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General Category => Beer Recipes => Topic started by: klickitat jim on June 13, 2013, 03:22:07 AM

Title: Cream Ale
Post by: klickitat jim on June 13, 2013, 03:22:07 AM
Never tried one. The wife's boss sent home a six pack of his partial mash version. Crazy good. I didn't know what it was and guessed a hefe because it had a little haze. But it was awesome, clean crisp with a faint orange zest finish.

Anyway I looked at BCS and a couple on the wiki. Think I'll give it a shot.

9lbs 2R
Mash 1.5:1 at 150
60 boil
2 oz Mt Hood FWH
1lb cane sugar at 30 min
Wirlfloc and Wyeast nutrient at 15 min
Wyeast 1056 at 65°

1.055
Hoping to get it down to 1.008
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: tschmidlin on June 13, 2013, 04:23:23 PM
What you have looks good, but since your wife's boss's was so good, why not ask for his recipe?
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: denny on June 13, 2013, 04:36:01 PM
I'd suggest you replace the sugar with flaked corn.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: bluesman on June 13, 2013, 04:36:58 PM
This one by Skotrat is excellent.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=6089.15
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: Upstate Dan on June 13, 2013, 05:01:43 PM
Here's my recipe that took 2nd place at the NYS Fair last year. This is my house beer. Pretty standard cream ale recipe. Great for watching baseball and hockey!

40% Pilsener Malt
40% American 2 Row
10% Flaked Corn
10% Flaked Rice

Mash at 150F.
Boil 90 minutes.

1 oz Hallertau @ 60 min. 0.5 oz Hallertau @ 5 min.

Ferment in the lows 60s with WLP001 or WLP080 (depends on how lager-like you want it to be).
Cold condition for 2-4 weeks.
Carbonate to 2.7 volumes.

Water treatment definitely benefits this beer.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: gmac on June 13, 2013, 08:16:40 PM
This one by Skotrat is excellent.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=6089.15

+1. I made Skorats and it was great!
Title: Re: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: Jimmy K on June 13, 2013, 08:42:06 PM
This one by Skotrat is excellent.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=6089.15

+1. I made Skorats and it was great!

I've made it twice, though the second time I cut down the bittering hops a little.

Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: klickitat jim on June 13, 2013, 10:17:42 PM
Well it's mashing right now so I'll keep the suggestions in mind as o make future adjustments.

I'm just surprised I liked the style
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: euge on June 13, 2013, 11:50:28 PM
Well if you do like it give Genesee a try. I was pleasantly surprised to find it hoppier than remembered; and when compared with Little Kings you'll see the wide difference across the style.

Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: klickitat jim on June 13, 2013, 11:55:47 PM
Not sure I can find it here on the left coast but I'll keep an eye out
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: HoosierBrew on June 14, 2013, 12:43:07 AM
There is a great brewery in Indy called Sun King, and they make a wonderful cream ale called Sunlight Cream Ale.  They say that they use just a pinch of oats and wheat in the grist, and I think I'm gonna try to clone it in my next cream ale. It has the drinkability and clean character of a cream ale, but is unique at the same time. Good stuff.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: the_pig on June 14, 2013, 03:51:36 PM
Hi All:

I was thinking about brewing one of these cream ales over the weekend, and I have a real amature question:

I see the recipie above calls for an addition of 1lb cane sugar during he boil (at 30 min).  If you substitute flacked corn (which I have a little of), does that go into the boil too (and not the mash)?

Thanks for any guidance to the amature here!

-Bill

Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: morticaixavier on June 14, 2013, 03:53:02 PM
Hi All:

I was thinking about brewing one of these cream ales over the weekend, and I have a real amature question:

I see the recipie above calls for an addition of 1lb cane sugar during he boil (at 30 min).  If you substitute flacked corn (which I have a little of), does that go into the boil too (and not the mash)?

Thanks for any guidance to the amature here!

-Bill

flaked corn goes in the mash.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: HoosierBrew on June 14, 2013, 03:53:28 PM
Hi All:

I was thinking about brewing one of these cream ales over the weekend, and I have a real amature question:

I see the recipie above calls for an addition of 1lb cane sugar during he boil (at 30 min).  If you substitute flacked corn (which I have a little of), does that go into the boil too (and not the mash)?

Thanks for any guidance to the amature here!

-Bill


No, it needs to be mashed.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: gmac on June 14, 2013, 03:58:20 PM
Personally I would go with corn for the corn flavour it provides more than the alcohol. I think that's a key aspect of the beer but others may not.
Mash the corn.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: the_pig on June 14, 2013, 06:20:03 PM
Thanks everyone! 

One follow up question:  Does adding sugar to the boil have a flavor/feel effect?  Or is it just to boost fermentable/alchol?

-Bill
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: morticaixavier on June 14, 2013, 08:39:42 PM
Thanks everyone! 

One follow up question:  Does adding sugar to the boil have a flavor/feel effect?  Or is it just to boost fermentable/alchol?

-Bill

it boosts alcohol and lightens body. If used in very high percentages it can add some cidery flavours. but at these levels it will just boost the gravity without changing the flavor.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: skrag6713 on June 24, 2013, 02:08:08 AM
Personally I would go with corn for the corn flavour it provides more than the alcohol. I think that's a key aspect of the beer but others may not.
Mash the corn.

I prefer to avoid the corn flavor personally.  I use rice syrup solids instead.  just replace the sugar with it.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: hopfenundmalz on June 24, 2013, 02:23:27 AM
Thanks everyone! 

One follow up question:  Does adding sugar to the boil have a flavor/feel effect?  Or is it just to boost fermentable/alchol?

-Bill

it boosts alcohol and lightens body. If used in very high percentages it can add some cidery flavours. but at these levels it will just boost the gravity without changing the flavor.
How high is high?
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: morticaixavier on June 24, 2013, 02:37:38 PM
Thanks everyone! 

One follow up question:  Does adding sugar to the boil have a flavor/feel effect?  Or is it just to boost fermentable/alchol?

-Bill

it boosts alcohol and lightens body. If used in very high percentages it can add some cidery flavours. but at these levels it will just boost the gravity without changing the flavor.
How high is high?

Good question. I've gone 20% but in a very big very malty beer. Actually at brew club the other day we had a member present on cask ale and he tapped a pin of ordinary bitter at 3.2% abv that had 2lbs of sugar in the recipe. I didn't get any particular cideryness there. so I guess the short answer is...
it depends.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: erockrph on June 24, 2013, 02:51:39 PM
Has anyone here actually experienced "cidery" flavors that can directly be attributed to nothing more than a high percentage of simple sugar in the recipe? Methinks this is an old wives tale from the days of yore before brewers focused on yeast health, pitching rates and controlling fermentation temperature.

Back in the days when brewing involved stale extract, a crapload of sugar and one 2-year old packet of Munton's dry yeast that was stored warm, then I can see why you would expect a lot off off fermentation off-flavors. I'm sure all that simple sugar caused fermentation temps to take off pretty quick as well. But, I've just never picked up cider notes in any well-fermented Belgian or IIPA.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: morticaixavier on June 24, 2013, 02:52:45 PM
Has anyone here actually experienced "cidery" flavors that can directly be attributed to nothing more than a high percentage of simple sugar in the recipe? Methinks this is an old wives tale from the days of yore before brewers focused on yeast health, pitching rates and controlling fermentation temperature.

Back in the days when brewing involved stale extract, a crapload of sugar and one 2-year old packet of Munton's dry yeast that was stored warm, then I can see why you would expect a lot off off fermentation off-flavors. I'm sure all that simple sugar caused fermentation temps to take off pretty quick as well. But, I've just never picked up cider notes in any well-fermented Belgian or IIPA.

I am entirely willing to accept that possibility especially after my experience with the ordinary bitter.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: Jimmy K on June 24, 2013, 03:18:19 PM
Methinks this is an old wives tale from the days of yore before brewers focused on yeast health, pitching rates and controlling fermentation temperature.

I think so too. Many belgian beers use high percentages of sugars and many super-high gravity recipes are almost 50% sugar. Probably what happened decades ago was that all malt beer had the flavor to cover bad yeast flavors. And simple sugars don't have nutrients, making bad yeast flavors even worse.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: gmac on June 24, 2013, 10:07:56 PM
I've definitely had cider flavours in the past (20 years ago) but I can't say it was sugar or bad yeast or what.  That was one of the reasons that I gave up on homebrewing for a while, cidery beer that was not good.  I found it worst with high percentages of corn sugar (50%).  Not saying it exists now but I still fear it to this day and it's one of the reasons I moved to all grain.
Title: Re: Cream Ale
Post by: yso191 on June 24, 2013, 11:45:28 PM
And I find myself wondering how often Acetaldehyde was labeled 'Cidery'