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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: Jimmy K on July 03, 2013, 12:34:36 PM

Title: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Jimmy K on July 03, 2013, 12:34:36 PM
I remember reading here that US-05 is surprisingly cold tolerate - like down to 50F or so. I've been wondering since if it would make a good yeast for hybrid styles like cream ale. Has anyone tried it?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: brewmichigan on July 03, 2013, 12:36:52 PM
I've done US-05 down to 58 with no problems. Slightly slower than normal but still churns through. Some people may have gone lower but 58 is what I've done. I think it makes an incredibly clean beer at and under 60.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: In The Sand on July 03, 2013, 12:44:08 PM
+1
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: majorvices on July 03, 2013, 01:26:11 PM
I had it cold crash accidentally down to 45 and it was still working, this was after several days (I was on a trip). Managed to raise temp back up to 60s and had no problems with attenuation or off flavors.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Three on July 08, 2013, 02:38:48 AM
You may be thinking lower than this but I'm fermenting right now with it at 62.  It is happily going about it's business.  First time for me this low.  Put it in the fermentor at 62 degrees last night at 6pm.  This morning it was doing it's thing.  I usually use it at 65 to 68 but read it would make my APA get nice and crisp and clean.  So what the heck, let's see what happens!
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 08, 2013, 06:53:00 PM
I made a mistake of under pitching (I think) this weekend into an Altbier. Chilled the wort in the fridge over night down to 55F. Rehyrdrated one packet of US-05, aerated for a minute with pure O2. 36 hours, no activity, raised temp to 60, nothing. Ended up pitching another packet last night and have a krausen forming this morning. I probably should've pitched 2 packs. Gravity was 1.050 for 4 gallons (that's the batch size I brew these days). Plus I rehydrated at 95F for 15 minutes, then pitched right into the wort, that probably wasn't the best idea either...

Thoughts, anyone?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Jimmy K on July 08, 2013, 07:10:02 PM
I made a mistake of under pitching (I think) this weekend into an Altbier. Chilled the wort in the fridge over night down to 55F. Rehyrdrated one packet of US-05, aerated for a minute with pure O2. 36 hours, no activity, raised temp to 60, nothing. Ended up pitching another packet last night and have a krausen forming this morning. I probably should've pitched 2 packs. Gravity was 1.050 for 4 gallons (that's the batch size I brew these days). Plus I rehydrated at 95F for 15 minutes, then pitched right into the wort, that probably wasn't the best idea either...

Thoughts, anyone?
An 11 gram packet should be plenty for 4G of a 1.050 beer. They are twice the size of Red Star packets.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: morticaixavier on July 08, 2013, 08:25:59 PM
I made a mistake of under pitching (I think) this weekend into an Altbier. Chilled the wort in the fridge over night down to 55F. Rehyrdrated one packet of US-05, aerated for a minute with pure O2. 36 hours, no activity, raised temp to 60, nothing. Ended up pitching another packet last night and have a krausen forming this morning. I probably should've pitched 2 packs. Gravity was 1.050 for 4 gallons (that's the batch size I brew these days). Plus I rehydrated at 95F for 15 minutes, then pitched right into the wort, that probably wasn't the best idea either...

Thoughts, anyone?
An 11 gram packet should be plenty for 4G of a 1.050 beer. They are twice the size of Red Star packets.

+1 it sounds like you maybe got a dead packet of yeast. properly rehydrated 1 packet of us=05 should have been more than enough for that batch. 95 for 15 minutes sounds good. did it get kind of creamy and goopy?

Do you mean you aerated the yeast that was rehydrating for 1 minutes of pure o2? cause it's possible you killed the yeast with that.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 09, 2013, 02:24:57 AM
Oh, no I didn't aerate the yeast; the wort, then pitched the yeast. The yeast didn't build up the foam on top when rehydrated, but I don't think I gave it enough time. But it was milky looking. Mr Malty says 12 grams if I put the yeast as a few months old and a hybrid beer setting. Half a gram is nothing, yeast could've been dead or I shocked it pitching 95F yeast into 55F wort?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Three on July 09, 2013, 04:15:17 AM
Oh, no I didn't aerate the yeast; the wort, then pitched the yeast. The yeast didn't build up the foam on top when rehydrated, but I don't think I gave it enough time. But it was milky looking. Mr Malty says 12 grams if I put the yeast as a few months old and a hybrid beer setting. Half a gram is nothing, yeast could've been dead or I shocked it pitching 95F yeast into 55F wort?

Just my 2 cents in on this.  (NOT PREACHING!)   I have been messing with yeast for over 40 years (mostly as a baker).  Heat is the demise of yeast.  You can keep it for a very long time (years) frozen or cold with just a little love.  Heat above 100 degrees can be a killer.   I have always curled my brow when I see anyone instructing people to rehydrate or activate yeast at anywhere near 100 degrees (sorry John Palmer!).  Rehydrate dry yeast at 80 degrees AND USE A THERMOMETER.  You CAN go higher then that but it is at your own risk.  You can't just guess though, go too high and you will kill the yeast.

FERMENTIS STATES: rehydration instructions
Sprinkle the yeast in minimum 10 times its weight of sterile water or wort at 27°C ± 3°C (80°F ± 6°F). Leave to rest 15 to 30 minutes.
Gently stir for 30 minutes, and pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 09, 2013, 03:29:20 PM
Thanks for your input, Three. I will do this the next time I brew and see how much better I fare.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: yso191 on July 09, 2013, 04:35:45 PM
I guess I'll follow this thread around the corner it's taking...

I have been brewing about a year.  Only once have I used dry yeast (S-05), and as in everything else I do, I researched rehydrating exhaustively and followed what I learned to the best of my ability.  It was a bust.  Nothing.  I ran down to the LHBS and picked up some wet yeast and off it went.

I have been hearing about a peachy flavor that one can get if one ferments with S-05 at low temps, so I want to try again on an IPA I will be brewing this weekend.  I am seriously thinking about following some of the advice I read which is to just pour 2 packets straight into the wort without rehydrating at all. 

Thoughts?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: bluesman on July 09, 2013, 04:43:35 PM
I remember reading here that US-05 is surprisingly cold tolerate - like down to 50F or so. I've been wondering since if it would make a good yeast for hybrid styles like cream ale. Has anyone tried it?

The Alt that we served during club night was fermented with US05. Fairly clean fermenting, although I pickup on a fruity ester (peach or pear-like) that's in the background flavor, even when fermented cold. It still makes a good beer, especially a hoppy American Ale style, but I'm uncertain about the effects on a Cream Ale style. There's only one way to find out...;)
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: denny on July 09, 2013, 04:56:51 PM
I guess I'll follow this thread around the corner it's taking...

I have been brewing about a year.  Only once have I used dry yeast (S-05), and as in everything else I do, I researched rehydrating exhaustively and followed what I learned to the best of my ability.  It was a bust.  Nothing.  I ran down to the LHBS and picked up some wet yeast and off it went.

I have been hearing about a peachy flavor that one can get if one ferments with S-05 at low temps, so I want to try again on an IPA I will be brewing this weekend.  I am seriously thinking about following some of the advice I read which is to just pour 2 packets straight into the wort without rehydrating at all. 

Thoughts?

I never rehydrate 05 and I get great performance from a single pack on beers even in the 70s gravity range.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: yso191 on July 09, 2013, 06:56:42 PM
Thanks Denny!
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 09, 2013, 08:16:53 PM
I guess I'll follow this thread around the corner it's taking...

I have been brewing about a year.  Only once have I used dry yeast (S-05), and as in everything else I do, I researched rehydrating exhaustively and followed what I learned to the best of my ability.  It was a bust.  Nothing.  I ran down to the LHBS and picked up some wet yeast and off it went.

I have been hearing about a peachy flavor that one can get if one ferments with S-05 at low temps, so I want to try again on an IPA I will be brewing this weekend.  I am seriously thinking about following some of the advice I read which is to just pour 2 packets straight into the wort without rehydrating at all. 

Thoughts?

I never rehydrate 05 and I get great performance from a single pack on beers even in the 70s gravity range.
This is just crazy to me. You're some kind of anomaly, Denny.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: denny on July 09, 2013, 08:24:55 PM
This is just crazy to me. You're some kind of anomaly, Denny.

Really?  It doesn't work for you?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 09, 2013, 08:32:52 PM
I don't know...not as well as you purport it does, I don't think. Maybe I should try it again. I usually just rehydrate by boiling 8oz of water in a mason jar for 3 minutes in the microwave at the beginning of the brew session, wait for it to come down to 95F, dump the yeast in, and let it rehydrate for the rest of the brew session. It's pretty easy. My last lager, I did that with 34/70, and stuck it in the fridge over night with my wort while it cooled to pitching temp. That worked out pretty well also.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Jimmy K on July 10, 2013, 12:25:57 AM
This is just crazy to me. You're some kind of anomaly, Denny.

Really?  It doesn't work for you?

I do what Denny says.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Three on July 10, 2013, 01:01:43 AM
I never rehydrate 05 and I get great performance from a single pack on beers even in the 70s gravity range.

+1

Using it dry in a fermenting bucket has always worked for me as well.  It may be an extra step but I find it easier to hydrate before I pour it into a carboy......
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 10, 2013, 01:27:57 PM
I never rehydrate 05 and I get great performance from a single pack on beers even in the 70s gravity range.

+1

Using it dry in a fermenting bucket has always worked for me as well.  It may be an extra step but I find it easier to hydrate before I pour it into a carboy......
Agreed. The way I described it above doesn't feel like more work than just sprinkling.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Jimmy K on July 10, 2013, 01:30:47 PM
Using it dry in a fermenting bucket has always worked for me as well.  It may be an extra step but I find it easier to hydrate before I pour it into a carboy......
Me too. Yeast viability aside, in a carboy you really can't "sprinkle it on the wort". I always wind up with a pile in the middle that takes forever to fully hydrate.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: hospter81 on July 10, 2013, 01:46:40 PM

I have been hearing about a peachy flavor that one can get if one ferments with S-05 at low temps, so I want to try again on an IPA I will be brewing this weekend.
Thoughts?

Really?? I make my apa with a lot of amarillo at FWH using US05 fermented at 64 and it has a very pleasant peachy flavor. But i always thought it was a hop flavor contribution....
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: thebigbaker on July 10, 2013, 02:02:28 PM
I also have never rehydrated my dry yeast.  I mainly use carboys and Speidel fermenters and just sprinkle the yeast right on top.  Most of my ales get US-05 and I recently had great results with Belle Saison dry yeast.  I haven't tried using dry yeast for high gravity beers (1.070+) as I usually will use liquid yeast w/ a starter.

Temp wise, I keep my ales in the low 60's, even fermented my last Saison in the low 60's and really liked the results.

I'm not sure if it's a peachy flavor, but I did an American Wheat beer that I split with US-05 and 1056.  The US-05 had a slight tartness to it.  Not sure if pitch rates had anything to do with the tartness as they were each 3 gallon batches, so with an entire pack of US-05 I probably over-pitched where as the pack of 1056 was closer to an ideal pitch rate (no starter). 
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: drjones on July 10, 2013, 04:54:57 PM
Quote
Only once have I used dry yeast (S-05), and as in everything else I do, I researched rehydrating exhaustively and followed what I learned to the best of my ability.  It was a bust.  Nothing.  I ran down to the LHBS and picked up some wet yeast and off it went.

I've never experienced any issues with US-05 - it has always been fool-proof.  I have normally just sprinkled a single pack over the foamy head on the wort after aeration and not stirred to give it time to absorb fluids slowly.  Lately I've been rehydrating my dry yeasts (e.g. Belle Saison).  It is probably wiser to let the cells gently absorb H20 and build up their cell walls, but I have not experienced any fermentation issues when I have not done so at the 5-gallon batch size for normal gravity beers.  I've also seen some "old schoolers" from a nearby club just dump a pack into their very high-gravity IPAs.  They seem to do fine.  I always keep US-05 on hand in the fridge for any unanticipated brewing needs.  It's a work horse for most American style ales.  I'm a fan of dry yeast - perhaps I'm just cheap.  My last liquid purchase was a Koelsch - liquid is obviously great for specialty varieties like that. 
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: erockrph on July 11, 2013, 07:48:00 PM
I never rehydrate 05 and I get great performance from a single pack on beers even in the 70s gravity range.

+1 - When in doubt, listen to Denny

My SOP for over 50% of my beers is something like this:

1) Pour wort into bucket/carboy/BB & shake like hell for a while
2) Sprinkle/pour in a packet of US-05
3) Move fermenter to basement
4) RDWHAHB
5) Add dry hops 5-10 days later
6) Package around day 14 or so

Hasn't failed me yet. Working with US-05 is pretty much "set it & forget it" for me.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on July 11, 2013, 08:34:51 PM


Working with US-05 is pretty much "set it & forget it" for me.
Yeah, it's pretty awesome. I just ordered a bunch of dry yeast, some of the Mangrove Jack's. Want to try out the Workhorse, the Newcastle dark ale, and the Bohemian Lager strains. I'd like to do only dry yeast if I can get away with it.
Title: Re: US-05 flocculation
Post by: drjones on August 08, 2013, 04:33:54 PM
Jumping back to this thread for a general US-05 question.  As noted above, 05 has always given me great results.  My most recent batch (a low-gravity, high dextrine session rye IPA) did not drop clear after three weeks.  I bottled and will just sit it out I guess, but I'm curious why this might have happened.  Was it this particular recipe?  Was it this pack of yeast?  Did I manage to infect it with a wild yeast or something else? (tasted fine - but that doesn't say much yet).  Final gravity was 1.015, so it had some viscosity - and the rye no doubt added to that as well.  Is that enough to slow settling that much?
Title: Re: US-05 flocculation
Post by: morticaixavier on August 08, 2013, 04:38:35 PM
Jumping back to this thread for a general US-05 question.  As noted above, 05 has always given me great results.  My most recent batch (a low-gravity, high dextrine session rye IPA) did not drop clear after three weeks.  I bottled and will just sit it out I guess, but I'm curious why this might have happened.  Was it this particular recipe?  Was it this pack of yeast?  Did I manage to infect it with a wild yeast or something else? (tasted fine - but that doesn't say much yet).  Final gravity was 1.015, so it had some viscosity - and the rye no doubt added to that as well.  Is that enough to slow settling that much?

could just be starch/protein haze instead of yeast. or perhaps the us-05 is just slowly chewing away at those dextrins. Majorvices posted about having issue with us-05 over carbing in the bottles for him regularly. maybe it's more capable of metabolizing more complex sugars/starches then we generally think?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Herminator on August 08, 2013, 09:28:45 PM
Quote

I do what Denny says.


I have used a lot of 05 without rehydrating and find it to be a beast at fermenting.  Always takes off and will fill a blow off tube.  Love that yeast for what it does with just some sprinkling. 
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Three on August 08, 2013, 10:26:02 PM
Yeah, it's pretty awesome. I just ordered a bunch of dry yeast, some of the Mangrove Jack's. Want to try out the Workhorse, the Newcastle dark ale, and the Bohemian Lager strains. I'd like to do only dry yeast if I can get away with it.


beersk,

I would love to hear how these work out for you......


Jumping back to this thread for a general US-05 question.  As noted above, 05 has always given me great results.  My most recent batch (a low-gravity, high dextrine session rye IPA) did not drop clear after three weeks.  I bottled and will just sit it out I guess, but I'm curious why this might have happened.  Was it this particular recipe?  Was it this pack of yeast?  Did I manage to infect it with a wild yeast or something else? (tasted fine - but that doesn't say much yet).  Final gravity was 1.015, so it had some viscosity - and the rye no doubt added to that as well.  Is that enough to slow settling that much?

I used US-05 in my last batch of APA. Not really a low-gravity brew though.  1.057 fermented to 1.012.  It dropped pretty darn clear in 11-12 days at 62 degrees. I would have to think with time it will condition out nice and clear.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: klickitat jim on August 09, 2013, 01:35:04 AM
I fear this thread!

I'm afraid of this journey going full circle, selling my flasks and stir plates at a garage sale, and eventually getting so simplified that I die with a keystone in my hand. No dry yeast for me, even if you prove its better
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on August 09, 2013, 01:47:50 PM
I fear this thread!

I'm afraid of this journey going full circle, selling my flasks and stir plates at a garage sale, and eventually getting so simplified that I die with a keystone in my hand. No dry yeast for me, even if you prove its better
No need to be closed minded, man. But, do whatever suits your fancy and makes the beer you like.
I just don't like shipping liquid yeast in the summer months and really only when it's cool out, like mid to late fall or early spring; winter is fine too, I guess. Whichever way you do it, there's more than one way to get to the same destination. You can take the long scenic route or the short and more direct route or any variation in between.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Three on August 09, 2013, 03:30:29 PM
I fear this thread!

I'm afraid of this journey going full circle, selling my flasks and stir plates at a garage sale, and eventually getting so simplified that I die with a keystone in my hand. No dry yeast for me, even if you prove its better

I apologize in advance as I must babble.....

NO FEAR!  It's just another tool.  I've never had a bad batch of beer using dry yeast.  There just isn't the greatest selection of strains available (yet).  But I think with temperature control you can get a lot of versatility out of the current strains.  So I think (for me) some time spent in experimenting and seeing just what can be done will be a benefit to the tool kit.

I love the liquids though.  Just an awesome selection of strains.  In use here 99% of the time.  Because of some planned high gravity brews I'm getting a 5L flask next week.  It may require a yet another stir plate.  Also, because I haven't complicated this simple process enough and I want to spend even more time doing something beer, I'm starting to  plan out how to get a mini lab set up to do yeast slants and other fancy yeast tricks.  Maybe try washing and reusing some.

So, last night a friend that has been checking out homebrewing the last few brews says he would like to brew tomorrow.  No time for a starter and I'm not going to pay for 2-3 pouches of liquid yeast.   And as I would rather brew than not.  NO FEAR! Armed with a few packages of US-05 or Nottingham we will be good to go.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: beersk on August 09, 2013, 04:12:24 PM
I fear this thread!

I'm afraid of this journey going full circle, selling my flasks and stir plates at a garage sale, and eventually getting so simplified that I die with a keystone in my hand. No dry yeast for me, even if you prove its better

So, last night a friend that has been checking out homebrewing the last few brews says he would like to brew tomorrow.  No time for a starter and I'm not going to pay for 2-3 pouches of liquid yeast.   And as I would rather brew than not.  NO FEAR! Armed with a few packages of US-05 or Nottingham we will be good to go.


Exactly my point. Most of my brew days are fairly spontaneous, at least what I brew is. I feel like brewing schwarzbier this weekend...okay, haven't made a starter, so I'll use some harvested 34/70 or I have some packets of it too...or I can use US-05 also. I don't usually do a whole lot of planning when I brew. More of, well, what do I feel like brewing this week...no local homebrew shop to buy yeast, so I can't just go grab whatever and make a starter.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Three on August 09, 2013, 04:54:30 PM
Exactly my point. Most of my brew days are fairly spontaneous, at least what I brew is. I feel like brewing schwarzbier this weekend...okay, haven't made a starter, so I'll use some harvested 34/70 or I have some packets of it too...or I can use US-05 also. I don't usually do a whole lot of planning when I brew. More of, well, what do I feel like brewing this week...no local homebrew shop to buy yeast, so I can't just go grab whatever and make a starter.

I with you.  I for the most part plan out two or three brews a month.  I have a good inventory of grains and some of the hops I use a lot.  So if needed, I can head to my LHBS and get yeast, and whatever hops, etc to make my recipe complete.  (I'm fortunate to have two LHBS available.  They are 20 miles away though so 5-6 bucks in gas each trip).   If the dates are recent on the liquid yeasts they have in stock, I get a few to keep on hand.  This is all good when I plan out a brew.  I make a starter, maybe have to do a step starter.  All good and the beer is great.  But I find I am starting to get more spontaneous.  So, I keep a few packs of 04, 05, and notty in my fridge just in case.  Maybe want to try a few things and experiment splitting a batch using different yeasts to get a comparison.  Or split a mash and make two three gallon batches hopped different, etc.  So this works out really well.  And the beer doesn't suck......
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: drjones on August 12, 2013, 03:58:59 PM
Quote
could just be starch/protein haze instead of yeast. or perhaps the us-05 is just slowly chewing away at those dextrins. Majorvices posted about having issue with us-05 over carbing in the bottles for him regularly. maybe it's more capable of metabolizing more complex sugars/starches then we generally think?

Thanks Morticaixavier, I agree this is looking like a starch/protein issue.  The FG stayed for two weeks prior to bottling - so I'm pretty sure not much fermentation was going on, though.  Drank some over the weekend and it tastes and smells terrific (about 5.5 oz hops in this small beer, about half chinook).  I'm wondering how this might relate to the experimental 160 degree mash temp - though I did do a successful iodine test because of these exact concerns.  Did the high temp not play well with the rye proteins, perhaps?  The recipe included 8 lbs MO, 1 lb Munich, 1 lb rye, and 8 oz C20.  I'll just have to see if it settles out in the bottles.  I plan on sharing it with the band soon, so it should move quickly, anyway :)
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: morticaixavier on August 12, 2013, 04:02:12 PM
Quote
could just be starch/protein haze instead of yeast. or perhaps the us-05 is just slowly chewing away at those dextrins. Majorvices posted about having issue with us-05 over carbing in the bottles for him regularly. maybe it's more capable of metabolizing more complex sugars/starches then we generally think?

Thanks Morticaixavier, I agree this is looking like a starch/protein issue.  The FG stayed for two weeks prior to bottling - so I'm pretty sure not much fermentation was going on, though.  Drank some over the weekend and it tastes and smells terrific (about 5.5 oz hops in this small beer, about half chinook).  I'm wondering how this might relate to the experimental 160 degree mash temp - though I did do a successful iodine test because of these exact concerns.  Did the high temp not play well with the rye proteins, perhaps?  The recipe included 8 lbs MO, 1 lb Munich, 1 lb rye, and 8 oz C20.  I'll just have to see if it settles out in the bottles.  I plan on sharing it with the band soon, so it should move quickly, anyway :)

The rye will give you cloudiness (protein) and the hops will give you cloudiness. It's not the mash temp though I mash at 162 for my small beers and the drop bright just fine. I use a bunch of Irish moss in the boil. did you dry hop?
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: jplowe on September 08, 2015, 08:32:07 PM
I have my fermentation chamber set to 58 but its been dipping down to 56.  On the package i believe it said 53-70 something.  Is lower better for US-05 or will cause off flavors?  I'm planning on letting it ferment a few days cold and ramp up to 60 or 62 for a week then a day or two a bit warmer.
Title: US-05 at low temp
Post by: tommymorris on September 09, 2015, 01:15:24 AM
I have my fermentation chamber set to 58 but its been dipping down to 56.  On the package i believe it said 53-70 something.  Is lower better for US-05 or will cause off flavors?  I'm planning on letting it ferment a few days cold and ramp up to 60 or 62 for a week then a day or two a bit warmer.
Low temps often lead to mild peach/stone fruit flavors.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 01:36:23 PM
I rehydrated for a while thinking it was the way to go for yeast viability.  Then I was reading about a lot of people not doing it and like the results so I tried it out.  No problems.  I even did this on 10 gallons of 1.070+ wort with 2 packets of US-05.  No problem.  I've probably done 5 or 6 batches without rehydrating now and I like the results.  I suspect that with rehydrating I'm more likely to cause a problem than make the beer better.

As for rehydrating being extra work - it's a little bit of extra work.  I find it to be a PITA to sit there and try to get the water at just the right temp for rehydration.

As for temperature I have typically been getting the wort down to about 60F, pitching, and then setting the temp controller to 62F (probe taped to the side of the fermentor).  I let the yeast slowly bring the temp up to 62F and then I hold it there for a couple of days.  Then I slowly allow the temp to rise as I see airlock activity starting to back off.  I do this until I'm in the upper 60s and then let the beer mature for a few days.  Unless the basement is really cold I don't typically need a heater to make any of this happen.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: S. cerevisiae on October 02, 2015, 04:26:21 PM
I have never had a beer made with US-05 that I actually liked.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 04:57:44 PM
I have never had a beer made with US-05 that I actually liked.

that's unfortunate.  I use it often and people seem to really like my beer.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: erockrph on October 02, 2015, 05:06:30 PM
I have never had a beer made with US-05 that I actually liked.
To me, it's the same thing as US 2-row and Cascade/Centennial hops. It's just fine. I like the beers it makes. But I can go to the store and pick up literally hundreds of other beers that taste similar.

It's a great "emergency yeast" for impromptu brewdays, but if I'm going to brew for myself I'd much rather choose something that's different than the majority of craft beer out there.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: S. cerevisiae on October 02, 2015, 05:39:06 PM
that's unfortunate.  I use it often and people seem to really like my beer.

I do not care what anyone says, beer made with US-05 has an edge to it that is not present in beers that are made with Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, or "Chico" cultured from the bottle (one is not going to detect this edge if one is making beers with the equivalent of 6 ounces of hops or more per 5-gallons of wort anymore than one will pick up slightly tainted meat used in a highly-spiced dish).  I believe that this edge, along with the tendency to produce the peach ester are the result of aerobic propagation in a bioreactor.  It's the same reason why S-04 has a few strange tendencies compared to Wyeast 1098 and White Labs WLP007.  S-04 is Whitbread "B," but something happens during aerobic propagation that alters it behavior slightly.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 02, 2015, 05:52:42 PM
that's unfortunate.  I use it often and people seem to really like my beer.

I do not care what anyone says, beer made with US-05 has an edge to it that is not present in beers that are made Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, or "Chico" cultured from the bottle (one is not going to detect this edge if one is making beers with the equivalent of 6 ounces of hops or more per 5-gallons of wort anymore than one will pick up slightly tainted meat used in a highly-spiced dish).  I believe that this edge, along with the tendency to produce the peach ester are the result of aerobic propagation in a bioreactor.  It's the same reason why S-04 has a few strange tendencies compared to Wyeast 1098 and White Labs WLP007.  S-04 is Whitbread "B," but something happens during aerobic propagation that alters it behavior slightly.

I agree, Mark. I've used lots of 05 in past years (mostly for spur of the moment brewing), and in a hop forward beer the differences aren't very noticeable. But I've also used it in styles like blonde and cream ale where the peach 'edge' you mention is definitely there. I generally just prefer liquid cultures in a starter. Personal preference.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 05:56:47 PM
I do not care what anyone says, beer made with US-05 has an edge to it that is not present in beers that are made Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, or "Chico" cultured from the bottle (one is not going to detect this edge if one is making beers with the equivalent of 6 ounces of hops or more per 5-gallons of wort anymore than one will pick up slightly tainted meat used in a highly-spiced dish).  I believe that this edge, along with the tendency to produce the peach ester are the result of aerobic propagation in a bioreactor.  It's the same reason why S-04 has a few strange tendencies compared to Wyeast 1098 and White Labs WLP007.  S-04 is Whitbread "B," but something happens during aerobic propagation that alters it behavior slightly.

I've used it recently in an oatmeal stout (not highly hopped at all) and a strong ale (only moderately hopped) and I don't really detect anything I would describe as off.  Perhaps if I was making blonde ale (which I pretty much never would) it would be there.  Most of my ales are either hoppy or dark or both.

There was a time when I didn't like it but now I do.  Perhaps something has changed about their process.  Fortunately I don't really need to convince your taste buds since you aren't drinking it.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 02, 2015, 05:58:45 PM
I will say I think 05 works perfectly well in a hoppy, dark, or otherwise fairly strong flavored beer. I just didn't like it in pale, mild ones.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 06:10:42 PM
I will say I think 05 works perfectly well in a hoppy, dark, or otherwise fairly strong flavored beer. I just didn't like it in pale, mild ones.

thinking back to the last time where I wasn't exactly happy with the results from US-05 I think temp control is important.  on that batch I didn't control the temperature like I have been more recently.  It could be that my current profile minimizes what some see as undesirable traits.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: Joe Sr. on October 02, 2015, 06:18:02 PM
Just because others don't like doesn't mean you're wrong for liking it.  But it's also possible that what Mark describes as "off" about US-05 is a flavor that you've come to expect from it.

One way to test this would be to split a batch and try US-05 in one fermenter and 1056 in another.

Personally, I don't care for Nottingham yeast.  I used to use it quite a bit and wasn't happy with a number of my batches.  Figuring it could be the yeast, I did a split batch with different English yeasts and came to the conclusion that there are better options for me than Nottingham.

Of course, I've got a batch going right now with US-05 and another batch going with S-04 (working through my dry yeast stash).  I've never used S-04 so hopefully any strange tendencies it may have are not evident.  And I'll have to look for a peach flavor in my pale ale.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 06:21:41 PM
Just because others don't like doesn't mean you're wrong for liking it.  But it's also possible that what Mark describes as "off" about US-05 is a flavor that you've come to expect from it.

One way to test this would be to split a batch and try US-05 in one fermenter and 1056 in another.

I agree.  I also don't really treat it as an equivalent to 1056.  similar but not the same.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: mabrungard on October 02, 2015, 08:30:31 PM
I like US-05 in a number of beers. I've used it to finish a Berliner Weisse, cold ferment a Munich Helles wort, and of course for hoppy PAs and IPAs. I think it is an incredibly versatile yeast.

However, I do agree with Mark that there can be 'something' in some strains that you may not like. I'm not a big fan of S-04 and for some reason, I very much dislike the flavor of WY 1007 beers. Its just me. So I can't fault Mark for his dislikes either.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 08:38:08 PM
I like US-05 in a number of beers. I've used it to finish a Berliner Weisse, cold ferment a Munich Helles wort, and of course for hoppy PAs and IPAs. I think it is an incredibly versatile yeast.

However, I do agree with Mark that there can be 'something' in some strains that you may not like. I'm not a big fan of S-04 and for some reason, I very much dislike the flavor of WY 1007 beers. Its just me. So I can't fault Mark for his dislikes either.

I really want to like S-04 but I can't quite do it.  it's right on the edge.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: S. cerevisiae on October 02, 2015, 08:58:01 PM
I agree.  I also don't really treat it as an equivalent to 1056.  similar but not the same.

While they are more than likely different isolates, US-05 and Wyeast 1056 are the same yeast strain.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: S. cerevisiae on October 02, 2015, 09:10:56 PM
I very much dislike the flavor of WY 1007 beers.

Wyeast 1007 is a strange beast. 
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: evil_morty on October 02, 2015, 09:26:44 PM
I agree.  I also don't really treat it as an equivalent to 1056.  similar but not the same.

While they are more than likely different isolates, US-05 and Wyeast 1056 are the same yeast strain.

that's what I hear but I have found the end results to be different.
Title: Re: US-05 at low temp
Post by: S. cerevisiae on October 02, 2015, 10:09:20 PM
that's what I hear but I have found the end results to be different.

The difference has to do with how US-05 is propagated.   In a nutshell, US-05 never experiences ethanol until it is pitched into a batch of beer because it propagated aerobically below the Crabtree threshold in a bioreactor using a continuously fed process.  Liquid cultures are propagated above the Crabtree threshold in batches.  If you want to know the gory details, search on my username and "Crabtree."   I have explained the dry yeast propagation process many times.  It is radically different that the liquid yeast propagation process.