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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: gmac on July 23, 2013, 02:07:09 PM

Title: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on July 23, 2013, 02:07:09 PM
I'm making a batch of kosher dills today and I thought maybe we should have a pickle thread.  Since we moved, this is the first time we've been able to have a big garden and although the weeds have been a problem, i'm looking forward to pickling cucumbers, hot peppers and green beans.  Plus I over planted my tomatoes big time so I'm going to be needing some good salsa recipes and I may even try tomato juice but we shall see.
Anyone else have anything going into brine or vinegar these days?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on July 23, 2013, 02:16:54 PM
The next frontier for me is vinegar. Does malt vinegar make good pickles?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: morticaixavier on July 23, 2013, 02:24:56 PM
The next frontier for me is vinegar. Does malt vinegar make good pickles?

you can add some for taste or use it for quick pickles but without knowing the actual analysis of the vinegar it's not really safe to use it for the primary acid source in canning.

although I suppose you could use a pH meter on the final product before sealing and be pretty safe. But Don't quote me on that.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: rainmaker on July 23, 2013, 03:00:47 PM
Tomolives. Pure money.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: bluesman on July 23, 2013, 04:49:58 PM
I prepared some of my IPA Hop pickles a couple of weeks ago. I added a pint of my IPA to the brine to make this half-gallon recipe. Delicious!

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/null_zpse6a9bdf5.jpg)[/URL]
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on July 23, 2013, 05:09:58 PM
Tomolives. Pure money.
Which are?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: rainmaker on July 23, 2013, 06:41:40 PM
http://www.mrswheelbarrow.com/2010/08/tomolives-pickling-green-tomatoes/

Exactly what to do with all those green tomatoes that you know you'll never eat should they ripen.  I usually plant one plant just to take firm green tomatoes from to pickle.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: duboman on July 23, 2013, 10:44:55 PM
We make spicy garlic pickles, cold packed, no vinegar, just spices, garlic, kosher salt and jalapeños. Two families and about 200 jars total coming up first weekend in August! Recipes go back 50 years


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: euge on July 23, 2013, 11:19:59 PM
We've had a miserable tomato crop this year. However, talk at work hums with the talk of pickling and canning!

You can use a 50/50 salt sugar brine in equal amounts to vinegar. So 500ml brine + 500ml vinegar+ seasoning= pickle. I like to pour this hot over washed peppers and carrots packed in mason jars. The pH should be low enough to keep in the cupboard but I stash them in the fridge just to play it safe.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on July 24, 2013, 11:37:53 AM
My first batch of pickles didn't turn out. I put them in my crock and weighted them down with the stone but a bunch if them managed to escape and molded. They smelled bad so I dumped.

Second batch back in mason jars and should be ready early next week.

Been enjoying a few batches of pickled eggs, too. Anxiously awaiting some that I added bunches of fresh garden picked jalapeños too. Read next week sometime.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: erockrph on July 25, 2013, 04:52:25 AM
Anyone ever make a fermented hot sauce? Looks like I'm going to have a good crop of serranos this year, so I'm thinking of giving that a whirl. I'm wondering if I need a lacto starter, or if it will reliably go on its own saurkraut-style. I'm also on the fence on whether I use them green or let them ripen fully.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: hopfenundmalz on July 25, 2013, 01:38:06 PM
The are books on pickling and fermented foods by Sandor Katz.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: Jimmy K on July 25, 2013, 01:57:00 PM
Anyone ever make a fermented hot sauce? Looks like I'm going to have a good crop of serranos this year, so I'm thinking of giving that a whirl. I'm wondering if I need a lacto starter, or if it will reliably go on its own saurkraut-style. I'm also on the fence on whether I use them green or let them ripen fully.
A guy I work with uses a yogurt starter from the natural food store, not sure if that's cheaper than a lacto culture from the LHBS. Salting and covering like saurkraut should work too I'd think.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on July 25, 2013, 03:57:30 PM
I was actually wondering about adding malt to my brine to get more lacto into the process.  Since malt is supposed to be covered in lacto (sour fermentations and all that right..?) my thinking is that it should help but who knows.  Maybe some runnings from my next mash collected after the mash tun has sat full of spent grain over night?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: Jimmy K on July 25, 2013, 04:08:46 PM
I was actually wondering about adding malt to my brine to get more lacto into the process.  Since malt is supposed to be covered in lacto (sour fermentations and all that right..?) my thinking is that it should help but who knows.  Maybe some runnings from my next mash collected after the mash tun has sat full of spent grain over night?
Not a bad idea. I don't think there is much alive after a mash though. 140 * 30min is pasteurization temp.  You could put fresh malt in a thermos and add dme and hot water though.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: bluesman on July 25, 2013, 04:40:58 PM
I was actually wondering about adding malt to my brine to get more lacto into the process.  Since malt is supposed to be covered in lacto (sour fermentations and all that right..?) my thinking is that it should help but who knows.  Maybe some runnings from my next mash collected after the mash tun has sat full of spent grain over night?

Interesting idea.

Another thought is adding Brett to the brine after it has cooled, but I'm wondering what the acidity from the acetic acid would do to the Brett cell walls. Maybe try blending a Brett beer to the brine of some pickles as an experiment. I believe the flavors would blend well.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on July 25, 2013, 05:03:59 PM
I was actually wondering about adding malt to my brine to get more lacto into the process.  Since malt is supposed to be covered in lacto (sour fermentations and all that right..?) my thinking is that it should help but who knows.  Maybe some runnings from my next mash collected after the mash tun has sat full of spent grain over night?
Not a bad idea. I don't think there is much alive after a mash though. 140 * 30min is pasteurization temp.  You could put fresh malt in a thermos and add dme and hot water though.
Well, somethings gotta be making that smell :)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: euge on July 25, 2013, 10:13:04 PM
I make my own fermented hot sauce and can testify that they will spontaneously ferment on their own without any help.

What I do is rinse the peppers, roughly chop them and then puree in a blender with water and about 6% salt by weight. Makes a pepper slurry that will be fermenting within 24 hours at room temp. I do this in a loosely covered mason jar leaving some headspace for expansion. You may have to rap the fermenter on the counter to knock solids back into the liquid as they will be pushed upwards by the fermentation. Any mold that forms can be scraped/lifted away before packaging- I can assure you that this does not ruin the product.

After 30 days or so in primary I puree again with about half it's volume of vinegar added. Strain any bulky solids remaining, package and store at room temp forever if desired. It only gets better...
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: erockrph on July 26, 2013, 12:08:28 AM
Thanks Euge! That's exactly the kind of info I was looking for.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on July 26, 2013, 02:57:00 AM
Me too although what peppers do you recommend?
I've got Hot Banana, Cayenne, Chile, Scotch Bonnet and Thai Bird Chile's going right now.  What do you think about just a blend of everything?  I've only got 4 plants of each so I doubt I'll have enough to do one variety only.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on July 26, 2013, 10:09:33 AM
I make my own fermented hot sauce and can testify that they will spontaneously ferment on their own without any help.

What I do is rinse the peppers, roughly chop them and then puree in a blender with water and about 6% salt by weight. Makes a pepper slurry that will be fermenting within 24 hours at room temp. I do this in a loosely covered mason jar leaving some headspace for expansion. You may have to rap the fermenter on the counter to knock solids back into the liquid as they will be pushed upwards by the fermentation. Any mold that forms can be scraped/lifted away before packaging- I can assure you that this does not ruin the product.

After 30 days or so in primary I puree again with about half it's volume of vinegar added. Strain any bulky solids remaining, package and store at room temp forever if desired. It only gets better...

And why are you just now getting around to sharing this? Sounds awesome. Guess I have a project for the weekend!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: euge on July 26, 2013, 11:00:22 AM
Any chile pepper ought to work. I found jalapeno based sauce to be fairly mild and a combo of serranos and habaneros not as hot as hoped for. I eat a lot of hot spicy food so YMMV.

I figured the technique out after researching Tabasco sauce. They are very open about what they do so I condensed their method to a practical time frame. The sauce is green and awesome!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: erockrph on July 26, 2013, 02:43:02 PM
Any chile pepper ought to work. I found jalapeno based sauce to be fairly mild and a combo of serranos and habaneros not as hot as hoped for. I eat a lot of hot spicy food so YMMV.

I figured the technique out after researching Tabasco sauce. They are very open about what they do so I condensed their method to a practical time frame. The sauce is green and awesome!

Tabasco is barrel-aged, right? Ever thought of throwing an oak cube or two in for an extended secondary?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: erockrph on July 26, 2013, 03:48:21 PM
And back to the topic of fermented pickles, is it possible to make a sweet fermented pickle (i.e., gherkin-style) or would the additional sugar encourage unwanted bugs to join the party?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: bluesman on July 26, 2013, 04:40:03 PM
I make my own fermented hot sauce and can testify that they will spontaneously ferment on their own without any help.

What I do is rinse the peppers, roughly chop them and then puree in a blender with water and about 6% salt by weight. Makes a pepper slurry that will be fermenting within 24 hours at room temp. I do this in a loosely covered mason jar leaving some headspace for expansion. You may have to rap the fermenter on the counter to knock solids back into the liquid as they will be pushed upwards by the fermentation. Any mold that forms can be scraped/lifted away before packaging- I can assure you that this does not ruin the product.

After 30 days or so in primary I puree again with about half it's volume of vinegar added. Strain any bulky solids remaining, package and store at room temp forever if desired. It only gets better...

Inspiring euge!

I have several varieties of peppers in my garden right now. (Habanero, Serrano, Jalapeno, Hot Cherry)

Guess what I'll be doing soon. ;)

:)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on July 26, 2013, 04:50:54 PM
Any chile pepper ought to work. I found jalapeno based sauce to be fairly mild and a combo of serranos and habaneros not as hot as hoped for. I eat a lot of hot spicy food so YMMV.

I figured the technique out after researching Tabasco sauce. They are very open about what they do so I condensed their method to a practical time frame. The sauce is green and awesome!

Tabasco is barrel-aged, right? Ever thought of throwing an oak cube or two in for an extended secondary?

I was thinking the same thing! Not sure how much oak flavor is in Tabasco though but be cool experiment.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: euge on July 26, 2013, 05:23:17 PM
I think the oak really isn't needed. Probably just tradition as at some point they are decanted and stirred in big vats for weeks. 
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: Delo on July 26, 2013, 07:31:44 PM
I should try this. I have a bunch of scotch bonnets in my freezer. Have you ever tried it with smoked peppers or roasted peppers?  Would that work?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: euge on July 26, 2013, 07:42:23 PM
I think it would work well. Maybe add a few raw chiles to kick off the fermentation. I suspect roasting the peppers would kill the bacteria/yeasties needed to start the action.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: Delo on July 27, 2013, 12:56:56 PM
I would think so to about the raw peppers. I had hot sauce with smoked bhutjolokia and smoked habanero and it was awesome. It also was not as hot as i thought it would be.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 12, 2013, 10:34:47 AM
I make my own fermented hot sauce and can testify that they will spontaneously ferment on their own without any help.

What I do is rinse the peppers, roughly chop them and then puree in a blender with water and about 6% salt by weight. Makes a pepper slurry that will be fermenting within 24 hours at room temp. I do this in a loosely covered mason jar leaving some headspace for expansion. You may have to rap the fermenter on the counter to knock solids back into the liquid as they will be pushed upwards by the fermentation. Any mold that forms can be scraped/lifted away before packaging- I can assure you that this does not ruin the product.

After 30 days or so in primary I puree again with about half it's volume of vinegar added. Strain any bulky solids remaining, package and store at room temp forever if desired. It only gets better...

I made this a couple weeks ago. I simply could not wait the full 30 days. 2 weeks, scrapped the mold off the top and blended it with vinegar yesterday. It's simply fantastic and a "kroger" bag of peppers made almost 2 quarts. I used a blend of peppers, some long green hot peppers someone gave me from their garden.No idea what they are. Jalepenos and habeneros from my garden.

Going to head to farmers market this week to make some more. Very fun!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on August 12, 2013, 02:07:45 PM
Any reason I couldn't freeze the peppers for hot sauce?  I'm getting some chili's turning red but given how far North I am, and the cool season we are having, things are maturing very slowly.  I was thinking of picking the red ones as they mature and throwing them into a ziploc until I get enough to try this.  Let me know if you think that freezing them would be a mistake.  There will probably be some fresh ones at the end.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: erockrph on August 12, 2013, 02:14:14 PM
Any reason I couldn't freeze the peppers for hot sauce?  I'm getting some chili's turning red but given how far North I am, and the cool season we are having, things are maturing very slowly.  I was thinking of picking the red ones as they mature and throwing them into a ziploc until I get enough to try this.  Let me know if you think that freezing them would be a mistake.  There will probably be some fresh ones at the end.

I'm in a similar boat. My first Serrano just turned bright red, but all the others are still fully green. I guess my only concern is whether there will be enough bugs on the last handful of fresh peppers to get fermentation going on its own. I think I'm just going to roll with it and see what happens. If fermentation doesn't go on its own I'll probably get a yoghurt starter going and pitch that.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: redbeerman on August 13, 2013, 03:30:05 PM
Hot dill wax beans, pickled jalapenos, and hot and sweet kohlrabi from the garden.  Also did 10 pints of chipotle salsa with tomatoes and last years home smoked chipotles.

(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/pickles2_zps7131d2d4.jpg) (http://s276.photobucket.com/user/redbeerman/media/pickles2_zps7131d2d4.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: kramerog on August 13, 2013, 03:54:18 PM
And back to the topic of fermented pickles, is it possible to make a sweet fermented pickle (i.e., gherkin-style) or would the additional sugar encourage unwanted bugs to join the party?

I think you could add the sugar at the same time as adding the vinegar, but I'm no pickle expert,
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 13, 2013, 10:00:51 PM
And back to the topic of fermented pickles, is it possible to make a sweet fermented pickle (i.e., gherkin-style) or would the additional sugar encourage unwanted bugs to join the party?

I think you could add the sugar at the same time as adding the vinegar, but I'm no pickle expert,

I'm making some sweet pickles now. If they turn out I'll post recipe saturday. No vinegar for my pickles. Salt water brine and natural fermentation.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: kramerog on August 13, 2013, 10:13:45 PM
And back to the topic of fermented pickles, is it possible to make a sweet fermented pickle (i.e., gherkin-style) or would the additional sugar encourage unwanted bugs to join the party?

I think you could add the sugar at the same time as adding the vinegar, but I'm no pickle expert,

I'm making some sweet pickles now. If they turn out I'll post recipe saturday. No vinegar for my pickles. Salt water brine and natural fermentation.

Won't the sugar ferment out?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: morticaixavier on August 13, 2013, 10:27:31 PM
And back to the topic of fermented pickles, is it possible to make a sweet fermented pickle (i.e., gherkin-style) or would the additional sugar encourage unwanted bugs to join the party?

I think you could add the sugar at the same time as adding the vinegar, but I'm no pickle expert,

I'm making some sweet pickles now. If they turn out I'll post recipe saturday. No vinegar for my pickles. Salt water brine and natural fermentation.

Won't the sugar ferment out?

I would expect so. I would think you would need to either refridgerate to halt the lactic fermentation or can/pasturize
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 13, 2013, 10:35:14 PM
Well, gosh, I didn't think about that. But I'll post my results Saturday.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: morticaixavier on August 13, 2013, 10:36:56 PM
Well, gosh, I didn't think about that. But I'll post my results Saturday.

you will probably be fine refrigerating them. lactic bacteria don't like the cold.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 13, 2013, 10:38:20 PM
Might back sweeten but going to finish fermentation first. I had planned on possibly  back sweetening anyway since I went with only about 3 or 4 tsp for the quart.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: HoosierBrew on August 13, 2013, 10:55:11 PM
I'm gonna make Euge's fermented hot sauce recipe this week.  I can't believe I've never done it. I make all different kinds of hot sauces normally (most of them hot as hell), but have never done a fermented one. Can't wait.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on August 13, 2013, 11:01:51 PM
So my first few spontaneously fermented pickles turned out OK, not great.  But they were pretty big cucumbers so I ended up cutting them to get them into a jar and that was a mistake. They went pretty mushy.  Plus, I was afraid of them going bad, even though they were going in the freezer so I added about 50% by volume of vinegar to the brine and holy cow are they sour now.  My 6 year old is still eating them but then he's also the one to eat the lemon out of the ice tea too so his tastes are suspect.

Kitchen is all torn out so nothing happening now despite all the green beans going bad in the garden.  All my cucumber plants got some sort of wilt (likely verticillium) and died so I have big plans for next year.  I'm thinking of just buying a box of jalapenos and scotch bonnets and doing Euge's hot sauce anyway.  No idea when my peppers will be ready.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: thatgeekguy on August 14, 2013, 06:34:12 PM
I've got a easy go-to recipe for hot and sweet dills:

- 1 gallon jar of sliced dills, any brand works fine
- 4 pounds sugar
- Peppers, chopped garlic etc based on your preferences.

1) Drain all the liquid from the pickles.
2) Remove all but an inch of pickles from jar.
3) Put drained pickles back into the jar in 1 inch layers, interspersed with sugar and the hot/garlicky stuff.
4) Tighten lid securely, place jar in refrigerator.
5) Turn jar upside down after 12 hours. Place jar in large bowl in case of lid leaks.
6) Turn jar rightside up after another 12 hours.
7) Repeat 4 & 5 for a week or so, allowing all the sugar and goodies to go into solution and become liquid.
8) Open jar and enjoy.

I also keep the liquid drained off from step 1 to use in cold pickling other things like beans/garlic/carrots/onions, why waste?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on August 14, 2013, 10:53:11 PM
I also keep the liquid drained off from step 1 to use in cold pickling other things like beans/garlic/carrots/onions, why waste?

I'm thinking pickle shots with vodka but maybe I'm crazy...
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 15, 2013, 01:46:08 AM
So my first few spontaneously fermented pickles turned out OK, not great.  But they were pretty big cucumbers so I ended up cutting them to get them into a jar and that was a mistake. They went pretty mushy.  Plus, I was afraid of them going bad, even though they were going in the freezer so I added about 50% by volume of vinegar to the brine and holy cow are they sour now.  My 6 year old is still eating them but then he's also the one to eat the lemon out of the ice tea too so his tastes are suspect.

Kitchen is all torn out so nothing happening now despite all the green beans going bad in the garden.  All my cucumber plants got some sort of wilt (likely verticillium) and died so I have big plans for next year.  I'm thinking of just buying a box of jalapenos and scotch bonnets and doing Euge's hot sauce anyway.  No idea when my peppers will be ready.


Try a couple tsp of calcium chloride per batch. Will keep your pickles crisp.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on August 15, 2013, 03:55:08 AM
So my first few spontaneously fermented pickles turned out OK, not great.  But they were pretty big cucumbers so I ended up cutting them to get them into a jar and that was a mistake. They went pretty mushy.  Plus, I was afraid of them going bad, even though they were going in the freezer so I added about 50% by volume of vinegar to the brine and holy cow are they sour now.  My 6 year old is still eating them but then he's also the one to eat the lemon out of the ice tea too so his tastes are suspect.

Kitchen is all torn out so nothing happening now despite all the green beans going bad in the garden.  All my cucumber plants got some sort of wilt (likely verticillium) and died so I have big plans for next year.  I'm thinking of just buying a box of jalapenos and scotch bonnets and doing Euge's hot sauce anyway.  No idea when my peppers will be ready.


Try a couple tsp of calcium chloride per batch. Will keep your pickles crisp.

Wish you'd said Calcium sulfate because I just bought some gypsum.  I'll have to find some Calcium chloride.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 15, 2013, 09:53:28 AM
You can also get it at the local grocer under the brand name "pickle crisp".
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: brewmichigan on August 21, 2013, 06:56:11 PM
You can also get it at the local grocer under the brand name "pickle crisp".

I'd buy it at the LHBS though. Much less expensive and you can pick up some yeast while you're there so it's not a uni-tasking trip.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: klickitat jim on August 21, 2013, 07:16:15 PM
I need a tried and true picked eggs recipe. Our chickens are cranking out more that we can eat and I'm not a big breast guy.

Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 22, 2013, 12:47:49 AM
Hey Jim, this is one I really enjoy. I kick it up some with some jalapeños and other peppers. There's a comment below from a guy who mixes different peppers into his and that's pretty much what I do loosely and they turn out great.

http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/13733/sweet-pickled-eggs?prop24=Mobile_RelatedRecipes

I also do a traditional red pickled egg with beets. Similar enough to this one

http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/17735/pickled-eggs
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: klickitat jim on August 22, 2013, 12:52:37 AM
Thanks I'll give it a shot
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 22, 2013, 01:02:11 AM
Also, just wanna say that calcium chloride really does the trick for pickled cucumbers (aka pickles ;). ). Not sure about the exact amount I am using but something like tsp per quart. My pickles are perfectly crisp. I'm using bluesman's recipe and, man, they are perfect.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: HoosierBrew on August 22, 2013, 10:26:55 PM
Just made the fermented hot sauce recipe (Euge's) using habaneros (including a couple Red Savinas), and serranos for added flavor.  Can't wait ! Gonna be hard to wait a month.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 23, 2013, 12:06:42 AM
2 weeks was plenty. Don't think you need a month.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: pinnah on August 23, 2013, 01:25:28 AM
Hey Jim, this is one I really enjoy. I kick it up some with some jalapeños and other peppers. There's a comment below from a guy who mixes different peppers into his and that's pretty much what I do loosely and they turn out great.

http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/13733/sweet-pickled-eggs?prop24=Mobile_RelatedRecipes

I also do a traditional red pickled egg with beets. Similar enough to this one

http://m.allrecipes.com/recipe/17735/pickled-eggs

Super cool on the pickled eggs...I guess we covered the best way to hard boil an egg. ;)

How long do these last Keith?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 23, 2013, 01:30:00 AM
So far my 15 year old hasn't let em even age properly yet! I can tell you the "sweet ones" are great @ about 2 weeks and the red ones ready after 7 days. The red ones start to get "silty" after a couple weeks (still taste great) but the clear ones are good to go with the same brine for at least two batches. Always mixed up fresh brine after 2nd batch.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: pinnah on August 23, 2013, 01:35:24 AM
Cool, I might try the sweet ones, as I get a little freaked out by red beet juice staining stuff.   :-X

 ;D, Things could be worst than your 15 year old raiding the pickled egg stash.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on August 23, 2013, 01:48:59 AM
boy, you got that right! lol!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on October 01, 2013, 03:02:17 AM

Any chile pepper ought to work. I found jalapeno based sauce to be fairly mild and a combo of serranos and habaneros not as hot as hoped for. I eat a lot of hot spicy food so YMMV.

I figured the technique out after researching Tabasco sauce. They are very open about what they do so I condensed their method to a practical time frame. The sauce is green and awesome!

Just made this again tonight with smoked habeneros and smoked cayenne  from my garden. Smells friggin fantastic in jar!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on October 01, 2013, 03:26:23 AM
I've got some going right now too (hot sauce). Just whatever peppers made it. Mostly cayenne. Not sure how much water to add. Ended up with about 1 1/2 cups in the pickle jar. Gonna add the same again in vinegar per above which should make lots of hot sauce for me.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on October 01, 2013, 03:37:21 AM
Just finished up some hot sauce ala Euge. Awesome stuff!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: erockrph on October 01, 2013, 04:15:42 AM
So how can you tell if your hotsauce fermentation is going? I haven't seen any real visible signs of fermentation in mine over the last couple of weeks. I did add garlic to mine, and I know it can have some antibacterial properties, so I can't help but wonder if that is having some effect.

Any suggestions on how to kick it off if it isn't fermenting?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on October 01, 2013, 04:34:09 AM
how can you tell if your hotsauce fermentation is going? I haven't seen any real visible signs of fermentation in mine over the last couple of weeks. I did add garlic to mine, and I know it can have some antibacterial properties, so I can't help but wonder if that is having some effect.

Any suggestions on how to kick it off if it isn't fermenting?

I added garlic too. A couple cloves or so and I sure don't have much visible activity either. There are a few bubbles in the pepper pulp but nothing that looks at all like a vigorous ferment. I'm not gonna screw with mine now but I would leave the garlic out next time until after the ferment is done. No mould after a week and a bit either but that may come. I've also been swirling mine once in a while because its just too much like a starter :)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 01, 2013, 11:39:23 AM
Mine didn't ferment vigorously, but I gave it a month, it developed the mold on top, and came out freaking amazing. Gonna make more soon.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on October 02, 2013, 06:20:02 PM

Mine didn't ferment vigorously, but I gave it a month, it developed the mold on top, and came out freaking amazing. Gonna make more soon.

same with mine. never saw much more than a few bubbles and then mold but the first batch was great.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on October 05, 2013, 11:46:39 AM
I may have found a way to keep your fermented hot sauce from molding. Drawing from sauer kraut I made a brine and, after the hot sauce sat for a couple days I gently poured the brine over the surface so that it remained separated from the sauce. This keeps the sauce out of contact from the air and, so far, has prevented mold.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 05, 2013, 02:03:53 PM
Good idea.  I'll try that on the next batch !
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: morticaixavier on October 06, 2013, 09:52:00 PM
(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5335/10126051795_27f8f0f057.jpg)

a house mate with more gumption than I finally got around to picking some olives of the tree in the backyard and putting them up to cure.

Starting to taste okay after nearly 2 weeks in the brine. still a bit acrid.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: clef051 on October 06, 2013, 10:49:23 PM
I make my own fermented hot sauce and can testify that they will spontaneously ferment on their own without any help.

What I do is rinse the peppers, roughly chop them and then puree in a blender with water and about 6% salt by weight. Makes a pepper slurry that will be fermenting within 24 hours at room temp. I do this in a loosely covered mason jar leaving some headspace for expansion. You may have to rap the fermenter on the counter to knock solids back into the liquid as they will be pushed upwards by the fermentation. Any mold that forms can be scraped/lifted away before packaging- I can assure you that this does not ruin the product.


After 30 days or so in primary I puree again with about half it's volume of vinegar added. Strain any bulky solids remaining, package and store at room temp forever if desired. It only gets better...

I'm printing this for future reference I don't have many peppers this year but plan on doing some next year.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: cornershot on October 07, 2013, 07:11:13 PM
I make my own fermented hot sauce and can testify that they will spontaneously ferment on their own without any help.

What I do is rinse the peppers, roughly chop them and then puree in a blender with water and about 6% salt by weight. Makes a pepper slurry that will be fermenting within 24 hours at room temp. I do this in a loosely covered mason jar leaving some headspace for expansion. You may have to rap the fermenter on the counter to knock solids back into the liquid as they will be pushed upwards by the fermentation. Any mold that forms can be scraped/lifted away before packaging- I can assure you that this does not ruin the product.

After 30 days or so in primary I puree again with about half it's volume of vinegar added. Strain any bulky solids remaining, package and store at room temp forever if desired. It only gets better...

I have some surplus jalapenos and cherries. Think  I'll give this a try. Just to clarify, is this 6% salt by weight of the peppers or the slurry? Thanks for the recipe!

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GidC1DSahxY&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DGidC1DSahxY
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on October 18, 2013, 06:10:11 PM
Whizzed up my hot sauce in the blender with 50 percent by volume vinegar. Wow, that's friggin hot!!!
Added about a 1/4 cup brown sugar to try to mellow it out a bit. I don't have the Souhwest palate that you guys must have. 95% Cayennes and 5 percent scotch bonnet with just a couple Thai bird chiles. Hot!!

Tastes ok, we'll what I can taste over the heat. A tiny drop off the tip of a spoon sends me to the sink for water. Have about a litre.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on October 19, 2013, 03:07:40 PM
The brine trick seemed to work. I'm on day 19 and full fermentation (bubbles and "hiss" when I cracked open the jar my wife sealed not knowing) - no mold! :)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: cornershot on November 07, 2013, 11:24:40 PM
Just finished and packaged my fermented hot sauce. Mine used 75% jalapenos and 25% cherry peppers with 6% salt by weight of the peppers and just enough water to help the blender make a slurry. This was allowed to ferment 30 days and then whizzed up in the blender with 50% by volume white vinegar.
The color is yellowish-green, like bile. It smells of jalapenos and a funky, earthy, brett-like aroma. It tastes just like it smells- only a little hotter than expected with just the right amounts of salt and vinegar. Overall, what can I say? I love it! It burns but it's so interesting I can't keep my hands off it. Looking forward to the morning endorphin rush. Ahhhh-oooooo!
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: theoman on November 08, 2013, 08:13:16 AM
I'm thinking of giving kimchi a try this weekend. Any tips?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: redbeerman on November 08, 2013, 01:04:12 PM
I'm thinking of giving kimchi a try this weekend. Any tips?

Make sure that the salt and cabbage are well mixed.  Don't be afraid to stick all kinds of veggies in there, carrots, radishes, of course hot peppers.  Leave the lid on whatever you are fermenting in loose, the fermentation will produce gas.  Homemade kim chi is pretty awesome.  You are using Napa cabbage, yes?
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on November 08, 2013, 01:40:04 PM
The brine trick seemed to work. I'm on day 19 and full fermentation (bubbles and "hiss" when I cracked open the jar my wife sealed not knowing) - no mold! :)

So, a few days after I posted this I noticed the brine had sunk and the top of my pepper sauce started to turn  very slightly off color probably due to oxydation. I added a tablespoon of red wine vinegar directly on top which seemed to fix problem and even now, on day 38, no mold. Going to blend in my red wine vinegar rest of of the way this AM and trying it on sardines for lunch this afternoon with a pickled egg on the side. :)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: tschmidlin on November 08, 2013, 05:47:57 PM
The brine trick seemed to work. I'm on day 19 and full fermentation (bubbles and "hiss" when I cracked open the jar my wife sealed not knowing) - no mold! :)

So, a few days after I posted this I noticed the brine had sunk and the top of my pepper sauce started to turn  very slightly off color probably due to oxydation. I added a tablespoon of red wine vinegar directly on top which seemed to fix problem and even now, on day 38, no mold. Going to blend in my red wine vinegar rest of of the way this AM and trying it on sardines for lunch this afternoon with a pickled egg on the side. :)
Are you sure it wasn't lactobacillus?  I can't remember what you were doing here, but when I ferment my hot sauce it gets a lacto layer on top.  When there is just a little it looks like a slight paling of the color.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on November 08, 2013, 05:55:46 PM
Might be that's what it was. Regardless, I didn't get mild and had full fermentation which is what I wanted.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on November 09, 2013, 12:52:23 AM
My hot sauce is actually going faster than I thought.  My local grocery has habanero's at a good pricer per lb.  I'm thinking of getting a pound or two and making another batch.  But, my last sauce was pretty hot for me with mostly cayenne and chili peppers.  I would expect habanero to be a lot hotter.

So, I'm wondering what you guys think about this: 50% habs, 50% plain old red bell peppers? 
Looking for good heat with some flavour but not painfully hot.  The other option that I'm not as excited about but considering is doing 2 batches, one all habs, one all red bell and then blending.  But I don't know if the bell's would work.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: jeffy on November 09, 2013, 01:26:28 AM
Why not use some poblanos instead of the bell peppers?  They're not very hot yet have a ton of flavor.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: HoosierBrew on November 09, 2013, 02:11:45 AM
Why not use some poblanos instead of the bell peppers?  They're not very hot yet have a ton of flavor.
+1.  There's no better flavor pepper than a poblano IMO. Together with a handful of smoking habaneros and you've got a good one. That's what I did when I made mine, and I also added a couple chipotles with some of the adobo sauce for some smokiness.  Awesome stuff.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on November 09, 2013, 03:54:17 AM
Why not use some poblanos instead of the bell peppers?  They're not very hot yet have a ton of flavor.
+1.  There's no better flavor pepper than a poblano IMO. Together with a handful of smoking habaneros and you've got a good one. That's what I did when I made mine, and I also added a couple chipotles with some of the adobo sauce for some smokiness.  Awesome stuff.
Availability is the reason. We have jalapeños, habeneros and bells. That's it.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: majorvices on November 09, 2013, 04:47:15 AM
are you trimming out seeds and veins? cause that's where the heat is. Aside from the seeds I don't find habeneros to be that hot.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: tschmidlin on November 09, 2013, 06:56:49 AM
I add bell pepper to my hot pepper jams, it adds flavor and color without the heat.  It works out well.

For hot sauce you can always take the edge off with some sweetness.  Carrots, mangoes, that kind of thing.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: gmac on November 11, 2013, 03:45:38 AM
I didn't remove anything but the stem.  Seeds and veins went in.  I like hot sauce but not crazy hot. I think I'll give it a whirl without the bells and see how it goes. I can always add something to tone it down if I need to later.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: theoman on November 11, 2013, 01:01:40 PM
I'm thinking of giving kimchi a try this weekend. Any tips?

Make sure that the salt and cabbage are well mixed.  Don't be afraid to stick all kinds of veggies in there, carrots, radishes, of course hot peppers.  Leave the lid on whatever you are fermenting in loose, the fermentation will produce gas.  Homemade kim chi is pretty awesome.  You are using Napa cabbage, yes?

Thanks! Yep, I'm using Napa cabbage. I just got it salted. For this batch, I'll keep it fairly simple with daikon raddish, green onion and a bit of carrot.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: bluesman on November 11, 2013, 05:34:42 PM
Not quite pickles but...I tried a new Pepper Sauce recipe using Habanero peppers from my garden. However, I used 24 fully ripened Habanero peppers (seeded). It is really tasty. :)

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe-Tools/Print/Recipe.aspx?recipeID=57326&origin=detail&servings=64&metric=false
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: redbeerman on November 11, 2013, 07:42:31 PM
Not quite pickles but...I tried a new Pepper Sauce recipe using Habanero peppers from my garden. However, I used 24 fully ripened Habanero peppers (seeded). It is really tasty. :)

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe-Tools/Print/Recipe.aspx?recipeID=57326&origin=detail&servings=64&metric=false

Sounds pretty yummy, Ron.  I need to try that sometime (hint).
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: theoman on November 15, 2013, 09:34:36 AM
The kimchi experiment seems to be going well. I'll try it this weekend. Unfortunately, my wife may never let me make it again.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: redbeerman on November 15, 2013, 02:10:08 PM
The kimchi experiment seems to be going well. I'll try it this weekend. Unfortunately, my wife may never let me make it again.

Yep, it does get a bit of an odor, but the result is yummy.  And the longer it goes, the better it gets.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: bluesman on November 15, 2013, 05:40:14 PM
Not quite pickles but...I tried a new Pepper Sauce recipe using Habanero peppers from my garden. However, I used 24 fully ripened Habanero peppers (seeded). It is really tasty. :)

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe-Tools/Print/Recipe.aspx?recipeID=57326&origin=detail&servings=64&metric=false

Sounds pretty yummy, Ron.  I need to try that sometime (hint).

Yup...next time your down to brew I'll hook you up. :)
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: tschmidlin on November 15, 2013, 07:56:42 PM
The kimchi experiment seems to be going well. I'll try it this weekend. Unfortunately, my wife may never let me make it again.
Sounds about right.  On the other hand, my wife complains less about my less odoriferous experiments than she used to.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: theoman on November 16, 2013, 09:48:38 AM
The kimchi experiment seems to be going well. I'll try it this weekend. Unfortunately, my wife may never let me make it again.
Sounds about right.  On the other hand, my wife complains less about my less odoriferous experiments than she used to.

Ah, relativity. I hope that works for me. We tried the kimchi last night and I think it tastes fantastic. My wife didn't mind it, but she can't get over the smell. I don't think it's that bad. It doesn't help that I laugh when she says she going to hurl.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: tschmidlin on November 18, 2013, 06:22:38 AM
The kimchi experiment seems to be going well. I'll try it this weekend. Unfortunately, my wife may never let me make it again.
Sounds about right.  On the other hand, my wife complains less about my less odoriferous experiments than she used to.

Ah, relativity. I hope that works for me. We tried the kimchi last night and I think it tastes fantastic. My wife didn't mind it, but she can't get over the smell. I don't think it's that bad. It doesn't help that I laugh when she says she going to hurl.
I could see how the laughter would be counterproductive :)  Hot sauce is much less stinky and I use it more than kimchi or sauerkraut anyway.  But the peppers might be harder to come by where you are.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: theoman on November 18, 2013, 08:17:23 AM
The kimchi experiment seems to be going well. I'll try it this weekend. Unfortunately, my wife may never let me make it again.
Sounds about right.  On the other hand, my wife complains less about my less odoriferous experiments than she used to.

Ah, relativity. I hope that works for me. We tried the kimchi last night and I think it tastes fantastic. My wife didn't mind it, but she can't get over the smell. I don't think it's that bad. It doesn't help that I laugh when she says she going to hurl.
I could see how the laughter would be counterproductive :)  Hot sauce is much less stinky and I use it more than kimchi or sauerkraut anyway.  But the peppers might be harder to come by where you are.

Wife threatened to burn the house down. So is it the cabbage that stinks so bad? Maybe cucumber kimchi would be tolerable? I'll try to grow some peppers this summer and give hot sauce a try if I succeed. Previous attempts at chili growing failed pretty miserably.
Title: Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
Post by: tschmidlin on November 18, 2013, 08:34:45 AM
Wife threatened to burn the house down. So is it the cabbage that stinks so bad? Maybe cucumber kimchi would be tolerable? I'll try to grow some peppers this summer and give hot sauce a try if I succeed. Previous attempts at chili growing failed pretty miserably.
Yes, it is probably just the cabbage.  It's in the brassica family of plants with mustard and broccoli and such.  They contain sulfur compounds and tend to get stinky when cooked too.  When I made sauerkraut my wife complained the smell was coming in to the house from the garage.  But I can ferment hot sauce in the kitchen on top of the fridge and she just wonders when it's going to be ready to eat.