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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: Jimmy K on February 02, 2013, 12:59:47 PM

Title: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 02, 2013, 12:59:47 PM
We made some mozzarella last night. First time making any cheese and it was pretty cool! What should we try next?
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-048TmgLHZH0/UQ0Ml6pQj8I/AAAAAAAAA2c/Xlg2VOtQ5Gk/s400/2013-02-01%252021.09.26.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-FDaOXW9wkMk/UQ0MlxFzPAI/AAAAAAAAA2Y/Wz14-ypvcxE/s400/2013-02-01%252021.19.14.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-0rTLaOQGYGQ/UQ0Ml1OithI/AAAAAAAAA2g/JTvjUGSDXmg/s400/2013-02-01%252021.32.26.jpg)
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-FqzNKxK-2uw/UQ0Mm6-dakI/AAAAAAAAA2w/mAZKRQUZNEI/s400/2013-02-01%252021.36.13.jpg)
Title: Mozzarella
Post by: bluesman on February 02, 2013, 02:06:39 PM
This is on my list of things to do. I love fresh Mozzarella!
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: denny on February 02, 2013, 05:27:00 PM
This is on my list of things to do. I love fresh Mozzarella!

Yeah, I'd love to get into cheesemaking.  I'm a cheeseaholic, though, and I hate to think what I'd look like with cheese AND beer around all the time!
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: hopfenundmalz on February 02, 2013, 06:39:59 PM
The LHBS has added cheese making kits and supplies. The wife is looking at those each time. Mozzarella is quick and easy, and fresh is great on pizza. She has the pizza thing down now, and fresh Mozzarella is the next step.

Nice pics. I might just show those to her.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: denny on February 02, 2013, 06:48:38 PM
The LHBS has added cheese making kits and supplies. The wife is looking at those each time. Mozzarella is quick and easy, and fresh is great on pizza. She has the pizza thing down now, and fresh Mozzarella is the next step.

Nice pics. I might just show those to her.

Yeah, my LHBS has both cheese making and coffee roasting equipment.  I just close my eyes when I walk by the display.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: hopfenundmalz on February 02, 2013, 08:27:25 PM
I have to admit, the coffee roasting is what has my interest. My LHBS is not into that, yet.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: denny on February 02, 2013, 08:56:28 PM
I have to admit, the coffee roasting is what has my interest. My LHBS is not into that, yet.

A good friend down the road is a killer homebrewer who also makes cheese and sausage and roasts coffee, has a vineyard and makes large amounts of wine and raises sheep.  His wife spins the wool.  I feel SO inadequate!
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: euge on February 02, 2013, 10:04:37 PM
The last mozz I made the pH was missed when trying to rush the process. Somehow I made balls of it and vac sealed each. After 3-4 weeks in the fridge it became an excellent spreadable cheese similar to Laughing Cow.

I just love making cheese.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: redbeerman on February 03, 2013, 01:16:29 AM
This is on my list of things to do. I love fresh Mozzarella!

Yeah, I'd love to get into cheesemaking.  I'm a cheeseaholic, though, and I hate to think what I'd look like with cheese AND beer around all the time!

You'd look like me ;)
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Alewyfe on February 03, 2013, 02:05:26 AM
This is on my list of things to do. I love fresh Mozzarella!

Yeah, I'd love to get into cheesemaking.  I'm a cheeseaholic, though, and I hate to think what I'd look like with cheese AND beer around all the time!
Cheeeeeeese......
That's why I don't come up to Eugene that often.  My market of price bill is $200 just for cheese when I get to the city.  I've had good luck making Goat's milk brie, but I've got to travel to get the fresh goat milk and
then there's making space in the beer fridge and the fact that it almost all reaches peak maturity at the same time so it seems to be feast or famine. Half the fun is just learning what goes into these processes though. You end up with so much appreciation for those who have perfected the craft.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 03, 2013, 01:50:46 PM
This is on my list of things to do. I love fresh Mozzarella!

Yeah, I'd love to get into cheesemaking.  I'm a cheeseaholic, though, and I hate to think what I'd look like with cheese AND beer around all the time!
I'll have to consider this very carefully.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 03, 2013, 02:00:51 PM
The LHBS has added cheese making kits and supplies. The wife is looking at those each time. Mozzarella is quick and easy, and fresh is great on pizza. She has the pizza thing down now, and fresh Mozzarella is the next step.

Nice pics. I might just show those to her.
It was pretty easy and quick (at least relative to beer, or even bread). Start to finish it took about an hour - one of those "That's it?" moments.
Cheeeeeeese......
That's why I don't come up to Eugene that often.  My market of price bill is $200 just for cheese when I get to the city.  I've had good luck making Goat's milk brie, but I've got to travel to get the fresh goat milk and
then there's making space in the beer fridge and the fact that it almost all reaches peak maturity at the same time so it seems to be feast or famine. Half the fun is just learning what goes into these processes though. You end up with so much appreciation for those who have perfected the craft.
Goat cheese would be cool. I know there are a few goat farms around here, I'll have to look into it. I work for the Dept. of Agriculture so somebody at work must know.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: tony on February 04, 2013, 10:34:51 AM
I love smoked Gouda and it is so expensive here, so I make my own.
Some of my early efforts... I have since then bought proper molds to
make it look better. The taste is the same, yummy.

(http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a357/nflder/DSCF4413.jpg)
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: phillamb168 on February 04, 2013, 12:22:10 PM
We made some mozzarella last night. First time making any cheese and it was pretty cool! What should we try next?


Care to share the recipe you used? Rennet or lemon juice? Any bacteria?
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 04, 2013, 01:36:45 PM
The recipe and process were very similar to this.
 
http://www.cheesemaking.com/howtomakemozzarellacheese.html (http://www.cheesemaking.com/howtomakemozzarellacheese.html)
 
Except I used 2tsp citric acid and also added 1/8 tsp kid lipase to the cold milk.  I also added calcium chloride just before the rennet because the milk was pasteurized.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: euge on February 04, 2013, 07:37:37 PM
I've been using the calcium chloride granules intended for brewing from the LHBS. Not sure if it has been in too strong of a concentration but the cheese has been great!
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 05, 2013, 12:59:26 AM
I've been using the calcium chloride granules intended for brewing from the LHBS. Not sure if it has been in too strong of a concentration but the cheese has been great!
How much are you using? My kit came with bottled calcium chloride in solution, but doesn't say what the concentration is.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: euge on February 05, 2013, 02:10:39 AM
I've been using the calcium chloride granules intended for brewing from the LHBS. Not sure if it has been in too strong of a concentration but the cheese has been great!
How much are you using? My kit came with bottled calcium chloride in solution, but doesn't say what the concentration is.

Just what the recipe calls for- maybe half a teaspoon. I'm sure it is too much but not sure if that matters.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 06, 2013, 03:43:29 AM
Tried again tonight, but with milk from a different source - a more local dairy (a big local dairy though). Complete disaster! Sounds exactly what happens with ultra-pasteurized milk (it was not marked ultra). We have some nice ricotta though.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Delo on February 06, 2013, 02:40:34 PM
I've been wanting to make fresh mozzarella for a long time.  It must have been great if you are already making it again. Did you also make ricotta from the leftover whey the first time?  I could see myself making this a lot. When do you add the Lipitor?
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 06, 2013, 02:56:41 PM
I've been wanting to make fresh mozzarella for a long time.  It must have been great if you are already making it again. Did you also make ricotta from the leftover whey the first time?  I could see myself making this a lot. When do you add the Lipitor?
It was very good, but mostly I just like making things myself.  The comment about ricotta was because of over-pasteurized milk. You can use pasteurized milk, but some companies are heating milk higher than minimal pasteurization temperatures to get longer shelf lives. The closer it gets to ultra-pasteurization, the more caesin (the protein that forms curds) is destroyed. That's what happened to me and I wound up with curdled milk. I strained it in a mesh bag to get something similar to ricotta. It's good, but it's not mozzarella.
 
Lipitor? That's a cholesterol drug. You mean rennet I think.  The recipe and process were very similar to this.
 
http://www.cheesemaking.com/howtomakemozzarellacheese.html
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Delo on February 06, 2013, 03:21:23 PM
No the lipitor joke was serious. I would seriously need to start taking it if I start making cheese. Cheese is one of my weeknesses. My humor doesnt come out too well in text. Maybe i needed this guy :o

The ricotta cheese question was separate. I've read where people make mozzarella and then take the left over whey that is strained and make ricotta.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on February 06, 2013, 03:32:03 PM
Maybe i needed this guy :o
Got it. My bad. That would have helped. I understand the concept though. If it's anything like brewing, cheesemaking will just encourage me to buy more great cheese too.
 
Quote
The ricotta cheese question was separate. I've read where people make mozzarella and then take the left over whey that is strained and make ricotta.
The whey is pretty much water with some dissolved sugars. I'm not sure how you'd get ricotta out of it since the proteins and fats are pretty much removed - unless the curd forms badly leaving a lot of that in the whey.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Delo on February 06, 2013, 04:26:04 PM
The whey is pretty much water with some dissolved sugars. I'm not sure how you'd get ricotta out of it since the proteins and fats are pretty much removed - unless the curd forms badly leaving a lot of that in the whey.
Thats what I was wondering. How much ricotta can you get after making mozzarella. When I finally get around to making it I might try to do both.  I like making things myself too and making both would be great.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: euge on February 06, 2013, 04:45:52 PM
Is anyone checking the pH of the curds when making mozzarella? According to my book the curds won't knit or stretch properly if the correct pH range hasn't been reached.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: morticaixavier on February 06, 2013, 04:48:50 PM
The whey is pretty much water with some dissolved sugars. I'm not sure how you'd get ricotta out of it since the proteins and fats are pretty much removed - unless the curd forms badly leaving a lot of that in the whey.
Thats what I was wondering. How much ricotta can you get after making mozzarella. When I finally get around to making it I might try to do both.  I like making things myself too and making both would be great.

ricotta was/is traditionally made with the whey left over from mozzerella making. you have to re-acidify it and wait a while. the yield is low but your just going to toss the whey anyway go for it. I wonder on a home scale if you would get enough to even bother though.

You can save the whey and use it in bread, or stew/soup for an added nutritional boost.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: weithman5 on February 06, 2013, 05:20:22 PM
No the lipitor joke was serious. I would seriously need to start taking it if I start making cheese. Cheese is one of my weeknesses. My humor doesnt come out too well in text. Maybe i needed this guy :o

The ricotta cheese question was separate. I've read where people make mozzarella and then take the left over whey that is strained and make ricotta.

my grandmother used to make her own mozzerlla and parmasean absolutely loved it.my mother has told me several times how and i never quite get around to it. 

here in my office i melt cheese in the microwave and people look at me like i am insane.  i get all the health crap from everyone. i have explained many times it is not bad for you, the food type is not the problem just the weight.  so make adjustments and you can stay off the lipitor hopefully.  Denny,  cheese and beer, what else do you need 8)
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: 1vertical on February 09, 2013, 09:14:36 PM
Goat cheese would be cool. I know there are a few goat farms around here, I'll have to look into it. I work for the Dept. of Agriculture so somebody at work must know.

I saw Farmageddon....gulp....
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on September 06, 2013, 04:31:12 AM
I just made my first batch of mozz today. It didn’t work out exactly as expected but the end result is awesome anyways. I can't get raw milk here, but I did get some non-homogenized whole milk from a local dairy.

I got a kit from Austin Homebrew Supply. For 1 gallon it was 2 tsp of citric acid and 1/2 tsp of CaCl2, and 1/2 tab of rennet. I'm other sure if I over-stirred after adding the rennet, or if something was up with the milk, but the curd sank to the bottom instead of floating and was in really small bits. I was able to fish most of it out with a small strainer. Once I got it in the microwave it set up fine and I was able to stretch it and get it into a nice ball.

I was able to get some ricotta out of the whey, but there wasn't much of a yield. The process is real simple. Just heat the whey to a boil (or just under - I think whey protein coagulates at around 200F). Then kill the heat and let it cool to maybe 130-140F. You can then strain through a cheese cloth. I got about 3/4 lb of mozzarella and something like 4-6 oz of ricotta from one gallon of milk.

The mozzarella is fantastic. I will definitely be doing this again. I might have to hunt down some raw milk across the border to try that out. I think this may end up being a gateway to bigger things. I'd love to start making my own cheddar and gouda.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: samuel.workman on September 06, 2013, 05:07:15 AM
Don't post a lot (obviously), but learn a ton from you guys.

I've used AHS Mozz kit a bunch, and early on experienced similar results. After taking a look at http://www.cheesemaking.com/howtomakemozzarellacheese.html and doing some reading, I think the AHS formula was very slightly overaccidifying my milk. First, I got rid of the CaCl2 as many recipes don't call for it. Then, I backed the acid down to 1 and 3/8 tsp in trial and error over several batches. The result was a really tight curd formation and really stretchy, moist mozz. Might be worth a quick try before seeking out more milk--my milk was really similar to your description.

As an agricultural product (especially sourced locally) our milk varies just like the hops, malt, and water from area to area. Given that, the formulas aren't exact, and it seems like cheese folks fiddle with it at the margins a good bit.

In answer to the question, I've never measured the pH, but absolutely will the next time around.

I just made my first batch of mozz today. It didn’t work out exactly as expected but the end result is awesome anyways. I can't get raw milk here, but I did get some non-homogenized whole milk from a local dairy.

I got a kit from Austin Homebrew Supply. For 1 gallon it was 2 tsp of citric acid and 1/2 tsp of CaCl2, and 1/2 tab of rennet. I'm other sure if I over-stirred after adding the rennet, or if something was up with the milk, but the curd sank to the bottom instead of floating and was in really small bits. I was able to fish most of it out with a small strainer. Once I got it in the microwave it set up fine and I was able to stretch it and get it into a nice ball.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on September 06, 2013, 01:11:41 PM
My second batch was a phenomenal failure. I got all ricotta. I'm sure the milk was overpasteurized.  The third was going well but I was trying to stir less to make a wetter, softer mozzarella. I think I overheated the curds. I haven't tried since.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Delo on September 06, 2013, 03:07:25 PM
I forgot about this thread. I've made some mozzarella a handful of times, not as much as I thought I would, and for some reason the first time had been the best. I had large curds that were easily separated and it was very easy.  The second time was all ricotta. The rest have been varying degrees of curd size but I always was able to get mozzarella.  In some of the batches, I would have a fair amount of whey to separate out each time I heated the curds and it looked like I would get only ricotta like cheese, but it worked out.  For me some of it may be a patience thing, but I think a lot of it is ph.  The recipe I use also calls for less citric acid, 1 tsp and also no CaCl2.  I've used organic pasturized, not ultrapasturized, milk from Wegmans for every batch. The 2 tsp may be for raw milk.  From what I read the curds dont form as well if the pH is too low.

I also got some ricotta after making the mozzarella by heating and straining. It wasn't a lot but it was worth it.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on September 06, 2013, 03:11:51 PM
Don't post a lot (obviously), but learn a ton from you guys.

I've used AHS Mozz kit a bunch, and early on experienced similar results. After taking a look at http://www.cheesemaking.com/howtomakemozzarellacheese.html and doing some reading, I think the AHS formula was very slightly overaccidifying my milk. First, I got rid of the CaCl2 as many recipes don't call for it. Then, I backed the acid down to 1 and 3/8 tsp in trial and error over several batches. The result was a really tight curd formation and really stretchy, moist mozz. Might be worth a quick try before seeking out more milk--my milk was really similar to your description.

Thanks a million! This is really helpful info for me. I was wondering if the CaCl was doing more harm than good, but I don't know if I would have looked to check the citric acid quantity. I don't think I'll be waiting too long to try this again since the cheese is so good. I'm wondering if my yield will improve on the ricotta as well if I get better results on the curd.

I'll be sure to update how the next batch comes out. Next time I might cut the unhomogenized whole milk 50:50 with skim to keep the calorie content down.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on January 23, 2014, 04:18:53 AM
I just made my second batch of mozz last night and thought I'd post a little update. Dropping the CaCl2 and cutting back on the acid made a huge difference this time around. I got a much tighter curd that stayed afloat so I could fish it all out easily. I didn't weigh my yield, but by eyeball it seems like I got more mozz and a bit less ricotta this time around.

I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: morticaixavier on January 23, 2014, 03:20:44 PM
I just made my second batch of mozz last night and thought I'd post a little update. Dropping the CaCl2 and cutting back on the acid made a huge difference this time around. I got a much tighter curd that stayed afloat so I could fish it all out easily. I didn't weigh my yield, but by eyeball it seems like I got more mozz and a bit less ricotta this time around.

I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.

nom...
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on January 24, 2014, 01:21:19 AM
I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
I'll be stopping by.  ;D
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on January 24, 2014, 01:45:43 AM
I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
I'll be stopping by.  ;D

As long as you bring beer, we're cool :)
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jimmy K on January 24, 2014, 02:23:29 AM
I made a 2-gallon batch. Half got regular cheese salt as normal and is being used for pizza/pasta/etc. The other half got truffle salt and is getting mainlined to my arteries as we speak. Fresh, homemade, truffle mozzarella is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
I'll be stopping by.  ;D

As long as you bring beer, we're cool :)
Which is a perfect transition to ... you live in Chepachet? My father-in-law owns The Old Post Office, an antique store in 'downtown' Chepachet (in the old post office building as a matter of fact).
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: euge on January 24, 2014, 03:27:02 PM
Mozz is an advanced-level cheese making skill. I backed off and started making fromage blanc. Not much effort but can take 24 hours or more. It is then packed in plastic tubs and gets to age a while (several weeks) in the fridge though it is perfectly good fresh. Think cream-cheese. With a little age fromage blanc gets a little more complex but not funky. Herbs are a nice addition to this spreadable cheese

If you buy Alouette you'll like fromage blanc.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on January 24, 2014, 04:12:12 PM
Mozz is an advanced-level cheese making skill. I backed off and started making fromage blanc. Not much effort but can take 24 hours or more. It is then packed in plastic tubs and gets to age a while (several weeks) in the fridge though it is perfectly good fresh. Think cream-cheese. With a little age fromage blanc gets a little more complex but not funky. Herbs are a nice addition to this spreadable cheese

If you buy Alouette you'll like fromage blanc.

Would this be similar to Boursin if herbed-up?
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on January 24, 2014, 04:30:54 PM
Which is a perfect transition to ... you live in Chepachet? My father-in-law owns The Old Post Office, an antique store in 'downtown' Chepachet (in the old post office building as a matter of fact).

Small world! I'm right around the corner from there. I've never done the whole antiquing thing downtown, but I've always meant to go check it out.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: euge on January 25, 2014, 01:12:38 AM
Mozz is an advanced-level cheese making skill. I backed off and started making fromage blanc. Not much effort but can take 24 hours or more. It is then packed in plastic tubs and gets to age a while (several weeks) in the fridge though it is perfectly good fresh. Think cream-cheese. With a little age fromage blanc gets a little more complex but not funky. Herbs are a nice addition to this spreadable cheese

If you buy Alouette you'll like fromage blanc.

Would this be similar to Boursin if herbed-up?

Absolutely. Boursin is another great example. Though, perhaps fromage frais would be a better classification since the cheese is still "alive". I use pasteurized whole organic milk to which a culture is added and fermented for 16+ hours. Then drain in the morning and hang via cheesecloth in the evening (sometimes overnight again) and then salt and package when the consistency is correct.

My foray into making hard cheese was very educational and ultimately a complete fail. I couldn't combat the mold effectively enough and my precious six week old Jack-cheese was run through with deadly looking black mold. Went into the trash.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-p3eN0SJIeo4/UuMNwCGUIKI/AAAAAAAAA0E/2YyATTCbPFw/w935-h526-no/20131117_134646.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-pP7lQtCrKWU/UuMNvTIZt_I/AAAAAAAAAz8/Jru4W8HbIaY/w935-h526-no/20131117_134749.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-2ZJKmZabGQ4/UuMNw-58SII/AAAAAAAAA0M/H9ojd6BbcDA/w935-h526-no/20131117_135140.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-brmlUxAV2bw/UuMNumF5aqI/AAAAAAAAAz0/evN-Wt4_jDk/w935-h526-no/20131117_135259.jpg)
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: erockrph on January 25, 2014, 05:30:44 AM
Damn... my waistline can't afford to get too heavy into cheesemaking as a hobby right now, but I'm starting to get hooked. I've had success with mozz, ricotta and paneer now, and fromage blanc sounds right up my alley. It also helps that I have a dairy nearby that has some delicious milk.
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jeff M on January 26, 2014, 11:33:12 PM
Damn... my waistline can't afford to get too heavy into cheesemaking as a hobby right now, but I'm starting to get hooked. I've had success with mozz, ricotta and paneer now, and fromage blanc sounds right up my alley. It also helps that I have a dairy nearby that has some delicious milk.

Sounds like Tha Danga Zone! to me ;)
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: el_capitan on January 28, 2014, 02:57:54 AM
Oh Jeez, I knew I shouldn't have clicked on this thread!

I made a couple batches of mozzarella a few years ago, and did the ricotta trick with the whey too.  It was a cool process. 

Some friends down the road from us raise grass-fed beef and sell us raw milk when we want it.  My wife makes kefir with it, which is phenomenal.  The lady makes a whole selection of cheeses and sells at farmer's markets around the area.  She offered to let me sit in on a batch and see what's involved in large-scale home cheesemaking.  She also offered to sell me some beginner's stainless equipment that her husband fabricated, before she moved up to large batches. 

I just barely restrained myself.  I figure it's best to wait a few years until our kids are a bit older before I dive into another hobby.  I'm hoping to involve them in the learning process too.  Ideally, I'd like to have a couple dairy goats and maybe a jersey cow.  The hobby farm is still a ways off, but we're working our way towards it. 

It's cool to be part of a community here of DIY-minded people.  You're making me want to get some molds and cultures and get going! 
Title: Re: Mozzarella
Post by: Jeff M on January 31, 2014, 12:47:31 AM
Bought the supplies to make Mozzarella for the superbowl:)  Cant wait!