further add that after much chilling and experimentation the best option is to sanitize the frozen PET bottles (the smaller the better) and place them directly in the wort.

I'm f'ing done with complicated cumbersome processes. After using an IC this Sunday I placed 12 sanitized 16oz frozen water bottles in 10 gallons of 85F wort. No stirring. It dropped to 62F in about 30 minutes and the bottles were still half ice.

No pump. No ice to buy or make. No bucket or cooler to place it in. No switching anything over. No mess. And less waste of water.

How efficient is that? Been doing it for all of 2012 with nary an infection. If one trusts Starsan for the fermenter and other equipment it certainly works well on the frozen bottles.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: tschmidlin on December 04, 2012, 04:53:21 AM
No pump. No ice to buy or make. No bucket or cooler to place it in. No switching anything over. No mess. And less waste of water.
Fixed that ;)

I think it's great you do it this way euge.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: neemox on December 04, 2012, 07:12:04 AM
Perfect, this seems to be simple and efficient.

Euge brings up a point I've often thought about but never done anything about. When trying to chill my wort, I usually stir, but in the process, it feels like I am subjecting myself to HSA and increasing the haze of my beer down the road. Does everyone stir their wort post-boil? Does no-one stir their wort post-boil? Does the cold break just fall out of solution once I get it in the fermenter?
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: euge on December 04, 2012, 12:16:41 PM
No pump. No ice to buy or make. No bucket or cooler to place it in. No switching anything over. No mess. And less waste of water.
Fixed that ;)

I think it's great you do it this way euge.

Thanks Tom.

I was serious about saying "no ice to make" because freezing up the bottles is a different beast altogether than making 20+ pounds of free ice. It can be quite the pain in the rear whereas after I'm done washing and drying the bottles I just pop them in the deep freeze and forget about them until the next brew session.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: morticaixavier on December 04, 2012, 03:40:56 PM
Perfect, this seems to be simple and efficient.

Euge brings up a point I've often thought about but never done anything about. When trying to chill my wort, I usually stir, but in the process, it feels like I am subjecting myself to HSA and increasing the haze of my beer down the road. Does everyone stir their wort post-boil? Does no-one stir their wort post-boil? Does the cold break just fall out of solution once I get it in the fermenter?

I have not had a problem with HSA. I stir every time. It's no different than using an IC with whirlpool return. don't spash too much but I really don't think it's an issue. I get brilliantly clear beers using only irish moss and time.

After I get it down as low as I am going to with the IC I pull the chiller and gt the wort moving as a mass then let it settle and much of the cold break drops to the bottom of the kettle where I can leave it behind by slowly opening the valve into the fermenter.
Title: Re: First Batch
Post by: tschmidlin on December 04, 2012, 05:29:43 PM
No pump. No ice to buy or make. No bucket or cooler to place it in. No switching anything over. No mess. And less waste of water.
Fixed that ;)

I think it's great you do it this way euge.

Thanks Tom.

I was serious about saying "no ice to make" because freezing up the bottles is a different beast altogether than making 20+ pounds of free ice. It can be quite the pain in the rear whereas after I'm done washing and drying the bottles I just pop them in the deep freeze and forget about them until the next brew session.
Ah, I see what you mean.  It's still making ice, but I get your point. :)