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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: capozzoli on February 22, 2010, 02:05:19 AM

Title: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: capozzoli on February 22, 2010, 02:05:19 AM
Who doesn't love a good sandwich? and not to many things go better with a beer. Am I right?

Ive noticed that there are people that cant cook, but can assemble a damn good sandwich.

I have been researching them lately. Lots of good old fashioned ones that are not around any more like The illusive Fried Brain sandwich of Saint Louis.

(http://sand.wich.es/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/00136.jpg)

Or all of the different types of burgers out there. Peanut butter on a burger?

The Cuban sandwiches are great.

(http://img.timeinc.net/recipes/i/recipes/ct/05/11/sandwiches-ct-1585343-l.jpg)

What are the famous local sandwiches around your way? Italian Beef?

Around here it is the hoagie which is named for Hog Island at the navy yard. The first one was made there when an Italian ship yard worker turned his antipasto over into an Italian roll. The rest is history.

(http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/903/sarcones22de.jpg)

Here is the land of cheese steaks too.

(http://jschumacher.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/philly_lunch1.jpg)

But I like a Tony Luke's  roast pork and broccoli rabe with  provolone much better.  Oh man are they good.

(http://media.onsugar.com/files/ons1/299/2993211/39_2009/f24a1666154fa044_3588153350_5eac3a3364_o.jpg)

There is a place near my work that makes a whole roast pig every day. That is what they use on their roast pork sandwiches. OMG. SO F-IN good.

The wonderful world of sandwiches. So what is your sandwich specialty. You own invention? Or a local classic?  Im working on some inventions. Im thinking of a fried soft shelled crab and bacon club. Huh? Huh? or maybe a fried oyster and bacon club. How bout a shrimp scampi hoagie?

Pics to come as I get some of these big boys built. 

What-a- ya got?
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: nicneufeld on February 22, 2010, 02:26:26 AM
Seems like, broadly speaking, a very East coasty sort of thing.  Not that we don't have great respect for them out in the midwest but sandwiches are elevated to an art form out east.  Here, the predominant indigeonous sandwich is BBQ brisket, on really really cheap white bread, the sort that gets immediately soggy from brisket juices and BBQ sauce so that you have to eat it with a fork.  Still, its a masterwork, but that's more about the meat than the sandwich itself.

I like grilling steak, onions, and peppers over charcoal and then slicing it all up into a sandwich with cheese.  Weird variant of the pepper steak.  And I smoke my own pastrami, which now paired with my meat slicer, makes great pastrami-on-rye, cold or hot.

But sometimes I like to go a bit further back in the realm of sandwich-making...thinly sliced cucumber on crustless buttered bread with a bit of coarse salt and pepper, hard to go wrong with that.  Simple, light, and fresh.
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: beerocd on February 22, 2010, 02:33:18 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell_Street_Polish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell_Street_Polish)
Gotta get the right ambiance....
(http://danrootphotography.lucita.org/images/folioPics/chic/Chicago04.jpg)

Polish w/ mustard and grilled onions - or a Pork Chop sammich (bone in)
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c7/Polish%2C_Pork_Chop_%26_Onions.JPG/794px-Polish%2C_Pork_Chop_%26_Onions.JPG)

http://alsbeef.com/ (http://alsbeef.com/)
Italian beef, giardinerra (sometimes sweet peppers), dipped (in au jus) -
sometimes red sauce, sometimes cheese and run it through a salamander (aka Cheesy Beef)
(http://alsbeef.com/images/menu/Beef-Sandwich-For-Web.jpg)
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: capozzoli on February 22, 2010, 03:53:54 AM
Oh man, I love kielbasa sandwiches.

The Vietnamese are making some damn good baguettes. All different kinds too. Some great Vietnamese cafes in town where they serve these lovely little sandwiches.

(http://img.metro.co.uk/i/pix/2009/10/VietBaguette_450x250.jpg)

Im thinking of trying to make some of these as well.

Ive also been thinking of an Indian themed sandwich. Hmm?
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: bluesman on February 22, 2010, 02:51:08 PM
Down in New Orleans they make this sandwich called the Muffuletta at a place called the Central Grocery Co. It is fantastic.

(http://wpcontent.answers.com/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f6/Centralcollage.jpg/300px-Centralcollage.jpg)

(http://photos.igougo.com/images/p121585-New_Orleans-Central_Grocery.jpg)

(http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/48/79/2a/a-whole-muffaletta-yum.jpg)
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: dbeechum on February 22, 2010, 05:24:28 PM
The Vietnamese are making some damn good baguettes. All different kinds too.

Co-worker of mine is Vietnamese and she'll occasionally bring in a selection of Banh mi Pate sandwiches. Damn I do love inhaling those things.

As for LA, the one thing we're known for Sandwich-wise is creating the French Dip Sandwich. We got two places in town that claimed to have invented the thing: Cole's Buffet and Phillipe's. I prefer the Phillipe's sandwiches and the crazy line and sawdust and pots o firey mustard.

(http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/10/06/yum_3.jpg)
It looks so humble there, but damn is it good. You can get a beef dip, turkey dip or a lamb dip and you can get a couple different cheese varieties on board as well.
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: mikeypedersen on February 22, 2010, 05:29:45 PM
Whenever I'm back East, I'll visit my friends in Hoboken half for the food.  My favorite italian sandwhich is Hot Cappicola, pepperoni, mortadella, a huge slab of fresh mozzerella, tomatoes, lettuce, onions, oil & vinegar, oregano & marjoram on fresh baked bread.  Man is that a good sandwich.  I'm getting hungry just thinking about it.

I finally found a spot in Denver that can even come close.  Of course, it's a little Mom & Pop shop that has been there for 50 years, but I was pretty excited to find it!
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on February 22, 2010, 06:11:20 PM
You guys are killing me.

I think I am going to have me some sandwich now.
But PBJ only :(
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: mikeypedersen on February 22, 2010, 06:39:25 PM
You guys are killing me.

I think I am going to have me some sandwich now.
But PBJ only :(
At least make it a double-decker!  ;)
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: blatz on February 22, 2010, 07:05:14 PM
a well made pbj on fresh doughy, crusty, country bread with a tall glass of ice cold whole milk can be just as divine and satisfying as some of the pics above.

now if you have plain ole pbj on wonderbread thats in a ziplock baggie that was made about 6 hours ago and is now all smashed under your juicebox, well, that is NOT good eats.

Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: Hokerer on February 22, 2010, 07:44:09 PM
Down in New Orleans they make this sandwich called the Muffuletta at a place called the Central Grocery Co. It is fantastic.

plus about a bazillion!!!  Can't go to the Big Easy without popping into Central Grocery for a Muffaletta.  Also, to make this beer related, Sydney's is just a couple doors down - nice bottle shop.
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: redbeerman on February 22, 2010, 08:22:29 PM
Schlotzky's used to have good sandwiches thirty years ago, but they've gotten big and I haven't eaten one since 1982.
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: hamiltont on February 22, 2010, 10:29:43 PM
Well, when I was a kid my favorite brown bag lunch for school was a peanut butter sandwich with sliced bananas & of course yellow mustard. MMMMMM!  I've outgrown them now.  ;D I grew up in Sioux City IA.  We still get back there once in a while.  A must stop for us is Milwaukee Weiner House.
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: mikeypedersen on February 22, 2010, 10:38:53 PM
Well, when I was a kid my favorite brown bag lunch for school was a peanut butter sandwich with sliced bananas & of course yellow mustard. MMMMMM!  I've outgrown them now.  ;D I grew up in Sioux City IA.  We still get back there once in a while.  A must stop for us is Milwaukee Weiner House.

 ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ???
Seriously?!?!  I might have to try that just because it seems like such a bizarre combination.....
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: capozzoli on February 22, 2010, 11:07:15 PM
Oh man the PB and J rocks. I eat it for breakfast on the go.

I make an Elvis Presley fried peanut butter and banana sandwich for breakfast too.

(http://nozama.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54ed05fc2883301156f126f1d970c-800wi)

My father eats P B and J with potato chips on it. I have to admit, it is good. Dont know about mustard though.

Anyone ever have a lobster roll? Holy cow this has to be good.

(http://matthewquinnmartin.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/lobster-roll.jpg)

How bout a lobster and bacon club?

The design for my fried soft shell crab and bacon club is coming along nicely.  The crab is going to be tempura style with a light rice flour batter. The formula for the spread is coming along as well. It is a mixture of mayo (home made) horse radish and old bay, lemon juice.
Still haven't picked out a bread but, may have to do a few test runs, but its going to be double decker. .
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: bluesman on February 23, 2010, 12:59:20 AM
Here's another famous sandwich from Nawlins called a "Po-Boy".

A "dressed" po' boy has lettuce, tomato and mayonaise; pickles and onion are optional. Non-seafood po' boys will also usually have mustard, but the customer is expected to specify whether they want "hot" or "regular" - the former being a coarse grained Creole mustard (such as that produced by Zatarain's) and the latter being American yellow mustard. Mother's Restaurant, a popular lunch stop in New Orleans on Poydras St., uses shredded green cabbage rather than lettuce for its dressed sandwiches.



A shrimp Po-Boy

(http://content5.videojug.com/68/6856b11a-32ce-560b-248d-ff0008c9444f/how-to-make-a-shrimp-po-boy-sandwich.jpg)

or a fried Oyster Sandwich...mmm...mmm...good. I can feel my arteries hardening up as I type.  ;D

(http://dcist.com/attachments/dcist_melissa/Oysters_PoBoy.jpg)
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: Hokerer on February 23, 2010, 03:15:42 AM
Here's another famous sandwich from Nawlins called a "Po-Boy".

Yep, every time Cappazolli mentioned making a fried crab or fried shrimp or fried oyster sammich, I kept thinking "Po Boy"
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: capozzoli on March 28, 2010, 11:26:57 PM
I didnt get pics but we made the soft shell crab and bacon club last night.

All I can say is wow. It was wonderful. Illdo it again real soon and get some pics.

I really want to make a bagel with cold smoked lobster tail cream cheese lettuce tom. and onion.
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: The Professor on March 29, 2010, 01:16:53 AM
Well, I love me a fried oyster Po'Boy. 
Tuna salad and provolone with lettuce, onion, and  oil& vinegar on a good sub roll is also a favorite.

But for me, the ultimate favorite is old fashioned 'navel' or 'plate' pastrami that has spent a full 2 or 3 hours in the steam cabinet, hand sliced and piled on rye bread, as served at places like Katz's Deli on the lower east side of New York City, Langer's in LA...and lately,  at a great old fashioned retro styled place called Irving's Deli in Livingston, NJ.   

Places that really do pastrami or corned beef  right are becoming rarer and rarer.
You haven't ever really had pastrami (or corned beef, for that matter) unless you get it from one of these 'old school'  Jewish delicatessens..that 2 or 3 hours the meat spends in the steam cabinet makes the meat meltingly tender. 
Also, if a deli brags about having lean pastrami or corned beef, turn around and walk out. 
It ain't the real deal.
(http://homepage.mac.com/asemok/images/katz.jpg)
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: bluesman on March 29, 2010, 01:22:17 AM

But for me, the ultimate favorite is old fashioned 'navel' or 'plate' pastrami that has spent a full 2 or 3 hours in the steam cabinet, hand sliced and piled on rye bread, as served at places like Katz's Deli on the lower east side of New York City, Langer's in LA...and lately,  at a great old fashioned retro styled place called Irving's Deli in Livingston, NJ.   

(http://homepage.mac.com/asemok/images/katz.jpg)


Oh Yea!

That is a fine sandwich.

I've had the real deal at The Reading Terminal Market in Philly layered on some great Jewish Rye Bread.

Great Sandwich indeed!
Title: Re: The Sandwich Thread.
Post by: capozzoli on March 29, 2010, 01:41:54 AM
Oh yeah!! Jewish deli sandwiches are hard to find. There is Sardi's in NYC, Awesome. Hymie s here in Philly.

My brother was just telling me about a place in NJ called The Kibbutz Room. We are going there next week. With a name like that it has to be good.