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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: gogreen437 on May 08, 2013, 08:01:25 pm

Title: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: gogreen437 on May 08, 2013, 08:01:25 pm
I am looking for a good British ale yeast that is fruity, is known to leave some diacetyl in the beer, but isn't over too over the top. 
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: dordway29 on May 08, 2013, 08:08:41 pm
Wyeast 1968 london esb is fun.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: hoser on May 08, 2013, 08:39:05 pm
Why would you ever choose a yeast that leaves diacetyl in beer?  I am very sensitive to diacetyl and hate finding it in my beers.

That being said, for English beers I like Wy1469 West Yorkshire.  Good all around work horse at a variety of temps, floccs well, good fruity profile, but sadly no diacetyl (which in my opinion is a good thing :P)

Personally, I would avoid a yeast that creates a butter bomb.  But, that is the BJCP judge in me.  To each their own I suppose...
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: gmac on May 08, 2013, 09:23:16 pm
WLP007 and a stick of butter.

Or Ringwood.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Three on May 08, 2013, 10:16:04 pm
I'm with dordway29 on this, and it has become my favorite. 

It won't disappoint!


Wyeast....

YEAST STRAIN: 1968  |  London ESB Ale™

A very good cask conditioned ale strain, this extremely flocculant yeast produces distinctly malty beers. Attenuation levels are typically less than most other yeast strains which results in a slightly sweeter finish. Ales produced with this strain tend to be fruity, increasingly so with higher fermentation temperatures of 70-74°F (21-23° C). A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete. Bright beers are easily achieved within days without any filtration.

Origin:
Flocculation: Very High
Attenuation: 67-71%
Temperature Range: 64-72F, 18-22C
Alcohol Tolerance: 9% ABV


Or White Labs....

WLP002 English Ale Yeast

A classic ESB strain from one of England's largest independent breweries. This yeast is best suited for English style ales including milds, bitters, porters, and English style stouts. This yeast will leave a beer very clear, and will leave some residual sweetness.

Attenuation:
63-70%
Flocculation:
Very High
Optimum Ferment Temp:
65-68°F
Alcohol Tolerance:
Medium



Enjoy your brew(ing)!


Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on May 09, 2013, 05:22:03 am
Wyeast 1968 london esb is fun.

+1
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: davidgzach on May 09, 2013, 06:53:43 am
Wyeast 1968 london esb is fun.

+1

+1 more.  My fav British yeast...
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Joe Sr. on May 09, 2013, 07:49:30 am
I have to agree on the ESB yeast.  It's my current non-Belgian favorite.

I'd also like a good dry yeast substitute.  I am not a fan of Nottingham.  I've not used S-04 that I can recall, but I believe it may be similar to the ESB yeast.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: erockrph on May 09, 2013, 09:18:33 am
I have to agree on the ESB yeast.  It's my current non-Belgian favorite.

I'd also like a good dry yeast substitute.  I am not a fan of Nottingham.  I've not used S-04 that I can recall, but I believe it may be similar to the ESB yeast.

Yep, S-04 rocks just as hard as 1968. Tastes great, ferments like a champ and drops like a sack of bricks when it's done.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: swampale on May 13, 2013, 05:50:33 am
i just don't like the bready flavour you get from S-04. I did taste a homebrewed Stout that was brewed with S-04 and didn't taste any of that bready flavour.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: hopfenundmalz on May 13, 2013, 06:33:28 am
Ones that I use.
1968/002, the Fuller's strain.
1469 for my Timothy Taylor Clone attempts.
022 Essex ale is a good change of pace when it is out.
1275 also can make some nice bitter.
1028 works for high gravity beers.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Joe Sr. on May 13, 2013, 07:57:40 am
I pitched 1968 in a stout last night and it's rocking this morning!

I grew the starter up from some slurry from last November.  Love that yeast!
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: reverseapachemaster on May 13, 2013, 08:35:54 am
i just don't like the bready flavour you get from S-04. I did taste a homebrewed Stout that was brewed with S-04 and didn't taste any of that bready flavour.

I've been using S-04 as my house yeast for a little while now. It doesn't always have to give you that yeast character. Personally I like some yeast character in my English beers so I do ferment those around 66-68F. American beer styles don't need that character so I ferment those with S-04 at 62-64F (usually ramping up from 62 to 64) and it comes out really clean.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: cheshirecat on May 13, 2013, 10:24:13 am
I use WLP002 in my lighter english beers and WLP013 London in my darker english styles (stout, porter, mild).
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: chumley on May 13, 2013, 10:31:28 am
Another vote for 1968 aka Fuller's yeast, as it best fits the bill for what the OP is looking for.

I, too, like a little diacetyl in a couple of styles, like British bitter and Bohemian Pilsner.  Not so much for the hint of butter, but the slick mouthfeel can enhance the body of what could be a thin beer.

Also, another vote for the Ringwood yeast.  Brew a nice 1.040 bitter with it, then use the yeast cake for a Baltic Porter or Russian Imperial Stout.  You can't go wrong.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: bluesman on May 13, 2013, 10:36:36 am
I use WLP002 in my lighter english beers and WLP013 London in my darker english styles (stout, porter, mild).

+1

I really like the esters produced by both of these strains.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: bwana on May 13, 2013, 11:09:56 am
WLP 005 is the fruitiest English strain I have used. Five days in you need to rouse this yeast. Good luck!
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: hopfenundmalz on May 13, 2013, 11:28:47 am
I used Ringwood once. That was the first, and last, time.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Joe Sr. on May 14, 2013, 08:29:56 am
FWIW, my current batch fermenting with 1968 is throwing off a lot of heat.  It's sitting at about 6 degrees warmer than the Belgian fermenting next to it (also very active).  It spiked up to a little over 70 last night before I got it cooled down.

I've never previously noticed a difference in the amount of heat generated by different yeasts, but it looks like 1968 could be one that warrants a closer watch to keep it within a reasonable temp range.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: cornershot on May 14, 2013, 08:48:24 am
Wlp023 has a really nice ester profile and is a strong fermenter. Great for malty styles. Hop flavors are muted.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: skyler on May 14, 2013, 02:46:45 pm
WLP002/WY1968 is a really outstanding yeast strain and is probably overlooked by some brewers due to the diacetyl warning and the absurdly low attenuation listed on the yeast companies' websites. IME, the diacetyl production isn't all that severe (better than most lager strains, anyway), and if you follow the homebrewers' British Ale rule of thumb by giving it an extra few days at ambient after it looks finished, the diacetyl will be pretty much cleaned up. Cold crashing too quickly will give you yeast that poops out on you with almost any beer. In the case of 002/1968, that does mean diacetyl. I have never had detectable diacetyl from 002/1968, and I ferment them cool (63-65º F), but I do ramp it up as krausen begins to shrink. That said, if you are trying to get diactyl production (why?), then the thing to do is to use ringwood (005/1187) and cold crash as soon as the yeast drops.

I am also going to plug a couple other yeast strains. I like 1318 a lot because it is basically 002 with less fruit (therefore great for American-style ales as well as bitters and porters and whatnot). And S-04 is also a great and underrated yeast strain. I think people who don't like S-04 ferment too warm with it. I find it produces excellent beers anywhere from 60º F to 68º F, but it gets a little breadier at the cooler end (58º-62º F) and can be a little too ester-forward warmer than about 66º-68º F. My usual fermentation plan with that one is to pitch at 62º and keep the fermentation chamber set to 58º to get fermentation in the 64º-66º F "sweet spot." I know most homebrewers in my clubs tend to ferment most of their beers 4º-6º warmer than I do, and many still just use the ambient temperature of their closets (not a lot of basements here in Oakland). That may cause much of the discomfort some people have with S-04.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: evandy on May 14, 2013, 05:25:27 pm
I make a lot of british ales... they are nicely balanced and I can't find too many here in the states that haven't been shipped over from England.

I've tried most of the Wyeast yeasts (London Ale 3, Thames Valley Ale, Irish Ale, London ESB, London Ale, etc.).  I've made Jamil's "Best Bitter" recipe at least 6 times now, with a bunch of different yeasts.  So far, my personal favorite by far is the WYeast private collection Thames Valley Ale II (1882). 

This is a GREAT yeast that I really love.  Last time I used it was for a brewin series with my homebrew club.  We made a Best Bitter, Northern Brown, and Brown porter about a month apart and repitched the 1882 between each batch.  All three of the beers were fantastic, but the Best Bitter was supurb.  THe next time it comes around in the WYeast private collection I suggest you check it out.

Personally, I'm thinking of starting a personal yeast slant of this one.  Once a year is not nearly enough.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Iliff Ave on May 15, 2013, 09:25:32 am
I plan to use S-04 for my next beer but am concerned about diacetyl. I have only used this yeast once and definitely had some diacetyl issues.

Ambient temp in the room where I will be fermenting is right above 60F but I don't have the ability to ramp up the temp toward the end of fermention. Will this be an issue?

Out of curiousity what would be the effect of pitching at too high but dropping the temp over time? I know this is bad practice. I don't as much control over my beers as I would like right now due to a different location and brewing partner...long story...

Sorry if I hijacked...
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: gmac on May 15, 2013, 08:36:58 pm
I don't have the ability to ramp up the temp toward the end of fermention. Will this be an issue?

Take it outside? (and put a garbage bag over it if it's in a carboy).
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: erockrph on May 15, 2013, 10:19:26 pm
Out of curiousity what would be the effect of pitching at too high but dropping the temp over time? I know this is bad practice. I don't as much control over my beers as I would like right now due to a different location and brewing partner...long story...

Depends on how far it drops. Diacetyl would be my main concern if it was just a few degrees, but if it was a big drop the yeast could stall out early.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Iliff Ave on May 16, 2013, 09:22:53 am
Out of curiousity what would be the effect of pitching at too high but dropping the temp over time? I know this is bad practice. I don't as much control over my beers as I would like right now due to a different location and brewing partner...long story...

Depends on how far it drops. Diacetyl would be my main concern if it was just a few degrees, but if it was a big drop the yeast could stall out early.

Let's say that the yeast was pitched at 70F and over two weeks the temp dropped to 62F. Is this a prime scenario for diacetyl? I am so used to using US05 that I am worried my practices will mess up the beer.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: denny on May 16, 2013, 10:26:19 am
Out of curiousity what would be the effect of pitching at too high but dropping the temp over time? I know this is bad practice. I don't as much control over my beers as I would like right now due to a different location and brewing partner...long story...

Depends on how far it drops. Diacetyl would be my main concern if it was just a few degrees, but if it was a big drop the yeast could stall out early.

I wouldn't worry about it.
Let's say that the yeast was pitched at 70F and over two weeks the temp dropped to 62F. Is this a prime scenario for diacetyl? I am so used to using US05 that I am worried my practices will mess up the beer.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: skyler on May 16, 2013, 12:11:48 pm
Out of curiousity what would be the effect of pitching at too high but dropping the temp over time? I know this is bad practice. I don't as much control over my beers as I would like right now due to a different location and brewing partner...long story...

Depends on how far it drops. Diacetyl would be my main concern if it was just a few degrees, but if it was a big drop the yeast could stall out early.

Let's say that the yeast was pitched at 70F and over two weeks the temp dropped to 62F. Is this a prime scenario for diacetyl? I am so used to using US05 that I am worried my practices will mess up the beer.

You just described my fermentation practice for the first 2 years I brewed. It's unpredictable how much that temperature swing will mess up your beer. My recommendation would be to just get it cooler before you pitch. If you can't chill the beer further, transfer it into your fermenter, then wait overnight. In the morning, the temperature will have dropped considerably and that is the time to aerate and pitch your yeast.

As for diacetyl with S-04 - I have never had that problem, but I always give my English-yeast beers plenty of extra time to clean up. I recommend you give the beer 2-3 weeks in primary, regardless of whether it appears "done" after 6 days. Basically, just give it a week longer than you would if you were using US-05. If you can't ramp it up to 70º F, at least you can give the yeast a longer amount of time to clean up after itself. In my experience, the extra week or two has caused zero problems, but "rush jobs" have caused me a lot of frustration.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Joe Sr. on May 16, 2013, 01:11:44 pm
My beers sit in primary usually for three weeks.  Sometimes longer depending on my schedule.

I've never experienced a problem from giving them extra time and I've never tasted diacetyl in my beer, although it's possible I've missed it.

I've had other off flavors from time to time, but none that I would attribute to time on the yeast.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: dzlater on May 17, 2013, 05:40:38 am
If you are concerned about diacetyl, you can try this:
http://www.winning-homebrew.com/diacetyl-test.html (http://www.winning-homebrew.com/diacetyl-test.html)
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: HoosierBrew on May 17, 2013, 06:31:22 am
My beers sit in primary usually for three weeks.  Sometimes longer depending on my schedule.

I've never experienced a problem from giving them extra time and I've never tasted diacetyl in my beer, although it's possible I've missed it.

I've had other off flavors from time to time, but none that I would attribute to time on the yeast.
+1.  Let the yeast clean up after itself.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Joe Sr. on June 03, 2013, 10:12:21 am
Checked the gravity on my stout last night.  The ESB yeast took it from 1.102 to 1.015 and it tastes nice and clean.  I love this yeast.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: morticaixavier on June 03, 2013, 10:30:05 am
nice. that's good attenuation and just in the sweetspot (no pun intended) for an RIS.
Title: Re: British Yeast Recommendation
Post by: Joe Sr. on June 03, 2013, 10:36:02 am
nice. that's good attenuation and just in the sweetspot (no pun intended) for an RIS.

Thanks.  First time I've used this yeast for this recipe.  I've always used the Irish Ale (1084?) yeast in the past.  I'll need to dig out some old bottles for a comparison.  For educational purposes only.