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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: brewsumore on November 25, 2012, 12:41:08 AM

Title: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: brewsumore on November 25, 2012, 12:41:08 AM
This might sound like an entry level question, but after years of doing it my way I still wonder if there are any good alternatives.  After racking from primary bucket into keg, bottling bucket or secondary, I wash out the remaining sediment in my bucket down the basement utility sink drain, and hose a lot of water, usually hot, down the drain after the yeast sediment to ensure it all gets down my pipes to the sewer without building up in my drain pipes.  Do you do the same, or do you have another solution?  The way I do it is time saving and easy, but it does require quite a bit of hot water.  Thanks!
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: a10t2 on November 25, 2012, 12:43:49 AM
Aside from drying it and (selling it to someone who will be) using it to make supplements/nutrients/feedstock, that's the only way I know of.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: cheba420 on November 25, 2012, 01:05:09 AM
Mine gets washed down the driveway, along the curb and into the gutter. I'm pretty sure that at the levels we're using, the yeast doesnt pose any issues to the waste water treatment facilities.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: piszkiewiczp on November 25, 2012, 04:53:50 AM
If you're sending the yeast down an indoor drain, it's no problem. The sewage treatment process is largely based on bacteria consuming organics. Any live yeast may actually help.
Sending the yeast down a curb drain may be a problem. Any newer city has separate storm and sanitary sewers. Street storm drains go to the nearest river, and a yeast slurry would be an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality, and cause areal stench if not flushed by a decent rainstorm. 
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: morticaixavier on November 25, 2012, 05:46:50 AM
it goes in the compost. or directly in the garden.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: dbarber on November 25, 2012, 01:47:50 PM
it goes in the compost. or directly in the garden.

+1  Mine goes in the compost bin.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: erockrph on November 25, 2012, 02:15:31 PM
I take my fermenters outside and just hose them off on the lawn. Or if it's cold out I'll just dump the first couple of rinses on the lawn behind the front porch.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: euge on November 25, 2012, 03:02:43 PM
Vegimite! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegemite)

Or "Marmite"...

Though you'd probably make quite a bit from just a single batch's slurry.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: rbclay on November 25, 2012, 03:50:14 PM
reuse at least once, then dispose! the best beers I make are done on a yeast cake. hey, that rhymes...
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: brewsumore on November 25, 2012, 05:33:51 PM
I don't have a garden and therefore no composter either, but I'll definitely try the lawn fertilizing option prior to snow season.  I'm already a lawn clippings mulcher rather than a bagger.  Thanks all!
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: denny on November 25, 2012, 06:05:42 PM
Down the drain into the septic tank here.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: tonyp on November 25, 2012, 06:57:09 PM
If I don't give it to my wife for the composter, I usually just toss it into the garden.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: gymrat on November 25, 2012, 08:37:11 PM
Mine goes down the drain with the garbage disposal running.
Title: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: redbeerman on November 25, 2012, 10:12:04 PM
Down the drain into the septic tank here.

+1
Title: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: majorvices on November 26, 2012, 12:00:36 AM
If you have a septic system it should actually be beneficial for it. RidX ready to go! ;)
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on November 26, 2012, 01:22:05 AM
My understanding is that yeast competes with beneficial bacteria for oxygen is septic systems. This is why municipalities do not want live yeast in their water treatment plants.

I give the yeast nice warm bath over 120F for 30 min and down the drain they go.
Composting is a fine option.
I already had house drain plugged with yeast.
Title: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: majorvices on November 26, 2012, 02:48:41 AM
My understanding is that yeast competes with beneficial bacteria for oxygen is septic systems. This is why municipalities do not want live yeast in their water treatment plants.


Now that you mention it I remember this as well. I think it is BS, but I remember hearing it. ;)

Most likely yeast in the septic system just dies or becomes dormant. I doubt there is much for it to consume since it has evolved to ferment maltose.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: tschmidlin on November 26, 2012, 03:19:19 AM
I dump plenty of yeast into our septic tank, and I've never had the guy pumping it out say there seemed like there was anything wrong or odd with our tank given the time between pumpings.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: denny on November 26, 2012, 04:42:28 PM
If you have a septic system it should actually be beneficial for it. RidX ready to go! ;)

Could be, but it certainly doesn't hurt!
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: tubercle on November 28, 2012, 03:39:02 AM
....Sending the yeast down a curb drain may be a problem. Any newer city has separate storm and sanitary sewers. Street storm drains go to the nearest river, and a yeast slurry would be an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality, and cause areal stench if not flushed by a decent rainstorm.

A quart of yeast slurry in a river will cause "an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality"?

Really?

Kind of like spitting in the ocean.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: corkybstewart on November 28, 2012, 05:14:11 PM
Sometimes mine goes onto the compost heap, sometimes onto the "lawn", sometimes into the septic tank depending on which fermentor I'm using.  If it's buckets it goes in the septic tank, carboys onto the lawn and the conical gets drained into buckets for the compost pile
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: morticaixavier on November 28, 2012, 07:04:37 PM
....Sending the yeast down a curb drain may be a problem. Any newer city has separate storm and sanitary sewers. Street storm drains go to the nearest river, and a yeast slurry would be an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality, and cause areal stench if not flushed by a decent rainstorm.

A quart of yeast slurry in a river will cause "an un-natural organic load, reduce water quality"?

Really?

Kind of like spitting in the ocean.

gotta say this argument doesn't hold water. it's not just 1 qt of yeast. it's 1 quart of yeast * 500K homebrewers in america (okay not all of them are dumping yeast in the storm drain, and not all of them that do live in the same place, but you get the idea)

the spitting in the ocean argument is exactly the same that leads to dumping radioactive waste in the ocean because hey what's a few thousand barrells of toxic gunk in the whole ocean?

Not saying there is an issue with disposing of the yeast cake in the storm drain but...
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: tschmidlin on November 29, 2012, 04:35:51 AM
gotta say this argument doesn't hold water.
I get what you're saying, but there is a huge difference between dumping something that is food and will degrade quickly, and something that is toxic and has a half-life of 24,000 years.  Huge difference.  And I know you know that.

Yes, the "spitting in the ocean" argument is a bad one in a lot of instances.  I don't think it is in this one, considering the volume of yeast on a homebrew scale, number of homebrewers who dump yeast outside, how frequently they dump yeast, geographic distances between them, and the fact that it will readily be healthy food for other organisms.  Crank up any of those factors and it might be bad.
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: morticaixavier on November 29, 2012, 06:34:19 AM
gotta say this argument doesn't hold water.
I get what you're saying, but there is a huge difference between dumping something that is food and will degrade quickly, and something that is toxic and has a half-life of 24,000 years.  Huge difference.  And I know you know that.

Yes, the "spitting in the ocean" argument is a bad one in a lot of instances.  I don't think it is in this one, considering the volume of yeast on a homebrew scale, number of homebrewers who dump yeast outside, how frequently they dump yeast, geographic distances between them, and the fact that it will readily be healthy food for other organisms.  Crank up any of those factors and it might be bad.

If I have told myself once, I have told myself a million times. 'Don't be hyperbolic'

point taken and fully conceded. I dump my yeast in the compost or on the lawn and it I am sure washed into local water ways and/or sewers. but mostly eaten by other life forms
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: tschmidlin on November 29, 2012, 08:58:44 AM
If I have told myself once, I have told myself a million times. 'Don't be hyperbolic'
And I've told you a billion times, stop exaggerating. ;D
Title: Re: disposing of yeast cake
Post by: tubercle on November 30, 2012, 01:14:53 PM
We keep fogetting that besides coming in neat little packages, yeast exist in nature. There is probably more yeast washed down a storm drain naturally in a day during a rain storm than all of us could dump in a year.