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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: bernman on December 01, 2012, 09:50:39 PM

Title: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bernman on December 01, 2012, 09:50:39 PM
Looking for recomendations for a kitchen knife set. I am not a pro chef so I don't need a $400.00 set of knives. I am looking for something good quality in the $100.00-$150.00 or so range. I have read reviews for a number of sets in that price range and they mixed. I was looking at Victorinox 8-Piece Knife Block Set
 online and the reviews are good and it is in my price range. Any suggestions or recomendations?

Thanks
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: greatplainsbrewer on December 01, 2012, 09:53:10 PM
Have the Fibrox handled victorinox and really like them.  Might just get the chefs knife and build up from there.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on December 01, 2012, 10:30:03 PM
Have the Fibrox handled victorinox and really like them.  Might just get the chefs knife and build up from there.

Same here.  Choice of Cook's Illustrated and I love them.  When I bought my last one, the guy at the knife shop said they're what just about every chef in town uses.  Great knives don't have to be expensive.  The 8" chef's knife is $25-30 and the 3 1/2 in. paring knife is about 6 bucks.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: mihalybaci on December 01, 2012, 11:26:02 PM
I have a Shun 8" santoku and a Shun Pro 10 1/2" yanagiba knife, and I highly recommend them. They are extremely sharp and they're well-balanced. They'll run about $120-160 each, depending on sale price. I haven't used the Victorinox Forschner Fibrox, but, as already mentioned, they're the preferred knife of America's Test Kitchen and performed just as well as $100+ knives in their tests.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Joe Sr. on December 02, 2012, 02:36:05 AM
Wusthoff.  We love the ones we have.

Bought the cheaper version (classic?) for my mother in law, because her knives were atrocious.  They're fine knives.

Never really tried anything else, except a few Chicago Cutlery knives that I still have around and use regularly.

Anything with a good weight and a good edge should do you just fine. Keep them sharp.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on December 02, 2012, 11:17:51 PM
Really all you need is one good knife for almost all applications. Then at some point you can branch off, but I'd recommend at least an 8"+ Chef's knife to start with. This will give you bang for the buck be it chopping, slicing or de-boning meat and vegetables.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: thetooth on December 03, 2012, 01:23:16 AM
I have a Shun 8" santoku and a Shun Pro 10 1/2" yanagiba knife, and I highly recommend them. They are extremely sharp and they're well-balanced. They'll run about $120-160 each, depending on sale price. I haven't used the Victorinox Forschner Fibrox, but, as already mentioned, they're the preferred knife of America's Test Kitchen and performed just as well as $100+ knives in their tests.

I bought my wife a Shun Chef's Knife for XMas last year and she loves it.  They work great and I think the damascus blades are beautiful.
Title: Kitchen Knives
Post by: redbeerman on December 03, 2012, 02:29:26 AM
I still use a 35 year old Wusthof set.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: nateo on December 03, 2012, 04:00:55 AM
8" Shun santoku is a good all-around knife. If you'll only have one "good" knife that's a good style to get, or a chef's-style like others suggested. Some Wuesthof knives are kinda heavy. If you have a local source, it'd be a good idea to get a feel for it before you buy. Some brands have a weight/balance/handle shape that may not work as well for you as others.
Title: Kitchen Knives
Post by: majorvices on December 11, 2012, 12:54:28 PM
Looking for recomendations for a kitchen knife set. I am not a pro chef so I don't need a $400.00 set of knives. I am looking for something good quality in the $100.00-$150.00 or so range. I have read reviews for a number of sets in that price range and they mixed. I was looking at Victorinox 8-Piece Knife Block Set
 online and the reviews are good and it is in my price range. Any suggestions or recomendations?

Thanks

I have the Victorinox set for a year now. Quality blades and sharp. I recommend it, especially for the price.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: erockrph on December 12, 2012, 08:10:25 PM
The best advice I ever got was to pick up the chef knife from a bunch of different sets and see which one feels best in your hand. I have the Wusthof Classic set and I love it. The chef knife is a bit heavy, but it is perfectly balanced in my hand and I like the extra heft.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on December 12, 2012, 09:30:09 PM
we have had multiple brands of knives from solingen as we have had at least 8 foreign exchange students from there and they bring them.  my favorite are the made by robert herder.  they are not stainless, they are carbon steel and need to be cared for a little bit but they hold edge and slice better than any knive i have including the wusthof, cutco, and a few japanese knives that have been brought over
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on December 13, 2012, 12:15:10 AM
I still use a 35 year old Wusthof set.

My Wustof set is only 15 years old, used daily and as good as new.  Tried many other bands, but Wustof is the best IMHO.  Wouldn't trade them for all the Victorinox in Switzerland.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on December 13, 2012, 12:33:41 AM
But I like my Chinese-made $8 chef's knife bought at the local grocery store! Virtually indistinguishable from my Henckles Fine-edge Pro sontoku in blade construction, forging and quality for a fifth of the price. The steel is marginally different- slightly softer but can hold a very sharp edge. I hand-sharpen all my knives and suggest avoiding anything cheap with a "ground-edge" BTW.

I figure they're probably made in the same place. Twenty years ago a cheap knife was exactly that.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on December 13, 2012, 01:22:06 PM
But I like my Chinese-made $8 chef's knife bought at the local grocery store! Virtually indistinguishable from my Henckles Fine-edge Pro sontoku in blade construction, forging and quality for a fifth of the price. The steel is marginally different- slightly softer but can hold a very sharp edge. I hand-sharpen all my knives and suggest avoiding anything cheap with a "ground-edge" BTW.

I figure they're probably made in the same place. Twenty years ago a cheap knife was exactly that.

slightly softer as in having lead in the alloy? :o
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Joe Sr. on December 13, 2012, 02:43:43 PM
But I like my Chinese-made $8 chef's knife bought at the local grocery store! Virtually indistinguishable from my Henckles Fine-edge Pro sontoku in blade construction, forging and quality for a fifth of the price. The steel is marginally different- slightly softer but can hold a very sharp edge. I hand-sharpen all my knives and suggest avoiding anything cheap with a "ground-edge" BTW.

I figure they're probably made in the same place. Twenty years ago a cheap knife was exactly that.

slightly softer as in having lead in the alloy? :o

He did say "Chinese-made."  Just like all the kids toys, chances are it has lead.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on December 13, 2012, 03:09:12 PM
We had a nice long thread on this in the past, might be worth a read:
http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2973.0

My $0.02, you only need a few knives. A like a Chef's, a paring and then maybe something like a boning. I wouldn't event get a set. Find individual knives you like and which fit your hand. The German style tend to be heavy, Japanese lighter. You can go high end or low end, but if you don't use the knife it is no better than a paperweight. I keep mine in a nice divided drawer insert and so they are off the counter and no one sees them.

If I was to just get some knives today I would probably go with/think about (Amazon links) some of the following to keep the costs down:
Victorinox Chef
http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-8-Inch-Fibrox-Straight/dp/B008M5U1C2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1355410777&sr=8-1&keywords=chef%27s+knife

Paring Knife
http://www.amazon.com/Wusthof-Gourmet-3-Inch-Paring-Knife/dp/B0000DJYE5/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1355411013&sr=8-2&keywords=paring+knife+wustof

Utility Knife
http://www.amazon.com/Henckels-International-5-Inch-Stainless-Steel-Utility/dp/B00004RFNE/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1355411174&sr=8-11&keywords=henckels+kitchen+utility+knife

Sandwich Knife (I really use this one quite a bit)
http://www.amazon.com/Guy-Fieri-Knuckle-Sandwich-Stainless/dp/B002W5VXVQ/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1355410924&sr=8-7&keywords=guy+fieri+knife

Scissors
http://www.amazon.com/Wusthof-Gourmet-2-Piece-Cutlery-Utility/dp/B002FQK1BA/ref=sr_1_2?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1355411240&sr=1-2&keywords=wustof+scissors

Also be sure to get a sharpening steel.

HTH

Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: morticaixavier on December 13, 2012, 03:51:07 PM
[...]
Also be sure to get a sharpening Honing steel.

HTH

fixed that for you  ;)

Yes, it's very important to steel your knife every time you use it. I havn't had my knives sharpened in close to a eyar now and some of them (the ones I use most) do need it but it is amazing how much better they cut when you hone the blade before using.

By the way I have a mixed bag, mostly henckle but i have an odd man out paring knife from some off brand made in the USA company that is quite nice.

My small (6 inch) french chef get's the most use, then the 8 inch santuko. I have a 6 inch santuko as well and like it but it is third string for sure.

On the bread knife though I would say save some money and get a cheap stamped blade. They are a pain to sharpen anyway and with the serations you dont' really need to for a very long time. I have a $15 henckly stamped blade bread knife that works just fine



Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Joe Sr. on December 13, 2012, 03:56:27 PM
On the bread knife though I would say save some money and get a cheap stamped blade. They are a pain to sharpen anyway and with the serations you dont' really need to for a very long time. I have a $15 henckly stamped blade bread knife that works just fine

Did you look at that sammich knife?  That's more than just a bread knife.

It reminds me of the knife the old guy used to make sammiches at the Berghoff stand-up bar back when they were open.  Awesome lunch line they had there, and the sandwhich guy really knew how to use his knife.  He was like an artist carving the meat, slicing the bread, slapping it all together using only the knife.  And, of course, you could get some Berghoff beer fresh from the tap.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: morticaixavier on December 13, 2012, 04:00:30 PM
On the bread knife though I would say save some money and get a cheap stamped blade. They are a pain to sharpen anyway and with the serations you dont' really need to for a very long time. I have a $15 henckly stamped blade bread knife that works just fine

Did you look at that sammich knife?  That's more than just a bread knife.

It reminds me of the knife the old guy used to make sammiches at the Berghoff stand-up bar back when they were open.  Awesome lunch line they had there, and the sandwhich guy really knew how to use his knife.  He was like an artist carving the meat, slicing the bread, slapping it all together using only the knife.  And, of course, you could get some Berghoff beer fresh from the tap.

that's a pretty knife. If I ate meat and wanted to use it for more than bread and cutting sandwhiches in half I might see the point but for my needs? meh.

I do like the offset handles. That is the one major complaint I have about all my knives. Mainly because my grip style has changes lately. I used to choke way up and hold the back of the blade with my fingers mostly while the handle just sat against my palm for steadyness. But lately I have been holding the handle more. Not sure why, I've been trying to switch back. I think is started when I was taking lots of tomatoes apart while canning sauce and my hand got slick so my 'normal' grip got a little dangerous.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Joe Sr. on December 13, 2012, 04:10:59 PM
Your normal grip is how I was taught to handle a knife when I worked in a kitchen.

But I do agree that the off-set handle is nice, particularly for slicing.  I do not have any and have taken to slicing so that the handle sits off the edge of the cutting board and gives my knuckles a bit more room.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on December 13, 2012, 05:09:37 PM
Thanks for the correction, I knew something appeared suspect when I typed it.

That Guy Fieri sandwich knife is the bomb. We have some plates with a lip and can put the sandwich in them and cut with ease. A normal knife just doesn't work as well. I got it on a whim and have to admit I use it all the time.

I did forget about a bread knife. The thinner the blade the better IMO. I like a cheapo bread as well. Not even sure mine has a brand ;)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on December 13, 2012, 05:14:07 PM
http://generalgood.co.uk/robert-herder

this is a link to two of my 3 favorite knives.  i have the salami knife which i use for nearly everything, and the bread knife which i actually use to slice my tomatoes.

my third favorite knife is a cutco cheese knife. 

i vary rarely need anything else.  prior to marriage i used my fishing knife for almost everything
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: PeckerWood on December 22, 2012, 03:33:31 PM
I'm a big fan of Wusthof. I bought the Grand Prix starter set 15 years ago to use while attending culinary school, and I still use those knives everyday. It turned into a collection over the years, making many great gifts along the way, and now have a 35 slot cherry block. To save you a lot of money, if I had to pick one knife I use the most, by far it would be the 7" Santuko Knife. I suggest going to CutleryandMore.com, they always have a Wusthof sale going on. If I had to do it all over again, I'd switch to the Classic Ikon series, they are bad-ass but very expensive. The Grand Prix II are very cost efficient forged steel knifes that are a good looking solid set that will last a lifetime.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: stlaleman on December 22, 2012, 06:22:09 PM
http://generalgood.co.uk/robert-herder

this is a link to two of my 3 favorite knives.  i have the salami knife which i use for nearly everything, and the bread knife which i actually use to slice my tomatoes.

my third favorite knife is a cutco cheese knife. 

i vary rarely need anything else.  prior to marriage i used my fishing knife for almost everything

Rapalaillet knife is all I use!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on December 22, 2012, 07:11:09 PM
Been using this fillet knife for many years.  It worked well on Florida fish.  Works well here too where the big fish are.  The only reason I'd ever replace it is if I lost it.  I'd buy the same one as a replacement.

(http://www.cutleryandbeyond.com/images/products/large_2184_W014625018.JPG)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: redbeerman on December 24, 2012, 08:08:49 PM
Been using this fillet knife for many years.  It worked well on Florida fish.  Works well here too where the big fish are.  The only reason I'd ever replace it is if I lost it.  I'd buy the same one as a replacement.

(http://www.cutleryandbeyond.com/images/products/large_2184_W014625018.JPG)

Nice!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on December 27, 2012, 03:32:17 PM
What brand is it?
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on December 27, 2012, 07:31:56 PM
W√úSTHOF
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: redbeerman on December 28, 2012, 12:43:14 PM
That should last you a lifetime.  Ours are 30 years old or so and the only casualties (broken carver) have been from stupidity (mine).
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: brewmichigan on January 02, 2013, 02:15:06 PM
I got 2 knives for Christmas this year. One is a Wustof 8 inch chefs knife, very sharp and beautiful. I'm going to keep this one. the other I got was  JA Henkel 6 inch utility knife. Also very sharp and beautiful but I don't have much use for it. I know it cost my in-laws a pretty penny and I have the gift receipt. I wanted to return in a get something else for the collection and I was wondering what everyone thinks would be a good idea.

I now have 2- 8 inch chefs knives, a santoku 8 inch knife, and a bread knife. What would be the next in line. I'm thinking a boning knife or a filet type knife, something very thin and flexible.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on January 02, 2013, 02:24:19 PM
http://generalgood.co.uk/robert-herder

look at these knives i have two. specifically the salami knife.  it is carbon steel made in solingen germany (same as wusthov) it is my go to knife for almost anything. however, i am not sure that you can find them in the USA.  they were gifts from kids from solingen.