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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: bendbrew on February 26, 2010, 01:24:26 AM

Title: First All Grain Batch
Post by: bendbrew on February 26, 2010, 01:24:26 AM
Well-I finally have all of my all grain equipment and ready to do my first all grain batch.  I am going to do Denny's Rye IPA but have a quick question. If I decide to do a ten gallon batch would I need to double everything?  I am using the recipe posted on this site.  Here it is for your review:  (Thanks)

DC'S RYE IPA - ALL-GRAIN RECIPE

Recipe by Denny Conn
O.G.: 1.073
F.G.: 1.013
IBU: 68
11 lbs. Pale Malt (2-row)
3 lbs. Rye Malt
1.25 lbs. Crystal 60L
0.5 lbs. Cara-Pils Dextrine Malt
0.5 lbs. Wheat Malt
1.0 oz. Mt. Hood, 4.9% Alpha Acid, First Wort Hop
1.0 oz. Columbus, 17.8% Alpha Acid, 60 min.
0.5 oz. Mt. Hood, 4.9% Alpha Acid, 30 min.
1.5 oz. Mt. Hood, 4.9% Alpha Acid, 0 min.
1.0 oz. Columbus, 17.8% Alpha Acid, Dry Hop
1.0 oz. Columbus, 17.8% Alpha Acid, Dry Hop in keg (optional)
Wyeast 2450PC Denny's Favorite 50, Wyeast 1272 American Ale Yeast II, or Wyeast 1056 American Ale (in order of preference)
1 tsp. Gypsum (add to the boil, not the mash)
1 tsp. Irish Moss
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: bluesman on February 26, 2010, 01:28:29 AM
Great choice. Just double everything for a 10 gallon batch.
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: Hokerer on February 26, 2010, 01:31:00 AM
Great choice. Just double everything for a 10 gallon batch.

Except the times, of course  ;D
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: euge on February 26, 2010, 07:23:45 AM
I'm excited for ya. Your first batch will go well. Take your time. Figure to start out with more water than you will think you need.

For that grain bill to end up with 10 gallons of chilled wort you'll need to start with at least 16 gallons if not more. You'll lose some water everywhere along the way. Evaporation. The grain. The hops. The Boil. ;)

How long will your boil be?
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: dean on February 26, 2010, 11:34:25 AM
When you're gathering your runoff from the mashtun... do it slow, or there is a good chance it will get stuck.  Just don't try to hurry the runoff and you should be okay.   :)
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: bendbrew on February 26, 2010, 03:00:13 PM
Thanks for all of the advice.  The standard for boils appears to be 60 minutes.  Is there a benefit for longer with this recipe. Also, along the lines of another thread, how long do you condition when you are force carbonating in a keg?
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: dean on February 26, 2010, 03:41:31 PM
Force kegging is an interesting topic, some say warmer is faster but its not true.  The beer will readily absorb gas quicker if its cold, much like cold water has the capacity to hold more oxygen than warm water... hence why trout live in cold streams and other bodies of water.  I force carb at about 30 psi, rocking or shaking the keg for a couple of minutes then leave it sit for an hour or two at that pressure.  Sometimes I don't even rock/shake it... just tip the keg upside down works too as long as it doesn't mess with your tubing or disconnects.  It really comes down to temperature in my opinion though.  After force carbing it you'll want to valve the gas off to the keg and let the pressure out... I take it to nothing and then dial the pressure down to nothing on the regulator, open the gas valve and bring my pressure up to a nice pour without having too much foam.  Diameter and length of your liquid tubing will also play a huge part in how much foam is produced when you pull off a pint.  If your tubing is short, set your pressure very low... with my quick picnic keg style I only use about 5 feet of foamfree tubing and I still have to set the pressure down to about two or three pounds.   If I have kegs in a kegerator I run longer lengths of foamfree tubing and set my pressure to about ten or twelve pounds. 
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: denny on February 26, 2010, 04:56:03 PM
Thanks for all of the advice.  The standard for boils appears to be 60 minutes.  Is there a benefit for longer with this recipe. Also, along the lines of another thread, how long do you condition when you are force carbonating in a keg?

No benefit to a longer boil, really.  I generally do about 70-75 min., only becasue I like to have the hot break form before I start my 60 min. hop addition.  So, after it comes to a boil, I let it go 1-15 min. before starting my hops.

Personally, I drink this beer as soon as it's carbed. 
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: bendbrew on February 26, 2010, 05:04:35 PM
Just out of curiosity, why is the gypsum added to the boil and not the mash?
Title: Re: First All Grain Batch
Post by: denny on February 26, 2010, 05:08:26 PM
Just out of curiosity, why is the gypsum added to the boil and not the mash?

If I added it to the mash, it would change the mash pH and I don't want to do that....it's fine as it is.  But I want the extra sulfates in the kettle to accentuate the hops.