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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 09:14:42 AM

Title: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 09:14:42 AM
I thought it would be cool to have a thread about barbeque. Maybe your favorite recipe or a technique you use to produce finger lickin' good Q.

There's nothing better than good Brews, Blues and BBQ'S.

I smoked a beef briscuit and made a twice baked potato with a side of green beans.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/8cd72cab.jpg)
Briscuit on the smoker getting real happy!

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/09915f3f.jpg)
The happy meal is served!  8)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/1182009003.jpg)
Wash it down with a good amber ale!

While listening to some Chicago Blues.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjPezeHN9Hc&feature=related
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 09, 2009, 09:50:03 AM
Blues, brews, and BBQs -- it's a way of life.   8)  That brisket looks great, bluesman.  I have a WSM too, although I haven't tried to smoke brisket yet.  Do you have a suggested rub recipe?

So far, baby back ribs have been my most successful smoking meat.  I like to do sort of a mexican-inspired rub with multiple varieties of dried, toasted, ground chiles (usually chipotle, chiles de arbol, ancho, guajillo, pasilla), cumin, cayenne, onion and garlic powder, salt, pepper, and mexican oregano.  I like to slather the ribs with yellow mustard before applying the rub.  I usually use a combination of smoke wood (white oak, cherry, apple).  I start the ribs meat-side down on the cooking grate and flip them after the first hour.  Then, I cook the ribs for a few hours more and take them off when they pass the tear test.  I like to use a spicy Texas-style BBQ sauce to finish the ribs (but not too much -- the meat itself needs to stand out).

Here's a photo of my last rib smoke.  I made some homemade fries and a spinach salad to go with the ribs.
(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/ribs.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: blatz on November 09, 2009, 09:57:47 AM
don't want to drive the thread off topic, but do you guys like the WSM smoker (18" or 22"?).  I have never smoked other than to use my Weber grill as a make-shift one, would it be easy enough for a newb?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 10:03:46 AM
aHHH yeah Matt.

The ribs look lip smackin' delicius.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 09, 2009, 10:04:53 AM
blatz,

I have the 18" and it's incredibly user friendly.  With a little guidance from www.virtualweberbullet.com, I made some killer baby backs the first time I fired it up.  I had done some smoking on a Weber performer grill before, but the WSM took it to a different level.  
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 10:05:45 AM
don't want to drive the thread off topic, but do you guys like the WSM smoker (18" or 22"?).  I have never smoked other than to use my Weber grill as a make-shift one, would it be easy enough for a newb?

Go for it!

The Cadillac of chimney style water smokers.

Weber makes a fantastic product.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bonjour on November 09, 2009, 10:20:51 AM
Get the widebody (22")  a rack will fit easier. 

about it being easy,  shhhhh,  you don't want anyone to know it didn't take 20 years to learn how to turn out great meat.  Let's just keep that our little secret
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 12:44:25 PM
Here's the BBQ guru Steven Raichlen's KC style BBQ Sauce recipe. I give it the bluesman's twist by adding some New Mexico chili powder to it. A fantastic all- around grilling sauce. Slather it on anythiing form babybacks to burgers.

Basic Barbecue Sauce Recipe
This is the type of sauce that most people in the United States think of as barbecue sauce: Brown sugar and molasses make it sweet; liquid smoke makes it smoky--there isn't a Kansas City pit boss around who wouldn't recognize it as local. Slather it on ribs and chicken, spoon it over pork shoulder, and serve it with anything else you may fancy. You won't be disappointed.

Makes about 2-1/2 cups


2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons prepared mustard
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon of your favorite barbecue rub
2 teaspoons liquid smoke
1/2 teaspoon black pepper


Combine all the ingredients in a nonreactive saucepan and bring slowly to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and gently simmer the sauce until dark, thick, and richly flavored, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the sauce to clean (or even sterile) jars and store in the refrigerator. It will keep for several months.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tesla_hv on November 09, 2009, 02:17:16 PM
As you may have seen in the "Pub" section, I slow grill/smoked a 12-pound brisket and a 10-pound pork roast.  The meat was on the grill for thirteen hours.  I used a beer mop for the brisket and a slightly different on for the pork.  Otherwise, I put no sauce on the meat but I do have it available at serving time.  Underneath the meat, I keep a pan of water to keep the meat moist.  This past weekend's effort was the best yet.  We served it with a keg of Oaked Arrogant Bastard clone.  

mod edit: removed bad photo link
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2009, 03:07:51 PM
Hot Diggity Dogg!

Looks fantastic!

Pit BBQ is awesome. I love watching the competitions. It takes alot of failures to get to the top of the pack with the best pit bosses. Just like brewing beer...it's trial and error until things begin to come together.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tesla_hv on November 09, 2009, 03:14:07 PM
Thanks.  I had a lot of fun doing it and it's kind of like being a proud father.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 09, 2009, 03:43:58 PM
I said it in the other thread, and I'll say it again: well done, Tesla!  That looks so incredibly tasty.  Beer mop -- I'm intrigued.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tesla_hv on November 09, 2009, 05:13:44 PM
I said it in the other thread, and I'll say it again: well done, Tesla!  That looks so incredibly tasty.  Beer mop -- I'm intrigued.
Recipe by: The Smoker King    
 
Brisket Mop Recipe
 
Ingredients:
1-Can dark beer (Shiner Bock works great, and don't forget to get some for you too)
1-Cup cider vinegar
1/2-Cup light oil (Canola is good)
1-Small onion, diced
3-Cloves garlic, minced
1/2-Cup Worcestershire sauce
1-Tsp freshly-ground black pepper
1-Tsp salt
1-Tbsp Cayenne
1-Tbsp Mustard Powder
1-Tsp Cumin
Juice from 1 Lemon
 
Instructions:
1. Mix all ingredients in a pot, and heat over med/low for 30 minutes.
2. The mop is now ready to use.
3. Stir well before each use. I keep the mop on low heat while I am smoking so I don't apply it cold.
 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 09, 2009, 05:59:30 PM
Thanks for that recipe!  I'll definitely use it when I smoke brisket (which I haven't done yet).

Man, I used to drink a lot of Shiner Bock in college.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tesla_hv on November 09, 2009, 06:48:53 PM
I didn't use Shiner.  I used a German dark beer. Kostritzer.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 10, 2009, 09:17:20 AM
I'm a BBQ nut myself.  Lately I've been doing more direct or indirect grilling, steaks and butterflied chickens and the like.

All above looks good.  Just picked up a corned beef brisket flat which I will coat in a pepper rub and smoke...fake pastrami, but its still fantastic!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 10, 2009, 09:58:59 AM
I'm a BBQ nut myself.  Lately I've been doing more direct or indirect grilling, steaks and butterflied chickens and the like.

All above looks good.  Just picked up a corned beef brisket flat which I will coat in a pepper rub and smoke...fake pastrami, but its still fantastic!

I was wondering when you were going to make your way over here, nic.  Cheers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 10, 2009, 10:57:42 AM
I'm a BBQ nut myself.  Lately I've been doing more direct or indirect grilling, steaks and butterflied chickens and the like.

All above looks good.  Just picked up a corned beef brisket flat which I will coat in a pepper rub and smoke...fake pastrami, but its still fantastic!

Yeah Nick...I just broke in the Weber 22.5" Gold One Touch this past weekend. I grilled your typical burgers and dogs...but I also grilled a spatchcocked chicken that was marinated in Pride of the Deer CampBBQ (complements of Jeff Smith) and used my standard dry rub. I indirect grilled the chicken. It turned out fantastic.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 10, 2009, 12:08:25 PM
Yeah, I used to direct grill spatchcocked chickens (lid on), I guess sort of "living dangerously" as it were.  They tended to come out pretty well and had that unique direct grilled taste.  However, I have become more moderate of late and am indirect grilling them, they come out better I think that way.

Next up...spatchcocked partially deboned turkey!  That should be a nice challenge.  Not sure whether I should do that on the WSM or the kettle.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 10, 2009, 12:11:57 PM
Yeah, I used to direct grill spatchcocked chickens (lid on), I guess sort of "living dangerously" as it were.  They tended to come out pretty well and had that unique direct grilled taste.  However, I have become more moderate of late and am indirect grilling them, they come out better I think that way.

Next up...spatchcocked partially deboned turkey!  That should be a nice challenge.  Not sure whether I should do that on the WSM or the kettle.

I say WSM for the turkey. Smoked turkey is awesome...or if you prefer the kettle...I would use your smokenator.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on November 11, 2009, 08:13:37 AM
Mmmmmmmmmm!  BBQ and beer!  What else needs to be said? ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 11, 2009, 09:23:36 AM
There's a BBQ joint in Syracuse, NY that I've performed at some years ago called Dinosaur BBQ.

(http://www.cmacevents.com/images/DinoLogo250.gif)

(http://alloveralbany.com/images/dinosaur_syracuse_exterior.jpg)

http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/

They make some of the best Q north of the Mason-Dixon line and their ribs are top notch.

They also make a BBQ sauce that is out of this world.

(http://gourmetmagic.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000001/DR_BBQue.jpg)

You can actually order it from their website.

http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/browseProducts.php?cat=1

The line is always out the door.

So...if you are ever up in New York State...near Syracuse...stop in and have some of the best BBQ New York has to offer while washing it down with some beer and listening to some great blues!  8)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on November 11, 2009, 03:42:48 PM
We usually do a huge smokey BBQ feast around Xmas. We do it to get together with the fam. and friends that will be out of town for Xmas.

Sort of a high winter thing.

Ill be sure to get some pics on here.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 12, 2009, 05:40:11 AM
Beer is a great addition to a BBQ marinade or sauce, but the one flavor that I really love in a BBQ mop sauce is Jack Daniels. I'll add it to my basic BBQ sauce. It has a flavor that lends itself well to smokey Q. Here's another southern recipe.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/bbqsaucemarinade/r/blbb227.htm
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 16, 2009, 08:27:23 PM
This is how one should not light a bbq grill.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GeRB1p9PVDY&feature=related
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:00:32 AM
Grilled Romaine (i used a Big Green Egg, but you can sub any other cooker)

Ingredients:
2 Romaine Hearts
Olive oil
Parmesian Cheese
Salt & Pepper
Italian Seasoning

Instructions:

Cut the Romaine Hearts down the middle. Pull off any loose external leaves. You want a small tight bunch. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh parmesian cheese. Push some cheese into the folds of the leaves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and whatever spices you like. Put into the fridge to keep these nice and cold. Take out at the last minute.
After grilling your meat, steak, etc., crank up the heat and flames in your Green Egg. Put the Romaine Hearts face up on the grill for 2 minutes, then flip over for a few minutes. It will make your grill a bit messy, so leave the heat up to burn off that cheese.

Serve immediately. I dont add any extra dressing, but a bit of Italian or Remolaude dressing is nice.





Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:00:40 AM
Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:02:28 AM
Grilled Potato's

Ingredients:

5 Medium Potato's thinly sliced
1 Medium Onion..(I used Vidalia) sliced
6 Tbs butter or margarine
1/3 Cup shredded cheddar cheese
2 Tbs fresh minced parsley
1 Tbs Worchestershire sauce
1/3 Cup Chicken broth
Salt and pepper added later to taste.

Instructions:

Place the potato and onion in a sheet of heavy duty aluminum foil about 20 x 20 inchs, and dot with butter.
Combine the cheese and parsley,Worchestershire sauce,salt, and pepper, and sprinkle over potato's. Fold foil upward around the tater's and add broth. Seal the edges of the foil well.
Grill, covered, over medium heat (250-300 in the BGE) for 25-40 minutes or untill the potato's are tender.

Yield is 4 to 6 servings.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:05:28 AM
(ok, this isn't que, but it's one of my favorite recipes of all time)

eggplant slices, tomatoes and mozzarella (aka THA BOMB)

Ingredients:

2 or 3 medium round eggplants
flour for dredging
4 round tomatoes, sliced
2 anchovy fillets, chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
sliced mozzarella
1/2 cup basil, chopped
vegetable oil
olive oil
1 teaspoon white vinegar
salt and pepper to taste

Instructions: slice eggplants. dredge eggplant slices in flour and fry in plenty of vegetable oil. do not allow to get too crisp. remove eggplant slices from oil and place on paper towel to drain.

oil a baking dish and place in 1 slice of eggplant at a time. on each slice of eggplant place a slice of tomato and a thin slice of mozzarella. place the next slice of eggplant halfway over the previous slice and continue until the bottom of the dish is covered. the eggplant should be so staggered that half of the previous slice is exposed. bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes.

in a saucepan heat 1/2 cup olive oil. add finely chopped anchovies, garlic, basil, vinegar, salt and pepper. stir well to dissolve anchovies. remove from heat.

remove eggplant slices frmo the oven and immediately pour on sauce. allow to cool slightly. eggplant may also be served cold.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:06:54 AM
Atomic Buffalo Turds (ABT's)

INGREDIENTS:
12 3-3 1/2 Inch Jalapenos - fresh
1 8 Ozs Pkg. Cream Cheese
12 Ozs. Bacon (regular sliced-NOT thick sliced)
1 Package Smoked Cocktail Wieners (Lil' Smokeys)  (you can substitute any meat here )
Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express rub  (or your favorite seasoning)
Wood Chunks (Apple, Hickory, or Guava Wood work well)




Procedure:
1 Wash, remove stems and halve jalapenos lengthwise. Only cut the stem off, don't cut
2 the end of jalapeno off to remove the stem. If the jalapenos are pretty fresh. you can
3 pull the stems off fairly easy. Remove seeds and veins (leave veins in if you would
4 like a hotter ABT).
5 Fill jalapeno halves with cream cheese, then top with a cocktail wiener. Put the two
6 halves together and wrap the whole thing with a piece of bacon. Secure each end of
7 the bacon with a toothpick.
8 Sprinkle a liberal amount of DP Red Eye Express rub all over the surface of the
9 bacon.
10 Stabilize grill at 350°.
11 Place a drip pan on regular grid to catch the drippings.
12 Put 2-3 chunks of wood on the coals and place ABT’s on the raised grid.
13 Cook about 45 minutes, then turn them over to crisp up bottom side of bacon, and
14 cook for an additional 15 minutes.
15 Allow to cool several minutes before serving.



(http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/1403/abt1.png) (http://img197.imageshack.us/i/abt1.png/)

(http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/8715/abt2.png) (http://img81.imageshack.us/i/abt2.png/)


photos borrowed from "rick's tropical delight".  thanks rick.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:07:57 AM
(http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/1970/december2007002ac9.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)


an older picture of some wings i did when i first got my BGE.  marinated them in texas pete's wing sauce for a few hours then did a light rinse and coated them with john henry's pecan rub.

reapplied the john henry's again the morning before putting them onto a 250 degree BGE for three and a half hours, indirect.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:08:38 AM
here's another older one.....


this was cooked on the mini egg.



filet mignon, asparagus (both with gorgonzola cheese (boar's head brand) and corn on the cob (my uncle's "pioneer growers").....

(http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/7130/steakn.jpg) (http://img188.imageshack.us/i/steakn.jpg/)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:10:06 AM
(http://img18.imageshack.us/img18/5787/december2007005.jpg) (http://img18.imageshack.us/i/december2007005.jpg/)



oh wait, that is beer pron.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:10:54 AM
(http://img9.imageshack.us/img9/6118/eats1.jpg) (http://img9.imageshack.us/i/eats1.jpg/)

(http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/7640/eats2.jpg) (http://img269.imageshack.us/i/eats2.jpg/)

(http://img268.imageshack.us/img268/9773/eats3.jpg) (http://img268.imageshack.us/i/eats3.jpg/)

(http://img252.imageshack.us/img252/2928/eats4.jpg) (http://img252.imageshack.us/i/eats4.jpg/)

(http://img149.imageshack.us/img149/8531/eats5.jpg) (http://img149.imageshack.us/i/eats5.jpg/)

(http://img223.imageshack.us/img223/9665/eats6.jpg) (http://img223.imageshack.us/i/eats6.jpg/)



the meal was much better than the pictures.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 07:11:46 AM
(http://img19.imageshack.us/img19/4088/kabobs.jpg) (http://img19.imageshack.us/i/kabobs.jpg/)


steak, chicken & pineapple kabobs with teriyaki sauce and dizzy pig pineapple head.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2009, 07:43:30 AM
Grilled Romaine (i used a Big Green Egg, but you can sub any other cooker)

Ingredients:
2 Romaine Hearts
Olive oil
Parmesian Cheese
Salt & Pepper
Italian Seasoning

Instructions:

Cut the Romaine Hearts down the middle. Pull off any loose external leaves. You want a small tight bunch. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh parmesian cheese. Push some cheese into the folds of the leaves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and whatever spices you like. Put into the fridge to keep these nice and cold. Take out at the last minute.
After grilling your meat, steak, etc., crank up the heat and flames in your Green Egg. Put the Romaine Hearts face up on the grill for 2 minutes, then flip over for a few minutes. It will make your grill a bit messy, so leave the heat up to burn off that cheese.

Serve immediately. I dont add any extra dressing, but a bit of Italian or Remolaude dressing is nice.


That sounds fantastic. There's one I need to try!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2009, 07:45:56 AM
Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Nice! Do you have any pics?

I love Balsamic...but the real aged vinegar is outstanding as opposed to the supermarket kind.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2009, 07:49:11 AM
Atomic Buffalo Turds (ABT's)

INGREDIENTS:
12 3-3 1/2 Inch Jalapenos - fresh
1 8 Ozs Pkg. Cream Cheese
12 Ozs. Bacon (regular sliced-NOT thick sliced)
1 Package Smoked Cocktail Wieners (Lil' Smokeys)  (you can substitute any meat here )
Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express rub  (or your favorite seasoning)
Wood Chunks (Apple, Hickory, or Guava Wood work well)




Procedure:
1 Wash, remove stems and halve jalapenos lengthwise. Only cut the stem off, don't cut
2 the end of jalapeno off to remove the stem. If the jalapenos are pretty fresh. you can
3 pull the stems off fairly easy. Remove seeds and veins (leave veins in if you would
4 like a hotter ABT).
5 Fill jalapeno halves with cream cheese, then top with a cocktail wiener. Put the two
6 halves together and wrap the whole thing with a piece of bacon. Secure each end of
7 the bacon with a toothpick.
8 Sprinkle a liberal amount of DP Red Eye Express rub all over the surface of the
9 bacon.
10 Stabilize grill at 350°.
11 Place a drip pan on regular grid to catch the drippings.
12 Put 2-3 chunks of wood on the coals and place ABT’s on the raised grid.
13 Cook about 45 minutes, then turn them over to crisp up bottom side of bacon, and
14 cook for an additional 15 minutes.
15 Allow to cool several minutes before serving.



(http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/1403/abt1.png) (http://img197.imageshack.us/i/abt1.png/)

(http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/8715/abt2.png) (http://img81.imageshack.us/i/abt2.png/)


photos borrowed from "rick's tropical delight".  thanks rick.

Well the name isn't exactly appealing.  ;D

But hotdamn!

I'm getting hungry now!

This is a must try! 8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 08:12:35 AM
went 2-1-2 on these at 250 degrees.... coated with some regular mustard... dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express, john henry pecan rub... an hour in foil with some sweet baby ray's... finishing them off with some sweet baby rays with some dizzy pig jamaican firewalk mixed in.... ought to go good with some southern pecan i think.

(http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/446/ribs2.jpg) (http://img517.imageshack.us/i/ribs2.jpg/)

(http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/9262/ribs1.jpg) (http://img255.imageshack.us/i/ribs1.jpg/)

(http://img338.imageshack.us/img338/2571/ribs3.jpg) (http://img338.imageshack.us/i/ribs3.jpg/)



.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 17, 2009, 08:13:09 AM
sorry, but i don't have pics on the computer of these.



Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Nice! Do you have any pics?

I love Balsamic...but the real aged vinegar is outstanding as opposed to the supermarket kind.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: akr71 on November 17, 2009, 08:14:23 AM
Beer is a great addition to a BBQ marinade or sauce, but the one flavor that I really love in a BBQ mop sauce is Jack Daniels. I'll add it to my basic BBQ sauce. It has a flavor that lends itself well to smokey Q. Here's another southern recipe.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/bbqsaucemarinade/r/blbb227.htm

How about BBQ sauce?  Should we start a new thread for homemade BBQ sauce or stick them here?  Beer always goes into my BBQ sauce - preferably a stout or brown ale.  Whisky or rye too if I've got it laying around and I deem it cheap enough to pour into a sauce.  Once I made a 'Mexican Maple' BBQ Sauce - liberal doses of Tequila & Maple Syrup and I jumped up the heat.

I'll post my entire recipe, but I imagine it would be better to dedicate a new thread for this.  I'd love to see what other folks put into their sauce.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2009, 09:00:08 AM
Beer is a great addition to a BBQ marinade or sauce, but the one flavor that I really love in a BBQ mop sauce is Jack Daniels. I'll add it to my basic BBQ sauce. It has a flavor that lends itself well to smokey Q. Here's another southern recipe.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/bbqsaucemarinade/r/blbb227.htm

How about BBQ sauce?  Should we start a new thread for homemade BBQ sauce or stick them here?  Beer always goes into my BBQ sauce - preferably a stout or brown ale.  Whisky or rye too if I've got it laying around and I deem it cheap enough to pour into a sauce.  Once I made a 'Mexican Maple' BBQ Sauce - liberal doses of Tequila & Maple Syrup and I jumped up the heat.

I'll post my entire recipe, but I imagine it would be better to dedicate a new thread for this.  I'd love to see what other folks put into their sauce.


Here's a previous post. I like to add some Bock beer to this one. Sometimes I'll add some Jack Daniels. Excellent sauce. A staple in my house.

Here's the BBQ guru Steven Raichlen's KC style BBQ Sauce recipe. I give it the bluesman's twist by adding some New Mexico chili powder to it. A fantastic all- around grilling sauce. Slather it on anythiing form babybacks to burgers.

Basic Barbecue Sauce Recipe
This is the type of sauce that most people in the United States think of as barbecue sauce: Brown sugar and molasses make it sweet; liquid smoke makes it smoky--there isn't a Kansas City pit boss around who wouldn't recognize it as local. Slather it on ribs and chicken, spoon it over pork shoulder, and serve it with anything else you may fancy. You won't be disappointed.

Makes about 2-1/2 cups


2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons prepared mustard
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon of your favorite barbecue rub
2 teaspoons liquid smoke
1/2 teaspoon black pepper


Combine all the ingredients in a nonreactive saucepan and bring slowly to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and gently simmer the sauce until dark, thick, and richly flavored, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the sauce to clean (or even sterile) jars and store in the refrigerator. It will keep for several months.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: akr71 on November 17, 2009, 10:25:41 AM
Here's my BBQ sauce.  I usually make it once or twice a year - I make a big batch & then can it in mason jars.  I start with homemade 'ketchup' - my wife & daughter love ketchup, but don't touch this stuff, so it all goes into the sauce.
Tomato Ketchup
     10 lb Tomato; totally ripe
      1    Bell pepper, red; seeded
           -& chopped
      4 lg Onion; chopped
  1 1/2 c  Vinegar, cider
      2    Garlic clove; crushed
      1 ts Peppercorns
      1 ts Allspice, whole
      1 ts Cloves, whole
      5    Cinnamon stick
      1 ts Celery seed
    1/2 t  Mustard, dry
    1/4 ts Cayenne
      4 T  Sugar, brown
      3 T  Sugar, white
      1 ts Salt

Cut tomatoes in quarters and puree them in food processor along with bell pepper. Strain puree through a coarse sieve to move skins and seeds. (You can dump the puree into a colander and work it through with your hands until there is nothing left in the colander but a dryish pulp of skins and seeds.  I save the pulp for later - see below)  Now puree onions, combine with tomato and pepper puree, and pour into a large stainless steel or enameled kettle.  Cook and stir occasionally over low heat until it is reduced by about a third and is considerably thicker. Meanwhile put garlic, peppercorns, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, and celery seed into the vinegar in a small pot and simmer covered for 1/2 hour to steep spices in the vinegar. Pour about half the spiced vinegar through a tea strainer into the thickened tomato mixture.  Stir. Also add sugar, mustard, cayenne, and salt at this point.  Here is where the tasting comes in.  You can adjust any of these ingredients to suit you.  You can add more spiced vinegar.  Or a little plain vinegar.  More or less sugar, mustard, cayenne.  Just sort of tinker with it.  Cook it some more, stirring often, until it looks like catsup should ook. Taste and adjust again.  You may notice that it looks slightly curdled.  Not to worry.  Hit it a lick in the food processor.  Smooths right out.

Next add some homemade pepper sauce - usually about a pint from the recipe below, but I've use Tobasco in a pinch.
Hot Sauce
Ingredients:
2 cups assorted chiles, freshly picked, cleaned, and stemmed (mostly red, but you can mix a few greenies in for spice...experiment with what you like, but "fleshier" chiles make a smoother sauce. Also, I leave the seeds intact....too much bother to take them out, and I think they add a nice flavor.)   I add about 2 or 3 tablespoons of the tomato pulp saved from the ketchup - it helps even out the color especially if you end up with a bunch of different colored peppers - brown pepper sauce is a little odd looking.
1 ts kosher salt
1/2 onion, red or white
Juice of 1/2 lime or lemon (I actually prefer lime, but only had lemon for this shoot)
3 large cloves Garlic
1 Cup White Vinegar, heated to almost boiling (turn your rangehood on for this one...fumes are pretty strong. I usually use the microwave for about 90 seconds....be careful though as vinegar boils sooner than water.)
Freshly ground black pepper
Put it all in a blender and puree until smooth.....may need to scrape it down a couple times.
Be careful when you take the lid off the blender....this stuff will burn your nosehairs out.
Cool, bottle, and age. You can start using it right away, but it will have a definite edge to it. Besides, it's still warm so it'll just be hot and salty. Makes about 3 cups of hot sauce.  After a night in the fridge, it's ready for using. As it ages, it will mellow and blend, but loses some heat. You'll find that when "fresh", it has a hard bite up front. But as it ages a week or so it's a nice overall heat that you'll love.

Now the tinkering begins! I reduce about 4 bottles of homebrew (stouts or brown ales preferred) and then add it to the ketchup along with Brown sugar (about 2 cups), soy sauce, Worstershire sauce, as much pepper sauce as you think it needs, marjoram, thyme, rosemary, more garlic.  Let it simmer and reduce.  Maple syrup/Molasses both work to sweeten and thicken it - corn syrup can be used to thicken it. Wait until near the end because the longer you have the syrup or molasses on the heat, the greater the chance you'll scortch it (I learned the hard way).

The ketchup, hotsauce and brown sugar is the base - every thing else is personal taste and each time it comes out a little different.  Although my wife says each time it gets better and better.  She hates when I make BBQ sauce because it takes the whole day, hates it more when we run out of the homemade stuff.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 17, 2009, 10:56:53 AM
Andy,

I am a BBQ and hot sauce fanatic. I like trying different styles of BBQ sauce. There are twelve different kinds of sauces, categorized by region.

1. Kansas City Sweet Sauce - probably my favorite.
2. South Carolina Mustard Sauce - great with pork.
3. East Caroilina Mop Sauce - speaks for itself. mop it on!
4. Lexington Dip (a.k.a.Western Carolina or Piedmont Dip)
5. Texas Mop Sauce - another great sauce!
6. Tennessee Whiskey Sauce - I love Jack Daniels in my sauces.
7. Louisiana Hot Sauce - an American staple
8. Memphis Dry Rub - can you say ribs!
9. Fruit Sauces
10. Sweet Glazes
11. Novelty Sauces

There is probably as many variations and iterations of each style that you could spend the rest of your life studying.

An american creation tracing back to Christopher Columbus.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: akr71 on November 18, 2009, 06:50:01 AM
There is a sauce thread now - I apologize for the interruption - back to your regularly scheduled programming  :-[

& I'll get back to drooling over those tasty pics, even though its only 10am...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 18, 2009, 08:37:44 AM
went 2-1-2 on these at 250 degrees.... coated with some regular mustard... dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express, john henry pecan rub... an hour in foil with some sweet baby ray's... finishing them off with some sweet baby rays with some dizzy pig jamaican firewalk mixed in.... ought to go good with some southern pecan i think.

Man those ribs look finger smackin' delicious!

I am going to try 3-2-1 on my next batch in the chimney water smoker.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 18, 2009, 10:16:37 AM
went 2-1-2 on these at 250 degrees.... coated with some regular mustard... dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express, john henry pecan rub... an hour in foil with some sweet baby ray's... finishing them off with some sweet baby rays with some dizzy pig jamaican firewalk mixed in.... ought to go good with some southern pecan i think.

Man those ribs look finger smackin' delicious!

I am going to try 3-2-1 on my next batch in the chimney water smoker.  8)



some of the best i've done.  i wish i had some now!!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 18, 2009, 10:48:51 AM
went 2-1-2 on these at 250 degrees.... coated with some regular mustard... dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express, john henry pecan rub... an hour in foil with some sweet baby ray's... finishing them off with some sweet baby rays with some dizzy pig jamaican firewalk mixed in.... ought to go good with some southern pecan i think.
Man those ribs look finger smackin' delicious!
I am going to try 3-2-1 on my next batch in the chimney water smoker.  8)
some of the best i've done.  i wish i had some now!!!!

me 2.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on November 18, 2009, 10:53:00 AM
Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Nice! Do you have any pics?

I love Balsamic...but the real aged vinegar is outstanding as opposed to the supermarket kind.


It better be for $10 an ounce. :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 18, 2009, 12:05:37 PM
Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Nice! Do you have any pics?

I love Balsamic...but the real aged vinegar is outstanding as opposed to the supermarket kind.


It better be for $10 an ounce. :D



if you have a local "tuesday morning", check there.  good stuff for good prices.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2009, 10:51:45 AM
I made 14 pounds of fresh Kielbasa yesterday.  :o   Sorry I didn't take any photos. I won't let it happen again.

14lbs Pork Butt (shoulder) deboned and chunked
1/3 cup coarse Kosher salt
1.4oz. Fresh ground black pepper
6 cloves fresh pressed garlic
2tsp mustard seed
1 1/2 cups cold water
marinate overnight in seasonings
ground into sausage casings

...I smoked some of it on my Weber OTG Kettle with some hickory and it turned out excellent.

I smoked it indirect over one full chimney worth of charcoal briquettes with the vents wide open until the internal temp of the Kielbasa reached 170F.  8)



Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on November 30, 2009, 02:14:30 PM
 I find it fascinating that there are so many sauces/mops. For every person that makes BBQ there is a recipe. There must be millions.

 I read about a fellow once that studied sauces just in the N.C./S.C. area and found 30 distinct varieties alone in these two states ( I tried to find the article again but can't seem to locate it). Each region has it's own.

 In the Southeast its going to be pork. Very, very rarely do you find beef BBQ and occasionally chicken, but the pork shoulder rules; unless , of course, you're doing the whole pig.

  Thankfully I was raised on the mustard/vinegar based sauces. You have to travel 50 miles or so from here before you start running into the tomato based stuff.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on May 07, 2010, 01:01:29 PM
It's time to revive the BBQ thread.  I'm doing brisket this weekend (7lbs).  I'm going to split it between two marinades.  I'll post the recipes after I finish.  Both will be smoked with hickory.  The first will be my standard red wine, worcestershire, cayenne marinade, and the second will be something else.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 07, 2010, 02:04:31 PM
Have I ever told you about the" Pride of the Deer Camp" marinade. It's a great all around marinade (beef, pork, poulty or wild game) and can be stored in the pantry for the long term. It's also very adaptable to other spices and flavors. I like to use a blend of Hickory, Apple and Oak for my brisket. I may be smoking one for Mother's Day.

Here's the basic recipe:

2 qt water
1 1/2 c  brown sugar
1 1/2 c  Worcestershire
1 1/2 c  yellow mustard
1 qt catsup
1/2 c  black pepper
1/2 c  red pepper
3 qt red wine vinegar
1 qt white wine
1 1/2 c  salt
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on May 07, 2010, 06:55:10 PM
Looks good Ron.     Here's what's cookin'down Cecuk County way,

One  is done like this,

Wet marinade
One cup Merlot.
Two tblsp. worchestershire
Two tblsp chili powder
1 tblsp garlic powder.
salt
fresh ground pepper

One is done like this, my daughter's idea, she hasn't steered me wrong yet ;) would have liked to use Hungarian paprika, but I don't have any at present.

Dry rub
Kosher salt
Fresh gound pepper
brown sugar ( probably a half cup)
Spanish paprika (~2 tblsp)

Both let sit overnight and smoked for two hours with hickory at 200F and slow roasted at 250F for 6 hours.

Pics and comments tomorrow.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on May 08, 2010, 01:41:29 PM
Just put a rack of ribs in the fridge to cure.

Dry rubbed with:

Kosher salt
Applewood smoke (flavored I assume) ground black pepper
paprika
onion powder
brown sugar

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 08, 2010, 02:07:53 PM
Got the pig this morning.  ;D
Pictures tomorrow.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Hokerer on May 08, 2010, 04:50:38 PM
Just put a rack of ribs in the fridge to cure.

Dry rubbed with:

Kosher salt
Applewood smoke (flavored I assume) ground black pepper
paprika
onion powder
brown sugar



Just finished up 3 racks of baby backs.  My dry rub has a bit more in it...

salt, pepper, paprika, cumin, thyme, oregano, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne, brown sugar and might be something else but I can't remember.

Tried apple wood chips this time.  Tasty!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on May 08, 2010, 05:22:11 PM
Sure ya cant remember...sure ya cant.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 10, 2010, 03:15:04 PM
Yesterday's lunch
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/S-iErFgGKLI/AAAAAAAAAMA/BBuLlOeSkv4/s800/HPIM2814.JPG)
This is about two hours into it, people came, there were drinks, there's no more pictures.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on May 10, 2010, 03:53:59 PM
Wow two hours in looks fairly rare!!!!

Hope you gave it a bit more fire!    ;D 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 10, 2010, 04:12:18 PM
Wow two hours in looks fairly rare!!!!

Hope you gave it a bit more fire!    ;D 

Nah, it was as white as a computer guy when I started. It just started getting color when I snapped this, the blood under the skin faded and it started looking less like a CSI corpse and more like lunch.

A little over 5 hours total, it came out pretty good. Should have been closer to 4 hours. It was a 65 pound (hanging weight) pig, meaning it probably finished up in the low 40's once it was prepped.

I just didn't get the crispy skin at the end, otherwise it was awesome. I'll have to throw on some wood and get some real flames going for the last 20-30 minutes next time.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on May 10, 2010, 04:21:20 PM
You can use a blow torch to crispy the skin. Either before or after cooking. Works great, just have to get the hand of it.

I am going to do a whole goat or pig for my daughters B-day in August. I want a goat the wife wants a pig. If I do the pig I am just going to get it from the Italian market pre cooked, they do it perfect every time.. I will have like 50-75 people this year so it will have to be a big one.

IF I do a goat gonna roast it myself, Ill use a halal goat.

How many people did that pig feed?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on May 10, 2010, 04:46:28 PM
You gonna slaughter the goat halal-style yourself?

Of course being a non-moslem, assuming you are a non-moslem, which is a safe bet from your openness towards roasting a whole pig, it might not strictly be halal when done by your hand, anyway.  Forget all the rules of that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 10, 2010, 04:48:08 PM
You're supposed to get 2 pounds per guest. Not that they'll actually eat it, that's taking into account bones and stuff too. Unsure of whose rule that is exactly, but it would be embarrassing to run out of food at a party after you went to all that trouble. I only had 12 people, so there's lots of leftovers. Could have easily had a few more families over.

Look at my spit - it's a dual. The coal pan would sit in the middle. One fire, two animals. You can do a pig and a goat and everyone is happy. And I don't know what your Italian market is like; but I can't imagine it being as good as just pulled off the spit.

Blow torch would be cheating. Gotta learn to do it properly!


How much does your market charge per pound for the finished pig?





Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on May 10, 2010, 04:52:12 PM
Nah, not gonna do it myself. Reeshnu my local halal butcher will do it. I think, unless they get whole goats in already slaughtered. Not sure. Hes a muslilim though, so no worries there.

If we do pig, all bets are off.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 10, 2010, 04:59:53 PM
You gonna slaughter the goat halal-style yourself?

Of course being a non-moslem, assuming you are a non-moslem, which is a safe bet from your openness towards roasting a whole pig, it might not strictly be halal when done by your hand, anyway.  Forget all the rules of that.

My understanding is it's all about the kill. So you can have two goats from the same farm, end up one halal - the other not depending on the processor. So the meat isn't any better one way or another - is it?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on May 10, 2010, 05:03:48 PM
I think the wife said its under a dollar a lb.

Ah man, Im talking about THE Italian market. There is a place there called Canullis house of pork. Very fresh, their pigs are hot off the coals and delivered to your door. They have a van that is just for delivering whole roast pigs. They are perfect every time. I dont know how they do it, crispy skin, real juicy meat. I have been at some parties were the pig was ruined.

I wanted to get a whole pig live while my father in law is here, he knows how to break down and process a pig. We were going to do it old country style cure some of it up and cold smoke, make some klobasa, you know. Maybe next year.

I dont think the blow torch is cheating. The last pig I did was perfect in every way except for the skin. I dragged the oxy/ acetylene with the rose bud tip from the truck and fired the whole thing at about 12 inches away. Made the skin and layered fat underneath come up like bacon.  
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on May 10, 2010, 05:06:28 PM
You gonna slaughter the goat halal-style yourself?

Of course being a non-moslem, assuming you are a non-moslem, which is a safe bet from your openness towards roasting a whole pig, it might not strictly be halal when done by your hand, anyway.  Forget all the rules of that.

My understanding is it's all about the kill. So you can have two goats from the same farm, end up one halal - the other not depending on the processor. So the meat isn't any better one way or another - is it?

No better at all, its just a bunch of hugger mugger. Just that I have a butcher near by that has lots of good fresh stuff cheap. They dont care that I am an infidel and I dont care that they are Muslim, thats all.

Said that I can get a whole goat 75-8o lbs. for 50-60 dollars.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 10, 2010, 05:20:04 PM

I dont think the blow torch is cheating.

I didn't say I wouldn't eat it. ;D  I'm just saying, for me to claim 100% success - I gotta pull it off utilizing the fire.
And man that's cheap out there. I paid a buck a pound, and then a processing fee. 65 pound pig, 45 processing...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on May 10, 2010, 08:33:05 PM
Im sorry, I misunderstood the wife. She has it written down and it would be about a $3 per lb boned ans stuffed. Less if it is just roasted whole and even less if you roast it yourself.  Maybe I will roast it myself.

Ill post the exact price if I do it.

The problem getting it crispy perfect for me is on an open fire. To close and it burns to far away and it wont get the golden crispyness.

Guess you could lower it down close to the fire for the last hour or so. Have to keep and eye on it then so it doesn't burn.

I have heard people say you have to torch it before you roast it, both to remove all of the stray hairs and to crispy up the skin and lock in all of the juices. I actually think it is better to torch it after it is done.

We have a friend that does pigs in a converted heating oil tank. Makes like a big closed oven. They come out great. Not like Canulli's though. They baste theirs with garlic or something. My mouth waters just thinking about it.

http://www.cannulismeats.com/

Some good tips on their whole roast pig page.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 11, 2010, 06:18:37 AM
That's still a great price. $6/lb is the going rate here for a roasted pig.
I look at it like it's a game. Any way it comes out, I had fun. The closer I get to that perfection the happier I am.
Not much different than with beer, if you taste it an say I could tweak it just this way next time for that perfect beer...

Since you can weld - you can come up with your own Rube Goldberg Spit. Where the horizontal frame can travel up and down to raise and lower the pig from the coal bed. Huge screws, pulleys, gears, motors - it'll be great! Then you can get that perfect skin every time - and since you're not using a torch it's not cheating.  ;D

Even when it does come out perfect though, usually the only skin that gets eaten is around the ribs, maybe a bit further out but the strays are usually legs, snout, head. Doesn't bother me if the rest is barber shop smooth. But I guess if you want a perfect presentation...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 11, 2010, 07:12:04 AM
The secret is "low and slow". It's time and temperature. No matter which method one uses the temp must be constant to achieve great results. I like them smoked the best. Barrel smokers are great because you can maintain pretty consistent temps and they make great smokers. The temp should remain at 225F +/- 25F. A clean porker is a happy porker. The three methods are the grill, the rotissereie or the rock-lined pit.

Here's a good reference.

http://www.askthemeatman.com/roasting_a_whole_hog_in_3_steps.htm
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 11, 2010, 08:16:30 AM
I'm going to a whole hog smoke on May 22.  I was asked to smoke some ribs for the event, so I'm going to do some Jamaican Jerk baby backs with Raichlen's Rumbullion sauce.  I'll also be bringing my portable kegerator with a keg of my Oberon clone.  Should be a ton of fun!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 11, 2010, 12:14:15 PM
Here's a good reference.

http://www.3men.com/spitroasting.htm (http://www.3men.com/spitroasting.htm)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 11, 2010, 12:20:12 PM
I'm going to a whole hog smoke on May 22.  I was asked to smoke some ribs

I'm surprised they asked you to bring pork to a hog roast.  :-\  I'da asked for something different, you know - for variety. The Oberon clone is definitely a nice touch, sounds like you're kicking off party season right!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 11, 2010, 12:32:41 PM
I'm going to a whole hog smoke on May 22.  I was asked to smoke some ribs

I'm surprised they asked you to bring pork to a hog roast.  :-\  I'da asked for something different, you know - for variety. The Oberon clone is definitely a nice touch, sounds like you're kicking off party season right!

I know the ribs are a little redundant, but there will also be brisket and some grilled meats.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 11, 2010, 01:25:30 PM

I know the ribs are a little redundant, but there will also be brisket and some grilled meats.

Coulda been a theme party. Pork, pork and nothing but pork!  ;D
And besides, your ribs will be a totally different texture and flavor than the whole hog ribs.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 11, 2010, 01:38:22 PM
here are some of my recent cooks....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/78f63625.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e96244f6.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/11871c53.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f5c8fced.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/40017ee4.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f105946a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e376db6b.jpg)

pulled beef

cooked at 250 to 160 internal then put the bacon on the bottom of the dutch oven with the chuck roasts on top and cooked covered at 300 to 215.  pulled beef, added back juices from dutch oven (sans oil) and 1/3 cup maple syrup and 2/3 cup water and put back on the egg for about an hour.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 11, 2010, 01:40:04 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/cf05465c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2b4b7708.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6ca1bda2.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 11, 2010, 01:42:38 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ac64936c.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 11, 2010, 01:43:03 PM
Here's a good reference.

http://www.3men.com/spitroasting.htm (http://www.3men.com/spitroasting.htm)

Another good one for sure!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 11, 2010, 01:44:29 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ac64936c.jpg)

Now that's what I'm talking about!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 11, 2010, 01:48:45 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/df1c95e5.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/467cc839.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a96a7b58.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6519a9a1.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 11, 2010, 02:17:36 PM
As mouth watering as those hunks of meat look, the peppers look pretty tasty too. We char them black, peel the skin, and then toss em in salt, minced garlic, and a little oil. (maybe a splash of vinegar if you're in the mood)

I always ask... is the egg worth it(to you)? Would you buy it again. Do you think you could cook as good without it?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 11, 2010, 03:26:03 PM
As mouth watering as those hunks of meat look, the peppers look pretty tasty too. We char them black, peel the skin, and then toss em in salt, minced garlic, and a little oil. (maybe a splash of vinegar if you're in the mood)

I always ask... is the egg worth it(to you)? Would you buy it again. Do you think you could cook as good without it?

completely worth it and i don't know what i'd do without it.  i have a large and a mini and i'm about to buy a medium.

and there is no way i could cook without it.  it has about 80% replaced my entire kitchen.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: EHall on May 11, 2010, 05:01:17 PM
If any of you have never tried pecan wood, you should definately give it a go.... its brings an awsome sweetness to anything you cook over it. Grilled or smoked. Its also with salmon.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 11, 2010, 05:12:38 PM
If any of you have never tried pecan wood, you should definately give it a go.... its brings an awsome sweetness to anything you cook over it. Grilled or smoked. Its also with salmon.

That is one I need to try. I am on the lookout for it. I have seen so many recipes using it.

Thanks for the reminder!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 11, 2010, 05:16:17 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/df1c95e5.jpg)

Man I bet the Weazel's mouth is watering as I post this. Those bacon wrapped scallops are awesome. I like smoking a pork loin wrapped in bacon. It always comes out super tender and presents really well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 12, 2010, 05:07:36 AM
If any of you have never tried pecan wood, you should definately give it a go.... its brings an awsome sweetness to anything you cook over it. Grilled or smoked. Its also with salmon.

I love pecan wood.  I bought about 10 lbs of it last year for smoking Jamaican-style BBQ, since it's supposed to be relatively similar to pimento wood (the wood of the allspice tree that is native to Jamaica).  I've also used it with great results in smoking baby backs with a more traditional BBQ flavor profile.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 12, 2010, 05:35:13 PM
I feel like the Forrest Gump of Pork. How many ways can one eat leftover pig roast?  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 12, 2010, 06:28:03 PM
I feel like the Forrest Gump of Pork. How many ways can one eat leftover pig roast?  :)

Pork....The other white meat.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 18, 2010, 06:06:14 PM
So to fully appreciate the differences in gas vs charcoal (lump)....
Last night I cracked the cryopac on some arrachera and after cleaning it up (and losing about a third of the total weight) I immediately grilled (propane) the thinnest portions for dinner last night. Salt and pepper only. It was....OK. Tonight after everything sat overnight, doused in salt, pepper and a shot of soy sauce I threw it on the weber grill with hot lump charcoal somewhere between orange hot and ash-y grey. Hot greyish meat vs a dark reddish, aromatic hunk of beef. What a difference.
Never had the same thing back to back; off the two different grills. Propane sucks!  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 19, 2010, 03:49:56 AM
So to fully appreciate the differences in gas vs charcoal (lump)....
Last night I cracked the cryopac on some arrachera and after cleaning it up (and losing about a third of the total weight) I immediately grilled (propane) the thinnest portions for dinner last night. Salt and pepper only. It was....OK. Tonight after everything sat overnight, doused in salt, pepper and a shot of soy sauce I threw it on the weber grill with hot lump charcoal somewhere between orange hot and ash-y grey. Hot greyish meat vs a dark reddish, aromatic hunk of beef. What a difference.
Never had the same thing back to back; off the two different grills. Propane sucks!  ;)

I have a Weber Genesis Silver gas grill that I like for it's convenience, but it doesn't stand up to the great flavor of good old fashioned charcoal grilling on my Weber Gold One Touch. I very much prefer to grill on charcoal anyday over gas.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 19, 2010, 05:54:48 AM
i know a lot of guys who, once they switch to lump charcoal start to used their big gassers to store their bbq gear in.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: weazletoe on May 23, 2010, 08:31:38 AM
Bacon, beer and BBQ in one thread. Now I miss my grills as much as I miss my brewing equipment. Man do I want some ribs.  :'(
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 25, 2010, 09:30:38 AM
The order of the day was Smoked Beef Brisket.

I used Steven Raichlen's dry rub overnight then marinated for a few hours in "Pride of the Deer Camp BBQ"
I used Apple, Oak and Hickory. Smoked for three hours then wrapped in Aluminum foil for two more hours.

It turned out excellent!

Tender and tasty!

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/004d287b.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on May 25, 2010, 09:40:54 AM
The order of the day was Smoked Beef Brisket.

I used Steven Raichlens dry rub overnight then marinated for a few hours in "Pride of the Deer Camp BBQ"
I used Apple, Oak and Hickory. Smoked for three hours then wrapped in Aluminum foil for two more hours.

It turned out excellent!

Tender and tasty!

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/004d287b.jpg)


Yum!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 25, 2010, 10:45:21 AM
Smoked for three hours then wrapped in Aluminum foil for two more hours.

So, 3-2-1 is just for ribs then?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 25, 2010, 11:27:31 AM
Smoked for three hours then wrapped in Aluminum foil for two more hours.

So, 3-2-1 is just for ribs then?

Pretty much the case as a general rule. I could have benefited by an additional hour of smoke, but I ran out of time.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: mikeypedersen on May 25, 2010, 11:41:05 AM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/df1c95e5.jpg)
Hey, what type of rub/seasoning did you use with the scallops?  Man, those look good!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 25, 2010, 11:48:21 AM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/df1c95e5.jpg)
Hey, what type of rub/seasoning did you use with the scallops?  Man, those look good!

sea salt
pepper
olive oil
dizzy pig tsunami spin
dizzy pig dizzy dust

(i love all the dizzy pig seasonings.)

http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 25, 2010, 01:51:48 PM

Pretty much the case as a general rule. I could have benefited by an additional hour of smoke, but I ran out of time.

And then at the end of it all, I go back to foil and let it sit in the smallest cooler (preheated with hot water) that it will all fit in for about an hour. It makes a huge difference.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: richardt on May 26, 2010, 06:35:55 PM
Doesn't matter what time of day I see those pics--I get hungry!

As if we ever needed to justify grilling and beer drinking.  See this link
http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/5-tricks-to-grill-your-way-to-better-health-1464885/ (http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/5-tricks-to-grill-your-way-to-better-health-1464885/)

Marinate meats. Marinating can reduce HCA formation by as much as 92 to 99 percent, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). One study in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry showed that marinating red meat in beer or wine for two hours significantly reduced HCAs. Scientists believe the antioxidants in these marinades block HCAs from forming.

also posted this on ethnic cooking.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 27, 2010, 05:39:06 PM
made some abt's tonight....

50/50 ground beef and pork
1/3 less fat philly cream cheese
bbq rub
bacon
jalapenos

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e0e1eaab.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1fd9a3e1.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3181a6d1.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ce995fa3.jpg)


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 27, 2010, 06:44:44 PM
That's some really fine looking Q my friend. Nice pics Great with beer I'll bet...

What time and temp (ball park) do you like to grill them for?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 27, 2010, 07:10:45 PM
That's some really fine looking Q my friend. Nice pics Great with beer I'll bet...

What time and temp (ball park) do you like to grill them for?


i cook them white hot coal until the bacon is crispy.  that seems to work perfectly. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: brewmonkeys on May 27, 2010, 08:22:49 PM
Just did my first pork butt with homebrew porter glaze.  To die for!  Sorry no pics.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 28, 2010, 06:08:57 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2287f4ef.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a06a9cf9.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/99fb4a80.jpg)

steak, chicken, portabello mushrooms, bell peppers, tomatoes, zucchini/squash hybrid
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 28, 2010, 06:44:18 PM

steak, chicken, portabello mushrooms, bell peppers, tomatoes, zucchini/squash hybrid

Food looks great, but I'm actually more interested in the wire skewers. They clean up OK? I saw them, looked like they were braided wire and wondered about cleanup.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: mikeypedersen on May 29, 2010, 07:37:38 AM
Rubbed these spare ribs after work last night.  Just put them in the smoker with an 80/20 mix of Hickory and Maple. 

(http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/23428214/sn/2000247420/name/2010-05-29+08.15.37.jpg)

Doin' the old 3-2-1 so they'll get 3 hours of smoke then get foiled, then lightly sauced and finished off for an hour.  Can't wait for dinner tonight!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 29, 2010, 07:44:32 AM
A good IPA will be in order for that!

Looks and sounds tasty for sure.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 29, 2010, 07:46:46 AM

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/99fb4a80.jpg)

steak, chicken, portabello mushrooms, bell peppers, tomatoes, zucchini/squash hybrid

Awesome job on those kebobs...my mouth is watering.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 29, 2010, 02:23:45 PM
Bird.

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/TAGFrr7vgmI/AAAAAAAAAMc/MGuPimA1I8k/s800/HPIM2821.JPG)

Best pic I could get with all the smoke. 5.5hrs on, then wrapped in foil and sitting in the cooler about an hour. I know it'll kinda wreck the skin but waiting for the bread to finish.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on May 29, 2010, 04:08:21 PM

steak, chicken, portabello mushrooms, bell peppers, tomatoes, zucchini/squash hybrid

Food looks great, but I'm actually more interested in the wire skewers. They clean up OK? I saw them, looked like they were braided wire and wondered about cleanup.

they clean up great.  i actually haven't even had food stick to them.   
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on May 31, 2010, 12:52:59 PM
10lb pork butt this weekend:

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs578.snc3/31496_431340024459_545709459_5479320_3522975_n.jpg)

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs538.ash1/31496_431340039459_545709459_5479321_4063748_n.jpg)

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs578.snc3/31496_431340044459_545709459_5479322_897530_n.jpg)

This weekend was my first overnight cook on my new UDS, and my first mostly unattended cook.  16 hours (without adding more fuel) at 225F with pecan, then wrapped it up for 2 hours until pulling and serving with homemade coleslaw, cornbread, carolina vinegar sauce, and carolina mustard sauce.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on May 31, 2010, 03:29:42 PM
10lb pork butt this weekend:

This weekend was my first overnight cook on my new UDS, and my first mostly unattended cook.  16 hours (without adding more fuel) at 225F with pecan, then wrapped it up for 2 hours until pulling and serving with homemade coleslaw, cornbread, carolina vinegar sauce, and carolina mustard sauce.

Carolina mustard sauce - Upstate style I hope and home made ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on May 31, 2010, 03:42:08 PM
Quote from: tubercle
Carolina mustard sauce - Upstate style I hope and home made ;D

I am an ignorant Canadian, so I have no idea what "upstate style" means, but yes it was a homemade mustard sauce.  First time making it as well (in the past, I've only made a vinegar sauce), and the whole family thought it was fantastic.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on May 31, 2010, 04:09:40 PM
There are about 6 distinct styles of BBQ sauce in the Carolinas in 3 major categories. Tomato based, vinegar based and mustard based.

 In the upstate of South Carolina we prefer the mustard based. Mustard thinned with a bit of vinegar and some sweetness added with honey or molasses and whole lot of black pepper. If you really want to do it right, puree a peach for the sweet part.

 You know its right when you buddy takes a bite and just nods and mumbles "damn!" while chewing a mouth full.


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 31, 2010, 04:44:00 PM
Baby backs with a southwest-style rub, homemade coleslaw, and beans.  Sorry for the artsy photo.  I was trying out a new iPhone App!

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/photo2-1.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on May 31, 2010, 05:58:04 PM

This weekend was my first overnight cook on my new UDS, ...  16 hours (without adding more fuel) at 225F

That's awesome dude! Another UDS on the planet!
How much fuel to go 16 hrs?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on May 31, 2010, 07:03:50 PM
In the upstate of South Carolina we prefer the mustard based. Mustard thinned with a bit of vinegar and some sweetness added with honey or molasses and whole lot of black pepper. If you really want to do it right, puree a peach for the sweet part.

You know its right when you buddy takes a bite and just nods and mumbles "damn!" while chewing a mouth full.

I used this recipe:

1 cup prepared yellow mustard
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon cayenne

I doubt the balsamic is at all traditional in any sort of sauce, but it was "damn" good!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on May 31, 2010, 07:06:54 PM
Quote from: beerocd
That's awesome dude! Another UDS on the planet!
How much fuel to go 16 hrs?

I figure I used about 12-15lbs.  Just cleaned out the UDS, and there is still a good bit left in the basket.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on June 01, 2010, 05:52:22 AM
In the upstate of South Carolina we prefer the mustard based. Mustard thinned with a bit of vinegar and some sweetness added with honey or molasses and whole lot of black pepper. If you really want to do it right, puree a peach for the sweet part.

You know its right when you buddy takes a bite and just nods and mumbles "damn!" while chewing a mouth full.

I used this recipe:

1 cup prepared yellow mustard
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon cayenne

I doubt the balsamic is at all traditional in any sort of sauce, but it was "damn" good!

  That looks like a great recipe. I'm going to use it on my next BBQ. I prefer balsamic vinegar myself. I like it with chicken especially.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on June 01, 2010, 09:45:30 AM
In the upstate of South Carolina we prefer the mustard based. Mustard thinned with a bit of vinegar and some sweetness added with honey or molasses and whole lot of black pepper. If you really want to do it right, puree a peach for the sweet part.

You know its right when you buddy takes a bite and just nods and mumbles "damn!" while chewing a mouth full.

I used this recipe:

1 cup prepared yellow mustard
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon cayenne

I doubt the balsamic is at all traditional in any sort of sauce, but it was "damn" good!

  That looks like a great recipe. I'm going to use it on my next BBQ. I prefer balsamic vinegar myself. I like it with chicken especially.

+1

Looks really fine.

I bet a dollop of honey would work fine in this as well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on June 04, 2010, 02:41:52 PM
added a new egg to the family last night.  grabbed a very lightly used small (like, used twice) for $150 with platesetter and grill cover....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/32aec8ec.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1cacb7c2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/953b4f35.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/58e4cb5b.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on June 05, 2010, 08:20:00 AM
Nice score. They're about twice that new...right?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 08:32:40 AM
Nice score. They're about twice that new...right?


$250

Capacity:    The Mini Big Green Egg can Cook:
# 2 Chicken Breasts OR
# 2 Pork Chops OR
# 1 Steak
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 08:33:58 AM
Those eggs remind me of....
(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:e-UA59biD8SjJM:http://nerdapproved.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/obama-russian-doll.jpg)

Two more to go right? Gotta collect them all!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on June 05, 2010, 03:51:30 PM
Nice score. They're about twice that new...right?


$250

Capacity:    The Mini Big Green Egg can Cook:
# 2 Chicken Breasts OR
# 2 Pork Chops OR
# 1 Steak


that's a small actually.  i think it's like $399 plus the nest, platesetter and cover. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on June 05, 2010, 04:21:52 PM

that's a small actually. 

My fault, if you say it's small then it's small.  ::)
I incorrectly assumed given the price that the mini was the new addition.
Then you got a heck of a deal! How's that happen?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on June 06, 2010, 03:19:46 PM

that's a small actually.

My fault, if you say it's small then it's small.  ::)
I incorrectly assumed given the price that the mini was the new addition.
Then you got a heck of a deal! How's that happen?

watch craiglist.  they pop up on there from time to time.  rarely in biloxi, but often in bigger cities.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on June 06, 2010, 03:23:25 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a452d84c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1a6c3650.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/cb2cdb3a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/74307f11.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5ea17391.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/af636924.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d6aa75a1.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on June 06, 2010, 05:30:12 PM


watch craiglist.  they pop up on there from time to time.  rarely in biloxi, but often in bigger cities.

So you started with the mini and then got obsessed? You'd still buy the other sizes, wouldn't you?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on June 07, 2010, 05:13:56 AM
i started with a large.  i'd recommend a large first and then a small or medium, depending on the number of people you usually cook for.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on June 07, 2010, 10:35:45 AM
Do you use a marinade for the shrimp or...?

Great looking Q!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on June 14, 2010, 07:05:32 AM
Do you use a marinade for the shrimp or...?

Great looking Q!

on the shrimp,  i just used a little salt and pepper along with some dizzy pig tsunami spin.

here are the past few cooks...

la bomba dogs
hamburgers w/ homemade quacamole
NatureWell ribeye steaks


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a950048a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8c48f503.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f8e0791e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c39895ed.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b4a405cf.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d4c9cabd.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on June 15, 2010, 08:23:44 AM
Looks great!

I just grilled the good ole' American burgers and dogs last night. Sometimes simpler is better.

I like to use a dallop of herbed butter in the middle of the burger to bring it a notch.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 26, 2010, 01:34:08 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/942597a4.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2dee1bd5.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0f83fa3a.jpg)

pork tenderloin

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1b6efb3a.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 27, 2010, 07:34:37 AM
Good eats!

I grilled some Chicken Breasts indirect last night ... sorry no pics.  Pulled off the grill at 180F internal temp.  Excellent results!

Do you use a thermometer during the grilling session.  I use a remote thermometer for most of my grilling with the exception of burgers, steaks and dogs or thinner cuts. It ensures doneness to your own tastes.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 27, 2010, 08:04:47 AM
Good eats!

I grilled some Chicken Breasts indirect last night ... sorry no pics.  Pulled off the grill at 180F internal temp.  Excellent results!

Do you use a thermometer during the grilling session.  I use a remote thermometer for most of my grilling with the exception of burgers, steaks and dogs or thinner cuts. It ensures doneness to your own tastes.


absolutely.  i think one of the keys to successful cooks is proper temps.  i use a thermapen and would highly recommend it, despite it's price.  they are truly wonderful.  i also have a couple thermometers, one remote, one non-remote.  the sunbeam non-remote seems to work better than my maverick et-7, although i haven't given the maverick much of a chance.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 27, 2010, 09:32:52 AM
Good eats!

I grilled some Chicken Breasts indirect last night ... sorry no pics.  Pulled off the grill at 180F internal temp.  Excellent results!

Do you use a thermometer during the grilling session.  I use a remote thermometer for most of my grilling with the exception of burgers, steaks and dogs or thinner cuts. It ensures doneness to your own tastes.


absolutely.  i think one of the keys to successful cooks is proper temps.  i use a thermapen and would highly recommend it, despite it's price.  they are truly wonderful.  i also have a couple thermometers, one remote, one non-remote.  the sunbeam non-remote seems to work better than my maverick et-7, although i haven't given the maverick much of a chance.

I use the Maverick et73 and really like it. It has taken all of the guess work out of BBQing.  I wouldn't have it any other way at this point. 
How did you grill your pork t-loin?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 27, 2010, 10:01:55 AM
and to what temp - little pink in the middle isn't it? I think that would freak out a bunch of people.
I personally don't have an issue with it...  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 27, 2010, 11:56:36 AM
Good eats!

I grilled some Chicken Breasts indirect last night ... sorry no pics.  Pulled off the grill at 180F internal temp.  Excellent results!

Do you use a thermometer during the grilling session.  I use a remote thermometer for most of my grilling with the exception of burgers, steaks and dogs or thinner cuts. It ensures doneness to your own tastes.


absolutely.  i think one of the keys to successful cooks is proper temps.  i use a thermapen and would highly recommend it, despite it's price.  they are truly wonderful.  i also have a couple thermometers, one remote, one non-remote.  the sunbeam non-remote seems to work better than my maverick et-7, although i haven't given the maverick much of a chance.

I use the Maverick et73 and really like it. It has taken all of the guess work out of BBQing.  I wouldn't have it any other way at this point. 
How did you grill your pork t-loin?

a little salt and pepper and some simply marvelous season all.  grilled over natural wood charcoal (on the egg).
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 27, 2010, 12:04:07 PM
and to what temp - little pink in the middle isn't it? I think that would freak out a bunch of people.
I personally don't have an issue with it...  :)

i actually meant to pull that at 155 internal (at the thickest point of the loin).  that one actually got pulled at 159.   from what i've read "properly" cooked pork tenderloin has a hint of rose in the center.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 27, 2010, 03:30:08 PM
"properly" cooked pork tenderloin has a hint of rose in the center.

Yeah, the cook it to death so you don't get worms rule really doesn't apply to the new space age pigs we have.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 27, 2010, 05:07:58 PM
dizzy pig stuff and salt& pepper on everything....  some olive oil as well on the veggies...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/cbb01fea.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0955ca93.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a47f9dc9.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a12edd44.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 27, 2010, 05:08:52 PM
"properly" cooked pork tenderloin has a hint of rose in the center.

Yeah, the cook it to death so you don't get worms rule really doesn't apply to the new space age pigs we have.


it was actually a hormel pork tenderloin.  next time you are in the store, check the recommended cooking temps...  155-160.....

here's the official usda temperature chart

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/Keep_Food_Safe_Food_Safety_Basics/index.asp


keep in mind that once something is pulled from the grill it will rise 5 degrees minimum and even more on larger cuts of beef that are cooked slow and low to say 195.  those may rise more than 10 degrees.


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 27, 2010, 05:44:57 PM
Here's what they used to suggest:

The wording of a CDC (Centers for Disease Control) recommendation from 1998 (as a result of recent cases caused by cougar jerky in the southwestern US) is as follows:

"Cooking is one of the most common methods of assuring that ‘Trichinella’ are destroyed; a temperature of 170 F (77 C) substantially exceeds the thermal death point and is usually achieved if the meat is cooked until it is no longer pink "
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 27, 2010, 05:56:52 PM
right, 170 SUBSTANTIALLY exceeds the thermal death point.  once something is dead, cooking it to death isn't necessary.  i mean, by that measure, all meat would be well done and that's totally unnecessary.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 28, 2010, 08:45:14 AM
right, 170 SUBSTANTIALLY exceeds the thermal death point.  once something is dead, cooking it to death isn't necessary.  i mean, by that measure, all meat would be well done and that's totally unnecessary.

+1

The food industry standards are established to ensure a level of safety when cooking raw meat.  I am not one to cook meat to death.
I haven't experienced any problems cooking pork tenderloins to a medium/medium rare condition.

Safe Cooking
For safety, the USDA recommends cooking ground pork patties and ground pork mixtures such as meat loaf to 160 °F. Whole muscle meats such as chops and roasts should be cooked to 160 °F.

For approximate cooking times for use in meal planning, see the attached chart compiled from various resources. Times are based on pork at refrigerator temperature (40 °F). Remember that appliances and outdoor grills can vary in heat. Use a meat thermometer to check for safe cooking and doneness of pork.

Can Safely Cooked Pork Be Pink?
Cooked muscle meats can be pink even when the meat has reached a safe internal temperature. If fresh pork has reached 160 °F throughout, even though it may still be pink in the center, it should be safe. The pink color can be due to the cooking method or added ingredients.

For more info....

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/Pork_From_Farm_to_Table/index.asp



Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on July 28, 2010, 09:19:18 AM
Deepsouth,

What kind of links are you grilling in that last set of pics you posted?  Are they kielbasa?  Looks tasty!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 28, 2010, 10:17:39 AM
Deepsouth,

What kind of links are you grilling in that last set of pics you posted?  Are they kielbasa?  Looks tasty!


deer sausage.  sorry!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on July 28, 2010, 11:02:25 AM
Deepsouth,

What kind of links are you grilling in that last set of pics you posted?  Are they kielbasa?  Looks tasty!


deer sausage.  sorry!

Nothing to be sorry about. Like I said, looks tasty!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 29, 2010, 07:37:40 AM
I'm thinking about trying some rendition of Turkish Kebobs this weekend.

(http://turkishcook.com/TurkishFoodForum/blogs/kebabs/attachment/112.ashx)

KEBAB WITH YOGHURT - Yogurtlu Kebab
4 Servings
3 tablespoons of butter
3 tomatoes
4 hot green peppers
4 slices of bread
500 g meat, cut into cubes or ground (kofte)
500g yoghurt
pepper
red pepper
salt
 
Leave meat cubes in a marinade of onion juice, olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook peeled tomatoes, cut into small pieces and 1 tablespoon of butter. Keep warm. Toast bread, cut into small slices and distribute on the plates. Prefer using 'pide' instead of bread, if you can find.

Skewer meat and grill on coal fire. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter and pour over bread. Add hot tomato sauce and yoghurt.Remove meat from skewer and place on the dish. Serve with hot green pepper and parsley.

You may prepare this meal with half meat cubes and half ground meat on skewers, too. If you wish, add melted hot butter on top.

(http://turkishcook.com/TurkishFoodForum/photos/kebabs/images/115/333x425.aspx)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 29, 2010, 08:13:31 AM
Hmmm, so at what point do they turn Turkish? Is it the yoghurt or the pita ? Greeks have souvlaki - also a kebob on pita with cucumber sauce which is pretty close. Just funny - like Italians and pizza; we all know the real deal is from CHICAGO.  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 30, 2010, 10:21:36 AM
i stuffed some peppers last night. baby sweet peppers, italian sweet peppers and some other unidentified pepper. i used ground round and ground pork, bread crumbs, s&p, dizzy pig dizzy dust and simply marvelous all purpose seasoning..... the ones with the toothpicks had la bomba.

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/32d40617.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a3165465.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/36d0ba84.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on July 30, 2010, 11:28:54 AM
nice. those pictures are frame-able.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 30, 2010, 11:30:40 AM
nice. those pictures are frame-able.

hahaha.  thanks.  i often have people "make fun" of me because i document all my cooks.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 30, 2010, 11:51:33 AM
nice. those pictures are frame-able.

hahaha.  thanks.  i often have people "make fun" of me because i document all my cooks.

I don't know who's worse you or Capp.  :-\ ::) :P

Very nice job on the peppers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 30, 2010, 12:24:07 PM
nice. those pictures are frame-able.

hahaha.  thanks.  i often have people "make fun" of me because i document all my cooks.

I don't know who's worse you or Capp.  :-\ ::) :P

Very nice job on the peppers!

thanks tons.

should i take fewer pics?

;o)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 30, 2010, 12:38:08 PM
should i take fewer pics?

Hell no...I view them as eye candy.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on July 31, 2010, 04:58:33 AM
Hmmm, so at what point do they turn Turkish? Is it the yoghurt or the pita ? Greeks have souvlaki - also a kebob on pita with cucumber sauce which is pretty close. Just funny - like Italians and pizza; we all know the real deal is from CHICAGO.  :D

Yep some things are the same dish for sure. But seems that each culture adds their own little touch.

I ordered a Turkish coffee at a Greek restaurant in Budapest once, man, they were so obviously offended. A lot of pointing and whispering at me. I thought they were going to throw me out. Couldnt tell if there was spit in my coffee after they brought it to me.

Pizza, Chicago? come on man. Thats not pizza! You have to go to NYC for real pizza, maybe Philly.   
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on July 31, 2010, 05:44:38 AM
Hmmm, so at what point do they turn Turkish? Is it the yoghurt or the pita ? Greeks have souvlaki - also a kebob on pita with cucumber sauce which is pretty close. Just funny - like Italians and pizza; we all know the real deal is from CHICAGO.  :D

Yep some things are the same dish for sure. But seems that each culture adds their own little touch.

I ordered a Turkish coffee at a Greek restaurant in Budapest once, man, they were so obviously offended. A lot of pointing and whispering at me. I thought they were going to throw me out. Couldnt tell if there was spit in my coffee after they brought it to me.

Pizza, Chicago? come on man. Thats not pizza! You have to go to NYC for real pizza, maybe Philly.   

And even "NYC" might be to general an "appellation"  ;) for pizza.  Brooklyn slices are where it's at!  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on July 31, 2010, 05:58:42 AM
Would you order one...

(http://www.tastesofchicago.com/images/lou_malnatis_deep_dish_pizza_hero_480.jpg)

I certainly would.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 31, 2010, 06:39:25 AM
Would you order one...

You know, I could go a year or two without them. That's all the manager's at work would order for the out-of-towners when they came in. I OD'd on that style. Their sausage pizza, is one big patty rolled out to the same size as the whole pizza. Sausage in every bite. And I do like that they use crushed tomatoes as their sauce base. But, I gotta take a break.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 31, 2010, 02:20:29 PM
the rib eyes had s&p, dizzy pig dizzy dust and simply marvelous cherry rub
the chicken had s&p, dizzy pig shakin the tree and tsunami spin
the romaine had olive oil, s&p, italian seasoning, parmigiano regiano and balsamic vinegar


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/733ac3e0.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/82d0c843.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5967d780.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8ff25a88.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1e309d59.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/eeaa5406.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2fc87500.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 31, 2010, 02:33:09 PM
You did it wrong,
I heard you only need
(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSLLk04xqI0-rZM9Bi2VIYHAi8KdTxnmKJ2FNcNv4bDzL5Xl98&t=1&usg=__by2uzbrzwS2bH7nIs3gNYYGhoHw=)

  ::)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on July 31, 2010, 02:39:54 PM
????
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on July 31, 2010, 03:09:17 PM
Ah crap it showed right after I posted it, gimmie a minute...

Guess imdb frowns upon links?

Hey, since I got your attention - have you ever baked bread in your egg? Any point to that? Would it get too smokey?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on July 31, 2010, 07:38:28 PM
This morning I thought it, now I know it.

Less really is more.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 01, 2010, 05:47:09 AM
This morning I thought it, now I know it.

Less really is more.


What happened?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 01, 2010, 06:06:55 AM
I was doing a lot of research on Argentinian BBQ, Built a simple one for a party Sat. Open pit bbq or grilll.

The Argentinians swear that all you should put on the meat when you cook it is salt, nothing else.

It was some of the best grilling I have ever done. The results are pictured in the Ethnic thread.

Now I have to find a way to scrape the mucus off my brain.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 01, 2010, 06:14:48 AM
This morning I thought it, now I know it.

Less really is more.

I'd be with you with beef, leaving exceptions for brisket, which benefits from a rich coating of chile powders among other things, but with the spatchcocked chickens, well, the right combination of herbs can be quite pleasant.

But really, putting a spice rub on the meat before cooking or putting a sauce like chimichurri on after is not really all that fundamentally different!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 01, 2010, 07:38:38 AM
Now I have to find a way to scrape the mucus off my brain.

Post PICS!  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 01, 2010, 05:09:12 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tvJvh_87i4
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 02, 2010, 05:12:47 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tvJvh_87i4

Let me know when your having the next BBQ.   :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on August 03, 2010, 07:12:57 AM
I made a 10 lb pork butt on the weekend.  I was a little out of sorts (had a migraine for a couple days), so I had some mental lapses, but the final product still turned out well.

I'm hosting a planning session for our homebrew club executive tonight.  I have ABTs ready to go on the smoker when I get home from work; for the filling I pureed some leftover pulled pork with a package of cream cheese.  If I get I chance, I'll take some pics tonight.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 03, 2010, 06:48:40 PM
It was BBQ time last weekend.

Bacon Wrapped Jalapeno Pepper Poppers

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010275.jpg)

They taste even better than they present.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010277.jpg)

Shish Kabobs

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010280.jpg)


(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010283.jpg)

Shish Kabobs over Mediteranian Rice with Pita Bread and Yogurt. 

Homebrewed German Pilsner to wash it all down!

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010288.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on August 04, 2010, 12:00:01 PM
How did you marinate the meat?  Lemon juice , salt, pepper, garlic and Greek oregano?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 04, 2010, 12:45:17 PM
How did you marinate the meat?  Lemon juice , salt, pepper, garlic and Greek oregano?

Ahhh...Ancient Chinese Secret.  ;)

It's pretty simple Jim.

Here's the recipe.

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups vegetable oil
3/4 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup white wine vinegar
1/3 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons ground dry mustard
2 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
2 tablespoons ground cloves

Mix together and refrigerate overnight.

Marinade meat cubes 4-12hrs of overnight.

Brush on while grilling.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on August 05, 2010, 04:47:06 AM
Sounds good!  Beef or lamb?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 05, 2010, 04:48:27 AM
Sounds good!  Beef or lamb?

I made chicken, beef and shrimp kabobs.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 05, 2010, 04:21:19 PM
Costillas

(Beef back ribs BBQ'ed the Argentinian way.)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06690.jpg)

This weekend we are doing a fresh killed duck and chicken on the 'parrilla.'

Im gonna make the next grill outta stainless.  

Oh and speaking ofthe kabobs Im going to make that heat rack removable top part into a kabob grill. Gonna notch the flat bar on both long sides to receive a kebab spear. The spear will be made out of SS square stock and the notch will be cut sq to receive it. Then just turn it to another side of the square stock and it will hold it where it is turned. Does that make sense? That way you can cook em even all the way around.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 05, 2010, 11:19:59 PM
I don't get the need to notch. Other than you have free time and wanna show off.  :P
Square stock will work with what you have, it will keep it's place just cuz it's square - right?

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2010, 03:10:44 AM
I would try to get some round stock SS.  Square will be harder to get through the meat and veggies unless the square stock is thin enough.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 06, 2010, 04:01:08 AM
If you have ever made big kebabs they are a bit of a pain in the ass. When you try to turn them the meat and veg just spins around the spear if you know what I mean. The square stock prevents the meat from spinning around. (I think))

The square stock will be about 1/8- maybe 3/16" thick with a point on one end and a handle on the other.

Witht the meat being unbalanced on the spear it can just roll over, the meat wont be laying on the grill, it will be suspended above it on the flat bar. Ive done it before this way and they just keep rolling back over every time I tried to turn them. Im hoping the notch will hold them where they are turned.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on August 06, 2010, 04:49:15 AM
I use square skewers all the time.  Bigger pieces of meat and all vegetables, once they start to cook will spin, even on the square ones.  That being said, speidies are small enough to stay in place on the skewer.  Pork and lamb work best.  Chicken not as well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 06, 2010, 05:04:01 AM
We use...
(http://www.pamperedchef.com/images/product/resized/2701_product.jpg) for meat
they are like a flat stock stainless steel - with that handle on the end.

and something similar to this
(http://www.taylorgifts.com/images/products/P38946B.jpg) for veggies

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2010, 06:40:26 AM
I use square skewers all the time.  Bigger pieces of meat and all vegetables, once they start to cook will spin, even on the square ones.  That being said, speidies are small enough to stay in place on the skewer.  Pork and lamb work best.  Chicken not as well.

Yea...I had some issues with spinning on the skewer with the kabobs. Now I used wood skewers which tend to bite into the meat a little but some still spun. The bigger the pieces the more likely they will spin.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2010, 06:41:12 AM

and something similar to this
(http://www.taylorgifts.com/images/products/P38946B.jpg) for veggies



I would like to get some cages.  How do you like using them?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 06, 2010, 07:49:21 AM
So long as you remember to hit em with some PAM - they're great. We dump the veggies out of the cages into a serving bowl; and likewise with the meat in a separate bowl to avoid incidents at the table. Rice or couscous as a base for the dish then layer the rest on top. We use jasmine rice and cook it in chicken stock with a shot of Vegeta - people just go nuts for the rice. (must be the MSG :) )
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on August 06, 2010, 07:51:29 AM
We use jasmine rice and cook it in chicken stock

I make rice like this all the time but I usually saute some shallots and garlic in a little olive oil before adding the stock and throw in a bay leaf or two as well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 06, 2010, 07:59:00 AM
We use jasmine rice and cook it in chicken stock

I make rice like this all the time but I usually saute some shallots and garlic in a little olive oil before adding the stock and throw in a bay leaf or two as well.

 "Uncle Ben's", can of peas, and honey. Goes great with bbq; or teriyaki anything.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2010, 07:59:47 AM
We use jasmine rice and cook it in chicken stock

I make rice like this all the time but I usually saute some shallots and garlic in a little olive oil before adding the stock and throw in a bay leaf or two as well.

Onion, garlic and carrots along with your favorite herbs do wonders for rice.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 06, 2010, 09:05:20 AM
I usually make basmati rice with just a bit of lemon juice and salt.  However, the relative blandness is fine because everything else I usually pair it with is so heavily spiced and flavored.

But pairing rice with BBQ....paella on the grill is one of my recent favorites.  I need a proper paella pan.  I like it with chicken, red or green peppers, onions, garlic, sun dried or diced tomatoes, chilies, mushrooms, and lots of spices (paprika, oregano, cumin).  I was using short grain sushi rice for it, because my wife hates sticky rice by itself (I have discovered!).  Now I'll have to find a cheap alternative in one of the local ethnic shops, as I'm not about to pay out the nose for some spanish "bomba" rice via mail order.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 06, 2010, 09:32:33 AM
I usually make basmati rice with just a bit of lemon juice and salt.  However, the relative blandness is fine because everything else I usually pair it with is so heavily spiced and flavored.

But pairing rice with BBQ....paella on the grill is one of my recent favorites.  I need a proper paella pan.  I like it with chicken, red or green peppers, onions, garlic, sun dried or diced tomatoes, chilies, mushrooms, and lots of spices (paprika, oregano, cumin).  I was using short grain sushi rice for it, because my wife hates sticky rice by itself (I have discovered!).  Now I'll have to find a cheap alternative in one of the local ethnic shops, as I'm not about to pay out the nose for some spanish "bomba" rice via mail order.

My wife is a big basmati rice fan so I prepare it most of the time.  I am always tweaking my rice recipes with the herbs and spices.  It's amazing to me how a few spices can really wake up a plate of good basmati rice.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 06, 2010, 03:42:28 PM
I have seen these "real" Turkish/greek kebab spears. They were about 16" long and they were made of a shape that is like a 1/4"  'v' in cross section. Then it was sharpened to a point sorta like a tent stake. They had a wood or some kind of plastic handle. Then they sat into a long 14" rectangular grill that had groves on either side to hold the kebab in place.

Thats what I want to get. The larger slow roasted lamb or solvaki type kebabs.

I want to make one of those big gyro rotisserie type skewers too. So I can make Doner kebabs over the fire.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 06, 2010, 06:13:24 PM
I want to make one of those big gyro rotisserie type skewers too. So I can make Doner kebabs over the fire.

Or tacos al pastor!  Just stick a pineapple on top of the pork!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 06, 2010, 07:14:36 PM
So I can make Doner kebabs over the fire.

It's just greek meatloaf on a stick. :) This years state fair had 60 different food items on a stick.
Like deep fried mac and cheese.... ON A STICK!

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 06, 2010, 07:31:43 PM
Its not just meat loaf.Not like that gyro sausage.

Its layer upon layer,of wonderful whole meat.


(http://www.rhinocarhire.com/getfile/ed3a1383-3703-40ef-b414-bc3e964e5c5e/Giant-Kebab-In-Paphos-Cyprus.aspx)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 07, 2010, 12:50:40 AM
I aways thought it was a pressed meat product like spam but the meat gets carefully layered up on that skewer. Saw it being made on the Istanbul episode of No Reservations(I think). Really a gigantic kabob. Sadly, I'm more likely to get Al Pastor here. I can get a decent gyro but all the way across the city. Hell of a drive.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 07, 2010, 02:35:46 PM
My doner kebab whould be the same but smaller. Layered chicken thighs 4" in dia, or lamb hammered out the same.

Now Im thinking of making a spit basket for small splayed pigs and turkeys instead of the Argentina way. I was thinking I could put a motor on it. But I am wondering how important it is for it to continually turn. Only really needs to be turned every now and again right?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 07, 2010, 04:04:03 PM
I think slow revolutions would work well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 07, 2010, 06:21:51 PM
My doner kebab whould be the same but smaller. Layered chicken thighs 4" in dia, or lamb hammered out the same.

Now Im thinking of making a spit basket for small splayed pigs and turkeys instead of the Argentina way. I was thinking I could put a motor on it. But I am wondering how important it is for it to continually turn. Only really needs to be turned every now and again right?

Man, you're all over the place with your bbq ideas. Why they gotta be splayed, you just like the look? The continuous turning gets you a different flavor because you are heating and cooling the meat continually - it's like a self basting/caramelizing action that causes a different taste/texture - At least on the outside.

How wide is your grill - could you just tack on some supports on the sides or from corner to corner for your spit? I'm sure you needed a tax deductible 1/16hp high torque low rpm dayton motor for the welding business anyway,  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 07, 2010, 06:42:22 PM
The grill is 3' x 4' plenty of room for a spit. Yes I am going to go tack happy on it.

The best part about splaying the pig or other is that when done properly it is just two or three inches thick at its thickest point. The cooking time is cut in half or more.

Im not convinced that the rotisserie does much at all. If you coal roast a pig skin side up for most of the time the juices and fat will baste down through the meat as it cooks then turn it over for the last third to crisp the skin.

Those rotisserie make the pig twist up and fall apart anyways. Though it would look cool.

But the rotisserie would work great for giant kebabs. My thinking here is for parties. Lots of yield easy to cook.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 07, 2010, 07:02:16 PM
The grill is 3' x 4' plenty of room for a spit. Yes I am going to go tack happy on it.

The best part about splaying the pig or other is that when done properly it is just two or three inches thick at its thickest point. The cooking time is cut in half or more.

Im not convinced that the rotisserie does much at all. If you coal roast a pig skin side up for most of the time the juices and fat will baste down through the meat as it cooks then turn it over for the last third to crisp the skin.

Those rotisserie make the pig twist up and fall apart anyways. Though it would look cool.

But the rotisserie would work great for giant kebabs. My thinking here is for parties. Lots of yield easy to cook.

You ever have a hot dog off one of those carousels vs just sit under a heat lamp or in a steamer? I'm telling you the cool/heat cycles make even the hot dog something to desire. If you have large spit forks at both ends there's no twist. If you don't want to do it that's fine - but you don't have to make stuff up.  ;)

That would look awesome, alternate whole hams, briskets, and chickens like a huge Flintstones kabob.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 07, 2010, 08:15:53 PM
How about a thin gauge cage to enclose the pig/meat on the spit to hold it all together as it rotates? ???
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 07, 2010, 08:31:35 PM
Thats called a spit cage. Im thinking the same thing except that it might be fine to have it just lay on top of the grill then a couple of people need to put the gloves on to turn it every now and then.

But maybe it is better turned,beerocd has a lot more experience with pigs than me.

Just found out my friend who lived in Argentina is gonna give me a couple of crosses.

Didnt get a duck or chicken for this weekend but its on deck. Gonna do the thanks giving turkey on the grill this year too.

Wonder how long it would take to get a kettle to boil on the grill?  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 07, 2010, 09:43:18 PM
Thats called a spit cage. Im thinking the same thing except that it might be fine to have it just lay on top of the grill then a couple of people need to put the gloves on to turn it every now and then.

But maybe it is better turned,beerocd has a lot more experience with pigs than me.

Just found out my friend who lived in Argentina is gonna give me a couple of crosses.

(http://www.smokymtbarbecue.com/store/images/Pig_Roaster_PR72GT.jpg)



Every way has it's own distinct advantages and slightly different flavors. The spit needs to be babysat the whole time. You sit around drink slivo and tend the fire. Another way is to put it on the grill of a drum smoker, with a heat diffuser plate under the pig, as in the pic above . No rotation, no motor, enclosed cooking keeps in the smoke and cooks faster. The la caja box cooks a great moist pig with absolutely no smoke flavor. I've eaten at the Brazilian bbq places and their stuff is great too.  You are willing to go the extra mile for an authentic meal. Probably a top one percenter in that category.

These guys got some neat flipping ideas - take a look, but I think your current grill is too low to the ground to incorporate this idea.
http://www.smokymtbarbecue.com/barbeque-videos/meadow-creek-barbeque-demonstrations.php (http://www.smokymtbarbecue.com/barbeque-videos/meadow-creek-barbeque-demonstrations.php)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 08, 2010, 04:26:55 PM
first shot at leg of lamb... boneless...

i couldn't find a whole leg of lamb.  the best i could do was a half boneless leg, pre-seasoned.  in light of that, i added garlic and olive oil and rosemary.  i refrigerated it for six hours before putting it on the grill.

i cooked it indirect at 325-350 to 160 internal.

it turned out delicious, although i do want to find a whole leg unseasoned next time.

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c24fda7b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1588aef3.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6735f93e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/46881a20.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/adeebf72.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5225a185.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 08, 2010, 05:38:55 PM
See, everytime I see one of your meals - I hit craigslist and search for the egg. I found Click ME (http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/for/1887890603.html) instead. Now I'm just trying to talk myself out of it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 08, 2010, 05:49:21 PM
What did you find?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 08, 2010, 05:52:23 PM
the THIS link won't take you there? I changed it so it's obvious now...
It's a Traeger Stainless Steel Smoker. I didn't link the pics here because the links will just break in the next day or two anyway.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 08, 2010, 06:28:39 PM
175 is not bad at all.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 08, 2010, 06:34:50 PM
the THIS link won't take you there? I changed it so it's obvious now...
It's a Traeger Stainless Steel Smoker. I didn't link the pics here because the links will just break in the next day or two anyway.

I'll have to try from a pc
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 08, 2010, 07:21:01 PM
What your BGE does internet too!  :o
It's a 15 year old, pellet feeder, stainless steel smoker. Can't find an example of it elsewhere on the net.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 08, 2010, 07:22:54 PM
What your BGE does internet too!  :o
It's a 15 year old, pellet feeder, stainless steel smoker. Can't find an example of it elsewhere on the net.


hahaha.   that looks nice and a great price.  you could get that and still look for an egg at that price.  check out the bbq-brethren forum.  lots of pellet smokers on there as well.  it's a great grilling forum.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 08, 2010, 07:33:59 PM
Yeah, that's where I got the idea for my WSM knockoff. Bought a weber 22.5 and happened to have a stainless barrel with handles and stainless perf at the bottom which is good for heat deflector or to hold a water pan. Also have a "barrel" type kingsford charcoal grill, and a propane grill too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 09, 2010, 03:37:47 AM
I need to check in over the weekends.  Alot of activity here.  

I want to try setting up my rotisserie on my Weber 22.5.
I've had it for a while but haven't used it yet.  Maybe this weekend.  I'm planning to do a chicken.
I'll post pics.

I still want to make a barrel smoker.  With a little help from my freinds...Capp.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 09, 2010, 07:27:13 AM
I still want to make a barrel smoker.  With a little help from my freinds...Capp.  ;D

You don't need a welder to build a smoker...
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436 (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)
(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:rFpqCZnsc-ItXM:http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/2159/2150412.jpg&t=1)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 09, 2010, 07:56:18 AM
I still want to make a barrel smoker.  With a little help from my freinds...Capp.  ;D

You don't need a welder to build a smoker...
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436 (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)
(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:rFpqCZnsc-ItXM:http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/2159/2150412.jpg&t=1)


Very Nice!

Thanks for the link.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on August 09, 2010, 08:29:00 AM
First time spatchcocked chicken for me on Sunday.

Simple wet rub/marinade:

Two Ancho, two guajillo and 3 pasilla peppers rehydrated, seeded
One big lime's juice
2 tbsp of olive oil
Salt
4-5 cloves of garlic

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/El%20Pollo%20Regio%20Clone/eecce3f4.jpg)

Getting the fire ready

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/El%20Pollo%20Regio%20Clone/f3524668.jpg)

5 minutes breast down, 5 minutes breast up, then slid grate over so they could cook indirect for about an hour and half

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/El%20Pollo%20Regio%20Clone/a546e048.jpg)

My wife laughed at me when I took picks of the prepared meal.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/El%20Pollo%20Regio%20Clone/6ef59e79.jpg)

The green sauce is 5 roasted and peeled jalapenos that were seeded, put in blender with two cloves of garlic and blended with some vegetable oil until a runny consistency, then sour cream added to get that pale green color and proper heat. If anyone's had El Pollo Regio's green sauce here in TX (not sure if they're anywhere else), this is a spot-on recipe for their sauce. Chicken was pretty close too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 09, 2010, 08:46:57 AM
Wonder if that's like El Pollo Loco.  I love their green avocado sauce, for which I have a decent clone recipe.  It's nothing fancy, and quite runny, but that's the way its supposed to be.  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 09, 2010, 09:50:11 AM
Nice work Robert!

Looks finger lickin'licious.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 09, 2010, 10:07:20 AM
I always have to look up the BIG words...

(http://imgs.sfgate.com/c/pictures/2006/05/24/fd_spatchcockgrf.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 09, 2010, 11:43:11 AM
I always have to look up the BIG words...

Spatchcocked chicken is great on the grill but it's rotisserie for me this weekend.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 09, 2010, 12:14:44 PM
Nah, I already knew that word - try again.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 09, 2010, 02:52:12 PM
I still want to make a barrel smoker.  With a little help from my freinds...Capp.  ;D

You don't need a welder to build a smoker...
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436 (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)
(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:rFpqCZnsc-ItXM:http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/2159/2150412.jpg&t=1)


You will only get hot smoke with that.  Besides when you work with me it is like a party! And, you dont just get metal work, you get gourmet metal work.

Eich bein ein fienschmeker
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 09, 2010, 03:11:31 PM
Yeah, 225 - 250 for smoking a brisket or other bronto burger type thing. I think I am going to use my sideways barrel for the smoke generator, and put flex hose on it to feed smoke to my WSM knock off. I should be able to smoke ice cubes with that setup. :)

Oh, and there are a few of us who can't afford an Authentic Capozzoli Custom Built BBQ Sculpture. ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 09, 2010, 05:08:01 PM
I offer financing.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 09, 2010, 05:14:09 PM
I just have to reiterate...Pro-Q Cold Smoke Generator!  I'm waiting for it to get cold, I'm going to smoke some ice myself!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 09, 2010, 05:23:04 PM
Cap should be able to make those in a coil pattern vs square pretty easy I'd think. Heck I might even be good enough already to make one of those in a coil pattern. Not like it would need to be purdy. You see any reason it wouldn't work?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 09, 2010, 05:44:04 PM
Hey nic you could build one of those snow smoke chambers this winter.

I cant find an image but I know they do it somewhere.

Just build a small igloo and hang some fish in there.

Yeah, I was thinking of trying to make one of those pro-Q things. It is cool.

I have a lot of luck using the hot plate pie tin method.

Checkout this thing in action.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=67047
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 09, 2010, 06:42:29 PM
I was amazed no one else made the product  - so I went hunting...

(http://www.amazenproducts.com/EMP_SMOKERTN.jpeg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 10, 2010, 11:55:01 AM
I offer financing.

You guys are too funny.  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 10, 2010, 11:59:44 AM
That's one thing I'd like to try...cold smoking some cheese and some fish.

Smoked Gouda (sausage-shaped)
Polish Kurpianka
Sherwood Smoked Cheddar
Idiazabal
Quicke's Oak Smoked Mature Farmhouse Cheddar
San Simon
Bruder Basil

(http://loriheyman.com/Hungary-Slovakia-Poland/smoked-cheese.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 10, 2010, 05:16:17 PM
I looked at that Pro-Q "clone", and its interesting but from viewing as high of a resolution as I could get to compare, I think the construction of the pro-q is better, personally speaking, and it has a higher quantity of pleased testimonials (mine included) so my recommendation sticks, as of now.

Smoked cheese is great with these units.  Extremely easy in cold weather.  When I cold smoke its like a smoky refrigerator, hovering just over freezing but still smoking.  Lots of smoke flavor, but absolutely no cooking, drying, or even warming!  However right now the temperature of my smoker reaches 110 degrees in the sun without a fire, even, so cold smoking isn't in the near future.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 10, 2010, 05:46:20 PM
im convinced, im getting one.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 10, 2010, 06:32:03 PM
Smoked ice cubes in one of those meat-tinis would be cool. I'll probably spend as much as one of those units rigging up a way to avoid paying for one of those units.  :P

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on August 10, 2010, 07:34:52 PM
Smoked ice cubes in one of those meat-tinis would be cool.

Hmm, how about half a drop of liquid smoke in an ice cube for that...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 10, 2010, 07:37:56 PM
We don't do things the easy way here...  >:(
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 10, 2010, 10:50:09 PM
Smoked ice cubes in one of those meat-tinis would be cool. I'll probably spend as much as one of those units rigging up a way to avoid paying for one of those units.  :P



Hah! That's how my brewery was put together!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 11, 2010, 07:16:06 AM
im convinced, im getting one.

I like it too.  I am definitely in the market for a cold smoke generator.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 12, 2010, 08:40:46 AM
Sooo...to those acquainted with balkan cured meats...any opinions on the smoked/cured/dried pork loin?  I got one of these, I think its a suva svinyska prsuta or something.  Scared the dickens out of my wife for how red it looked when sliced, it being pork and all, but quite interesting.  We think we still prefer suva govedina on the whole but it was nonetheless rather an interesting product. 

For dinner last night I had a huge plate of suva govedina, the prsuta, ljuta kobasica, cheese, roasted red peppers, green olives, black olives, dill pickles, celery sticks, green peppers, cucumber, ajvar and crackers.  Oh, and lots of beer.  The wife had friends over so I holed up in the mancave and watched Michael Caine affect a poncey British officer (still, a VC recipient, though) in "Zulu".  Such a frightfully entertaining, albeit grossly inaccurate, movie.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2010, 09:40:01 AM
I'm thinking about curing and smoking a Turkey Breast this weekend.  If I can get a good turkey breast at the local market I want to brine it for two days in the following:

1 gallon hot water
1 pound kosher salt
2 quarts vegetable broth
1 pound honey
1 (7-pound) bag of ice
1 (15 to 20-pound) turkey, with giblets removed
Vegetable oil

Combine the hot water and the salt in a 54-quart cooler. Stir until the salt dissolves. Stir in the vegetable broth and the honey. Add the ice and stir. Place the turkey in the brine, breast side up, and cover with cooler lid.. Brine overnight, up to 12 hours.

Remove the turkey from the brine and dry thoroughly. Rub the bird thoroughly with the vegetable oil and start smokin'!

What do you think?  Comments?  Suggestions?


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 12, 2010, 09:45:19 AM
Sooo...to those acquainted with balkan cured meats...any opinions on the smoked/cured/dried pork loin?  I got one of these, I think its a suva svinyska prsuta or something.  Scared the dickens out of my wife for how red it looked when sliced, it being pork and all, but quite interesting.  We think we still prefer suva govedina on the whole but it was nonetheless rather an interesting product. 

For dinner last night I had a huge plate of suva govedina, the prsuta, ljuta kobasica, cheese, roasted red peppers, green olives, black olives, dill pickles, celery sticks, green peppers, cucumber, ajvar and crackers.  Oh, and lots of beer. 

Suvi vrat and prsut are two different cuts. The loin is often referred to as suvi vrat - prsut is prosciutto. Was the piece you had a bit more on the mush side, also was yours kinda the marbleized cut or the ultra lean meat only cut? I prefer the loin a little drier, it has better mouthfeel. You just basically have to try everything at least once and decide what you like from that.

That plate is almost perfect - I'd toss the celery and crackers and sub in some kajmak and fresh bread.  ;D

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 12, 2010, 09:49:19 AM
I'm thinking about curing and smoking a Turkey Breast this weekend.  If I can get a good turkey breast at the local market I want to brine it for two days in the following:
1 pound honey

Is the honey actually going to penetrate into the meat? Could injecting warm honey give you a bigger bang for your buck since you won't need to use anywhere near as much honey?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2010, 09:52:15 AM
I'm thinking about curing and smoking a Turkey Breast this weekend.  If I can get a good turkey breast at the local market I want to brine it for two days in the following:
1 pound honey

Is the honey actually going to penetrate into the meat? Could injecting warm honey give you a bigger bang for your buck since you won't need to use anywhere near as much honey?

Yes that is a great method but I am brining the turkey so the honey is used to flavor and sweeten the brine.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 12, 2010, 10:06:00 AM
Well, be sure to report back to us. I am interested as to how much honey comes through in the final product. I am sure it will taste great, but being a cheapskate, I don't think I'd dump 5-6 bux worth of honey into a brining solution.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2010, 10:31:14 AM
Well, be sure to report back to us. I am interested as to how much honey comes through in the final product. I am sure it will taste great, but being a cheapskate, I don't think I'd dump 5-6 bux worth of honey into a brining solution.

Substituting brown sugar will work great as well if money is an issue.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 12, 2010, 11:17:45 AM
Suvi vrat and prsut are two different cuts. The loin is often referred to as suvi vrat - prsut is prosciutto. Was the piece you had a bit more on the mush side, also was yours kinda the marbleized cut or the ultra lean meat only cut? I prefer the loin a little drier, it has better mouthfeel. You just basically have to try everything at least once and decide what you like from that.
That plate is almost perfect - I'd toss the celery and crackers and sub in some kajmak and fresh bread.  ;D

Totally meant to post this in ethnic cooking, oh well...at least the meat was smoked, if not by me! The labelling just said "pork loin" and googling I think led me to think prsut was correct.  The piece I had was very firm, but almost a jelly-like glossiness to it, on the inside and out.  Very strange.  Certainly dense and not really mushy.  I would say its similar to the dried beef (nothing near as soft as slanina), but that gelatiny gloss, and a textural uniformity, unlike the beef.  I'd say suvi vrat sounds like it!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 12, 2010, 12:16:12 PM

Substituting brown sugar will work great as well if money is an issue.

Not quite as simple as that (I'm complicated  :P). Putting it another way it's like frying up a pound of bacon (and then throwing it away) so you can have the grease to fry liver and onions in.

Know that I'm not knocking you or your methods. I would just have to have you come back and say OMG best turkey ever before I would try something like that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2010, 12:28:59 PM

Substituting brown sugar will work great as well if money is an issue.

Not quite as simple as that (I'm complicated  :P). Putting it another way it's like frying up a pound of bacon (and then throwing it away) so you can have the grease to fry liver and onions in.

RDWHAHB    ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: riverrat on August 12, 2010, 12:46:01 PM
Could similar results be had by mixing up a much smaller batch of the brining solution and injecting it into the meat, then allowing that to sit for a while?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 12, 2010, 01:16:01 PM
Quote from: nicneufeld link=topic=165.msg36221#msg36221 date=1281637065
Totally meant to post this in ethnic cooking, oh well...
[/quote

This has really become the "SMOKED" section anyway - so it totally fits in here. More smokin' than grillin' going on here.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on August 12, 2010, 03:45:05 PM
Substituting brown sugar will work great as well if money is an issue.

I have experimented with various poultry brines, and I have found that a simple salt and brown sugar brine is more than adequate for my tastes.  I don't think the other stuff really does much of anything in my opinion.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 12, 2010, 06:05:21 PM
Im grilling this years turkey on the parrilla. Spatchcocked of coarse. Gonna pull off some dutch oven cookery in the hot coals for some of the trimmings.

Spatchcocked turkey works great. I cut from the breast side not the spine. I find this works better. Cut them like these chickens.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC06443.jpg)

Reduces the cooking time and the breast stays good and juicy under the wings and legs.

Works great in the oven, on the grill or for hot smoking.

Here is some images of a smoked TG dinner we did. The meats were cold smoked and then roasted in a 500 degree oven. All other stuff was done in the same 500 degree oven.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday017.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday014.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday021.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday025.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday020-1.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday019.jpg)

I really love Thanks Giving. It is my favorite holiday. Best part, no commercialism.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2010, 06:09:16 PM
Awsome work Capp...as usual.   ;)

Smoked Turkey is one of my all time favorite meats.  If done right it is phenominal.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 12, 2010, 06:13:09 PM
Thanks, that was from like two or (oh my) three years ago in the old cooking thread.  ::)

You guys coming on the 21st?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 12, 2010, 06:15:24 PM
Well just think T-giving is only three months away.  Better start planning for it now.  ;)

Especially since you have that fancy new grill.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 12, 2010, 06:16:13 PM
Suddenly I'm hungry.

And never to early to prepare.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 12, 2010, 07:03:31 PM
My neighbors are calling it a white trash grill.  :o

They are Philistines. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 12, 2010, 08:01:05 PM
Weld on a Mercedes hood ornament, then they'll want one too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 12, 2010, 10:05:34 PM
My neighbors are calling it a white trash grill.  :o

They are Philistines. 

You need to have a very loud grill-fest and not invite them.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on August 13, 2010, 05:35:38 PM
I told them that I am just trying to blend in.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 13, 2010, 07:44:59 PM
Capp...you are the nicest guy I know...blending in is natural for you.  ::)

Rotisserie this weekend.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 19, 2010, 05:46:39 PM
This was the order of the day last Sunday.

Rotisserie Chicken!    ......on the grill as promised.   ;)

trussed, seasoned and ready to go

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010346.jpg)

ready to get happy

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010347.jpg)


round and round she goes...

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010350.jpg)

awwww yeahhh!   :-*

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010352.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bobburchler on August 19, 2010, 06:06:01 PM
Looks a little rare.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 19, 2010, 06:33:41 PM
The chicken should be thawed and allowed to come close to room temp prior to applying dry rub and assembling on the spit for grilling.

The next thing to consider is the seasoning. Marinades, dry rubs and bastes will all work well with rotisserie chicken. Traditionally we think of basting meat on the spit, but that can lead to burning and requires more attention. Of course you may still want to baste during cooking to keep the bird moist, but a good marinade will do more towards a juicy bird that applying sauces while cooking.

When applying marinades or rubs to your chicken do your best to get it under the skin and to the meat. Coating the skin will help make the skin tasty but won't do a lot for the meat underneath. 

The key to doneness of poultry is measuring the internal temp of the bird in the thigh but not touching the bone. When the temp reachs 180F it is done.  I then remove the bird from the grill and allow to cool for about thirty minutes or so.

I forgot to mention that balance is important in that when the bird is balanced on the spit it will rotate without spinning and/or creating stress on the motor.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 19, 2010, 08:10:19 PM
I then remove the bird from the grill and allow to cool for about thirty minutes or so.

Wrapped in foil, sitting in a cooler? Stays hot, keeps moist - best thing I did to my bbq routine.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on August 19, 2010, 09:55:42 PM
So hungry for smoked meat . . .

I need to take some pictures of my efforts one of these days.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 03:09:27 AM
I then remove the bird from the grill and allow to cool for about thirty minutes or so.

Wrapped in foil, sitting in a cooler? Stays hot, keeps moist - best thing I did to my bbq routine.

This  ^^^^^

is a great tip.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on August 20, 2010, 04:45:48 AM
Definitely a good tip. I started doing that with dry-rubbed ribs and I thought it improved the presentation considerably. Much juicier.  Probably part from simply resting the meat, and part from steaming it a bit; just a guess, but it's a noticeable improvement.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 05:08:39 AM
There's a technique for smoking ribs called 3-2-1.

The 3-2-1 method of smoking ribs is not rocket science.. just a series of basic instructions that will make them more tender.

The 3-2-1 method starts out by preparing the ribs as normal.. removing the membrane, dusting with a rub or with just some salt and pepper if you prefer and then onto the smoker grate for about 3 hours.

This first stage is the “3” in the equation and is over when you see the meat starting to pull back from the bone about a quarter inch. This normally requires about 3 hours or so if you are able to maintain 225 degrees in your smoker.

The second stage of the process is removing the ribs from the smoker and wrapping them in heavy duty foil. Just before closing up the foil, splash on some apple juice.

Place the ribs back in the smoker wrapped in foil and let them cook for 2 hours.

This step will tenderize the ribs.

When the second stage is over, remove the foil and place the ribs back on the smoker grate unwrapped to firm them up a little before serving.  This is the "1" stage

Keep a close eye on the ribs at this point and remove them when they reach 170 degrees which should take about 45 minutes to an hour.

Let the ribs sit on the counter for about 15 minutes before slicing to allow the juices to redistribute throughout the meat.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 20, 2010, 11:05:50 AM
I've been stuck on "3" in my method. :-\ I will try this in my drafty old smoker.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 11:13:18 AM
It's definitely a trial and error process like brewing in a way.  It's also knowing the look and feel of the ribs as they cook.  It's so easy to overcook them.

Once the meat pulls away about 1/4" their ready to go to "2" so you have to really watch them closely at this stage of the game.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on August 20, 2010, 11:40:02 AM
Mmmmmmmmmm, ribs ;D.  Ron,  I'm going to have to smoke me some BBs on Sunday.  Wash 'em down with saison.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 11:47:36 AM
Mmmmmmmmmm, ribs ;D.  Ron,  I'm going to have to smoke me some BBs on Sunday.  Wash 'em down with saison.

Hey Jim....what time is dinner?   ;D

Here's a great discussion on BBQ and the 3-2-1 method.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-17775.html
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on August 20, 2010, 11:56:30 AM
I smoke my ribs until they look just short of being done (4-5 hours?). Then I wrap in foil with a little liquid (using some combo of the following; apple juice, cider vinegar, honey, maple syrup), and then wrap towels around the foil.  Let sit for 30-60 minutes, then take them out and brush lightly with sauce before serving.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 12:00:54 PM
I smoke my ribs until they look just short of being done (4-5 hours?). Then I wrap in foil with a little liquid (using some combo of the following; apple juice, cider vinegar, honey, maple syrup), and then wrap towels around the foil.  Let sit for 30-60 minutes, then take them out and brush lightly with sauce before serving.

Some folks use a blend of apple juice and Jack Daniels in a spray bottle.  They wet the ribs down every so often to keep them from drying out.  I am planning to give that a try.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on August 20, 2010, 12:33:53 PM
Some folks use a blend of apple juice and Jack Daniels in a spray bottle.  They wet the ribs down every so often to keep them from drying out.  I am planning to give that a try.

I like cooking and brewing things as simple as possible, and when I BBQ I really don't like opening my smoker until the meat is done.  This is why I don't like messing around with the 3-2-1 method, or constantly applying mops/sprays.

With the method I use, the ribs still get a moisture addition and are steamed/rested a bit with the foil wrap.  They come out plenty moist, sticky to touch, and have a nice shiny glazed look.

But yeah, some JD would be a nice addition.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 12:37:44 PM
Some folks use a blend of apple juice and Jack Daniels in a spray bottle.  They wet the ribs down every so often to keep them from drying out.  I am planning to give that a try.

I like cooking and brewing things as simple as possible, and when I BBQ I really don't like opening my smoker until the meat is done.  This is why I don't like messing around with the 3-2-1 method, or constantly applying mops/sprays.

With the method I use, the ribs still get a moisture addition and are steamed/rested a bit with the foil wrap.  They come out plenty moist, sticky to touch, and have a nice shiny glazed look.

But yeah, some JD would be a nice addition.

I think it's really more for flavor than moisture.   :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on August 20, 2010, 12:47:16 PM
Mmmmmmmmmm, ribs ;D.  Ron,  I'm going to have to smoke me some BBs on Sunday.  Wash 'em down with saison.

Hey Jim....what time is dinner?   ;D

Here's a great discussion on BBQ and the 3-2-1 method.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-17775.html
There is a ton of excellent info in the BBQ Brethren web site.  I've gained a lot of good ribs knowledge from this site as well...
http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/best_BBQ_ribs_ever.html (http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/best_BBQ_ribs_ever.html)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 20, 2010, 12:50:52 PM
Mmmmmmmmmm, ribs ;D.  Ron,  I'm going to have to smoke me some BBs on Sunday.  Wash 'em down with saison.

Hey Jim....what time is dinner?   ;D

Here's a great discussion on BBQ and the 3-2-1 method.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-17775.html
There is a ton of excellent info in the BBQ Brethren web site.  I've gained a lot of good ribs knowledge from this site as well...
http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/best_BBQ_ribs_ever.html (http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/best_BBQ_ribs_ever.html)

I've seen the site before but haven't had a chance to browse yet.  Thanks...I'll check it out.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 20, 2010, 01:26:29 PM
3-2-1 will work but a few times I've seen it overcook ribs...particularly back ribs.  I used to foil ribs a lot but I've found it less necessary of late.  But it was helpful for me when I was having trouble getting them tender enough!  Haven't even been doing "low and slow" of late, I've been surprised by how tender and smoky higher temperatures with charcoal and hickory can get them.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on August 20, 2010, 06:14:12 PM
I will try this in my drafty old smoker.

Aluminum foil is an awesome way to draft proof your smoker. Make a foil snake, and pinch it around the doors, lid, wherever there's a draft that there shouldn't be. When you crunch it down, it conforms to the opening, and seals it up pretty good. You'll be able to control your fire better this way.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 23, 2010, 12:34:35 PM
i cooked a few things over the weekend.....   chicken wings, pork tenderloin & meatloaf

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f8e9777d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/10d13ed3.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2957b5cd.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/be075651.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/18948b7e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/028c7c6e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b9fb4560.jpg)


thanks for looking.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 23, 2010, 12:36:12 PM
3-2-1 will work but a few times I've seen it overcook ribs...particularly back ribs.  I used to foil ribs a lot but I've found it less necessary of late.  But it was helpful for me when I was having trouble getting them tender enough!  Haven't even been doing "low and slow" of late, I've been surprised by how tender and smoky higher temperatures with charcoal and hickory can get them.

i used to do 3-2-1 or some variation thereof, but lately, it's been straight smoke.  i have found that when i foil my ribs i have less control over when they are actually ready and the bark that builds up over the first three hours gets soggy and sometimes even the last hour doesn't get it "right" again.  plus, depending on the size of the rib, i have actually opened the foil and had "fall off the bone" ribs, which i don't like.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 23, 2010, 02:15:09 PM
3-2-1 will work but a few times I've seen it overcook ribs...particularly back ribs.  I used to foil ribs a lot but I've found it less necessary of late.  But it was helpful for me when I was having trouble getting them tender enough!  Haven't even been doing "low and slow" of late, I've been surprised by how tender and smoky higher temperatures with charcoal and hickory can get them.

i used to do 3-2-1 or some variation thereof, but lately, it's been straight smoke.  i have found that when i foil my ribs i have less control over when they are actually ready and the bark that builds up over the first three hours gets soggy and sometimes even the last hour doesn't get it "right" again.  plus, depending on the size of the rib, i have actually opened the foil and had "fall off the bone" ribs, which i don't like.

Great looking Q as usual!

When using the  3-2-1 method and finishing for the last hour I have found that you need a higher heat (250+) to establish that crusty outer layer but yet maintain the tender middle.  There's a fine line between fall off the bone and fork tender.  It requires babysitting the meat.  Once the ribs become fork tender during the "2" stage they must be removed from the foil and finished at "1".  In my experience the 3-2-1 method works well if your grill temps are properly regulated which is a challenge for me sometimes. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on August 23, 2010, 02:28:44 PM
Yeah, the degree of tenderness is an important consideration.  I don't much like it when they get to the point you can't even pick them up by the bone end without the meat splattering off.  But, I also want the meat to come cleanly off the bone...when the meat is not quite tender I get those damn bits of meat wedged in between my teeth which annoys me rather!

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 23, 2010, 02:31:02 PM
that's why i just use straight smoke and the "bend method" of testing.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 30, 2010, 06:46:17 AM
i did a little grilling over the weekend....

red snapper had olive oil, salt, dizzy pig tsunami spin and shakin' the tree and simply marvelous season all

bacon wrapped scallops had dizzy pit tsunami spin and shakin the tree

baby bok choy had simply marvelous season all, olive oil and salt




(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a2c62361.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6de0436a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3034ba75.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2fddefc9.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0c41b334.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1820d840.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7b49d693.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6fbc3dcb.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/07184f52.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1847895c.jpg)



i seasoned the tri-tip with kikoman teriyaki sauce, dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express and simply marvelous sweet and spicy.

i pulled it at 140 and let it rest 20 minutes.

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/fbbf27ad.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bdc4fd75.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c5977d0a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7c2eaf41.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d7ce6e53.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f027c0dc.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 30, 2010, 09:32:31 AM
Looks simply marvelous. 

Did you grill the fish direct?  What temp?

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 30, 2010, 10:47:25 AM
Looks simply marvelous. 

Did you grill the fish direct?  What temp?



thanks tons!

i grilled the fish direct on a raised grid at 375.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on August 30, 2010, 12:03:32 PM
Oh Man I'd hit that like a Tasmanian Devil!!! Great lookin' Q!!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 30, 2010, 12:24:56 PM
Oh Man I'd hit that like a Tasmanian Devil!!! Great lookin' Q!!!!

thanks!  cheers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 30, 2010, 06:55:52 PM
That tri-tip cut is typically found on the West-Coast? I've heard of it but never seen it. Bottom sirloin gotta taste great.

Looks good!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on August 30, 2010, 10:02:49 PM
That tri-tip cut is typically found on the West-Coast?

Hmmm . . . name is "deepsouth"

.sig says "Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)"

I suppose Mississippi has a west coast.  Sort of  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on August 30, 2010, 10:37:22 PM
That tri-tip cut is typically found on the West-Coast?

Hmmm . . . name is "deepsouth"

.sig says "Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)"

I suppose Mississippi has a west coast.  Sort of  :)

It does indeed!

Only my friends from California have ever talked tri-tip. When pressed as to what it's like they can't describe it. But it isn't like brisket. Google returns: Bottom Sirloin! I'm sure it is a commonly found cut outside Texas. Love sirloin and it'd be a shame to cook it like a brisket. I'll ask a butcher for some. ;)



Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on August 31, 2010, 03:46:07 AM
That tri-tip cut is typically found on the West-Coast? I've heard of it but never seen it. Bottom sirloin gotta taste great.

Looks good!

They use tri-tip in chili cook-offs.  I haven't seen it in our local grocery stores.  Perhaps the local butcher shop will have it.  I want to get my hands on this cut for making chili.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on August 31, 2010, 05:52:08 AM
That tri-tip cut is typically found on the West-Coast?

Hmmm . . . name is "deepsouth"

.sig says "Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)"

I suppose Mississippi has a west coast.  Sort of  :)

It does indeed!

Only my friends from California have ever talked tri-tip. When pressed as to what it's like they can't describe it. But it isn't like brisket. Google returns: Bottom Sirloin! I'm sure it is a commonly found cut outside Texas. Love sirloin and it'd be a shame to cook it like a brisket. I'll ask a butcher for some. ;)





i had to ask them to cut me one.  you never see them out and rouses is the only place on the coast that will cut them.   this was my first one.   double check the "bottom sirloin" part, because the butcher made it a pont to tell me it was the top..... not sure if he was correct about that, but the cut was correct.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on August 31, 2010, 02:13:55 PM
Mostly when I see tri-tip here it is prepackaged with marinade.  I don't remember the brand, but I've tried them and they're decent.

Tri-tip chili . . . that sounds great (well, any chili sounds great), I'll have to try that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 02, 2010, 09:41:52 AM
Did some babybacks over the weekend and tried the 3-2-1 method (sort of) and the ribs came out great. It was more like 3-1.5-0... I fell asleep and woke up at the 1.5 mark and checked the ribs. They gently steamed when the foil was opened up and no juice! They felt and looked ready.

Indeed some of the best ribs to date! Getting my fluctuating temps under control really made a difference even though still believe my temps might be a little higher than desired. If I hadn't foiled the ribs they would have been dry for sure! Already a nice bark- the conclusion was: "done" and an executive decision to remove the ribs was made.

Ate the last of them last night.

Aside note:

I have two thermometers. One big dial in the lid that I installed. One oven-style inside at grill/meat level on the grate that only gets seen when I open the sucker up. The one in the lid usually reads 100 degrees more than the one at meat level. Which one do I trust?  ???
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 02, 2010, 09:51:28 AM
Did some babybacks over the weekend and tried the 3-2-1 method (sort of) and the ribs came out great. It was more like 3-1.5-0... I fell asleep and woke up at the 1.5 mark and checked the ribs. They gently steamed when the foil was opened up and no juice! They felt and looked ready.

Indeed some of the best ribs to date! Getting my fluctuating temps under control really made a difference even though still believe my temps might be a little higher than desired. If I hadn't foiled the ribs they would have been dry for sure! Already a nice bark- the conclusion was: "done" and an executive decision to remove the ribs was made.

Ate the last of them last night.

Aside note:

I have two thermometers. One big dial in the lid that I installed. One oven-style inside at grill/meat level on the grate that only gets seen when I open the sucker up. The one in the lid usually reads 100 degrees more than the one at meat level. Which one do I trust?  ???

Have you tried calibrating them.  Boil some water and measure the temp. then calibrate accordingly.

I might pick up some ribs for the weekend.  Glad the 3-2-1 method (well almost) worked out for you.

Happy grilling!

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 02, 2010, 10:57:57 AM
Did some babybacks over the weekend and tried the 3-2-1 method (sort of) and the ribs came out great. It was more like 3-1.5-0... I fell asleep and woke up at the 1.5 mark and checked the ribs. They gently steamed when the foil was opened up and no juice! They felt and looked ready.

Indeed some of the best ribs to date! Getting my fluctuating temps under control really made a difference even though still believe my temps might be a little higher than desired. If I hadn't foiled the ribs they would have been dry for sure! Already a nice bark- the conclusion was: "done" and an executive decision to remove the ribs was made.

Ate the last of them last night.

Aside note:

I have two thermometers. One big dial in the lid that I installed. One oven-style inside at grill/meat level on the grate that only gets seen when I open the sucker up. The one in the lid usually reads 100 degrees more than the one at meat level. Which one do I trust?  ???



have you ever tried straight smoking the ribs without foiling them?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 02, 2010, 12:04:12 PM
Yes. This was the second time I did foil. Wasn't impressed the first time, but put them in foil too soon (I think) and they came out braised from sitting in too much juice and too hot of an environment.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 02, 2010, 12:16:56 PM
Yes. This was the second time I did foil. Wasn't impressed the first time, but put them in foil too soon (I think) and they came out braised from sitting in too much juice and too hot of an environment.


that's pretty much why i stopped foiling.  i'd have great bark and then i'd foil and it would turn soggy-ish...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 02, 2010, 12:51:23 PM
That's why you use the "1" direct without foil.  It works for me, but different strokes for different folks.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 02, 2010, 01:00:37 PM
That's why you use the "1" direct without foil.  It works for me, but different strokes for different folks.  8)

that's worked for me before, but if the ribs become overcooked/fall off the bone during the foiling process, the extra "1" goes out the window...    i just feel like i have more control when i don't foil.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 02, 2010, 01:10:25 PM
That's why you use the "1" direct without foil.  It works for me, but different strokes for different folks.  8)

that's worked for me before, but if the ribs become overcooked/fall off the bone during the foiling process, the extra "1" goes out the window...    i just feel like i have more control when i don't foil.

I certainly respect your opinion. YMMV from mine. Great debate.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 02, 2010, 01:28:09 PM
That's why you use the "1" direct without foil.  It works for me, but different strokes for different folks.  8)

that's worked for me before, but if the ribs become overcooked/fall off the bone during the foiling process, the extra "1" goes out the window...    i just feel like i have more control when i don't foil.

I certainly respect your opinion. YMMV from mine. Great debate.  8)

absolutely!  no singular proper way to Q and if you stop listening and reading, you stop learning!

cheers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 05, 2010, 10:28:33 AM
dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express on the beef tenderloin, dizzy pig pineapple head on the pineapple, dizzy pig shakin' the tree and tsunami spin on the chicken, japanese eggplant....all topped off with simply marvelous season all and one of the firewires was glazed with seal sami terayaki sauce...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bed8247c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8bd4dbd2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/42c75c0b.jpg)


and then pulled beef yesterday.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6f557d06.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b9054a22.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/16ca0f6e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8b5fb92b.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 05, 2010, 12:05:35 PM
Looks great as usual.   8)

I'm planning to smoke a Boston Butt tomorrow.  I'll post pics.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 05, 2010, 12:11:22 PM
i'm putting on chicken wings as we speak.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on September 05, 2010, 12:19:21 PM
A little prep work this afternoon. 9 lb pig butt. Rehydrated some anchos and pasillas, chopped em up and mixed in with some dijon mustard. We'll call it anco chile dijon mustard... ;D

Used a pre-mixed rub from Rudy's BBQ. Its a nice rub that has a real strong black-pepper spiciness. Rub, mustard, then plastic wrap. Into fridge and will probably fire up the pit around midnight. Hickory, mesquite and charcoal with some applewood chips sprinkled on top throughout the night.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/4bc3dfcf.jpg)

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/fd5775df.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 05, 2010, 01:01:38 PM
That's gonna be scrumdelicious!

I'm using a basic dry rub on my butt (no pun intended)  :D

I'm firing my smoker up first thing tomorrow a.m.

Butts are an all day affair.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 05, 2010, 01:02:53 PM
i'm putting on chicken wings as we speak.

I still want to try wings on the grill.  I forgot if you said you went indirect or ???
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on September 05, 2010, 01:07:39 PM

Butts are an all day affair.

Or an all night affair... (pun intended  8) )
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 05, 2010, 01:49:08 PM
i'm putting on chicken wings as we speak.

I still want to try wings on the grill.  I forgot if you said you went indirect or ???

direct, raised grid...

300 degrees today, smoking on a bit of pecan...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/57d4a8ba.jpg)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 05, 2010, 01:49:36 PM
A little prep work this afternoon. 9 lb pig butt. Rehydrated some anchos and pasillas, chopped em up and mixed in with some dijon mustard. We'll call it anco chile dijon mustard... ;D

Used a pre-mixed rub from Rudy's BBQ. Its a nice rub that has a real strong black-pepper spiciness. Rub, mustard, then plastic wrap. Into fridge and will probably fire up the pit around midnight. Hickory, mesquite and charcoal with some applewood chips sprinkled on top throughout the night.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/4bc3dfcf.jpg)

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/fd5775df.jpg)

that's going to be awesome.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 05, 2010, 02:16:05 PM
finished product, pecan smoked chicken wings, no sauce necessary.

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/57d4a8ba.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ef8130f1.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0b2bb920.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 05, 2010, 04:11:41 PM
Man those wings look fantastic.

Argentinian style BBQ again.

Whole spachcocked chicken and a pork shoulder. Cooked with sea salt only. Another rule I learned is dont salt it till it starts to cook, after it starts to get a little crispy on the outside. Cause if you salt it before it will pull out a lot more of the moisture.  

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07239.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07241.jpg)

Here it is served with a health slathering of chimachuri. Along side of Argentinian style potato salad.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07245.jpg)

Had one of Thirsty Monks Bohemian Darks that he left behind when he and his family visited us for dinner. Very nice.

Two questions, when is his brewery going to open, and will they distribute to Philly?  :-*

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC07244.jpg)




Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 05, 2010, 04:18:59 PM
Delicious!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 05, 2010, 08:54:45 PM
Absolutey marvelous Cap !

Simply Marvelous...what else can I say.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on September 06, 2010, 05:40:47 AM
I love it when you say 'spatchcock'  ;)

Good looking chimichuri. I'm making some to go with marinated and grilled hanger steaks today.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 06, 2010, 07:15:46 AM
The idea of pork butt cooked without any rub or marinade and direct grilled, not smoked, is almost against the laws of nature in this country, but I'd be interested in how it comes out...how long and to what temperature (if measured) did you cook it?  Slicing it as you did sounds like a good plan.

We got a whiff of cooler temps the other day.  It sharpened my anticipation for cold smoking!  Some smoked salmon, actually smoked gravlax, would be nice, and the smoked cheeses are awesome.  I always get more "scandinavian" come winter time. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 06, 2010, 09:58:17 AM
The pork is an internal temp 150 degrees. I know I know, but what ever. I am certain that the cut is extremely fresh.

The pork comes off with a pure pork flavor. Its very agreeable. For s***s and giggles ask yourself this. What does a dry rub do during the cooking period that it wouldn't do sprinkled on after? Burn?

The tradition with barbacoa, and European cold smoking originated with using just salt to cure the meat and smoke to further cure and dry it to extend its shelf life. Both add to and enhance the flavor obviously.

Later people stated using black pepper, paprika and what not.

I see the usefulness of brine and marinade, they are also along the lines of curing and opening up the pours of the meat also adding moisture and fat for a more tender product. I will still use them for Korean BBQ, American BBQ, Greek solvaki and stuff like that, but I am done with dry rubs.

The thing with Argentine BBQ is that is basically slow roasted 12"-16" over the coals. In contrast most grilling is done just a few inches over the coals. You do get a hint of smoke flavor and you can increase that buy putting unburnt logs on the fire. But the main flavor is the meat. When cooked this simple way using just salt the flavor of the meat becomes clarified. You can put sauce on later.

For Turkey day Im going to spatchcock a couple a fresh killed turkeys then I am going to marinade them in a mixture of olive oil garlic, pureed dried figs salt and pepper for a few days. Then slow roast them ovre the coals while basting frequently with the marinade. The slow roasthigher over the coals should prevent the oil or fruit from burning.

Spatchcock.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 06, 2010, 10:39:21 AM
The pork comes off with a pure pork flavor. Its very agreeable. For s***s and giggles ask yourself this. What does a dry rub do during the cooking period that it wouldn't do sprinkled on after? Burn?

The sugar content of most traditional BBQ rubs forms a bark while cooking...definite caramelization and browning (Maillard?).  I don't know the science but there is definitely a difference between seasoning before cooking and seasoning after, IMO!  Just like adding hops at the beginning and adding them at the end of a boil, timing does affect things.  But, this isn't a criticism of your method.  Just one of many great ways to cook pigs with live fire; I can see a "modified direct grilling" as I've heard your approach called being great for direct grilling meats at lower temperatures.  Regular direct grilling is too hot for a lot of things, but modified direct grilling (I can do this by removing the pans in my Weber Smoky Mountain and grilling a foot or two over the fire) is a great way to get that unmistakeable direct grilling flavor (I think which comes in large part from the drippings burning) at a temperature where, say, a spatchcocked chicken won't totally burn before getting cooked through.

Just prepped the ribs, with a marinade (hehe!) of sambal oelek, garlic, ginger, pineapple juice, and kecap manis.  Going to glaze them at the end of the smoke with a sauce made from hoisin and pineapple jelly.  Cooking the rice to fry later, too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 06, 2010, 11:54:39 AM
Yes Nick...Most dry rubs have brown sugar which aids in the formation of a bark on the outside of the pork.  This bark is very flavorful and adds to the complexity of the meat flavor.  I always use a dry rub on my pork smokes.  Salt and pepper is okay but a good dry rub does wonders for a Boston butt or ribs.  Just my 2 cents worth.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 06, 2010, 01:43:33 PM
i always rub mine down good.  adds layers of flavor.  i like the taste of straight pork, but i like them rubbed down better.  matter of preference for sure and thank goodness there are so many different ways to do proper tasty bbq.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 06, 2010, 03:47:54 PM
Yes sir.

Truth be told, I like rubbing my meat too, just dont want it dry.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on September 06, 2010, 04:30:19 PM
As promised, finished product.

Didn't get any shots on the smoker as it smoked overnight but here it is after 15 hours on pit, and 1 hour wrapped in a towel in a cooler. Shredded like a dream.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/0073c65f.jpg)

And here's thirds....Simple slaw on top with a homemade Jack Daniels Ancho BBQ sauce.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/06c43249.jpg)


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 06, 2010, 05:07:02 PM
tri-tip, asparagus & potatoes...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3c49efb4.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/327e2753.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c88a1cae.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f5b80ac2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/30bef961.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3a7397be.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/54d5baf7.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 06, 2010, 05:07:31 PM
As promised, finished product.

Didn't get any shots on the smoker as it smoked overnight but here it is after 15 hours on pit, and 1 hour wrapped in a towel in a cooler. Shredded like a dream.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/0073c65f.jpg)

And here's thirds....Simple slaw on top with a homemade Jack Daniels Ancho BBQ sauce.

(http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/rsauermann/Labor%20Day%20Butt/06c43249.jpg)





looks marvelous!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on September 06, 2010, 05:26:02 PM
I've got to find some tri-tip in Texas. The few pics I've seen on here have my mouth watering. Nicely done deepsouth. I love asparagus on the grill. I grill it dry to bring out the nutty, woody flavors of the stalk.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 06, 2010, 05:43:08 PM
Hickory smoked chicken, rubbed with fajita seasoning out of one of Raichlen's books.  No pics in process, but with the pork shoulders I smoked the other day and some homemade bbq sauce (another Raichlen recipe more or less) we're headed to the neighbors.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TIWJt827O6I/AAAAAAAAACk/NyXs-Fs7GMM/IMG00079-20100906-1735.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 06, 2010, 05:48:58 PM
nice!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 06, 2010, 06:12:04 PM
I grilled on the Weber kettle yesterday.

It was Boneless Chicken Breasts, Portobella Mushrooms and Roasted Red Peppers.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010358.jpg)

The mushrooms were marinated fro 2 hours in EVOO, Aged Balsamic, Green Onion, Garlic, salt and pepper.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010360.jpg)

The chicken was also marinated in Pride of the Deer Camp BBQ overnight.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010361_edited-1.jpg)

Then it was the long smoke today.  8)

Boston Butt with one of my dry rubs.  I started with prepared mustard and brown sugar then applied the dry rub.  Overnight.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010363.jpg)

9hrs on the smoker with 3 in the foil then wrapped in a towel and in the coller for 2hrs.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010371.jpg)

Melt in your mouth.  You know it's done when you can pull the bone clean out.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010372.jpg)

One of my boys after a long days smoke.  8) 
His name is Muddy.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010366.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 06, 2010, 06:17:12 PM
Wow!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 06, 2010, 10:31:39 PM
Awesome!  i'm going to have to do a Boston butt one of these days, but the brisket is the next on the list.  I'm considering corning it and then just making pastrami - nothing like a hot pastrami with swiss on homemade rye.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 07, 2010, 03:31:22 AM
Thanks gents!

Briskets are a challenge to get the right tenderness but I love them.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 07, 2010, 05:20:54 AM
I'm considering corning it and then just making pastrami - nothing like a hot pastrami with swiss on homemade rye.

Absolutely!  I usually cheat and buy precorned beef, but its fantastic stuff.  The idea of boiling corned beef to me now is anathema.  A meat slicer is really helpful...some people like thicker slices of pastrami, but I like smoking it, then cooling it overnight to firm it up, then slicing it extremely thin.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 07, 2010, 09:00:27 AM
We love corned beef, even boiled, but ever since I started corning them myself SWMBO can't stand the store bought stuff.  I don't use salt peter so it doesn't have that artificial red color that she found kind of creepy, it turns brown/greyish (I think some people call corned beef without salt peter "grey corned beef").  It's not the most appetizing color, but it sure tastes good.

I do a dry rub for it, rather than the brine you see at the store.  I weight it down with bricks and flip it every day for 10 days, wash off the salt/spices, then add more spices without the salt and cook it up.

I usually cut it into pieces to make it more manageable, but I think I want to corn this one whole.  I'm going to need to find some bigger ziplocs :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 07, 2010, 10:01:21 AM
Ahh the smell of smoked meats...

I started breaking in the new smoker this weekend both Sat & Sun and left Labor day to brew (which was laborious and sweaty).

I did Baby-backs, chicken wings and sausage first go around. Sadly only the ribs were left for the pics. The ribs went a full 6 hours at 225 but I think they're overcooked. Still moist but a little mushy. Flavor is good.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TIZqdPiFEqI/AAAAAAAAAPo/1GIwvZ9atxg/s640/2010-09-04%2019.43.16.jpg)

Sunday's efforts were more successful IMO. Cut down a full rack of ribs to more of a St Louis cut and rubbed good with my "secret spices". Lamb shank with silverskin removed, rubbed with s&p, garlic, comino and sugar.

I then took the trimmings from the spare-ribs, spiced then bound and rubbed with French's mustard and onto the smoker. Went into a pot of bean along with the bone from the shank the next day.

Even though these ribs were meatier I only took them to 4 hours at 225. Excellent! Oh- and the lamb... the lamb turned out really nice!

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TIZqdeIhbXI/AAAAAAAAAPs/3ujPXZIMkX8/s640/2010-09-05%2014.53.01.jpg)
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TIZqdhotT4I/AAAAAAAAAPw/0BHTEZu601w/s640/2010-09-05%2018.56.43.jpg)
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TIZqeLb0TjI/AAAAAAAAAP0/GwhgZ3CNnac/s640/2010-09-05%2019.01.49.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 07, 2010, 10:04:50 AM
Nice work...and nice new addition as well my freind!

I like it!  8)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 07, 2010, 10:10:27 AM
great pictures! 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 12, 2010, 10:28:23 AM
For those who cut their own wood for smoking, where do you stand on bark/no bark on the wood?  I left it on for the madrona I smoked with last weekend, and I just cut up some plum and don't feel like taking off the bark.  Any opinions?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 12, 2010, 10:31:22 AM
For those who cut their own wood for smoking, where do you stand on bark/no bark on the wood?  I left it on for the madrona I smoked with last weekend, and I just cut up some plum and don't feel like taking off the bark.  Any opinions?

If it falls off, toss it in the bonfire pit - if it sticks, smoke with it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 12, 2010, 10:56:33 AM
For those who cut their own wood for smoking, where do you stand on bark/no bark on the wood?  I left it on for the madrona I smoked with last weekend, and I just cut up some plum and don't feel like taking off the bark.  Any opinions?

If it falls off, toss it in the bonfire pit - if it sticks, smoke with it.

+1

I generally use it with the bark.  I don't intentionally remove it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: jeffy on September 12, 2010, 11:03:11 AM
I have a friend who removes all traces of bark before he smokes his malt.  I find this a bit anal, but he says it helps with reducing astringency in the beer.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 12, 2010, 11:20:33 AM
I'm smoking a leg of lamb.  I wonder if it will be noticeable?  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 12, 2010, 11:22:23 AM
I'm smoking a leg of lamb.  I wonder if it will be noticeable?  :)

Doubtful. I haven't found it to make a difference one way or another.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 18, 2010, 12:44:31 AM
So on Wednesday I did a 7.5 hour smoke with Babybacks and wings. This time went low and kept it initially at 180F then raised it up to 215 for 4 hours. The thicker part of the rack could have went a little longer IMO but it's tender off the bone and tastes good. Amazingly the wings had stood up to the punishment- a couple got dried up a bit but the rest are still juicy.

I wasn't expecting a near double the time to smoke the ribs with such a small temperature difference. So is there a ROT to this? Are the benefits any greater by going that low and long or longer with the Babybacks or any rib cut for that matter?

The BGE can certainly go for a long time based on fuel usage. At 225 I bet I could go for 24 hours no problem.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 18, 2010, 12:06:56 PM
The idea behind the low and slow (i think?) is that it will give the meat time to fully drink up the smoke and start breaking down to become more tender. same principle in the oven or on the stove, Tougher roasts and cuts of meat will get more tender when cooking low for a longer time.

I find that with the low and slow method it is better to with light wisps of smoke instead of a thick dense smoke. Kinda like with cold smoking.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 18, 2010, 02:29:51 PM
The idea behind the low and slow (i think?) is that it will give the meat time to fully drink up the smoke and start breaking down to become more tender. same principle in the oven or on the stove, Tougher roasts and cuts of meat will get more tender when cooking low for a longer time.

I find that with the low and slow method it is better to with light wisps of smoke instead of a thick dense smoke. Kinda like with cold smoking.

Correct!

Winner ...winner...smokey dinner!

This is the master plan Cap.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 18, 2010, 02:53:21 PM
So on Wednesday I did a 7.5 hour smoke with Babybacks and wings. This time went low and kept it initially at 180F then raised it up to 215 for 4 hours. The thicker part of the rack could have went a little longer IMO but it's tender off the bone and tastes good. Amazingly the wings had stood up to the punishment- a couple got dried up a bit but the rest are still juicy.

I wasn't expecting a near double the time to smoke the ribs with such a small temperature difference. So is there a ROT to this? Are the benefits any greater by going that low and long or longer with the Babybacks or any rib cut for that matter?

The BGE can certainly go for a long time based on fuel usage. At 225 I bet I could go for 24 hours no problem.

If you want alot of smoke you need to smoke longer, but if you happy with a milder smoky flavor then increase the temp and decrease the time.  It's a matter of personal preference.


I like the best of both worlds so I like to target somewhere in the middle.  It's a time and temperature ratio and you need to find your comfort zone.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 18, 2010, 04:26:02 PM
If you are really adventurous, when it gets cold enough out to make it safe....cold (i mean COLD!) smoke some ribs for 8 hours, then hot smoke them much more quickly...would be interesting to try...a true cold smoking at refrigerator temps followed by a high heat smoke roasting around 350 deg.  May have to try it someday.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 18, 2010, 04:43:04 PM
Nic, thats pretty much how I do my bbq.

I brine it cold smoke it then finish it hot over the coals. Works f-in awesome. Gives the ribs a "crust' that is reminiscent of bacon.

still, only salt though. ;)

Real hard to do in the summer time though, for a long smoke at really low temps you end up in the "danger zone" as you may know.

But, Im thinking of stocking up towards the end of the winter, cold smoking and then vacuum sealing for the summer grill season.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 18, 2010, 05:27:20 PM
Interesting concept Nic.  I be interested in your findings should you decide to do it.
Sounds like it would work.  I wonder what the correlation is between smoke absorption and temperature.  Does the smoke get absorbed at the same rate no matter what the temp may be...or not.  :-\
Sounds like an experiment waiting to happen.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 18, 2010, 06:13:48 PM
Its interesting to think about the history of bbq. I think we can all agree that "real" bbq involves smoking the meat. Anything else is just grilling. i.e. Argentina, Greece, Italy.  

BBQ comes from the native Caribbean Indian word Barabicu. This was a method of salting and smoking meat and fish to preserve. As the story goes the natives showed the British Buccaneers how to do it. Then they would salt and smoke feral pigs and what not from the islands then take them back to the ships for voyages.

The method was four branches as legs with a grill top of wood with all the meat tied to it. Then it was raised high off of the coals and would be smoked open air style.

(http://foodnerd.org/images/bbq/barbacoa.jpg)

I think if you long cold smoke it and then finish it hot before serving you will be experiencing bbq in its pristine state.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 18, 2010, 06:29:58 PM
I was thinking of doing just salt and fresh cracked pepper. I'm using a combination of mesquite charcoal and pecan and getting a nice flavor. I can see the smoke and the meat. No rub...

Haven't used sauce in a while either. It's good without it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 19, 2010, 12:14:10 AM
Ok, here's the ~8lb brisket - dry rubbed with corning spices, put in the fridge with weights, and flipped every day for 10 days.  Washed, patted dry, rubbed again with corning spices (salt free this time) and smoked today for  ~9 hours with Madrona wood.  It turned out great! :)
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TJW3BO0jUjI/AAAAAAAAADg/IFoIwo6WktQ/IMG00119-20100918-1917.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 19, 2010, 06:33:10 AM
Looks great Tom. What temp did you smoke?  How was the tenderness?

I pull briskets when fork tender (butter tender), usually about 180-190. Then let them cool for 30 minutes before trimming and slicing.

Here's a great tuturial for brisket on the bbq bretheren forum. Enjoy!

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=57882
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 19, 2010, 08:55:23 AM
I heard back then on these islands and some of the tall ships they served long pork.Any of you guys ever had that?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 19, 2010, 09:38:40 AM
I heard back then on these islands and some of the tall ships they served long pork.Any of you guys ever had that?

Any details?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: maxieboy on September 19, 2010, 09:38:50 AM
I heard back then on these islands and some of the tall ships they served long pork.Any of you guys ever had that?

Nope!  :o  Looking forward to your processing, cooking technique, and final product pics... 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 19, 2010, 09:50:30 AM
I heard back then on these islands and some of the tall ships they served long pork.Any of you guys ever had that?

Didn't we do this bit already?  :-\
Bottom line was whatever you cook, if you do it right and season it properly it will be good.  ;)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 19, 2010, 11:25:53 AM
Looks great Tom. What temp did you smoke?  How was the tenderness?
It stayed between 225 and 250 the whole time, took it off when it hit 185.  It wasn't as tender as I'd hoped, but it was really good.  Next time I think I'll let it go a bit longer.  Man, I love corned beef - first time I had it smoked/grilled instead of just boiled.

I heard back then on these islands and some of the tall ships they served long pork.Any of you guys ever had that?
Funny.  Maybe you could get yourself some hufu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hufu).
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 19, 2010, 11:26:10 AM
I would imagine long-pig would just do the smoke and no rub to be authentic. Supposed to be the best there is...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 19, 2010, 12:19:49 PM
I think (for now) I will steer clear of the long pork. But it is a part of BBQ style, maybe not practiced at present but historically it was.

Who knows what the future holds?

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f7/Cannibals.23232.jpg/714px-Cannibals.23232.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 19, 2010, 12:51:47 PM
BBQ human canibalism is pretty sick.  :o
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 19, 2010, 01:02:28 PM
Looks like cap is set up for it though with his Argentine grill. ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 19, 2010, 01:05:02 PM
I cant figure out what they guy with the beard is doing in the back.

Either he is saying:
"
 Ew man, dont eat people!"

or

"Hey you pigs, save some for me."

This print may make a good tee shirt.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 19, 2010, 01:06:05 PM
BBQ human canibalism is pretty sick.  :o

What, you prefer braised?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 19, 2010, 01:19:51 PM
I cant figure out what they guy with the beard is doing in the back.

Either he is saying:
"
 Ew man, dont eat people!"

or

"Hey you pigs, save some for me."

This print may make a good tee shirt.



Oh crap that is funny...! :D

He's either inciting them to eat more or a protesting Greek philosopher. Or maybe he want to join in.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: maxieboy on September 19, 2010, 02:00:44 PM
I cant figure out what they guy with the beard is doing in the back.

Either he is saying:
"
 Ew man, dont eat people!"

or

"Hey you pigs, save some for me."

This print may make a good tee shirt.




He's saying: "I hope you guys used SALT ONLY!"  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 19, 2010, 03:33:40 PM
5:55

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2HlkQfr11w
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 19, 2010, 04:29:30 PM
i cooked a lot this weekend....

cedar wrapped fresh salmon with green onions and asparagus, chicken wings, abt's & a fatty...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/074aaa08.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d8fcd0fc.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d1eaf626.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7b78c3af.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c323eff7.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 19, 2010, 06:17:49 PM
Now that looks delicious!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 19, 2010, 06:21:16 PM
i cooked a lot this weekend....


So, if you were gonna pick someone famous you looked like - would it be Uncle Jesse from Dukes of Hazzard?
You're always cooking SOOOOOOOOOOOOO much!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 19, 2010, 06:22:36 PM
i cooked a lot this weekend....


So, if you were gonna pick someone famous you looked like - would it be Uncle Jesse from Dukes of Hazzard?
You're always cooking SOOOOOOOOOOOOO much!

Just call him "The Man"  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 19, 2010, 06:37:39 PM
i cooked a lot this weekend....


So, if you were gonna pick someone famous you looked like - would it be Uncle Jesse from Dukes of Hazzard?

 
You're always cooking SOOOOOOOOOOOOO much!

I eat in moderation, but I don't cook that way. Hahaha.  I give away half of what I cook.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 20, 2010, 03:27:55 AM
BBQ human canibalism is pretty sick.  :o

What, you prefer braised?

ok....very funny.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 20, 2010, 04:23:55 AM
BBQ human canibalism is pretty sick.  :o

What, you prefer braised?

ok....very funny.  ;)

The real problem is getting pots and pans big enough to do something other than bbq.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: EHall on September 20, 2010, 10:47:35 AM
mmm human stew! ... something I drive around in everyday...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 20, 2010, 10:34:31 PM
Here's my Short-pork done overnight. Twelve hours @185 before it got wrapped and put back on the pit with the dampers nearly closed shut for the next 6 hours. Removed and rested for an hour.

I did an injection and rub on a 7 pound pork shoulder (picnic with bone-in).

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TJhAEQWlcNI/AAAAAAAAAQQ/pZxjtfe4qOg/s640/2010-09-19%2015.36.54.jpg)
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TJhAFISJLYI/AAAAAAAAAQU/inFHrn07yPc/s640/2010-09-19%2015.46.40.jpg)

Ahhh a beer break!
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TJhAFXuGOHI/AAAAAAAAAQY/zokzYHVnHWU/s640/2010-09-19%2016.02.29.jpg)

After 12 hours:
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TJhAFnPmpsI/AAAAAAAAAQc/YRlR8K82KYc/s640/2010-09-20%2003.40.00.jpg)

Chopped and sauced about 5 pounds:
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TJhAFyAhmuI/AAAAAAAAAQg/Z1Su59APUyU/s640/2010-09-20%2012.38.11.jpg)

The end product on a kaiser roll and coleslaw:
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TJhAsZXzWyI/AAAAAAAAAQo/EpWCYSm_gJY/s640/2010-09-20%2012.57.00.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 20, 2010, 11:01:25 PM
Looks great euge!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 21, 2010, 03:50:46 AM
Splendid Euge!

Looks fantastic!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on September 21, 2010, 04:30:17 AM
Yum!  Did you use a Carolina vinegar based sauce I presume?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 21, 2010, 05:57:28 AM
good looking stuff.  i see the egg is treating you well, and you it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on September 21, 2010, 05:59:15 AM
Looks good rad...er Euge. But you lost me at
Quote
Chopped

Gotta pull that pork man!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 21, 2010, 10:04:06 AM
Yum!  Did you use a Carolina vinegar based sauce I presume?

It was a thin vinegar tomato sauce made with apple-juice and some drippings. Barely can tell it's there so it might need some notch-kicking. ;) Otherwise it's unctuous, smoky and porky.

Robert I pulled it with forks as much as I could until my hands got tired. Then chopped, which I think is traditional. Ended up with alot- maybe the folks at work will eat well. They'll want brisket too.


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on September 21, 2010, 10:20:57 AM
I've started using those yellow dishwashing gloves to pull mine (the pork shoulder  ;) ). Works like a charm. The fork thing never worked for me. I'm still eating on mine from Labor Day. I froze most of it. I did make some stuffed Hatch Chiles with pulled pork and cream cheese a couple of nights after making it. Those were out-freakin-standing.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 21, 2010, 10:26:34 AM
try bear paws.....


http://www.kck.com/bear-paws-bbq-meat-handler.html
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 21, 2010, 10:30:04 AM
I've started using those yellow dishwashing gloves to pull mine (the pork shoulder  ;) ). Works like a charm. The fork thing never worked for me. I'm still eating on mine from Labor Day. I froze most of it. I did make some stuffed Hatch Chiles with pulled pork and cream cheese a couple of nights after making it. Those were out-freakin-standing.

That's a good idea! And the rellenos sound delicioso. That's definitely within my capabilities. Have four pounds meat vac-packed, which is probably 16 or so sandwiches worth. Not wanting to reinvent the wheel, but I think some thin sliced onion would go well either with the slaw or as a sub, but then it'd need pickles. Oh jeez now I'm talking chopped beef... :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 21, 2010, 10:33:07 AM
try bear paws.....


http://www.kck.com/bear-paws-bbq-meat-handler.html

(http://www.kck.com/images/bear_paws/bear_paws_main_4.jpg)

Now that's an idea! Plus one can defend the que from hungry guests... :D

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on September 21, 2010, 10:53:30 AM
try bear paws.....


http://www.kck.com/bear-paws-bbq-meat-handler.html

(http://www.kck.com/images/bear_paws/bear_paws_main_4.jpg)

Now that's an idea! Plus one can defend the que from hungry guests... :D

They are amazing!!!  Pull a 9 pound Butt in a matter of a couple minutes.  Just amazing!!! Cheers!!!

Edit:  This is where I bought mine: http://cgi.ebay.com/BEAR-PAW-CLAWS-ELECTRIC-MEAT-HANDLER-SMOKER-BBQ-GRILL-/150484577624?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2309946d58 (http://cgi.ebay.com/BEAR-PAW-CLAWS-ELECTRIC-MEAT-HANDLER-SMOKER-BBQ-GRILL-/150484577624?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2309946d58)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 27, 2010, 06:15:54 AM
these are some of the shrimp i got a few days ago along with some "sushi grade" tuna and fresh cobia i bought from the seafood market. 


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5e3cd964.jpg)


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/503d6f9e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/24d15d02.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/11b869c6.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/4ae68d03.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e81e50dc.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f7b9fee2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/aebff318.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 27, 2010, 06:24:49 AM
That's some great looking Q as usual deepsouth. 

I brined and smoked a turkey breast...pics to follow.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 27, 2010, 06:36:42 AM
That's some great looking Q as usual deepsouth. 

I brined and smoked a turkey breast...pics to follow.


can't wait to see that.  i've yet to try a big bird like that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 27, 2010, 09:41:52 AM
Mmmm. Shrimp.

Were they marinated? Looks tasty.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 27, 2010, 10:55:22 AM
Mmmm. Shrimp.

Were they marinated? Looks tasty.

they were, for a couple hours.  course sea salt, dizzy pig shakin' the tree and paul prudhomme's seafood magic.  probably some of the best grilled shrimp i've done.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 27, 2010, 11:17:35 AM
Mmmm. Shrimp.

Were they marinated? Looks tasty.

they were, for a couple hours.  course sea salt, dizzy pig shakin' the tree and paul prudhomme's seafood magic.  probably some of the best grilled shrimp i've done.

What temp and how long do you grill them?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 27, 2010, 11:25:33 AM
I thought they looked marinated. Shrimp really benefit from a quickie marinade. A quick brine will do wonders as well.

Did 2 racks of babybacks last night along with some stuffed pork-loin (yup you guessed it: with bratwurst), potatoes and corn on the cob.

The loin was/is excellent! I got a good deal on a whole loin at 1.67/# and it was fresh- never frozen. So I cut and stuffed five roasts, vac-packed and froze 4- the other went in the smoker at 275 until 155F in the center.

The ribs are another story. For some reason I had a brain fart and modified Harry Soo's 6 hour 275F method (no spritzing) for my babybacks. Came out waaay overcooked. The bark was excellent, next time only 4 hours. I think either the spritzing or the size of the ribs makes a difference here. I'm just not prepared to "spritz" every 15 minutes for two hours.

Solution? Chopped pork with a sweet vinegar sauce on rolls...

Actually, the crunchy bits are great in the pork. Additional dimensions of texture and flavor. Expensive way to make pulled pork but goood... :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 27, 2010, 12:10:36 PM
Mmmm. Shrimp.

Were they marinated? Looks tasty.

they were, for a couple hours.  course sea salt, dizzy pig shakin' the tree and paul prudhomme's seafood magic.  probably some of the best grilled shrimp i've done.

What temp and how long do you grill them?

i get my grill pretty hot...  in this case, probably 400-450 and then i just go by "look and feel" and it never hurts to pull one off and pop it in my mouth!   

obviously, shrimp don't take long at all.  these were ready in under 10 mintues i'm sure.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 27, 2010, 06:27:55 PM
Here' the new WSM smoker.  This is the first smoke.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010373.jpg)

I brined the Turkey for 24 hrs.

2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter

I smoked the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010374.jpg)


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 27, 2010, 06:38:06 PM
Here' the new WSM smoker.  This is the first smoke.



Oooohhhhhh Aaaahhhhhhhhh Shiny!

PS - Thanks for wearing clothes while taking the shot. Looks like a red shirt and bluejeans? Do you remember when people were taking pictures of shiny things and posting em for sale on ebay while they were nekked. The intent wasn't even to sell the product but rather to "show their wares"
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 27, 2010, 06:39:58 PM
Here' the new WSM smoker.  This is the first smoke.



Oooohhhhhh Aaaahhhhhhhhh Shiny!

I should kick some dirt on it or something.  It just looks too shiny.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 27, 2010, 06:53:24 PM
Beautiful! There you go making me hungry again.

Walked in for the WSM walked out with a BGE. I think you'll be able. To cook a lot in that one. Is it the 21.5"?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 27, 2010, 06:58:58 PM
Beautiful! There you go making me hungry again.

Walked in for the WSM walked out with a BGE. I think you'll be able. To cook a lot in that one. Is it the 21.5"?

I got the 18.5" since it's just the wife most of the time. If I need the additional cooking space I can break out the Weber 18.5 kettle and the Silver G gas grill.

So much Q and so little time!   8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 27, 2010, 10:13:34 PM
That looks great!  I'm definitely in the market for a smoker and have been eying the WSM.  Can't decide.  Are the BGEs everything they're supposed to be?  Has anyone here ever compared them to other kamados?   I'm going to have a hard time convincing my wife we should spend the money on one, but it's worth a try :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 27, 2010, 10:42:41 PM
That looks great!  I'm definitely in the market for a smoker and have been eying the WSM.  Can't decide.  Are the BGEs everything they're supposed to be?  Has anyone here ever compared them to other kamados?   I'm going to have a hard time convincing my wife we should spend the money on one, but it's worth a try :)

Without the Nest and Plate Setter it costs less. To do it all again I'd skip the Nest. That was $120. Then you could spend the remainder on a control system (http://www.thebbqguru.com/categories/BBQ-Guru-Controls-and-Packages/). LOL

I think the popular Weber will hold more but the frugal Egg is versatile and can easily go over 1000F according to the info out there. It's very heavy and should last decades if not longer. I put mine together without help. Check out the ceramic if you can.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 27, 2010, 11:44:46 PM
Without the Nest and Plate Setter it costs less. To do it all again I'd skip the Nest. That was $120. Then you could spend the remainder on a control system (http://www.thebbqguru.com/categories/BBQ-Guru-Controls-and-Packages/). LOL
:o

I think the popular Weber will hold more but the frugal Egg is versatile and can easily go over 1000F according to the info out there. It's very heavy and should last decades if not longer. I put mine together without help. Check out the ceramic if you can.
I'm not afraid of putting stuff together, and I'll probably build my own table rather than buy one or a nest.  They even have plans on the website.  I'm sure I would just buy the egg to start and then drool over accessories before breaking down and buying them :)

What is the frugal egg?  Is that just the egg itself, no frills?  It's still going to be $800+ . . .
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 28, 2010, 12:02:30 AM
Well, its frugal cause I've done 6 looong cooks and still haven't hit the 10# mark in charcoal. Close but not yet. Supplemented with what the Pecan tree sheds so maybe it's skewed slightly. But by just a bit. I'd do a 6 hour smoke and there'd be loads of charcoal left.

I think you can do without the plate setter if you do some low and slow, and you won't need it for grilling. 

 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 12:35:32 AM
It would take a long time to break even if you're going by charcoal used.  :)

But that's not the main motivation anyway, it's the awesome food.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 28, 2010, 04:52:32 AM
Here' the new WSM smoker.  This is the first smoke.



Oooohhhhhh Aaaahhhhhhhhh Shiny!

PS - Thanks for wearing clothes while taking the shot. Looks like a red shirt and bluejeans? Do you remember when people were taking pictures of shiny things and posting em for sale on ebay while they were nekked. The intent wasn't even to sell the product but rather to "show their wares"

Perhaps it's a good thing I'm not Weazeltoe then.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 28, 2010, 04:53:46 AM
That looks great!  I'm definitely in the market for a smoker and have been eying the WSM.  Can't decide.  Are the BGEs everything they're supposed to be?  Has anyone here ever compared them to other kamados?   I'm going to have a hard time convincing my wife we should spend the money on one, but it's worth a try :)

Thanks!

I can't vouch for the almighty egg but the WSM is the shazizzle!

Tell her you'll smoke with no pants then.  :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on September 28, 2010, 04:55:18 AM
If you look hard enough you can see his reflection in the turkey breast too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 28, 2010, 05:05:52 AM
That looks great!  I'm definitely in the market for a smoker and have been eying the WSM.  Can't decide.  Are the BGEs everything they're supposed to be?  Has anyone here ever compared them to other kamados?   I'm going to have a hard time convincing my wife we should spend the money on one, but it's worth a try :)

Do you have a regular weber grill already? There's a conversion kit for it.
http://www.shop.cajunbandit.com/product.sc?productId=1&categoryId=4 (http://www.shop.cajunbandit.com/product.sc?productId=1&categoryId=4)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 28, 2010, 05:10:40 AM
If you have a 22.5 weber kettle, these work wonders: 
http://smokenator.com/default.htm

I bought one and used it for a long time.  Then I finally gave in and bought a brand new 2009 model WSM, with the new features, thermometer, etc.  I use my WSM, well, a few times a year.  The Smokenator is easier to operate for smaller quantities of food...up to a modest size brisket or turkey. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 28, 2010, 05:16:24 AM
It's a combo of the cook and the cooker and knowing how to use your tools of Q.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 28, 2010, 05:17:34 AM
Oh, that bird looks divine!  Check out that skin!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on September 28, 2010, 09:46:34 AM
Anyone know if you can easily use a WSM or UDS for smoking sausage?  I'm talking sub 200F temps, and possibily some sort of rack to hang multiple coils?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 28, 2010, 09:57:21 AM
Anyone know if you can easily use a WSM or UDS for smoking sausage?  I'm talking sub 200F temps, and possibily some sort of rack to hang multiple coils?

Sure do...

They can be loaded on top as shown and on the lower rack as well.  Smoked sausage is one of my favorites.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Dzozvd_N1Dg/RlmjjarFzkI/AAAAAAAAAME/bbcIiPmo0Xk/s400/P1000193_edited.JPG)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 28, 2010, 05:25:25 PM
Anyone know if you can easily use a WSM or UDS for smoking sausage?  I'm talking sub 200F temps, and possibily some sort of rack to hang multiple coils?

If you want really cool smoking...sorry for the incessant reposting, but:
http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/CSG.html

Love this gadget.  I've missed out on cold smoked cheese all summer, I'm gearing up for a nice winter cold smoking season.  Zero heat, nice light trickle of smoke.  Won't cook the sausages, though.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on September 28, 2010, 05:38:57 PM
man why don't you become their US distributor and make something out of all this promoting you do for them?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 28, 2010, 05:48:19 PM
Don't worry, my enthusiasm may wane a bit when I try it, again, at subzero temperatures and incessantly swear at it for not lighting and staying lit.  I think it operates best at cool/cold temperatures, not necessarily freezing temps!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 28, 2010, 06:01:13 PM
venison tenderloin....

soaked 24 hours in buttermilk and drained off.  seasoned 24 hours with sea salt, dizzy pig raising the steaks and dizzy pig dizzy dust.

seared on the spider and brought it up and cooked it to 130 internal.

venison tenderloin....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b2d83b57.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/15e06dc1.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e64fff7b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/544bbb12.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b7f44259.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/12e65830.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 28, 2010, 06:26:19 PM
Nice bark on that t-loin.  I've never had a venison t-loin.  I don't hunt, but if I did I'm sure it would be on the grill.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 08:54:01 PM
Anyone know if you can easily use a WSM or UDS for smoking sausage?  I'm talking sub 200F temps, and possibily some sort of rack to hang multiple coils?

If you want really cool smoking...sorry for the incessant reposting, but:
http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/CSG.html

Love this gadget.  I've missed out on cold smoked cheese all summer, I'm gearing up for a nice winter cold smoking season.  Zero heat, nice light trickle of smoke.  Won't cook the sausages, though.
For those of us in the US . . .

http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/Order%20USA.html

Very tempting, I might have to do that.

venison tenderloin....
That looks fabulous!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 09:52:44 PM
For those of us in the US . . .

http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/Order%20USA.html

Very tempting, I might have to do that.
And . . .done.  Plus I ordered some cherry and hickory dust to go in it.  I want to smoke some cheese before Thanksgiving, this will give me a chance to practice a bit and get it done.  Thanks, I hadn't heard of that product.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 28, 2010, 10:04:13 PM
Rarely gets cold enough to use it safely around here. Maybe a few select days or night. Either that or adapt a fridge somehow.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 11:12:34 PM
I don't know, the directions say you can do cheese as long as the ambient is below 86F and the box doesn't get above 92F.  Should be fine most places, at night and for many months during the day.  Salmon should apparently be kept below 86F, but still, as long as it's below 80F for 5 hours it should be no problem.  Even in South Central Texas.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 28, 2010, 11:19:50 PM
Oh I thought it had to be below 40F? The temps you describe sound better to me. Interesting.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 28, 2010, 11:36:01 PM
Oh I thought it had to be below 40F? The temps you describe sound better to me. Interesting.
Well, that's what they say . . .
http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/ColdSmoking.html
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on September 28, 2010, 11:46:14 PM
Ideal temps are 75-78F! I can see a cheese soaking up some smoke flavor in that range.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 29, 2010, 12:27:44 AM
Yeah, warm enough to be a bit soft . . . I imagine there would be some variability between cheese varieties and a softer cheese might not need to be as warm.  But it's a great starting point. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on September 29, 2010, 03:25:34 AM
For those of us in the US . . .

http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/Order%20USA.html

Very tempting, I might have to do that.
And . . .done.  Plus I ordered some cherry and hickory dust to go in it.  I want to smoke some cheese before Thanksgiving, this will give me a chance to practice a bit and get it done.  Thanks, I hadn't heard of that product.

That's one thing on my list. Smoked cheese...I've never cold smoked and want to try it.

I've seen quite a few fairly simple ways to do. Here's a simple method.

http://www.smoker-cooking.com/build-a-cold-smoker.html
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on September 29, 2010, 05:25:54 AM
To smoke cheese indirect in your egg, I've read to us three pieces of charcoal natural briquettes. I haven't tried it yet.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on September 29, 2010, 07:48:26 AM
And . . .done.  Plus I ordered some cherry and hickory dust to go in it.  I want to smoke some cheese before Thanksgiving, this will give me a chance to practice a bit and get it done.  Thanks, I hadn't heard of that product.

Here's a much cheaper source of dust.  I have 5lbs of mesquite and 5lbs of apple, and 5lbs of sawdust is a LOT of sawdust as you might imagine, this thing only uses a few ounces per burn.  I don't know if I'll ever use it all up.
edit: helps to include the link!
http://www.psseasoning.com/index.cfm/act/products.view/category_id/20
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on September 29, 2010, 09:03:44 AM
And . . .done.  Plus I ordered some cherry and hickory dust to go in it.  I want to smoke some cheese before Thanksgiving, this will give me a chance to practice a bit and get it done.  Thanks, I hadn't heard of that product.

Here's a much cheaper source of dust.  I have 5lbs of mesquite and 5lbs of apple, and 5lbs of sawdust is a LOT of sawdust as you might imagine, this thing only uses a few ounces per burn.  I don't know if I'll ever use it all up.
edit: helps to include the link!
http://www.psseasoning.com/index.cfm/act/products.view/category_id/20
Things that would have been good to know YESTERDAY!   :(

No big deal, if it works well for me I'll order a bunch of the other stuff.  I can use it as a change from the typical madrona/apple/plum that I use.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 03, 2010, 02:15:41 AM
The pork butt is on! 18 lbs covered in salt and bone suckin' sauce.(dry rub)
Mostly lump, some briquettes - some fist sized mesquite chunks.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 03, 2010, 07:32:23 AM
I have beef jerky going in the smoker this morning (after marinading/brining for 60 hours).  It is running at a nice 160-170F with a big hunk of mesquite.

Once it is done, I may try doing some cheese if I can get it cool enough.  Bought a big chunk each of gouda and aged cheddar to try with some cherry wood.

And if all this turns out, I'm bringing it to our homebrew club meeting on Wednesday.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 03, 2010, 10:05:55 AM
The pork butt is on! 18 lbs covered in salt and bone suckin' sauce.(dry rub)
Mostly lump, some briquettes - some fist sized mesquite chunks.

Post some pics!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 03, 2010, 10:06:53 AM
I have beef jerky going in the smoker this morning (after marinading/brining for 60 hours).  It is running at a nice 160-170F with a big hunk of mesquite.

Once it is done, I may try doing some cheese if I can get it cool enough.  Bought a big chunk each of gouda and aged cheddar to try with some cherry wood.

And if all this turns out, I'm bringing it to our homebrew club meeting on Wednesday.

What marinade recipe did you use for the jerky?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 03, 2010, 04:44:04 PM
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/TKkUslbO0MI/AAAAAAAAAOo/4NBKXjFNrnA/s400/HPIM3113.JPG)
This is half of it. 18 lbs went on at 4 this morning. Started the fire at 3am. Pulled it off at 10 when it hit 160 and wrapped it and put it in the cooler for a couple hours until the guests arrived. Pulled it and hit it with Carolina style sauce.
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/TKkUtdfx5gI/AAAAAAAAAOw/PtHwgCM4FXM/s400/HPIM3096.JPG)
Crock pot just to keep it warm, cider vinegar, brown sugar, chile powder and pepper flakes.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zgqYdZTOtWA/TKkUs4oYBiI/AAAAAAAAAOs/B9B_3tZyy84/s400/HPIM3104.JPG)
Yeah, festive - Halloween plates. Cole Slaw on the sammich, gnocchi with italian sausage, and gibanica.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 03, 2010, 06:18:40 PM
That looks fantastic!

Next time you get a chance...post a pic of the franken-WSM.

Nice looking bark on that shoulder.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 03, 2010, 06:52:02 PM
I gotta wipe it down before I can post that. Dripped like crazy today, it's pretty ugly right now. Picking up the meat, my fingers would just go right through it, it was so soft. I overestimated the fuel, it was still going so good I rummaged for some more meat and came up with a ham. that went from ten till three. I'll be eating this pretty much all week, I'll be pork Gump with all the different ways I'm gonna eat this stuff. Not like it's a bad thing...
I shoulda taken pics when I was shredding it but I was pressed for time and didn't even think I was gonna post pics until bluesman requested them. anyway, there was a nice smoke ring a bit better than a quarter inch all around. The bark was incredible, if you're not into making your own rubs yet - Bone Sucking Sauce is pretty darn good.




Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 03, 2010, 06:58:40 PM
Quote
Not like it's a bad thing...

It ain't! Looks wonderful! Betcha it's good on rice or potatoes too!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 03, 2010, 07:01:41 PM
Quote
Not like it's a bad thing...

It ain't! Looks wonderful! Betcha it's good on rice or potatoes too!

Yeah, throwing it on top of rice tomorrow for lunch. Probably douse the pork with a little swad hot n spicy ketchup (runny stuff) just to change up the flavor a bit. Bet on american fries with onions it'd be good - guess that's almost a hash.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 03, 2010, 10:36:39 PM
Once it is done, I may try doing some cheese if I can get it cool enough.  Bought a big chunk each of gouda and aged cheddar to try with some cherry wood.
Let me know how the cheese turns out . . . I'll probably do some this week, my ProQ was here when I got back from Portland.

Speaking of the ProQ, I was a bit annoyed - they include a votive candle for starting it, which seems nice except it was a super cheap candle.  It was broken and crumbled, the wick had fallen out, crumbs of wax were ALL over the ProQ, and I sliced my finger on some rough edges when trying to brush the bits off.  In the end I just put the thing on the grill and cranked it up to about 500F for 15 minutes or so to burn off the wax.

Has anyone used one for hotter smoking, like 225F?  I figure you can just have it running in the box while your heat comes from another source.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 04, 2010, 07:14:26 AM
well, this started out as a rib roast, but it was a pretty hectic weekend and i had to squeeze in homemade lasagna and a rib roast and decorate for halloween yesterday...   the lasagna was from scratch, straight down to the pasta.  my first time using semolina flour (boy did this make ALL THE DIFFERENCE in the WORLD)...  the rib roast turned into steaks....  seasoned the steaks with dizzy pig red eye express and sea salt & pepper.



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f4122f02.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c8b7f4b1.jpg)


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/73c454b1.jpg)

the lasagna was not cooked on the egg, sorry....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1b9babf7.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/23d02c0a.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 04, 2010, 08:31:53 AM
Tasty looking Q as usual.  The Lasagna is making me hungry right now.  ;)

What's a good beer to serve with lasagna?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 04, 2010, 08:46:07 AM
Tasty looking Q as usual.  The Lasagna is making me hungry right now.  ;)

What's a good beer to serve with lasagna?

that's a good question....  sam adams oktoberfest was yesterday!

if i had my pick, i'd probably pick and amber ale or a pale ale.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 04, 2010, 09:56:40 AM
Certainly could go with a nice steak right now. I think something a little more bold like a porter or a dubbel would go well with the lasagna.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 04, 2010, 05:27:53 PM
What's a good beer to serve with lasagna?

Wine.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on October 04, 2010, 05:51:13 PM
What's a good beer to serve with lasagna?

Wine.

Have to agree...I'd like something big and rich like amarone, or...well, anything red, really!  However, I think for some reason I'd lean towards a saison in beer...maybe its because the last commercial beer I had was a Tank 7 from Boulevard that was particularly excellent, and that is colouring my opinion.  By the cold hard facts, it isn't a great pairing, but the complexity of this beer, which has a girth about it, but still remains light in many ways, makes it a perfect food pairing for so many dishes.  Hard to think of something that wouldn't go with a well-brewed, higher gravity saison.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 04, 2010, 05:52:54 PM
Basement deggo red.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 04, 2010, 10:33:19 PM
So, I smoked my first cheese with the ProQ cold smoker tonight, roughly a pound of Tillamook cheddar.  It's a bit chilly here right now so the smoking happened at 53F, quite a bit colder than ideal.  After 3 hours of smoking with hickory dust the cheese has a very mild flavor.  I'm going to let it sit in the fridge for a day or so and taste it again.  It tastes good and everything, but the smoke is more mild than I'd like it.

I think if it had been warmer it would have softened the cheese and so it would have absorbed the smoke flavor better, but maybe I'm making that up.  Maybe the smoke box is too big for best results, I don't really know.

I'd post a pic, but it just looks like a couple of blocks of cheese.  No smoke marks or browning or anything like that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 04, 2010, 10:41:54 PM
I think you'll have to do it longer at those temps.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 04, 2010, 10:55:11 PM
I'm sure you're right, this was just a quick test batch to see how it goes and I don't want to be up all night.  I want to have it nailed down by the beginning of November, so I'll be doing lots of tests. :)  Plus I'll do some during the day when it's warmer, that should help!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 05, 2010, 03:38:16 AM
I'm sure you're right, this was just a quick test batch to see how it goes and I don't want to be up all night.  I want to have it nailed down by the beginning of November, so I'll be doing lots of tests. :)  Plus I'll do some during the day when it's warmer, that should help!

Could you post pics next time?

I'm just curious to see your results...eventhough they're just blocks of cheese.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on October 05, 2010, 05:57:25 AM
Funny, I smoked for about the same time (at even colder temps) and got great smoke flavor.  You're right, you likely won't see any coloration (its a coloring wash they put on smoked cheese commercially anyway).  I used very plain storebought yellow cheddar, I wonder if the consistency of the cheese affects it (ie., denser crumblier cheeses don't absorb as much as softer ones?)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 09:14:32 AM
So that brown stuff that looks like grill marks is really just coloring?  That's good to know, I thought it might be smoke marks.

I'm guessing the texture of the cheese will affect it, but I haven't tested it, I only did the cheddar.  I'm not saying the smoke flavor is bad, just not as intense as I want it to be.  I'll have to see what other people think, and maybe compare it to some store bought smoked cheese.

And really blues, there's nothing to see, just some ~1x1x5 chunks of yellow cheddar.  But I can do some process picks next time, that might be more interesting.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 05, 2010, 09:24:45 AM
And really blues, there's nothing to see, just some ~1x1x5 chunks of yellow cheddar.  But I can do some process picks next time, that might be more interesting.  ;D

That will work.   :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 10:23:05 AM
And remember to take the cheese out of it's wax coating first!  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 05, 2010, 11:47:54 AM
Here are a few pics from last weekend's Que... 1 Butt, 4 Pork Roasts and 2 Fatties.   Cheers!!!

The fairly modified Char-Griller...
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4150/5054433801_97b3955691_m.jpg)

Ready to foil a roast...
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4103/5054433813_ac146e0c2e_m.jpg)

Pullin' a Pork Roast
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4092/5054433815_65e98cf8d2_m.jpg)

The Fatties...
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4089/5054433819_3ef316e875_m.jpg)

Pulled Pork Sammie...
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4130/5054433821_3a8700c377_m.jpg)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 11:59:51 AM
Good thing I just had lunch! This would have me running to the fridge!.

The "fatties" are some sort of meatloaf?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 05, 2010, 12:18:00 PM
Phantastic work hamilton!   8)
How do you like that grill?
I was considering getting a chargriller (that is a chargriller?) but opted out for the WSM.
What style of beer did you serve with that feast?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on October 05, 2010, 12:18:12 PM
In online BBQ forum speak fatties tend to be basic breakfast sausage meat (usually) formed into rolls, seasoned, often stuffed with various ingredients, and smoked, so in a sense very much like smoked meatloaf.  Looks good!  
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 05, 2010, 12:21:31 PM
The "fatties" are some sort of meatloaf?

Just a tube of Jimmy Dean Sausage dusted with rub & smoked to ~165F. I made these primarily for breakfast.  Muffin, fatty, egg, cheese A.K.A McMuffin.  The Fatty possibilities are endless.  Roll the sausage out to 1/2", fill with sautéd peppers & onions, cheddar cheese, cream cheese, wrap with a bacon weave, etc... etc...  Roll it up like a jelly roll & seal the edges so the "goodies" don't fall out.  I was lazy & just dusted them...  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 12:27:12 PM
MMMM.

..but you always have to say "I smoked a fattie"
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 05, 2010, 12:30:26 PM
Phantastic work hamilton!   8)
How do you like that grill?
I was considering getting a chargriller (that is a chargriller?) but opted out for the WSM.
What style of beer did you serve with that feast?
It took some time to get the Char-Griller working the way I wanted it.  I added the baffles under the grates to help even out the temp, a charcoal basket in the firebox, drilled extra 3/4" holes by the intake & chimney to allow better flow. I can get it smokin' hot or run it < 200F. I really like the control cause I usually start the Que out ~200F for the first hour or so for the smoke & then bump it up to ~250F for the balance.

Beer? During the cook I went through 4 pints of DIPA, Irish Red and Sweet Stout. With the meal, a Smokehaus Porter I made last winter by smoking some of the base malt with Alder wood.  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 05, 2010, 05:31:19 PM
Roll the sausage out to 1/2", fill with sautéd peppers & onions, cheddar cheese, cream cheese, wrap with a bacon weave, etc... etc...  Roll it up like a jelly roll & seal the edges so the "goodies" don't fall out.  I was lazy & just dusted them...  Cheers!!!

Put the sausage in a ziplock, I use two rolls per gallon bag. Punch it down, flatten it out even across the whole bag. Then you cut away the sides, put your ingredients across the middle and use the plastic still under the sausage to aid in rolling it up. Pinch the ends shut and smoke away! I view it as more a novelty than anything, I would never do just fatties on the grill.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 05, 2010, 06:59:24 PM
Roll the sausage out to 1/2", fill with sautéd peppers & onions, cheddar cheese, cream cheese, wrap with a bacon weave, etc... etc...  Roll it up like a jelly roll & seal the edges so the "goodies" don't fall out.  I was lazy & just dusted them...  Cheers!!!

Put the sausage in a ziplock, I use two rolls per gallon bag. Punch it down, flatten it out even across the whole bag. Then you cut away the sides, put your ingredients across the middle and use the plastic still under the sausage to aid in rolling it up. Pinch the ends shut and smoke away! I view it as more a novelty than anything, I would never do just fatties on the grill.
True. Fatties fill the gaps or even better yest include them with some ABT's, wings, Jap Poppers for hors d'oeuvres while the rest of the Que is chuggin' away...  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 05, 2010, 07:02:31 PM
I'm going to make one along with a brisket this weekend.  I'll try to post pics.
Fatties are the bomb diggity dogg!  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 08:15:28 PM
I think smoking a fattie will go over well. Probably throw my own twist on it like always. ;)

Was at walmart looking at their meat. Haven't bought any from them since last year because the product has "up to 12% added solution" on the tag. And it isn't cheap either. So I'm paying for 12% of liquid.

Still, the stuff is basically prebrined right?

Opinions?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 06, 2010, 04:49:22 AM
I think smoking a fattie will go over well. Probably throw my own twist on it like always. ;)

Was at walmart looking at their meat. Haven't bought any from them since last year because the product has "up to 12% added solution" on the tag. And it isn't cheap either. So I'm paying for 12% of liquid.

Still, the stuff is basically prebrined right?

Opinions?
,

Pretty hard to get away from that "added solution" BS. Pretty much anything frozen has it, or anything cryopac'd.
My last hunk o meat was from the restaurant supply store - I didn't see anything like that on the label. Only thing I
hate about buying there is there is much less info on the packaging. Like you can read the label and see your shrimp
are from China or Thailand when you buy retail. No such labeling on their packaging.  :-\ Kinda makes sense,
the restaurants would only be looking at cost per unit to figure their profit. They don't care what they're feeding you.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 05:29:51 AM
I think the best way to avoid "unknown" solutions or additives is to prepare your own "fresh" sausage.

Here's a recipe:

Homemade Pork Sausage Recipe

10 pounds ground pork
4 tablespoons salt
3 tablespoons powdered sage
3 teaspoons powdered thyme
1 teaspoon ginger
1 ½ teaspoons nutmeg
1 teaspoon white pepper
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cup cold water

Reduce quantities as required.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 06, 2010, 09:03:29 AM
There's lots of fresh sausage recipes . . . I never bother packing them into casings, I just use it as loose sausage.  I got this one from a TV show with the Mexican cooking guy.  Rick Bayless?  I leave out the spinach powder because I don't have any, although I might make my own for the next batch.

Chorizo Verde
<edit - recipe moved to the sausage thread> (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=4020.msg46188#msg46188)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 09:21:59 AM
There's lots of fresh sausage recipes . . .

+1

There's as many variations as there are chef's in the kitchen.  ;)

Here's a good fatty recipe called "The Bacon Explosion"...Weaz would love this one.

http://www.bbqaddicts.com/blog/recipes/bacon-explosion/

(http://www.inquisitr.com/wp-content/bacon-explosion.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 06, 2010, 10:26:51 AM
There's lots of fresh sausage recipes . . .

+1

There's as many variations as there are chef's in the kitchen.  ;)

Here's a good fatty recipe called "The Bacon Explosion"...Weaz would love this one.

http://www.bbqaddicts.com/blog/recipes/bacon-explosion/

(http://www.inquisitr.com/wp-content/bacon-explosion.jpg)
I think I just plugged an artery! :o  Dayamn that looks good...  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 06, 2010, 10:47:52 AM
Please! I want to go to pork Nirvana!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on October 06, 2010, 01:37:42 PM
Our company equipment tech is building me a smoker/grill out of 20" well casing.  It will have 54" X 20" grilling surface, a 36" tall smoker with 3 shelves and hooks for hanging sausage or cheese at one end and a firebox with flat top at the other end.  It should weigh in at about 800 pounds when it's done but it will be great to have.  We're talking about mounting it on a trailer but I think I'd rather pour a slab for it under a shade tree behind the house.  I'll post pictures when it's done.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: ryang on October 06, 2010, 02:24:50 PM
That sounds awesome, and don't forget the pictures!!  :o
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 02:34:02 PM
That sounds awesome, and don't forget the pictures!!  :o

+1

Looking forward to the end result via pics.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 06, 2010, 08:52:15 PM
Wow. Incredible. Stuffed mine with onion, garlic and pepper jack, Used #1hot sausage and #1 ground pork and one pack of bacon.

Ate four sandwiches. Whew.

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TK1AqIFQr0I/AAAAAAAAATM/Kt_lMkKMGSs/s640/2010-10-06%2020.27.25.jpg)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TK1Aq7qocsI/AAAAAAAAATQ/tEm3xdOwQr4/s640/2010-10-06%2020.29.38.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on October 06, 2010, 08:55:19 PM
I've been looking at the bacon explosion pretty much since it's been posted.  I must make one of these fatties.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 07, 2010, 03:37:48 AM
Wow. Incredible. Stuffed mine with onion, garlic and pepper jack, Used #1hot sausage and #1 ground pork and one pack of bacon.

Ate four sandwiches. Whew.

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TK1AqIFQr0I/AAAAAAAAATM/Kt_lMkKMGSs/s640/2010-10-06%2020.27.25.jpg)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TK1Aq7qocsI/AAAAAAAAATQ/tEm3xdOwQr4/s640/2010-10-06%2020.29.38.jpg)

Now that...my freind is a work of art.... and a thing of beauty.   ;)  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 07, 2010, 08:40:44 AM
Wow. Incredible. Stuffed mine with onion, garlic and pepper jack, Used #1hot sausage and #1 ground pork and one pack of bacon.

Ate four sandwiches. Whew.


Lookin' real good!!!  First thing I thought of was Movin' Out by Billy Joel...  "can give you a
Heart attack-ack-ack-ack-ack-ack".  Cheers!!!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 08, 2010, 12:04:19 PM
I also did a thick rack of babybacks that night. Honestly it's not my favorite cut but it's all the store had. I prefer the meatier St Louis style cut. So I picked the thickest and most uniform rack I could find.

Regardless, inspired by Cap's "salt only" meat I decided just to do salt and pepper. No brining. No injecting. No rub. Plenty of coarse salt and pepper right before smoking for six hours at 225. I can honestly say these ribs turned out pretty darn good. Great flavor. Nothing disguising the meat. Just the smoke, the concentrated rib flavor and the soft and crunchy texture of the meat.

The previous rack (St Louis) was injected and rubbed. I actually got complements on them from people at work who don't often offer such comments. Hmm. Guess adding "pie-spice" to the rub and injection marries well with the meat too. But they were a little sweet for me, and that comes from my injecting process. Easily fixed.

So I'll definitely do salt only in the future. Anyone else try this? If not may I suggest...?

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 08, 2010, 11:07:04 PM
Ok, I smoked some more cheese today.  Tillamook cheddar, hickory smoked.  Ambient temp varied from 59-69F during the smoke, ~7 hours.

Start of smoke:
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TK9TxUWdXWI/AAAAAAAAAD0/-45rirTgZrg/IMG00139-20101008-1019.jpg)

Almost the end of smoke:
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLADhEkyUmI/AAAAAAAAAEI/zQBOqUDNtKU/IMG00140-20101008-1654.jpg)

Color comparison to fresh cheese from the same 5 lb block.  They definitely seem smaller, although you can't really compare the sizes of the smoked on the left to the not-smoked on the right, they weren't exactly uniform when I cut them.  The smoked ones have a crust of some sort, but I'm not sure if the cheese looks much different from cheese left at that temp and humidity for 7 hours would without smoking it.  I read somewhere I should wipe them before wrapping, and this time there was drops of oil/fat on the surface, so that's good.  Not so much last time.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLADhAb0ZPI/AAAAAAAAAEM/Q1d5Ih0GeHw/IMG00141-20101008-1712.jpg)

Anyway, they're wrapped and "resting" for a week or ten days.  I'll do some more cheddar and probably some gouda, but this time with cherry.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 08, 2010, 11:15:14 PM
Do you have a hole in your sock Tom?

The cheese looks pretty good actually. Its color has deepened. I bet it'll be pretty smoky after 7 hours. Let time do it's thing. Next time weigh each piece to see if there's any evaporation going on.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 08, 2010, 11:20:10 PM
Do you have a hole in your sock Tom?
;D  Nope, gold toe (http://www.goldtoe.com/).


The cheese looks pretty good actually. Its color has deepened. I bet it'll be pretty smoky after 7 hours. Let time do it's thing. Next time weigh each piece to see if there's any evaporation going on.
Yeah, I'm going to weigh them next time and see what the deal is.  If I remember.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on October 09, 2010, 03:44:25 AM
Those look great!  I think the most I've smoked is 4 hours and I didn't see much coloring, except for maybe a slight darkening of the pepper jack (that may've been my imagination).  These pics make me want to do some straight away, but alas, I have to go on a lovely two week vacation this morning, at 6AM, driving across the southwest to california and back, seeing 5 national parks and generally relaxing, so it will have to wait til I get back, for shame.   ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 05:21:55 AM
After you are done eating all that cheese Tom, (which will be in what? a year and a half) Make some lox. What temps ya hitting in the bbq? Just salt it and cure it like you would grava lax but with much less sugar and no dill,  then smoke it up.

Thats what I want to see.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 09, 2010, 11:52:04 AM
Ok, I smoked some more cheese today.  Tillamook cheddar, hickory smoked.  Ambient temp varied from 59-69F during the smoke, ~7 hours.

Start of smoke:
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TK9TxUWdXWI/AAAAAAAAAD0/-45rirTgZrg/IMG00139-20101008-1019.jpg)

Almost the end of smoke:
(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLADhEkyUmI/AAAAAAAAAEI/zQBOqUDNtKU/IMG00140-20101008-1654.jpg)

Color comparison to fresh cheese from the same 5 lb block.  They definitely seem smaller, although you can't really compare the sizes of the smoked on the left to the not-smoked on the right, they weren't exactly uniform when I cut them.  The smoked ones have a crust of some sort, but I'm not sure if the cheese looks much different from cheese left at that temp and humidity for 7 hours would without smoking it.  I read somewhere I should wipe them before wrapping, and this time there was drops of oil/fat on the surface, so that's good.  Not so much last time.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLADhAb0ZPI/AAAAAAAAAEM/Q1d5Ih0GeHw/IMG00141-20101008-1712.jpg)

Anyway, they're wrapped and "resting" for a week or ten days.  I'll do some more cheddar and probably some gouda, but this time with cherry.

Tom...I'm impressed. Looks great.

Let us know how they taste.

I want to try this method.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 09, 2010, 04:30:40 PM
Enjoy the trip nic, you know we don;t feel bad for you at all :)

After you are done eating all that cheese Tom, (which will be in what? a year and a half) Make some lox. What temps ya hitting in the bbq? Just salt it and cure it like you would grava lax but with much less sugar and no dill,  then smoke it up.

Thats what I want to see.
The cheese will be gone pretty quickly I think, mac and cheese takes a lot and I'll probably give away at least half of it.  It's all practice.  :)

Salmon - I was planning on doing something like this (http://www.macsbbq.co.uk/Salmon.html), do you have a good recipe?  What do you think of that one?  The temperature doesn't really rise above ambient, so it should be fine to do whenever.  Ambient is rarely above 80 here, and never this time of year.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 04:50:09 PM
That recipe sounds great although I would leave out the jack. I also put two fillets together skin side out and then wrap it. After I wrap it I weight it with a pot of water or something. This removes a lot more moisture from the meat and helps produce a more dense finished product. That makes it easier to slice thin. After you get the hang of smoking it you will need a long razor sharp carbon steel fish knife so that you can slice it tissue paper thin. Slicing lox is a skill that takes some practice. So many restaurants and delis butcher it or cut it way to thick. 

Ive done the black pepper crust. The wife hates it and it was a but much for some others. I liked it though.

With salmon I usually go for the traditional nova lox.

All kinds of whole fish are good cold smoked. Ill bet there is lots of good fresh fish your way.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 09, 2010, 05:04:26 PM
Yeah, we get lots of fish out here.  That famous fish place in Seattle where they throw the fish was walking distance from my place when I lived downtown, I did my shopping at the Pike Place market.  I didn't buy from them though, they always wanted to charge me tourist prices.  Better deals further down.

I'm not so into lox that I need it done in any traditional way, I just love smoked salmon.  I might even prefer it hot smoked!   :o  But I'm going to do some and see how it turns out, then maybe do it again.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 09, 2010, 05:38:22 PM
I think the hot smoked is called kippered salmon.


(http://www.fishseller.com/usrimage/kipperedtipsa.jpg)
A thing of beauty.



Lox is an acquired taste.

Try hot smoking Chilean sea bass. Wow.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 09, 2010, 06:29:01 PM
I think the hot smoked is called kippered salmon.


(http://www.fishseller.com/usrimage/kipperedtipsa.jpg)
A thing of beauty.



Lox is an acquired taste.

Try hot smoking Chilean sea bass. Wow.

Now that's what I'm talking about!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 09, 2010, 11:24:22 PM
I think the hot smoked is called kippered salmon.
Around here it's called smoked salmon.  I'm pretty sure kippers are different, but I'm not sure how.

Try hot smoking Chilean sea bass. Wow.
:-\  Sorry, I might not look it but I'm one of those dirty smelly hippies who won't eat something like that because it's on the avoid list - things that are "overfished or caught or farmed in ways that harm other marine life or the environment" . . . there's plenty of sustainable choices.
http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 10, 2010, 04:55:49 AM
Thanks for the list. Im not a hippie (mostly cause I hate the smell of pertuli or what ever it is called) but I do care about our oceans.

I will now avoid Chilean sea bass. I also noticed we get some other things on the avoid list that we will no longer get.

This list is interesting, Im just a little concerned that it is putting a band aid on a machine gun wound. We are fishing the crap out of every species and Im not sure there is any hope.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 10, 2010, 05:54:18 AM
Man, grouper is on that list. That's pretty much the only fish they serve down in Cancun.  ???
And the chilean sea bass, usually with a cream sauce - crap that's so good!

Will it be like everything else? We are being good citizens while the rest of the world enjoys everything and doesn't give a damn? A good example would be DDT activists. DDT never killed anyone - the mosquitoes that survived due to not using it though....  :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 10, 2010, 10:00:47 AM
I think the hot smoked is called kippered salmon.
Around here it's called smoked salmon.  I'm pretty sure kippers are different, but I'm not sure how.

Try hot smoking Chilean sea bass. Wow.
:-\  Sorry, I might not look it but I'm one of those dirty smelly hippies who won't eat something like that because it's on the avoid list - things that are "overfished or caught or farmed in ways that harm other marine life or the environment" . . . there's plenty of sustainable choices.
http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx
Thanks for the list. Im not a hippie (mostly cause I hate the smell of pertuli or what ever it is called) but I do care about our oceans.

I will now avoid Chilean sea bass. I also noticed we get some other things on the avoid list that we will no longer get.

This list is interesting, Im just a little concerned that it is putting a band aid on a machine gun wound. We are fishing the crap out of every species and Im not sure there is any hope.

Ya'll should read the latest issue of National Geographic. It has extensive articles about this very subject.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 10, 2010, 05:25:41 PM
Is this one of the article?

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/11/photogalleries/sea-bass-fishing/index.html/

Here is another one from the NYT. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/08bass.html?_r=1

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 10, 2010, 07:38:44 PM
I'm still reading it but they cover the Gulf spill and the ocean food chain and the ramifications of how we consume and fisheries impact.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 11, 2010, 02:51:57 PM
Here is another one. http://www.seafoodbusiness.com/articledetail.aspx?id=4294995394

Apparently Whole Foods is launching a campaign. "Chilean Sea Bass is Back"

http://www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/news-061013-1.html
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 11, 2010, 02:58:55 PM
Hey Tom, hope I didnt put you off of the BBQ thread. Sometimes I write things to get a reaction or create some conversation. Thats why I wrote Chilean sea bass. Wrong I know but perhaps good because it helps raise awareness right.  I learned something. I didnt know, that the Atlantic farm raised salmon was a problem. Wont be getting that again.

 I did cook Chilean Sea Bass before but that was years ago before I was made aware of the problem.Havent had it since then.But it is wonderful cold smoked.

What other kind of fish at that market? Fresh water fish is great smoked too. Ever fish when you were on LBI? Ever catch eel? Oh man they are so good smoked!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 11, 2010, 03:37:03 PM
Yeah I think he hates you now...  :P
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 11, 2010, 05:32:29 PM
Yeah I guess. I just really want to be able to have some Chilean Sea bass again.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 11, 2010, 11:35:04 PM
Hey Tom, hope I didnt put you off of the BBQ thread.
Ha!  No worries, I've just been busy. :) That trip to the farmers market kept me occupied making stuff, and I still haven't gotten through all of the cabbage and cukes yet.  Made 2 meatloafs and 5 lbs of sausage yesterday.  Busy day at work, blah blah blah, you know how it goes.

Anyway, I'm not going to tell people what to eat - but I'll tell them what I won't eat and why, they can make their own decisions.  ;)

Other fish at the market?  All kinds of salmon, cod, oysters/clams/mussels, dungeness crab, halibut, monkfish, geoducks, tons of stuff really.  We used to fish for flounder and bluefish on LBI all of the time, those were the main things.  We never caught eel, but I love unagi. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 11, 2010, 11:59:56 PM
The NG issue really paints it in a bad way. I'm still gonna eat Atlantic Salmon cause I like it, and usually it's the least expensive. The "good salmon" are hyper expensive and reach prime beef prices. Living on any coast will produce great local seafood. Jealous. According to NG seafood will be a thing of the past by 2050.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 12, 2010, 08:15:14 AM
steaks, shrimp, spatchcock....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/488710a2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1178cc7c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/171af554.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ac75f966.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0ed19d09.jpg)

and my girl, Scarlet Begonias, RIP
1999-2010

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/art050_640x480.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 12, 2010, 09:15:51 AM
That's quite a feast deepsouth, I'm getting hungry again . . .
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: narvin on October 12, 2010, 09:50:01 AM
Chilean Sea Bass is rare now?  Its rating is going to go way up on fishadvocate.com...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 12, 2010, 10:04:47 AM
That's quite a feast deepsouth, I'm getting hungry again . . .

+1

Looking great!

God rest Scarlet.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 12, 2010, 10:12:40 AM
Chilean Sea Bass is rare now?  Its rating is going to go way up on fishadvocate.com...
Chilean Sea Bass is rare now?  Its rating is going to go way up on fishadvocate.com...

This made me lol.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on October 12, 2010, 10:14:49 AM
I'll bet the Imperial Bourbon-Barrel Chilean Sea Bass rates higher.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Hokerer on October 12, 2010, 10:20:33 AM
I'll bet the Imperial Bourbon-Barrel Chilean Sea Bass rates higher.

As Jason and Todd would say...  "hell yeah!"
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 12, 2010, 10:30:37 AM
I'll bet the Imperial Bourbon-Barrel Chilean Sea Bass rates higher.

As Jason and Todd would say...  "hell yeah!"

You guys are too funny.   :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 12, 2010, 11:11:59 AM
whomever was talking about grilling with just salt, i did my last steaks with sea salt only.  they were delicious!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 12, 2010, 11:22:57 AM
whomever was talking about grilling with just salt, i did my last steaks with sea salt only.  they were delicious!

That was me and cap. He was certainly right.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 12, 2010, 01:09:03 PM
Fire, Meat, salt. Sometimes less really  is more.

Hey deepsouth. Next time try your spatchcock with the cut up the breast along the keel bone. Flip it over then open it cut side dwon on the cutting surface. Press hard so it lays flat even if you have to break a few bones to get it that way. Then start it on the grill cut side down. This places the breat meat in a better position under the thighs and wings the juice and fat from those more flavorful parts keeps the breast moist and tasty. Works awesome. Then cook for 2 thirds of the time this way. Try to get it to slow roast over the coals Till it is mostly cooked through. Then raise the grill a little higher off of the coals and flip it over let it cook the last third skin side down till the skin gets crisp. get it cooking over the flames slow enogh on the skin side and it gets like fried chicken. Real crispy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 12, 2010, 01:18:40 PM
i thought the bird layed open pretty easy.  i guess it does that if you cut it along the wrong side.  thanks for the tip.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 12, 2010, 03:27:28 PM
Yeah it take a little more pressure to get it to lay flat when you cut it on the breast side. I have had great results with it this way instead of cut up the spine.

Works great for turkey too case with the breast under the legs and wings the otherwise hard to keep juicy breast is under the wings and thigh.

We are doing a fresh killed turkey spachcocked this way on the parillia grill this year. I cant wait, I love Turkey Day.

Nothing says Thanks Giving better than BBQ.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 12, 2010, 06:32:25 PM
I fired up the WSM over the weekend.

I smoked a fatty!  ;D

(2) 1lb. tubes Jimmy Dean Sage Sausage
1lb. Smithfield Bacon
onion
pepper
cheese
Dizzy Dust

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010379.jpg)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010381.jpg)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010383.jpg)

I also smoked a flat brisket with Dizzy Dust dry rub.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010378-1.jpg)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010388.jpg)

dinner is served! 8)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010389-1.jpg)

....and washed it all down with my Oktoberfest.  ;)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010385.jpg)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 12, 2010, 06:49:32 PM
Nice looking fatty.  Mmmmmmm

Brisket. Been holding off on that.  How long and at what temp?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 12, 2010, 06:54:03 PM
Nice looking fatty.  Mmmmmmm

Brisket. Been holding off on that.  How long and at what temp?

Thanks.

250-275 for 4hrs.

Fatty's rock!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 12, 2010, 07:50:56 PM
Very nice Blues!

Cap I have 7 turkeys, none are ready for this year. What kind of turkey are you getting?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 12, 2010, 07:57:18 PM
Very nice Blues!

Cap I have 7 turkeys, none are ready for this year. What kind of turkey are you getting?


How old do they have to be - generally...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 12, 2010, 07:58:35 PM
Im not sure? What kinds are there? I saw though that they have really big white ones and then they have these little black ones that look like wild turkeys. Are they wild turkeys?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 12, 2010, 08:26:52 PM
geez a cow only takes a year!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 12, 2010, 08:33:09 PM
We have Bourbon Reds,(what else). Look for a "heritage" turkey on of the breeds from the early 20 century. The big white ones are the butter balls. Just ask if they can naturaly reproduce. The butterballs can't. there are small whites that can and they taste the best. The name to look for are midget white, beltsville.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 12:45:24 AM
Ok, I smoked some more cheese today.  Tillamook cheddar, hickory smoked.  Ambient temp varied from 59-69F during the smoke, ~7 hours.
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLADhAb0ZPI/AAAAAAAAAEM/Q1d5Ih0GeHw/IMG00141-20101008-1712.jpg)
After letting the cheese rest for 10 days, we tried it today.  It definitely has a more intense smoke flavor than the last batch, but it still isn't as intense as I'd like it to be.  Maybe I should have eaten it a little fresher rather than letting it rest.  Next time.

It has been stored in the fridge wrapped in plastic wrap and foil.  The appearance changed a bit from when they were right off the grill, the moisture was more evenly distributed again, the slightly crusted look had disappeared.

I'll do a cherry wood batch this week.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 19, 2010, 01:45:44 AM
Looks like they took on a bit more color this time.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 19, 2010, 06:01:27 AM
Nice looking fatty.  Mmmmmmm

Brisket. Been holding off on that.  How long and at what temp?

that phatty looks awesome!

Thanks.

250-275 for 4hrs.

Fatty's rock!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 19, 2010, 06:15:23 AM
Nice looking fatty.  Mmmmmmm

Brisket. Been holding off on that.  How long and at what temp?

that phatty looks awesome!

Thanks.

250-275 for 4hrs.

Fatty's rock!  8)

Thanks for turning me on to the Dizzy Pig products...I'm hooked for life now.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 19, 2010, 06:49:45 AM
Nice looking fatty.  Mmmmmmm

Brisket. Been holding off on that.  How long and at what temp?

that phatty looks awesome!

Thanks.

250-275 for 4hrs.

Fatty's rock!  8)

Thanks for turning me on to the Dizzy Pig products...I'm hooked for life now.  ;)

no problem...  those things are great!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 09:01:43 AM
Looks like they took on a bit more color this time.
Yes, definitely some nice color developed.

I'm thinking that smoking in a smaller container next time will help concentrate the smoke and thus the smoke flavor.  Maybe the grill is just too big and empty for the amount of smoke given off.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 19, 2010, 09:09:13 AM
Looks like they took on a bit more color this time.
Yes, definitely some nice color developed.

I'm thinking that smoking in a smaller container next time will help concentrate the smoke and thus the smoke flavor.  Maybe the grill is just too big and empty for the amount of smoke given off.

Yea...I think the level of perceived smoke flavor in the cheese is related to the level or amount of smoke that the cheese is exposed to during the smoking process.  If it is exposed to more smoke it should absorb more smoke....at least that's my thinking.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 19, 2010, 10:20:28 AM
Yea...I think the level of perceived smoke flavor in the cheese is related to the level or amount of smoke that the cheese is exposed to during the smoking process.  If it is exposed to more smoke it should absorb more smoke....at least that's my thinking.

I did some 6-year old cheddar and mild gouda on my UDS a few weeks back using a couple chunks of cherry wood.  Ran it with the lid off to keep the heat under 90F.  Smoked for 1 hour.  Has more and better smoke flavour than the decent applewood smoked cheddar I can buy commercially.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 19, 2010, 10:24:18 AM
Looks like they took on a bit more color this time.
Yes, definitely some nice color developed.

I'm thinking that smoking in a smaller container next time will help concentrate the smoke and thus the smoke flavor.  Maybe the grill is just too big and empty for the amount of smoke given off.

How about using a cardboard box with a lesser volume?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 19, 2010, 11:44:51 AM
Yea...I think the level of perceived smoke flavor in the cheese is related to the level or amount of smoke that the cheese is exposed to during the smoking process.  If it is exposed to more smoke it should absorb more smoke....at least that's my thinking.

I did some 6-year old cheddar and mild gouda on my UDS a few weeks back using a couple chunks of cherry wood.  Ran it with the lid off to keep the heat under 90F.  Smoked for 1 hour.  Has more and better smoke flavour than the decent applewood smoked cheddar I can buy commercially.

I'd love to try some of that...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 12:05:08 PM
How about using a cardboard box with a lesser volume?
That's what I'm thinking too.   :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 19, 2010, 12:11:34 PM
I'd love to try some of that...

It turned out really good, much better than my attempt at beef jerky a few days prior - too salty, not smoky enough.  Brined the meat too long, and didn't add any liquid smoke, as I don't like using artificial stuff, and thought I'd get enough natural smoke flavour.  This batch will get finely chopped like bacon bits, and used in stews and chili.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 19, 2010, 12:15:13 PM
I'm thinking that smoking in a smaller container next time will help concentrate the smoke and thus the smoke flavor.  Maybe the grill is just too big and empty for the amount of smoke given off.

Like I said earlier, in my experience, this was not true at all.  1 hour in a UDS (55 gallon drum) with no lid on a somewhat breezy day produced a ton of smoke flavour.  I used a couple small pieces of lump charcoal, then smothered them with small chunks of cherry wood.  There was smoke a plenty.

EDIT:  Looking back at your setup, I see you have one of those little cold smoker gizmos.  Yeah, maybe they don't produce nearly enough smoke.  On my setup, the cheese was totally immersed in billowy, smoky goodness.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 01:12:05 PM
I'm thinking that smoking in a smaller container next time will help concentrate the smoke and thus the smoke flavor.  Maybe the grill is just too big and empty for the amount of smoke given off.

Like I said earlier, in my experience, this was not true at all.  1 hour in a UDS (55 gallon drum) with no lid on a somewhat breezy day produced a ton of smoke flavour.  I used a couple small pieces of lump charcoal, then smothered them with small chunks of cherry wood.  There was smoke a plenty.

EDIT:  Looking back at your setup, I see you have one of those little cold smoker gizmos.  Yeah, maybe they don't produce nearly enough smoke.  On my setup, the cheese was totally immersed in billowy, smoky goodness.
Yeah, those things give off wisps of smoke, so if I can capture and concentrate it a bit more that might help.  If I have a box at home I'll do it tonight and see what happens.  It's getting a lot colder though, hopefully that won't be a negative.  It'll probably smoke around 55F at best.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 19, 2010, 03:33:16 PM
Yeah, those things give off wisps of smoke, so if I can capture and concentrate it a bit more that might help.  If I have a box at home I'll do it tonight and see what happens.  It's getting a lot colder though, hopefully that won't be a negative.  It'll probably smoke around 55F at best.

That seems pretty cold.  I would think the cheese could absorb more smoke at slightly warmer temps.  Mine was right around 85-90F and didn't melt.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 04:46:16 PM
Yeah, those things give off wisps of smoke, so if I can capture and concentrate it a bit more that might help.  If I have a box at home I'll do it tonight and see what happens.  It's getting a lot colder though, hopefully that won't be a negative.  It'll probably smoke around 55F at best.

That seems pretty cold.  I would think the cheese could absorb more smoke at slightly warmer temps.  Mine was right around 85-90F and didn't melt.
I think you're probably right, but I don't have a decent way to warm it up without it getting too warm.  I'll see if I can come up with anything.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 09:11:37 PM
I tried to smoke some cheese tonight, but couldn't get it going  :-\

I got a baking sheet, a box, the cheese, some foil-wrapped bricks to support the cheese, and the smoker filled with cherry wood dust.  I tried probably half a dozen times to light the dust and it would stop burning shortly after I took the flame away.  I thought maybe it was smothering in the box, so I raised one end and it didn't help.  I moved everything back to the grill and set it up there, but it still wouldn't stay smoking.  I dumped out all of the dust and re-packed it in case it was too tight, but it didn't help.  I even got to the point where I built a small fire under it with a box of matches, but as soon as the matches burned out the dust stopped smoking.

I gave it up for the night.  :( I think that there might be something wrong with the dust, even though it is the dust that they recommend.  It feels plenty dry, but maybe there's something else going on.  I'll clean it all out and try again tomorrow.  If it's still not working I might switch back to the hickory that worked so well last time. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 20, 2010, 03:30:52 AM
I tried to smoke some cheese tonight, but couldn't get it going  :-\

I got a baking sheet, a box, the cheese, some foil-wrapped bricks to support the cheese, and the smoker filled with cherry wood dust.  I tried probably half a dozen times to light the dust and it would stop burning shortly after I took the flame away.  I thought maybe it was smothering in the box, so I raised one end and it didn't help.  I moved everything back to the grill and set it up there, but it still wouldn't stay smoking.  I dumped out all of the dust and re-packed it in case it was too tight, but it didn't help.  I even got to the point where I built a small fire under it with a box of matches, but as soon as the matches burned out the dust stopped smoking.

I gave it up for the night.  :( I think that there might be something wrong with the dust, even though it is the dust that they recommend.  It feels plenty dry, but maybe there's something else going on.  I'll clean it all out and try again tomorrow.  If it's still not working I might switch back to the hickory that worked so well last time. 

Do you think it was damp or lack of O2.  Maybe try drying the dust in a 250F oven first.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 20, 2010, 09:28:52 AM
Do you think it was damp or lack of O2.  Maybe try drying the dust in a 250F oven first.
I don't know for sure, but that's a good idea, I'll try that.  I need to come up with a new way to light it, I used all of the fuel in my lighter too.  :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 20, 2010, 10:04:43 PM
The problem appears to be the cherry wood dust.  I dried it in the oven as you suggested, and could not get it to remain lit.  After several more tries and failures I switched and dried some hickory dust in the oven and then started it up.  It's still going and will for a few more hours at least.  It is currently going in the box setup I made.

Here are some pics from the failed attempts, when it was still light out.  As you can see, I sat it on a baking sheet with a couple of foil-wrapped bricks (I use them for weighting stuff down when I need to, like when I make corned beef) to hold up the cheese.
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TL_IP7FBNjI/AAAAAAAAAEs/R8HUSg4_JgE/cheese1.jpg)

I put the box resting on one end of the baking sheet, to let a little more air in, but it looks pretty much like this.  The top brick is to cover slit in the box and to the wind from blowing it around.  It should keep critters from getting in there too, but they might not be interested in the smoky smell anyway.
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TL_IP-G_aPI/AAAAAAAAAEw/ResXtizrEr4/cheese2.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on October 21, 2010, 05:12:39 AM
Would your dud-dust stay lit if you didn't cover it with the box? Just wondering, you could whip out some more boxes and duct tape to stack boxes to get the smoke away from your doo-hickey and maybe it wouldn't die out ???
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 21, 2010, 05:42:29 AM
Depending on the desity of the wood there may be some correlation to combustion.  ???

Check this out.

http://www.nakedwhiz.com/eggbase/fplr1464.pdf
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 21, 2010, 10:33:02 AM
I couldn't get it to stay lit for more than a couple of minutes no matter where I put it.  It needed a flame to keep burning.

Thanks for the link bluesman.  It's possible that the density of the wood is the problem, although it could also be the consistency of the dust.  They weren't obviously that different, but I didn't look too closely and definitely didn't screen them or anything :) 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 21, 2010, 12:37:36 PM
That set up is awesome. Thats how I do fish quite a bit. Funny  how sometimes the simplest solution is the best. and cheapest.

(http://www.lazygamer.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/4435a4e63f8b_C243/wallace_gromit_cheese.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 21, 2010, 01:07:40 PM
Yeah, I was trying to think of how to fit a grate in there and then thought, I don't really need a grate at all.  It worked really well with stuff I had lying around.  The top picked up a lot more color than the bottom, and the chunk of gouda (not pictured) that I threw on was a bit too close to the heat source and got a tad melty in spots, but nothing terrible.  Looking forward to trying it after I let it rest for a week or so.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on October 21, 2010, 01:35:14 PM


Apparently Whole Foods is launching a campaign. "Chilean Sea Bass is Back"

Nah, they're just buying Peruvian Sea Bass and rebranding it as Chilean!!!!

"Are they...ill-tempered?"
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 22, 2010, 08:11:53 PM
Tom, what woods have you used to date? I guess you have only smoked cheese with it so far? I just got my smoker which came with some sugar maple as a sample.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on October 22, 2010, 08:31:59 PM
I've only successfully used the hickory.  The cherry wouldn't stay lit.  It came with oak I believe, but I haven't tried it yet.  And yeah, just cheese at this point.  I might try some fish soon, but I'd like to dial it in with the cheese first, and make sure I know what I'm doing.  I was almost ready to do it, but the cherry is a bit of a setback, I lost a little confidence. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 22, 2010, 08:43:46 PM
I need to catch some fish this weekend to make it worth while.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2010, 08:46:30 PM
Trying to decide what to BBQ this weekend.  ???

Maybe some ribs or some smoked fish or...?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 22, 2010, 08:51:18 PM
Cold smoking Bluesy?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2010, 08:54:46 PM
Cold smoking Bluesy?

Yea...I need to step it up with some cold smoking.

I love smoked fish...Salmon, Whiting, or...

This is the way to go.  ;)

(http://aerotoxic.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/smoked-fish.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2010, 08:56:07 PM
This is a picture of beauty.  :)

(http://bazaarboston.com/uploaded/pic0000084.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 22, 2010, 08:56:12 PM
Pan fish, for me. blue gill, sunfish,....
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 22, 2010, 08:58:58 PM
I can catch none of that from home!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2010, 09:11:06 PM
I can catch none of that from home!

Neither can I.  :(
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 22, 2010, 09:21:48 PM
I'm 100 feet from pan fish though
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 22, 2010, 09:39:34 PM
Hey Bluesman, that smoked fish case looks like the one at Bells Market, only smaller. Just past that is the smoked meat and sausage section. You would love that store, pretty cheap too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 22, 2010, 10:37:51 PM
Trying to decide what to BBQ this weekend.  ???

Maybe some ribs or some smoked fish or...?
This is a picture of beauty.  :)

(http://bazaarboston.com/uploaded/pic0000084.jpg)

I was thinking of smoked salmon but similar to a fatty. De-skin a fillet maybe butterfly it too and then use a light seafood stuffing to roll up the meat with. Wrap and tie the skin back around the roll fat-side in. Low and slow 200-225 for a couple hours till it's a bit crispy. Not enough skin would be the main problem.

Probably not the first to think of it... ;)

That case full of fish is awesome!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 23, 2010, 08:08:28 AM
Hey Bluesman, that smoked fish case looks like the one at Bells Market, only smaller. Just past that is the smoked meat and sausage section. You would love that store, pretty cheap too.

It's supercalafragalisticexpialidocious!  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 23, 2010, 08:12:53 AM
Trying to decide what to BBQ this weekend.  ???

Maybe some ribs or some smoked fish or...?
I was thinking of smoked salmon but similar to a fatty. De-skin a fillet maybe butterfly it too and then use a light seafood stuffing to roll up the meat with. Wrap and tie the skin back around the roll fat-side in. Low and slow 200-225 for a couple hours till it's a bit crispy. Not enough skin would be the main problem.

Probably not the first to think of it... ;)

That case full of fish is awesome!

I'm thinking about this...and it is hot smoked. What temp do you think would be good.  :-\

(http://www.copperriver.com/smoked-salmon3.jpg)


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 23, 2010, 09:59:14 AM
Hey Bluesman, that smoked fish case looks like the one at Bells Market, only smaller. Just past that is the smoked meat and sausage section. You would love that store, pretty cheap too.

It's supercalafragalisticexpialidocious!  ;D

Is that Bells Market?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 23, 2010, 10:22:36 AM
Trying to decide what to BBQ this weekend.  ???

Maybe some ribs or some smoked fish or...?
I was thinking of smoked salmon but similar to a fatty. De-skin a fillet maybe butterfly it too and then use a light seafood stuffing to roll up the meat with. Wrap and tie the skin back around the roll fat-side in. Low and slow 200-225 for a couple hours till it's a bit crispy. Not enough skin would be the main problem.

Probably not the first to think of it... ;)

That case full of fish is awesome!

I'm thinking about this...and it is hot smoked. What temp do you think would be good.  :-\

(http://www.copperriver.com/smoked-salmon3.jpg)




I wouldn't go over 200F. Maybe something like 165 for 2.5-3 hours. It'll be cooked through. Get the fattiest piece that you can so it'll remain juicy and unctuous.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 23, 2010, 10:30:35 AM
The wild salmon never has much fat. The really marbled fatty salmon is the farm raised Atlantic salmon I think? Whats up with that? We used to get the fatty farm raised stuff all the time but now that I have been made aware of the disregardful behavior of the producers we are put off.

Ill have to admit though, that fatty stuff is good. Maybe I am looking at the wrong thing? Or fatty wild salmon is just not available around here.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 23, 2010, 11:39:40 AM
Or fatty wild salmon is just not available around here.

This is what I'm afraid of...

Maybe I'll just try some farm raised for a trial run.  :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 23, 2010, 11:58:09 AM
That steel head trout that looks just like salmon smokes up nicely.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 23, 2010, 01:35:01 PM
That steel head trout that looks just like salmon smokes up nicely.

I actually prefer a good piece of Steelhead trout (Rainbow trout) but it lately it's been hard to come by. Ten years ago it was right there next to the salmon- always beautiful, and a buck or two cheaper. Now I rarely see it and it isn't cheaper than the least expensive specie of salmon, which is usually Atlantic farm-raised.

I know it isn't "popular" but I really like the Atlantic salmon. It has a nice velvety texture, a consistent flavor and the fat content makes it harder to overcook. I can't do $20/lb Wild Chinook or Coho. :'( In fact I've been less pleased with wild salmon on a few occasions, but then it was cheaper than usual...

The Steelhead looks like it would do coldsmoking well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 23, 2010, 07:34:45 PM
The Steelhead looks like it would do coldsmoking well.

This^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

is something to put on the list of things to smoke.

For sure.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 24, 2010, 11:29:08 AM
Didn't go for the fish yesterday. Instead I went the el-cheapo route: spatchcocked cornish rock hen, some country-style ribs, a fattie and two large stuffed bell-peppers.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TMR1NJ_jtSI/AAAAAAAAAUE/uwOf2Vjf_FA/s640/2010-10-23%2022.46.50.jpg)

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TMR1NyanVVI/AAAAAAAAAUI/sCojBMNrgKY/s512/2010-10-23%2023.30.51.jpg)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TMR1OUGrwEI/AAAAAAAAAUM/JFOH5ck6IQo/s640/2010-10-23%2023.37.07.jpg)

I stuffed the fattie with sharp cheddar and fresh cilantro! The little hen turned out just right with salt and pepper and the bacon keeping it moist- 200F for 2.75 hours. To my surprise she stole the show from the fattie. The pork should have been cooked at a higher temp for a shorter time. It's still ok and will be incorporated into various dishes throughout next week. Some might get frozen.

These were my first stuffed bell-peppers. I felt they could have gone a bit longer than 3.5 hours so sealed them up in a plastic container to rest under their own heat. Turned out nice- great sliced on crusty French bread.

I'm gonna fire the smoker up again and do fish and wings. ::)

Or maybe a couple more rock-hens. :D


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 24, 2010, 01:35:21 PM
That BBQ is slammin'!!!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 24, 2010, 04:28:44 PM
Ohhh Ya, I'd be all over that!!!  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 25, 2010, 07:26:13 AM
a little dinner saturday night....



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/9e803742.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d20d8232.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ec9c940f.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a836b1a3.jpg)







thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 25, 2010, 07:27:44 AM
Didn't go for the fish yesterday. Instead I went the el-cheapo route: spatchcocked cornish rock hen, some country-style ribs, a fattie and two large stuffed bell-peppers.




great looking stuff there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 25, 2010, 08:04:43 AM
Really nice deepsouth!

I was grillin' and chillin' last night too.

Some Spatchcocked Chicken.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/00bf0b09.jpg)

...and some Sirloin Steaks.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/ec973c60.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 25, 2010, 08:05:41 AM
The Steelhead looks like it would do coldsmoking well.

This is all I use for smoking.  There is a large rainbow trout (aka "steelhead") fish farm 2 hours away from here, so supply is always plentiful and fresh, as well as being tastier AND cheaper than the atlantic or pacific salmon that has to be shipped in.

The fish farm is on a large lake that my parents have a cabin on.  The steelhead are not native to this lake, but about 10 years ago, the farm nets broke, so now the lake is nicely stocked!  The world record 48 pounder was caught there last year:

(http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/wiredscience/2009/09/konradrecordrainbow580-350.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 25, 2010, 11:08:19 AM
There was a line from hell at the fish counter yesterday. As I'm the impatient sort I ended up walking out with a whole fresh young chicken. Spatchcocked it. Next time I'll remove the plate-setter and grill it direct. Came out delicious.

Rubbed with fresh chopped cilantro, lime and butter. I packed some under the skin of the breasts and thighs. Salt and pepper then the bacon. OMG.

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TMXFjyGsBhI/AAAAAAAAAUc/1UzYoLZAeQQ/s720/100_0128.JPG)

Enjoyed with corn tortillas and some sour cream and fresh squeezed lime. And a little Tiger Sauce...

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TMXFGj1QlVI/AAAAAAAAAUY/Tgv4bAGq7JM/s720/100_0134.JPG)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on October 25, 2010, 11:53:01 AM
Looking real good!!  Nothing went to waste either.  Cheers!!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on October 25, 2010, 12:12:45 PM
great looking food guys!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on October 26, 2010, 12:45:39 AM

Some Spatchcocked Chicken.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/00bf0b09.jpg)


I've never tried the direct heat method for whole chicken like that before, how do you keep it from drying out/not cooking all the way through? Would love to try this on the Egg this weekend, the crusty pieces, they look delicious...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 26, 2010, 04:17:10 AM
I've never tried the direct heat method for whole chicken like that before, how do you keep it from drying out/not cooking all the way through? Would love to try this on the Egg this weekend, the crusty pieces, they look delicious...

Direct works best.  One full chimney of charcoal spread evenly across the grill.
Brining, marinating, pesto rub or a dry rub all work very well.
15 min skin side down then flip and grill until the internal temp near the thigh reaches 165F.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on October 26, 2010, 12:45:17 PM
I'm doing a batch of chili for Halloween; anybody ever tried smoking chili? I'm thinking about putting it into the Le Creuset and smoking for a few hours with some hickory chunks. Probably add some brown sugar to balance a bit. One thing though, my meat is half short ribs, 1/4 ostrich, and 1/8 pulled pork (applewood smoked) and 1/8 applewood smoked ribs. I don't expect the smoked food to contribute too terribly much in the way of smoke, but would smoking the chili outright lend too much smokiness?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: jeffy on October 26, 2010, 12:58:42 PM
I'm doing a batch of chili for Halloween; anybody ever tried smoking chili? I'm thinking about putting it into the Le Creuset and smoking for a few hours with some hickory chunks. Probably add some brown sugar to balance a bit. One thing though, my meat is half short ribs, 1/4 ostrich, and 1/8 pulled pork (applewood smoked) and 1/8 applewood smoked ribs. I don't expect the smoked food to contribute too terribly much in the way of smoke, but would smoking the chili outright lend too much smokiness?
What is this "too much smokiness" that you refer to?
I wonder if you could smoke some of the ingredients before you cook it....
I once smoked some hops to dry hop a smoked beer.
I used to have a stick of hardwood with a zillion holes drilled into it that I would put into the smoker and then seal it up and freeze it until the beer got kegged.
So, no, I doubt that it would lend too much smokiness, but that's just my opinion.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 26, 2010, 02:00:59 PM
Yes.  I would smoke the beef and peppers prior to cooking the chili. 

Sounds like it would be a nice twist to an awesome recipe.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on October 26, 2010, 02:10:21 PM
If I have the room on my smoker, I'll throw my baked beans on there for 4-6 hours.  They soak up a fair bit of smoke, and the temp is just right for keeping them at a low simmer.  I think smoked chili would work just as well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on October 31, 2010, 03:09:04 AM
Hurray for daylight savings time! I was able to get up super early to get started on my smoked chili experiment. Here's my "mise en place" - although it's a bit crowded ;-)

(http://dev.nycbearsfans.com/photo_mise.jpg)
That's:

Ostrich sirloin (brown package), duck fat (white package), andouille (the Cajun kind, not the *BLECH* French kind), some onions, a whole lotta chopped tomatoes,  a can of green chiles, some Knob Creek for deglazing, garlic, cumin, chipotles in adobe, Oregano, a home-made chili powder, BACON, diced short ribs, an Irish red ale (for the cook), and some pimenton. Will post pics of the completed chili once it's on the smoker.


And of course, chili requires a bit of RDWHAHB:

(http://dev.nycbearsfans.com/photo_beer.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on October 31, 2010, 03:10:45 AM
Also, not pictured, some pulled pork I'll put in with the andouille. Because you can never have enough meat.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 31, 2010, 08:45:34 AM
This is sounding good. Are you going to smoke all of the meat and peppers first and then cook the chili?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on October 31, 2010, 10:23:24 AM
Food looks great.

I really like the SS counters and the back splash. Frow what I can see of them any way.

Are they custom.?

I would love to have ss counters. Im thinking about this for the next house. SS counters in the main kitchen and also in the basement brewery/prep kitchen.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 31, 2010, 11:23:25 AM
Looks great. Phil- you get the same things we can get? I see a little tin of green chiles there. Did it cost a small fortune?

Can't wait to see the finished chili!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on October 31, 2010, 05:22:24 PM
Did large shrimp and another spatchcocked chicken yesterday. Delish.

Saved the lamb shank for today. Curry powder, salt and pepper and some applewood rub. Wrapped in bacon and in the smoker for 3 hours.

Spicy baked black beans done in the dutch-oven underneath the lamb shank to catch the dripping. Woowee! It all came out smoky, spicy and fantastic!

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TM3ZgIjkD3I/AAAAAAAAAVU/_AFOzC3xyC8/s720/100_0146.jpg)

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TM3ZUHlbCiI/AAAAAAAAAVQ/PDit8pR0zNE/s720/100_0149.jpg)

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TM4GFUUrGlI/AAAAAAAAAVg/iUpdwMes2jg/s720/100_0160.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on October 31, 2010, 06:04:02 PM
Looks marvelous!

I love how the bacon crisps on the outside of the Lamb like that...mmm!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 07, 2010, 11:14:25 AM
This is sounding good. Are you going to smoke all of the meat and peppers first and then cook the chili?

Life got in the way of responding to all these. Basically, I toasted the peppers in a cast iron for a few minutes and then threw them in the food processor with some cumin, smoked paprika and garlic powder and ground them all a bit. Then I sweated the onions, cooked some bacon, and then seared all the meat in batches after cubing it. Then I deglazed with bourbon and threw everything in and simmered for a couple hours. Then I added my green chilis and chipotles and an (8 oz) bottle of coke (beet sugar, not HFCS!) and simmered a bit more, and then took it out to the smoker and let it set there with the smoke until serving time, about 3 hours. Unfortunately, for whatever reason it didn't pick up too much of the smoke but my pot had a -beautiful- color after all was said and done. Here's a pic, and you can see the chili in there too (after everybody ate most of it):

(http://philliplamb.com/beerpics/IMG_0802.jpg)

(http://philliplamb.com/beerpics/IMG_0801.jpg)

My wife also did up some halloween-y home made oreos with a white chocolate ganache orange-colored filling:

(http://philliplamb.com/beerpics/IMG_0803.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 07, 2010, 11:17:31 AM
Food looks great.

I really like the SS counters and the back splash. Frow what I can see of them any way.

Are they custom.?

I would love to have ss counters. Im thinking about this for the next house. SS counters in the main kitchen and also in the basement brewery/prep kitchen.

Behold the magic of Ikea (I think). My landlord put them in when he redid the house, I dunno if they're custom or not but pretty much the entire kitchen is Ikea.

Re the brewery idea, I couldn't find any SS at the big box hardware shop so I bought aluminum sheeting instead, pretty expensive but I only needed 1m x 2m. I hammered it out onto my entire brewing shelf, as the shelf itself is made out of MDF and, well, not very happy around heat/humidity. Seems to be doing pretty good now though.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 07, 2010, 11:23:56 AM
Looks great. Phil- you get the same things we can get? I see a little tin of green chiles there. Did it cost a small fortune?

Can't wait to see the finished chili!

I can get 'em if I'm clever and/or willing to pay for the privilege. Green chiles I found at the American market in Paris (http://www.thanksgivingparis.com/) and I believe they were €3,50 - about $5 after quantitative easing kicks in ;-) For most of my chile needs I go to Germany, those guys love spicy stuff, and it's not terribly pricey since it's produced in Germany as opposed to wherever La Preferida comes from. Next year I hope to grow my own Habañeros and Poblanos, but I dunno if we've got the soil for it here.

The craziest thing to pay for here, by far, are snacks. Marshmallows, a tiny bag, are €5, and Lucky Charms are €12. That's for the small box. Needless to say I ask my dad to ship me stuff most of the time.

As this is a BBQ topic, I should note that Mesquite cannot be found in Europe, so I am a 100% applewood smoke guy, unless I can get Hickory from the UK. Doesn't have the same taste though.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 07, 2010, 11:42:14 AM
The chili looks like someone made a dent in it... ::)

Is mesquite considered undesirable? Someone could fill up some shipping containers with bags of "Texas Mesquite Chunks" and make a fortune selling them for Euros. It does make a fine grilling wood since it burns hot and quick.

Phil a little can of green chillies like that probably run me $0.79 at the local store! I'm in the wrong business... :P

Growing the peppers hmmm? It might be a little cool in Paris. A trick is to plant in full sun and cover with black plastic pots for part of the day so it gets real hot. Do this to encourage germination and up till they are about 4-5 inches tall. Until they start sprouting you can leave them covered 100% of the time. Probably take at least 10 days top germinate.

Or you can start inside but it'll need to be in a hot place like a box with a light bulb.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 07, 2010, 12:25:35 PM
Heh, yup. It was a hit, fed about 15 people along with some honey chipotle wings. I'm getting closer to convincing these people that spicy = good.

Mesquite: I think it just won't grow here; I dunno if we could get away with bringing it in, the EU typically doesn't like people planting non-native plant species without permission :-p I've been told by the Germans that I need to stop my complainink unt use gut european vood, ya. But I still got about 10 pounds of mesquite chunks I snuck over with me ;-)

You wanna see some crazy prices, you can check out this site: http://www.myamericanmarket.com/us (in English). The lady who runs it is really nice, but it's pricey because people gotta get their French's Mustard on. €3.79 is for one of those 10-oz sizes, btw.

I grew piment d'esplette without a problem so I was guessing I'd be alright, but those were plants as opposed to the seeds I've got now so I think I'll go with the black pot idea. One of the nice things about this climate, though, is that I'm in prime Hallertauer climate range, though, so this time next year I hope to be posting some pics of my bounty.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 07, 2010, 12:52:03 PM
Oh no not planting! Incredibly invasive. But the wood itself, split and ready to go. I'm partial to pecan, but only because I have a tree that provides a constant supply. They shed like crazy.


I'm interested to know how the euro's like the wings. Is it a novelty to them? Twenty years ago they were just getting popular across the US outside NY state and the east coast. Now they're almost a staple and the damn things cost nearly $4+ a pound. Kinda like skirt steak. Used to cost pennies because no-one knew what to do with it. Blam, fajitas get popular and the meat now costs $7 a pound.


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 07, 2010, 01:38:08 PM
I'm interested to know how the euro's like the wings. Is it a novelty to them? Twenty years ago they were just getting popular across the US outside NY state and the east coast. Now they're almost a staple and the damn things cost nearly $4+ a pound. Kinda like skirt steak. Used to cost pennies because no-one knew what to do with it. Blam, fajitas get popular and the meat now costs $7 a pound.

That's how I felt about hanger steak/onglet - they used to be pretty cheap until Food Network showed people what you could do with them.

Wings: They're somewhat popular thanks to places like KFC and Buffalo Grill, but they're really generic and typically not done correctly. Think super sweet "BBQ" sauce and being cooked for wayyy too long.

The people I had over really enjoyed them, and have asked me to cook them again for our next get-together. I'm doing a pretty good job introducing people to the "right" way these sort of things are done. Speaking of introducing, I now have two coworkers who have started brewing their own beer. I hope to have our first "real" event sometime in the next few months, and get things REALLY rolling.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 07, 2010, 02:55:08 PM
Yeah, I remember when wings were super cheap.  We used to eat them a lot with our modified Frank's hot sauce - delicious.  I had a roommate 15 years ago or so when I was working the late shift, and every couple of weeks when he felt like staying up late he'd make wings and we'd hang out drinking beers and dining in fine style. Good times.   ;D

I like your idea of selling mesquite in Europe euge, it would make an awesome road trip.  Ship them all to Antwerp and then load up a truck and drive around Germany selling them all.  Then load up the truck again and drive around France.  Repeat with different countries until the whole shipping container is gone.  You might not make a ton of money, but maybe it would pay for itself. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 07, 2010, 05:48:57 PM
Back in 94 when I was living in Austin a buddy convinced his dad to bankroll an enterprise to Africa. He loaded up a van in a shipping container and packed a bunch of appliances in there. He may have gone to Liberia but it was definitely on that West coast. Sold everything quickly at a profit except the van. The problem was it was a gasoline engine and everyone wanted diesel. He sold it though eventually. 

He romped around Africa a bit and caught malaria. He then ended up in Europe where he blew the rest of the money. Boy was his dad pissed. 

I think it's worth looking into this mesquite business. When a rancher clears land around here there's huge piles of it laying around. Perhaps they would let someone haul it off for pennies or even free.

If anything it might be a fun experience!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 07, 2010, 07:13:20 PM
I think it's worth looking into this mesquite business. When a rancher clears land around here there's huge piles of it laying around. Perhaps they would let someone haul it off for pennies or even free.

If anything it might be a fun experience!
I think it would be an awesome experience!

But I'm not even going to bring this one up to SWMBO, no point in having her looking at me like I'm more crazy than she thought.   ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on November 07, 2010, 08:21:44 PM
Where I live mesquite is just a damn nuisance.  It grows everywhere, you can't kill it, and the thorns will flatten truck tires.  But when new drilling locations are built lots of mesquite gets bulldozed so I pick it up all the time.
As for shipping to France, there are no restrictions on shipping live plants.  I shipped 6 dry root pecan trees to my BIL last spring, and before I did it I checked the EU regulations.
My BIL has tried growing green chiles in France(he's a farmer) but the growing season is too short.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 08, 2010, 01:32:30 AM
Where I live mesquite is just a damn nuisance.  It grows everywhere, you can't kill it, and the thorns will flatten truck tires.  But when new drilling locations are built lots of mesquite gets bulldozed so I pick it up all the time.
As for shipping to France, there are no restrictions on shipping live plants.  I shipped 6 dry root pecan trees to my BIL last spring, and before I did it I checked the EU regulations.
My BIL has tried growing green chiles in France(he's a farmer) but the growing season is too short.

I'm really surprised to hear there aren't any restrictions. I'd think from a conservation perspective, they'd be worried about little invasive buggies coming over and infecting all of Europe, like what happened in the US with the Asian Long-horned Beetle.

If you guys DO decide to truck all over selling mesquite, contact the Big Green Egg dealerships in France and Germany (the ones in France are along the German border so it's not too far), I'm sure they'll be interested.

One thing I've noticed about BBQ in Europe, it's like Germany resurrected the Sigfried Line. If you want to buy anything like a smoker, you gotta head towards the German border, no matter what country you're in.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 08, 2010, 08:36:14 AM
I made my own smoked chili this weekend with various leftovers of frozen smoked BBQ meat.  I used brisket, chicken breast, wild boar burgers, beef jerky and italian sausage.  For beans, I used a bean and lentil mix I had sitting around, as well as some black beans.  For my liquid, I used a bomber of Sierra Nevada Golden Ticket Baltic Porter.  Then I added a bunch of mole sauce I had kicking around that also needed to be used up.  Tossed in a can of corn niblets too.

It smells and tastes great, tons of smoky goodness.  Took some over to my parents, and they declared it the best chili they have ever eaten.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 08, 2010, 11:59:54 AM
Then I added a bunch of mole sauce I had kicking around that also needed to be used up.
Man, I had this Mole mix that I was thinking of whipping up to go in the chili, but I wasn't sure how the flavors would mesh. I'll know to give it a shot next time.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 08, 2010, 12:18:29 PM
I think mole's rich flavors will complement any chili. Usually I include unsweetened baker's chocolate to my mine. I've never added mole but I have a jar in the fridge that needs using up soon.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on November 08, 2010, 12:19:12 PM
Where I live mesquite is just a damn nuisance.  It grows everywhere, you can't kill it, and the thorns will flatten truck tires.  But when new drilling locations are built lots of mesquite gets bulldozed so I pick it up all the time.
As for shipping to France, there are no restrictions on shipping live plants.  I shipped 6 dry root pecan trees to my BIL last spring, and before I did it I checked the EU regulations.
My BIL has tried growing green chiles in France(he's a farmer) but the growing season is too short.


One thing I've noticed about BBQ in Europe, it's like Germany resurrected the Sigfried Line. If you want to buy anything like a smoker, you gotta head towards the German border, no matter what country you're in.

I barbecue a lot for my inlaws in France but their grills are pretty basic.  The big ones are water heaters cut in half.  You can put a lot of chicken on one but temp control is pretty much out of the question.  One BIL has a Weber type grill that he paid around $250 for but it's pretty small and not very well designed.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 08, 2010, 12:54:08 PM
Louie Mueller Barbecue, located in Taylor, Texas is an authentic Texas barbecue establishment founded in 1949

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2236/2072323379_f0f16f22f7.jpg)

(http://www.wyattmcspadden.com/texas-bbq/images/photo-louie-mueller-lrg.jpg)

(http://www.louiemuellerbarbecue.com/image_index/iconic_images/brisket_cooking_on_pit.gif)

If I ever go to Texas, this is a place I want to eat at.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfoNV1acCz0
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 08, 2010, 01:35:58 PM
I think mole's rich flavors will complement any chili. Usually I include unsweetened baker's chocolate to my mine. I've never added mole but I have a jar in the fridge that needs using up soon.

I have also used baker's chocolate before with good results.  When using mole, if it is a spicy one, you may need to back off on your other pepper/heat/spice additions.

Also, for Learn to Homebrew Day, we fired up my friend's UDS smoker and made a mess of chicken thighs and 3 kinds of sausages for lunch.  Pretty tasty, and hit the spot seeing as we had started sampling beer at 8am.

When it comes to smoking poultry, my best results by far have been with skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs using my standard rub, and then brushing with my standard sauce before serving. I have never been happy with my attempts at whole chicken or turkey, though a spatchcocked chicken might fare better with most of the skin facing down.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 09, 2010, 06:41:00 AM
I barbecue a lot for my inlaws in France but their grills are pretty basic.  The big ones are water heaters cut in half.  You can put a lot of chicken on one but temp control is pretty much out of the question.  One BIL has a Weber type grill that he paid around $250 for but it's pretty small and not very well designed.

Yup. Most of my friends (save one) have "bbq grills" which are basically electric or gas skillets. The one guy I know has a Weber Genesis, although he spent some time in Germany so I think it rubbed off on him.

When we moved here, we decided to ship two things: our king-size bed, and our Large Big Green Egg. We told the movers, "load the egg and the bed first, and then fit in whatever else you can." Left behind a couch, TV console, and a nice chair because my priority was the Egg. SO glad I did it, because as you said, whatever you can find out here is usually crap.

One nice thing about BBQ out here, though. I can't remember what they're called, but I've got a bag of dried grapevine that I throw on to the grill when I'm doing steaks and such. They're super super cheap and give a nice dose of smoke without forcing me to resort to my stash of contraband mesquite and hickory.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on November 09, 2010, 07:53:13 AM
My SIL cooked a leg of lamb in her fireplace last year over grapevines, pretty damn fine eating.  Since my inlaws live in a wine area there are lots of old vines to be had.  With a proper smoker or grill those could turn out some very fine barbecue.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 12, 2010, 08:47:17 AM
some recent stuff off the eggs.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/339a9b1f.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/df1abd1f.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e4b0771b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/4c900aa9.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/fcbcd793.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/57336c44.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a8f1b499.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/413.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 12, 2010, 09:03:25 AM
BBQ'd Salmon on a cedar plank is one of my favorites.
Where do you get your cedar from and how long do you soak it prior to Qing.

I like to marinade my salmon for at least 2 hrs in a honey teriyaki sauce using frech garlic and ginger prior to hitting the grill.
I'm going to have to pick some up for the weekend BBQ.

Fantastic looking Q as usual!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 12, 2010, 10:54:51 AM
Baby in a pumpkin!  Hilarious!   ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 12, 2010, 11:07:11 AM
You use a dry rub on the baby? How long in the smoker? ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 12, 2010, 11:19:35 AM
BBQ'd Salmon on a cedar plank is one of my favorites.
Where do you get your cedar from and how long do you soak it prior to Qing.

I like to marinade my salmon for at least 2 hrs in a honey teriyaki sauce using frech garlic and ginger prior to hitting the grill.
I'm going to have to pick some up for the weekend BBQ.

Fantastic looking Q as usual!


thanks!

those are actually those cedar "papers".  pretty thin.  i don't soak them.  got them off woot a couple months ago.  i actually used them on this particular fish because the skin was on and i didn't want it to stick to the grill and fall apart as i was pulling it out.  
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 20, 2010, 01:33:22 AM
Doing a "choice" chuck roast (boneless). Rubbed and awaiting overnight in the fridge.

Have a dilemma: do it fast and slice thin or low and slow with a foiled resting?

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: roguejim on November 20, 2010, 03:01:40 AM
I'd go low and slow for pulled beef. 

As for spatchcock chicken, any pointers on the procedure?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 20, 2010, 11:37:33 AM
I'd go low and slow for pulled beef.  

As for spatchcock chicken, any pointers on the procedure?

Cutting the backbone out is easy- kitchen shears/scissors seem safer to me than a knife. I go slow skin side up with my chicken- about 225F for 2.5 hours or until the juices run clear. I test the thigh with my thermapen and if it's over 165 then I remove it.

The other way is go hot (375F) for about an hour flipping it at least once.

I like to rub a bit compound butter under the skin. Plain salted works well too. Bacon layered over the skin will keep it a bit more moist but not necessary. I just like bacon... ;)

Think I'll do a chicken too. I'm making most of this for my folks. They don't cook much anymore but they like to eat! Portion it out and vacuum seal- they can reheat and have it whenever they want.

I'll do the low and slow for the beef then. Thanks.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 20, 2010, 12:00:06 PM
i do mine slow and low like a pork butt.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 21, 2010, 12:53:13 PM
I did the roast for about three hours around 225-250F and then double-foiled it for another 2 hours when internal was over 165F. When the internal temp reached about 212 (a little higher than I wanted- 205F) I removed the package. This got wrapped in a bath-towel and then placed inside a soft lunch cooler with a temp probe. I wrapped the cooler in another towel and placed the whole thing in my unlit oven for about 3 hours.

The temp slowly dropped to about 125F. I pulled the beef with my gloved hands... Amazing. Literally fell apart in nice strands and I mixed a small amount of sauce in. Delicious.

Reminds me so much of Barbacoa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbacoa) I can't believe it. Well without the grease... ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: roguejim on November 21, 2010, 01:40:08 PM
I did the roast for about three hours around 225-250F and then double-foiled it for another 2 hours when internal was over 165F. When the internal temp reached about 212 (a little higher than I wanted- 205F) I removed the package. This got wrapped in a bath-towel and then placed inside a soft lunch cooler with a temp probe. I wrapped the cooler in another towel and placed the whole thing in my unlit oven for about 3 hours.

The temp slowly dropped to about 125F. I pulled the beef with my gloved hands... Amazing. Literally fell apart in nice strands and I mixed a small amount of sauce in. Delicious.

Reminds me so much of Barbacoa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbacoa) I can't believe it. Well without the grease... ;)

What do you feel is the advantage to foiling? 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 21, 2010, 02:55:39 PM
I feel it helps finish out the meat in a manner similar to a braise.  Keeps it from drying out while continuing to break down the collagen and muscle fibers.  When I opened the foil before towelling it steamed but there wasn't any liquid and only a just a bit of fat. Perfect.

I've done ribs like this as mentioned way back in this thread.  Called the 3-2-1 method.

Now I think any tough cut like a brisket, butt or shoulder could benefit from foiling at some latter part of the process.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 22, 2010, 12:55:15 PM
I only foil once the meat comes off the smoker.  Turns out plenty moist.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: MrNate on November 22, 2010, 01:24:10 PM
So I picked up some pork spare ribs, but I have no smoker. Anyone have any suggestions on the best way to cook these bad boys up?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 22, 2010, 02:19:44 PM
So I picked up some pork spare ribs, but I have no smoker. Anyone have any suggestions on the best way to cook these bad boys up?

do you have a crock pot or dutch oven?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: MrNate on November 22, 2010, 02:25:30 PM
I have both. Whatcha got in mind?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 22, 2010, 02:41:49 PM
My MIL makes some awesome c^@(& pot ribs, but I don't have the recipe.  It should be easy enough to google one, but maybe somewhere here has a tried a true one  . . .

<edit> edited potentially offensive word ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 22, 2010, 02:45:11 PM
Love them c%$#^ pot ribs.  Shhhh....don't say that word.

The AHA culinary wizard will come after you.  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 22, 2010, 02:48:39 PM
I have both. Whatcha got in mind?

i found this on the bbq-brethren forum....

"Seared them quickly on the weber kettle and then put in a cast iron dutch oven on smoker at 250 for a few hours. Use a braising liquid of dark beer, onions, garlic, carrots etc. Just leave the top off the dutch oven and you get a nice smokey flavor into the ribs and braising liquid."

substitute oven for smoker and leave the top on and cut down on the time.  if you choose this method, i'd watch them close.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on November 22, 2010, 02:52:18 PM
So I picked up some pork spare ribs, but I have no smoker. Anyone have any suggestions on the best way to cook these bad boys up?

Do you have a gas grill?  Some hickory chips in a foil pouch with toothpick size holes punched into it will work. Heat & chips on one side. Ribs & no heat on the other side. Just have to play with it a little to get it right.  Cheers!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 22, 2010, 03:14:14 PM
You could try the Alton Brown method. Season and wrap in foil. In a 250ish oven for about 2.5 hours. Then drain and reduce liquid.  Open foil and baste ribs with it. Pop in oven at 375 until carmelized.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 22, 2010, 03:20:47 PM
You could try the Alton Brown method. Season and wrap in foil. In a 250ish oven for about 2.5 hours. Then drain and reduce liquid.  Open foil and baste ribs with it. Pop in oven at 375 until carmelized.

I've used a similiar method. 

I marinate the ribs in 50/50 beer and tomato juice with plenty of your favorite dry rub overnight.
Then cover with aluminum foil and bake at 250F for about three hours. Drain the marinade, brush with your favorit BBQ sauce and broil on low until caramelized.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: MrNate on November 22, 2010, 04:02:35 PM
Oven method sounds easiest, but not smokey. I'll have to debate this for a bit.

Thanks guys!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 22, 2010, 05:10:55 PM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Figaro_Liquid_Smoke.jpg/197px-Figaro_Liquid_Smoke.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on November 22, 2010, 07:24:17 PM
Anybody smoking or grilling the turkey? 

 I just got a 14 lb fresh killed turkey today at the Italian market. Picked it out of a cage and then it went to the back. Chop chop, 20 mins later it was dressed and ready to go. The place stunk so I didn't go into watch. I was told to get it a few days in advance so the meat can "relax" a few days before cooking.

Im gonna reverse spatchcock the turkey and do it over an open fire Argentine style. Salt only.

But, I do have to do some smoking. Just got an amazing gift from a bud who drove down to Georgia to go pig hunting. He got 11, but three were males and got tossed. (not sure why males are no good). . He iced up the truck and drove back to NJ with a bed full of pigs. He gave me a gigantic leg of pork.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09183.jpg) It is 15-20lbs, had to break it down cause no room. Im half way done in the pic. Would have been great to roast it whole over the coals but no way.

Im gonna cure and smoke some of it.

I was worried that it would be real gamy lik those Russian boars, they are awful tasting. I also thought it would be stringy and tough cause it is so big. But man is this pork delicious. Almost like regular domestic pork but a hint of that wild flavor.

Really nice, if I lived down there I would hunt pigs regular for sure, wouldnt need much.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 22, 2010, 07:51:53 PM
Nice score on the porker!

I was thinking about trying a fresh turkey this year buted opted for a frozen.  It's a 20 pounder.  I just put it in a cooler full of water to start thawing out.

The wife wants to roast it in the oven which is fine by me.  I wanted to smoke a smaller twelve pounder that I have,but it would be too much, I'll save it for another time soon.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: MrNate on November 22, 2010, 09:35:37 PM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Figaro_Liquid_Smoke.jpg/197px-Figaro_Liquid_Smoke.jpg)

Heresy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 23, 2010, 12:46:57 AM
Anybody smoking or grilling the turkey?  

But, I do have to do some smoking. Just got an amazing gift from a bud who drove down to Georgia to go pig hunting. He got 11, but three were males and got tossed. (not sure why males are no good). . He iced up the truck and drove back to NJ with a bed full of pigs. He gave me a gigantic leg of pork.

I picked up a 19 pound turkey, I plan to butcher it and smoke it in pieces.

A friend of mine goes wild pig hunting, he said if you shoot an "intact" male it is super gamy and very much not good eats.  But he sometimes shoots "bars", which apparently is a boar that has been castrated.  When they are hunting and the dogs find a young male, the guides slice it and set it free so they can hunt it in a couple of years.  He smoked a shoulder from one when I was there once - he's from NC, his sauce used Bone Sucking Sauce as a base.  I'm not sure what else he did to it, but it was most excellent.  
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on November 23, 2010, 08:35:13 AM
We usually get a fresh turkey from the Amish folks, but this year someone else is doing the cooking.  I hear they got a fresh one, but I don't know where from, most likely the grocery.  :(    I am a bit skeptical about how this feast will turn out, but at least all I have to do is make dinner rolls. ;)  Almost talked them into smoking it and then finishing it in the oven, but there was some questioning the flavor of the gravy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on November 23, 2010, 01:02:08 PM
Oven method sounds easiest, but not smokey. I'll have to debate this for a bit.

Thanks guys!

You can give them a dry rub, cook them low and slow in the oven, and then finish them on the grill to crisp them up and give them color.  If you want them to be smoky, you can always put some ground chipotles in your dry rub.  Or serve with a smoky BBQ sauce.

I use the gas grill method a lot too.  Damp wood wrapped in foil, holes poked in it, on the lit side of the grill.  Ribs on the unlit side.  You can combine this with the oven method too, depending on how much smoke you want.  It can be a little harder to control the temperature this way.

Spare ribs have a lot more fat on them, so you don't have to worry about them drying out as much as baby backs.  I still like to wrap them and let them rest after cooking, though.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 23, 2010, 01:51:10 PM
I'm doing a turkey this year to help my mom out, who usually does the whole feast for the family.  Spatchcocked and cajun-spiced, then smoked or smoke-roasted, I think, with the backbone and other trimmings roasted then boiled to make a stock for gravy.  I might also try that trick of herb butter under the skin.  Couldn't hurt!  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 23, 2010, 03:09:19 PM
I want to smoke a turkey, duck, chicken...or turducken.  :)

A turducken is a dish consisting of a de-boned chicken stuffed into a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed into a de-boned turkey. The word turducken is a portmanteau of turkey, duck, and chicken or hen.

The birds can be stuffed in layers with a cranberry sauage stuffing mixture.
Then smoked...low and slow...probably an overnighter.

(http://thymeforfood.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/turducken-11.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on November 23, 2010, 05:33:32 PM
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 23, 2010, 06:33:29 PM
I want to smoke a turkey, duck, chicken...or turducken.  :)

Ordered one from cajun-grocer once....ONCE.
Big let down. I didn't smoke mine; and you'll probably have much better stuffing.
If I found the time, I'd give it a go like you're going to do.
Buying turducken ready to go is not something I'd recommend.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 23, 2010, 06:35:40 PM
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.

Wash it, salt it, smoke it. It will be good. (I've never brined, not that I'm against it, just haven't)
I smoked two last year, one just salted - the other with bone sucking sauce.
Both very good, just depends what you're looking for.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 23, 2010, 06:44:58 PM
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.

13 lbs is a good size to smoke.

Brine the Turkey for 24 hrs.

2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 23, 2010, 06:46:13 PM
I want to smoke a turkey, duck, chicken...or turducken.  :)

Ordered one from cajun-grocer once....ONCE.
Big let down. I didn't smoke mine; and you'll probably have much better stuffing.
If I found the time, I'd give it a go like you're going to do.
Buying turducken ready to go is not something I'd recommend.

Great advice.

I would buy all three birds fresh and prepare them myself.  You know how us homebrewers think.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 23, 2010, 06:52:44 PM

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!

So you smoke hot and fast to leave in the moisture? Cuz that's why you're brining in the first place?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 23, 2010, 06:54:47 PM

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!

So you smoke hot and fast to leave in the moisture? Cuz that's why you're brining in the first place?

It renders a fantastic smoked turkey. Hot and fast...the only way to smoke a turkey.  Try it sometime.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 23, 2010, 10:26:14 PM
Anybody smoking or grilling the turkey? 

 I just got a 14 lb fresh killed turkey today at the Italian market. Picked it out of a cage and then it went to the back. Chop chop, 20 mins later it was dressed and ready to go. The place stunk so I didn't go into watch. I was told to get it a few days in advance so the meat can "relax" a few days before cooking.

Im gonna reverse spatchcock the turkey and do it over an open fire Argentine style. Salt only.

But, I do have to do some smoking. Just got an amazing gift from a bud who drove down to Georgia to go pig hunting. He got 11, but three were males and got tossed. (not sure why males are no good). . He iced up the truck and drove back to NJ with a bed full of pigs. He gave me a gigantic leg of pork.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC09183.jpg) It is 15-20lbs, had to break it down cause no room. Im half way done in the pic. Would have been great to roast it whole over the coals but no way.

Im gonna cure and smoke some of it.

I was worried that it would be real gamy lik those Russian boars, they are awful tasting. I also thought it would be stringy and tough cause it is so big. But man is this pork delicious. Almost like regular domestic pork but a hint of that wild flavor.

Really nice, if I lived down there I would hunt pigs regular for sure, wouldnt need much.



i like to do my birds reverse as well.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 24, 2010, 02:42:07 AM
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.
I think this is worth a read . . . I haven't tried "dry brining" a turkey (I don't see how this is really different from rubbing it) but I might for this year's smoked turkey effort.

http://www.oregonlive.com/foodday/index.ssf/2010/11/a_tale_of_two_turkeys.html

<edit> Forgot link . . .  ::)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 24, 2010, 03:03:33 AM
In case you missed it, it is really cold in the NW and we've had a blizzard (this is all NW relative).  We got about 2.5 inches of snow, and schools were closed Tuesday and Wednesday.  Yes, I know that is really nothing, but it happens so rarely here we just don't have the equipment to deal with it.

Anyway, this means getting together with the neighbors for some food and beverages . . . I decided to make a Bacon Explosion (http://www.bbqaddicts.com/blog/recipes/bacon-explosion/) that we could have for dinner.  It turned out great, I've already been asked it make it again :)

I need a little practice making it look better (more uniform), but it was still delicious.  It was interesting to bbq when the weather is this cold, it averaged about 18F for the 4 hours it took to smoke (and it's currently 13.5F) so I had to heat the grill more than usual to keep a good temp.  I smoked it with mesquite, 2 lbs of bacon and 2 lbs of maple sausage with homemade bbq sauce and rub.

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TOzfPCumLXI/AAAAAAAAAFw/i4XnNJsNDuI/IMG00010-20101123-1426.jpg)

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TOzfPdVZoCI/AAAAAAAAAF0/3dS-N45ADb4/IMG00011-20101123-1717.jpg)

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TOzfPtuHjfI/AAAAAAAAAF8/H8TMzzkNeNo/IMG00014-20101123-1818.jpg)

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TOzfYYUaonI/AAAAAAAAAGE/DL1lUFmTsfY/IMG00016-20101123-1834.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: roguejim on November 24, 2010, 03:10:36 AM
Foiling a packer brisket or boston butt makes sense because you can get the color you want on the bark, and then wrap 'em, usually around 170F until finished.  But foiling ribs just isn't my thing.  I mean, how long do you cook them for anyway?  4-5 hrs?  Foiling seems an easy way to really overcook them.  I like to be able to see them.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on November 24, 2010, 03:39:15 AM

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!

So you smoke hot and fast to leave in the moisture? Cuz that's why you're brining in the first place?

It renders a fantastic smoked turkey. Hot and fast...the only way to smoke a turkey.  Try it sometime.

I will be stealing this for my smoked turkey. Doing a 12-pounder smoked and another 12-pounder fried. Assuming the burner gets here on time...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on November 24, 2010, 05:46:03 AM

Anyway, this means getting together with the neighbors for some food and beverages . . . I decided to make a Bacon Explosion (http://www.bbqaddicts.com/blog/recipes/bacon-explosion/) that we could have for dinner.  It turned out great, I've already been asked it make it again :)


That's awesome Tom.  I've been looking for an excuse to make one of those since I first saw the recipe awhile back.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 24, 2010, 05:51:31 AM
that's a beautiful bacon creation up there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 24, 2010, 06:56:47 AM
I need a little practice making it look better (more uniform), but it was still delicious.  It was interesting to bbq when the weather is this cold, it averaged about 18F for the 4 hours it took to smoke (and it's currently 13.5F) so I had to heat the grill more than usual to keep a good temp.  I smoked it with mesquite, 2 lbs of bacon and 2 lbs of maple sausage with homemade bbq sauce and rub.

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TOzfYYUaonI/AAAAAAAAAGE/DL1lUFmTsfY/IMG00016-20101123-1834.jpg)

Nice work Tom!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on November 24, 2010, 07:13:49 AM
Sitting here drooling like a dog.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on November 24, 2010, 07:59:27 AM
Sitting here drooling like a dog.

+1000
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on November 24, 2010, 09:58:39 AM
Quote
A turducken is a dish consisting of a de-boned chicken stuffed into a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed into a de-boned turkey. The word turducken is a portmanteau of turkey, duck, and chicken or hen.

This quote amuses me since it implies that a reader of this thread wouldn't know what a 'turducken' is, but would know what 'portmanteau' means.  Not cutting on anyone; it just amused me.

Personally, I don't think I'd make a turducken because I enjoy duck so much on its own.  Roast duck is great on its own (use American, French, or Chinese recipe variations), but I also sometimes like to buy several, break them down, make confit with the legs, cook the breasts on their own or make them into sausage, and render the fat because you can never have too much duck fat around.  Fry potatoes in it sometime.  Wow.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 24, 2010, 10:05:07 AM
grilled everything but the cheese..... 

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/06c181e3.jpg)

i'll be putting on four boston butts tomorrow....  one for me, one for my dad and two for our homebrew club christmas party on december 4th (the same day as my bjcp exam, yikes).
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: MrNate on November 24, 2010, 10:11:01 AM
Quote
A turducken is a dish consisting of a de-boned chicken stuffed into a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed into a de-boned turkey. The word turducken is a portmanteau of turkey, duck, and chicken or hen.

This quote amuses me since it implies that a reader of this thread wouldn't know what a 'turducken' is, but would know what 'portmanteau' means.  Not cutting on anyone; it just amused me.

Thank you. I hate that word, by the way. It reeks of foppery.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 24, 2010, 10:44:05 AM
Great job on the fattie Tom. Looks delicioso.

We still need a drooling emoticon.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: roguejim on November 24, 2010, 01:12:34 PM
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.

13 lbs is a good size to smoke.

Brine the Turkey for 24 hrs.

2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!



Is the oil for sauteeing? Or, add to the brine?  How much?

Do you cook the brine first?

Are you putting the turkey directly on the smoker's grate, or in a pan to retain the juices for gravy?

Finally...Any seasoning to go on the bird?  Basting?

Thanks.  I'm firing up the Traeger and using your brine recipe.  I used an Alton Brown recipe last year which was a vegetable broth based brine.  Yours looks more appetizing.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 24, 2010, 02:34:42 PM
In case you missed it, it is really cold in the NW and we've had a blizzard (this is all NW relative).  It was interesting to bbq when the weather is this cold, it averaged about 18F for the 4 hours it took to smoke (and it's currently 13.5F) so I had to heat the grill more than usual to keep a good temp.

Looks great Tom, but I think I can one up you!  We have had a ton of snow already this year including another foot or so in the last 24 hours.

Anyways, later today, I am going to smoke a 9.5lb pork butt overnight, and then bring to a potluck lunch at work tomorrow.  The temp is 1F right now, but expected to drop to -11F overnight (-26F with the windchill).

Should be interesting.

By the way, it was -13F when I brewed last Friday (-26F with the windchill).  Even in an attached garage with the door only open a foot or two, and a propane burner givin 'er, it was damn cold!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 24, 2010, 03:44:47 PM
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.

13 lbs is a good size to smoke.

Brine the Turkey for 24 hrs.

2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!



Is the oil for sauteeing? Or, add to the brine?  How much?

Do you cook the brine first?

Are you putting the turkey directly on the smoker's grate, or in a pan to retain the juices for gravy?

Finally...Any seasoning to go on the bird?  Basting?

Thanks.  I'm firing up the Traeger and using your brine recipe.  I used an Alton Brown recipe last year which was a vegetable broth based brine.  Yours looks more appetizing.

Here's the recipe.

1 12-14 lb turkey
2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter
Combine apple juice, brown sugar, and salt in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring to dissolve. Boil for one minute, remove from heat, let mixture come to room temperature, then refrigerate to 40*F.

In a large non-reactive container, combine the apple juice mixture with the remaining ingredients and stir. Place rinsed, drained whole turkey into the brine. Use a heavy weight to keep the bird submerged, if necessary.

Refrigerate for 24 hours. Remove turkey from brine, rinse inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Fold wing tips under the bird. Brush outside surface with vegetable oil or melted butter.

Cook at 325-350*F to 160-165*F in the breast, 170-175*F in the thigh, approximately 2-1/2 to 3 hours. Cover loosely with foil and let rest 30 minutes before carving.

No seasonings are necessary.

Good Luck!

Post some pics.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 25, 2010, 12:18:57 AM
Thanks guys, it was a lot of fun and really not that hard, I'll be doing that again.  You've definitely got to serve it to a crowd or make it smaller though, even with 6 adults eating it there was a lot left over.  Not any more though, it's gone now. :)

In case you missed it, it is really cold in the NW and we've had a blizzard (this is all NW relative).  It was interesting to bbq when the weather is this cold, it averaged about 18F for the 4 hours it took to smoke (and it's currently 13.5F) so I had to heat the grill more than usual to keep a good temp.

Looks great Tom, but I think I can one up you!  We have had a ton of snow already this year including another foot or so in the last 24 hours.

Anyways, later today, I am going to smoke a 9.5lb pork butt overnight, and then bring to a potluck lunch at work tomorrow.  The temp is 1F right now, but expected to drop to -11F overnight (-26F with the windchill).

Should be interesting.

By the way, it was -13F when I brewed last Friday (-26F with the windchill).  Even in an attached garage with the door only open a foot or two, and a propane burner givin 'er, it was damn cold!
It's much colder in lots of places, but this is record lows for us this time of year! :)  We're wimps, what can I say?  It was one of the reasons I moved here though, I'm not in to temperature extremes. ;)

I think the coldest it's ever been when I brewed was about 25F.  Not that bad, I know, although it was when we had no power for several days and the house was only 40F so there was really no way to get warm except to huddle close to the mash tun. ;D  I can't even imagine brewing when the wind chill puts it under 0, we had weather like that when I was moving here from IN - I left a few days late, it was too cold to pack my truck.

I've got pork butt on my list to do again soon, but I'm doing another bacon weave tomorrow - this one will be wrapped around a butterflied turkey breast stuff with sausage dressing.  I can't wait. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 25, 2010, 06:03:31 AM
I've been up for almost an hour and a half now trying to get some charcoal to light.  Usually I cheat getting charcoal lit by starting a few coals of that "instant light" charcoal, which are soaked in fluid, and then adding regular charcoal.  Today it looks like I got a bum bag of instant charcoal, because they wouldn't light any easier than normal charcoal.  I ended up breaking a couple lighters and going through half a box of matches and burning a LOT of leaves to get things hot enough to light the charcoal...

But...I now have a cajun rubbed spatchcocked turkey on the smoker.  Deboned the breast section entirely, phew that was a lot of work yesterday.  That turkey got a lot of calcium or something!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 25, 2010, 06:10:51 AM
I've been up for almost an hour and a half now trying to get some charcoal to light.  Usually I cheat getting charcoal lit by starting a few coals of that "instant light" charcoal, which are soaked in fluid, and then adding regular charcoal.  Today it looks like I got a bum bag of instant charcoal, because they wouldn't light any easier than normal charcoal.  I ended up breaking a couple lighters and going through half a box of matches and burning a LOT of leaves to get things hot enough to light the charcoal...

Maybe you can score one of these on a black friday special...
(http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/06/01/97/00/0006019700191_100X100.jpg)

Good luck, hope it turns out great!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 25, 2010, 06:16:42 AM
my overnight pork butt is done after 12.5 hours.  Temp held steady all night long, and still lots of charcoal in the box.  Looks and smells great.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 25, 2010, 06:21:47 AM
See, I have a chimney, and I use it, but I don't have paraffin starters, or other sorts of flammable items to start them with.  Some days the wind and the cold just make getting a fire started nearly impossible without a "jump start".  

Guess I better go check on it...hopefully the damn thing isn't hovering at 120 degrees!

EDIT:  no worries, cooking nicely at 350 degrees!  That's perfect IMO, I'm not looking to smoke this low and slow, I want smoke, but I also want crisp skin.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 25, 2010, 06:28:53 AM
See, I have a chimney, and I use it, but I don't have paraffin starters, or other sorts of flammable items to start them with.

2 sheets of newspaper, balled up on the underside - whoosh! Heap Big Fire.
Never used paraffin - (tea candle basically?)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 25, 2010, 07:12:45 AM
I've been up for almost an hour and a half now trying to get some charcoal to light.  Usually I cheat getting charcoal lit by starting a few coals of that "instant light" charcoal, which are soaked in fluid, and then adding regular charcoal.  Today it looks like I got a bum bag of instant charcoal, because they wouldn't light any easier than normal charcoal.  I ended up breaking a couple lighters and going through half a box of matches and burning a LOT of leaves to get things hot enough to light the charcoal...

But...I now have a cajun rubbed spatchcocked turkey on the smoker.  Deboned the breast section entirely, phew that was a lot of work yesterday.  That turkey got a lot of calcium or something!


sounds like your lump may have gotten damp somehow.

i start my grill with a pair of welder's gloves, safety goggles and a bernzomatic mapp gas torch. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 25, 2010, 07:22:37 AM
2 sheets of newspaper, balled up on the underside - whoosh! Heap Big Fire.
Never used paraffin - (tea candle basically?)

I'd have to have newspapers on hand.  Do all my newsreading online!  But even so, the only way I got the coals lit was to continuatlly keep pushing handfuls of leaves into the chimney...once I kept a leaf fire going for 10 minutes the coals were lit.

Every once in a while I have a rough time getting a fire going, but usually, light a couple instalight coals, let burn for a minute, add regular charcoal, wait, and I have a bunch of coals at the ready.  I'm thinking it was a combination of the unusual cold, possible humidity, and bad charcoal.

No worries now...except that my bird is on track to be done a lot quicker than I had expected!!!  Thanksgiving brunch perhaps?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 25, 2010, 08:30:00 AM
light a couple instalight coals, let burn for a minute, add regular charcoal, wait, and I have a bunch of coals at the ready.  I'm thinking it was a combination of the unusual cold, possible humidity, and bad charcoal

I had a bad incident with one of those magic briquettes. It was this honeycomb shaped piece of charcoal and chemical crap pressed together. I lit one in a smoker pan to let the chemical smell waft away before I threw the rest of the charcoal on it. I decided to move the pan (it's just one briquette, right?) and ended up like the guy in raiders of the lost arc...
(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQRuc9JsMNPHZDpvvJWV-4pn1Enu4xcnBwc3m0UAS5RDtCq6Nsx9g)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 25, 2010, 11:58:51 AM
I use a chimney full of charcoal and 2-3 sheets of newspaper to get my coals lit. It takes about 20-30 minutes for the whole chimney to get lit and then I transfer the lit coals to the grill.  I have 100% success with this method of lighting my coals.

Hey Nic...maybe start saving any extra mail circulars and any paper that you discard for lighting your charcoal in the chimney.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: akr71 on November 25, 2010, 12:19:08 PM
Thanks guys, it was a lot of fun and really not that hard, I'll be doing that again.  You've definitely got to serve it to a crowd or make it smaller though, even with 6 adults eating it there was a lot left over.  Not any more though, it's gone now. :)
 

My daughter (she's 7 and 45 lbs soaking wet) asked me the other day when I was going to make the bacon explosion again  ;D Sounds like I need to add a few things to the grocery list...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 26, 2010, 09:45:08 PM
Great use for those old phone books. Rip some pages out and hit them with some vegetable oil. Use that to light the chimney.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: roguejim on November 27, 2010, 03:03:50 AM
I'm brining the bird in Bluesman's brine recipe as I type.  Tomorrow it gets smoked.  I'll baste it a couple of times with a butter/maple syrup blend.  Can someone give me a brief tutorial on posting pics?  Thanks.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 27, 2010, 03:20:05 AM
You have to upload the pics to some website, I use google picasweb since I have a gmail account.  Then you just paste the URL to the pic in between [pic][/pic] tags.  If you click the quote button on a post with a picture in it then you can see what I'm talking about.

Looking forward to the pics of the bird :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 27, 2010, 11:00:42 AM
Anyone made their own pastrami before?  I was thinking of trying it, and then possibly steam in beer to serve.  Our club has a potluck coming up in Feb, and you have to incorporate beer into the dish, so this was an idea that popped in my head.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 27, 2010, 05:16:37 PM
Anyone made their own pastrami before?  I was thinking of trying it, and then possibly steam in beer to serve.  Our club has a potluck coming up in Feb, and you have to incorporate beer into the dish, so this was an idea that popped in my head.

I make it frequently, although one could say I was cheating.  Usually I use cheap corned beef brisket points, particularly just around st patricks day when they go on sale...soak them to reduce a bit of saltiness, hit them with a very aromatic pepper rub, and smoke until done....chill in the fridge over night, then onto the meat slicer, bagged up and then frozen for later use.

Recently I cured my own, this time trying out an eye of round roast, an incorrigibly lean piece of meat.  It's interesting...the brisket is better I think, but I like this version for use as a cold cut on sandwiches.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on November 27, 2010, 05:47:48 PM
Nic, how are you slicing your lunch meats? I like my Jewish lunch meats sliced tissue paper thin. Im really into this idea of making this stuff at home but slicing seems to be an obstacle. 

There is a Jewish sandwich place near me that is just wonderful. Their sandwiches are a real treat. They slice the pastrami so thin that it is see through and it still holds together. Same with their lox, the old guys that work the deli case are artist with a knife.

Man I could go fro a sandwich.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 27, 2010, 05:53:40 PM
Nic, how are you slicing your lunch meats? I like my Jewish lunch meats sliced tissue paper thin. Im really into this idea of making this stuff at home but slicing seems to be an obstacle. 

A good slicer is on my wish list. It would be nice to be able to thinly slice a smoked bottom round roast.
I am a sandwich lover. Pastrami, smoked turkey, or even pork roll on some fresh bread with some good cheese and some stone ground mustard.
I was eying one up for less than $100 on Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/EdgeCraft-610-Choice-Premium-Electric/dp/B0002AKCOC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1290905498&sr=8-1
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 27, 2010, 06:02:56 PM
A good slicer is on my wish list.

I got the el-cheapo model from one of those bargain shopper magazines. I think sixty bux. With a little learning curve you can come up with some great slices. Only problem is I can't put a whole hunk of prosciutto on the slider thingy. Sure the pro model would be great but this works for now. I was worried it would be one of those fad gadgets that I'd use a little and then need to find storage for. If my use keeps up I may upgrade.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 27, 2010, 06:51:42 PM
Nic, how are you slicing your lunch meats? I like my Jewish lunch meats sliced tissue paper thin. Im really into this idea of making this stuff at home but slicing seems to be an obstacle. 

A good slicer is on my wish list. It would be nice to be able to thinly slice a smoked bottom round roast.
I am a sandwich lover. Pastrami, smoked turkey, or even pork roll on some fresh bread with some good cheese and some stone ground mustard.
I was eying one up for less than $100 on Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/EdgeCraft-610-Choice-Premium-Electric/dp/B0002AKCOC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1290905498&sr=8-1

I have this very model.  Works pretty reasonable...BUT...you either have to have better tricks up your sleeve than I do, or your meat has to be of a different consistency, or its not capable of paper thin.  The cured meats I am doing slice to a reasonable degree of thinness, but if you try to go too thin they tend to shred and flake up.  If you work the curing process to get a drier, denser product, this might be alleviated. 

An electric slicer is an expensive product, it takes up a lot of space on your counter, and its a pain in the neck to use and clean sometimes, but I have to admit, for all these cons, you just can't get results like these with a knife, at least reasonably.  I bought a fancy 12" granton edge slicing knife, thinking I wouldn't need a slicer if I was patient and had a good knife, but that hardly ever gets used now. 

I really should try some of the serbian cured meats, like the suva govedja, on the slicer sometime.  I bet it could peel off nearly transparent strips of the meat, as dense as that meat is!  Usually with that sort of meat I just take my time with the chef's knife since I'm only doing a small amount of it at a time.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 28, 2010, 12:02:03 AM
Anyone made their own pastrami before?  I was thinking of trying it, and then possibly steam in beer to serve.  Our club has a potluck coming up in Feb, and you have to incorporate beer into the dish, so this was an idea that popped in my head.
If you're steaming it in beer it sounds more like corned beef to me.  I corn my own briskets every few months, and I've smoked one once to make pastrami.  It was excellent . . . well, it seems to turn out great no matter what I do, even just boiling it in water :)

I do a dry rub rather than the wet brine you usually see, weigh it down with bricks in the fridge and flip it daily for 10 days before cooking.  I leave out the sodium nitrate because I'm not too concerned about the final color. Delicious!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 28, 2010, 08:23:07 AM
For you BBQ'ers in the upper midwest (or places where it gets really cold in the winter), what do you do with the water in your water pan after smoking?  In the warmer months, I just dig a hole somewhere in the backyard (usually near the compost pile) and bury it.  With layers of snow and frozen ground, I'm not sure whether this will work in the winter (although I've never tried it).  At the very least, it seems a lot more labor intensive.  Any suggestions?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 28, 2010, 09:18:59 AM
No water pan. Try it you'll like it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 28, 2010, 09:50:06 AM
I've tried going without when smoking poultry, since poultry is generally amenable to higher smoke temps (around 350-375 is what I usually do).  But I haven't tried low and slow smoking sans water pan.  Can you really get as low as 225 without a water pan in a Weber Smoky Mountain Cooker?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 28, 2010, 09:57:29 AM
I've tried going without when smoking poultry, since poultry is generally amenable to higher smoke temps (around 350-375 is what I usually do).  But I haven't tried low and slow smoking sans water pan.  Can you really get as low as 225 without a water pan in a Weber Smoky Mountain Cooker?

It's not exactly what I have, I built something very similar. In the winter you should be able to. I assume you're doing the Minion(sp?) method. Light fewer coals at the get go, allow less air through the vents, should work. I think my setup may be a little larger - It's a 22.5 weber kettle with a 30" tall stainless cylinder between the top and bottom.
The water pan just got to me. Soooo nasty - I just quit using it. I see no ill effects in my Q.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 28, 2010, 10:03:06 AM
I use a WSM with and without the water pan. I recently smoked a Bottom round roast and a fatty with the water pan using the minion method and got up to the upper two hundreds for a few hours with no problem. The vents were 50% and the water pan was boiling nicely for the duration.  The roast was pulled at 130F while the fatty at 175F all within a few hours of smoking.

However, I like to smoke turkeys and chickens high heat without the water pan.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 28, 2010, 11:03:14 AM
Anyone made their own pastrami before?  I was thinking of trying it, and then possibly steam in beer to serve.  Our club has a potluck coming up in Feb, and you have to incorporate beer into the dish, so this was an idea that popped in my head.
If you're steaming it in beer it sounds more like corned beef to me.  I corn my own briskets every few months, and I've smoked one once to make pastrami.  It was excellent . . . well, it seems to turn out great no matter what I do, even just boiling it in water :)

I was planning to brine for a week or so, then add a dry rub and smoke.  Guess I was thinking of just steaming it with a bit of beer to warm it up when serving, maybe thow in some sauerkraut too?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 28, 2010, 11:05:25 AM
For you BBQ'ers in the upper midwest (or places where it gets really cold in the winter), what do you do with the water in your water pan after smoking?  In the warmer months, I just dig a hole somewhere in the backyard (usually near the compost pile) and bury it.  With layers of snow and frozen ground, I'm not sure whether this will work in the winter (although I've never tried it).  At the very least, it seems a lot more labor intensive.  Any suggestions?

When I use my parents electric smoker, I'll use the water pan drippings for soup stock or a gravy base.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on November 29, 2010, 12:05:57 AM
I was planning to brine for a week or so, then add a dry rub and smoke.  Guess I was thinking of just steaming it with a bit of beer to warm it up when serving, maybe thow in some sauerkraut too?
Oh, I see . . . that sounds delicious :)  I'd have to keep the kraut separate though, or my wife won't love it ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 29, 2010, 05:45:02 AM
For you BBQ'ers in the upper midwest (or places where it gets really cold in the winter), what do you do with the water in your water pan after smoking?  In the warmer months, I just dig a hole somewhere in the backyard (usually near the compost pile) and bury it.  With layers of snow and frozen ground, I'm not sure whether this will work in the winter (although I've never tried it).  At the very least, it seems a lot more labor intensive.  Any suggestions?

When I use my parents electric smoker, I'll use the water pan drippings for soup stock or a gravy base.

I wouldn't give my water pan to a dog to drink out of. You wash yours out after every use, or you just really brave?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 29, 2010, 05:56:42 AM
I've seen folks line their water pan with aluminum foil to catch the drippings for making gravy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 29, 2010, 06:35:53 AM
I wouldn't give my water pan to a dog to drink out of. You wash yours out after every use, or you just really brave?

+1.  Mine would have to be scrubbed terribly clean and then maybe baked in an oven before I'd consider it food safe again!  :D

That's one thing that keeps me using my smokenator / weber kettle combo...my WSM is just a pain in the neck to clean.  The Weber cleans up much easier.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 29, 2010, 09:47:57 AM
i cooked 40 lbs of boston butt this weekend.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bb53ec68.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7c5e2f9e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/008beb09.jpg)


it was a 21 hour cook.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 29, 2010, 10:18:49 AM
 :o

Wow...that looks piglicious!

Nice color and bark.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 29, 2010, 02:20:48 PM
Fantastic looking butt! ;D

Hey deepsouth, you're the guy who likes to use Dizzy rubs, right?  I'm about to order some. Do you have any favorites or recommendations?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 29, 2010, 03:23:43 PM
Fantastic looking butt! ;D

Hey deepsouth, you're the guy who likes to use Dizzy rubs, right?  I'm about to order some. Do you have any favorites or recommendations?

i am....

my favorites....

red eye express (everything but chicken)
dizzy dust (everything)
shakin' the tree (chicken and pork)
tsunami spin (chicken and pork)
raisin' the steaks (steaks and burgers)
pineapple head (pineapple and chicken kabobs)

all their stuff is top notch.  i actually keep one of everything from them!

let me know what you decide on.

cheers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 29, 2010, 03:27:03 PM
I wouldn't give my water pan to a dog to drink out of. You wash yours out after every use, or you just really brave?

Yeah, they keep the thing spotless.  So it contains hot water and fresh drippings... seems a shame to throw that out, no?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 29, 2010, 06:44:43 PM
Wow, I've never seen a clean water pan - except new out of the box. I just throw mine in the fire pit every now and then and it's clean enough since I never use what's in the pan. Gotta say I'm happy to see there's only one guy here with a spotless water pan.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 29, 2010, 07:14:16 PM
Wow, I've never seen a clean water pan - except new out of the box. I just throw mine in the fire pit every now and then and it's clean enough since I never use what's in the pan. Gotta say I'm happy to see there's only one guy here with a spotless water pan.

I don't use a water pan on my smoker.  My parents' crappy electric smoker has a water pan.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 29, 2010, 08:00:56 PM
I clean my water pan after every use.  In fact, I try to keep my smoker pretty clean in general.  I let it go once and mold began to grow on the inside...it was nasty.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on November 30, 2010, 05:44:23 AM
I clean my water pan after every use.  In fact, I try to keep my smoker pretty clean in general.  I let it go once and mold began to grow on the inside...it was nasty.

 My S.O.P. is to intend to clean the pan after each use. More often than not I realize I didn't the next time I take off the lid to fire it up again. Seen some interesting stuff.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 30, 2010, 07:20:12 AM
how about bacon wrapped duck breasts.....  soaked the duck in buttermilk overnight and seasoned it, wrapped it in bacon and grilled.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a78fee71.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6418f95c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1c84f87e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3fcd2f9d.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2010, 07:36:05 AM
I clean my water pan after every use.  In fact, I try to keep my smoker pretty clean in general.  I let it go once and mold began to grow on the inside...it was nasty.

+1

This is my SOP. I had a water pan that started to rust from lack of cleaning so I clean it out after every use now.
In fact it is so clean I can eat out of it.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2010, 07:37:17 AM
how about bacon wrapped duck breasts.....  soaked the duck in buttermilk overnight and seasoned it, wrapped it in bacon and grilled.....

That will work for me.  ;)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on November 30, 2010, 08:31:05 AM
I couldn't imagine not keeping a smoker or grill clean.  That is pretty nasty when you think about it.

If find the UDS is really easy to clean.  With no water pan, the drippings hit the charcoal and burn up, and I don't use sauces or marinades during the cooking process either, so none of that crap is dripping all over either.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 30, 2010, 08:48:47 AM
I couldn't imagine not keeping a smoker or grill clean.  That is pretty nasty when you think about it.

If find the UDS is really easy to clean.  With no water pan, the drippings hit the charcoal and burn up, and I don't use sauces or marinades during the cooking process either, so none of that crap is dripping all over either.


i've never cleaned my grill besides removing ash and scraping the grate before i drop food on it.  am i the only one?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 30, 2010, 09:21:37 AM
I clean my grill pretty good of the debris and grease with a wire brush or wad of paper. Then it gets a good spraying.

This gets done every time. I connected the dots years ago when I would get the sh!ts from a dirty gunked up grill. The heat of the fire isn't enough to tackle the whole job especially when using sugary BBQ sauces.

My understanding is "sand" in the water pan is better than water.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 30, 2010, 09:41:01 AM
I clean my grill pretty good of the debris and grease with a wire brush or wad of paper. Then it gets a good spraying.

This gets done every time. I connected the dots years ago when I would get the sh!ts from a dirty gunked up grill. The heat of the fire isn't enough to tackle the whole job especially when using sugary BBQ sauces.

My understanding is "sand" in the water pan is better than water.

i haven't tried it yet, but what about a "burn out"?  would that work as well?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 30, 2010, 10:25:30 AM
I couldn't imagine not keeping a smoker or grill clean.  That is pretty nasty when you think about it.

I can!  I worked at a Kansas City BBQ joint when I was a teenager.  I can very readily imagine!  :D

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2010, 10:34:40 AM
If you are running a BBQ joint and keeping the grill hot most of the time it's not as much of a problem to have grease and debris in and around the grill. Keeping the grill at a minimum of 250-300F is a safe window.  Cleaning the grill of grease and debris at a minimum is sound practice. We don't want to ingest any harmful bacteria.

Here's a guide to food safety from the USDA.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/barbecue_food_safety/index.asp
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on November 30, 2010, 11:46:13 AM
I clean my grill pretty good of the debris and grease with a wire brush or wad of paper. Then it gets a good spraying.

This gets done every time. I connected the dots years ago when I would get the sh!ts from a dirty gunked up grill. The heat of the fire isn't enough to tackle the whole job especially when using sugary BBQ sauces.

My understanding is "sand" in the water pan is better than water.

i haven't tried it yet, but what about a "burn out"?  would that work as well?

Envisioning.... Maybe. Probably. Then give the grill a good going over with a brush and wipe. All I know is since adopting a clean grill procedure any "incidents" have dropped to zero.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on November 30, 2010, 05:43:50 PM
I couldn't imagine not keeping a smoker or grill clean.  That is pretty nasty when you think about it.

If find the UDS is really easy to clean.  With no water pan, the drippings hit the charcoal and burn up, and I don't use sauces or marinades during the cooking process either, so none of that crap is dripping all over either.


i've never cleaned my grill besides removing ash and scraping the grate before i drop food on it.  am i the only one?

No your not the only one, I never clean any of my out door cooking gear. I just put it on the fire burn it off then brush it down liberally with cooking oil as it cools. This is how you season it. If it isn't stainless cleaning it off with soap or down to steel will promote rust. Just like a cast iron pan.

I even brush the smoker inside and out with oil regularly. It builds up.

So I guess I dont clean my outdoor stuff. I dirty it.  ::)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on November 30, 2010, 05:55:48 PM
I got my "monstrosity" as my wife calls it just in time to smoke some turkeys for Thanksgiving.  But for a whole day I burned some old Kingsford briquets in the firebox while spraying all surfaces with veggie oil.  After a day of heat and a pint of oil all the grills were well seasoned.  Now it'll just be a matter of scraping chunks off as needed. ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 30, 2010, 06:24:08 PM
i've never cleaned my grill besides removing ash and scraping the grate before i drop food on it.  am i the only one?
No your not the only one, I never clean any of my out door cooking gear. I just put it on the fire burn it off then brush it down liberally with cooking oil as it cools. This is how you season it. If it isn't stainless cleaning it off with soap or down to steel will promote rust. Just like a cast iron pan.
I even brush the smoker inside and out with oil regularly. It builds up.
So I guess I dont clean my outdoor stuff. I dirty it.  ::)

Dirty. The fire goes for almost an hour before I drop the food on it. I wire brush the grate prior to adding food. Clean the ash from the last smoke before starting the new one. That's it; no aches pains or complaints...  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on November 30, 2010, 06:45:10 PM
how about bacon wrapped duck breasts.....  soaked the duck in buttermilk overnight and seasoned it, wrapped it in bacon and grilled.....

Yumm!  What's the buttermilk do?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on November 30, 2010, 06:50:18 PM
Butter milk is a great marinade for fowl, the healthy bacteria and fats in butter milk help the meat start breaking down to become more tender.

For really good fried chicken.Start by marinading the chicken parts in buttermilk. Then dredge them in flour drop them in a pan full of hot lard and you will have the best fried chicken in the world. Coarse you have to add some other flavors but Im not giving away my secret mixture of eleven herbs and spices.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on November 30, 2010, 07:32:04 PM
Then dredge them in flour drop them in a pan full of hot lard and you will have the best fried chicken in the world. Coarse you have to add some other flavors but Im not giving away my secret mixture of eleven herbs and spices.

Meat salt and oil, Cap, meat salt and oil.  Anything more, and you're a Philistine!  :D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on November 30, 2010, 07:55:21 PM
I couldn't imagine not keeping a smoker or grill clean.  That is pretty nasty when you think about it.

If find the UDS is really easy to clean.  With no water pan, the drippings hit the charcoal and burn up, and I don't use sauces or marinades during the cooking process either, so none of that crap is dripping all over either.


i've never cleaned my grill besides removing ash and scraping the grate before i drop food on it.  am i the only one?

No your not the only one, I never clean any of my out door cooking gear. I just put it on the fire burn it off then brush it down liberally with cooking oil as it cools. This is how you season it. If it isn't stainless cleaning it off with soap or down to steel will promote rust. Just like a cast iron pan.

I even brush the smoker inside and out with oil regularly. It builds up.

So I guess I dont clean my outdoor stuff. I dirty it.  ::)


the eggs are all some ceramic type stuff, so i'm guessing burning it out is my best option.  i went over to the bge forum and did a search for it and burn out comes up constantly.  that said, i've done high temp cooks, but never a full burnout.  i've not noticed much stuff in there really.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2010, 08:13:04 PM
Dirty. The fire goes for almost an hour before I drop the food on it. I wire brush the grate prior to adding food. Clean the ash from the last smoke before starting the new one. That's it; no aches pains or complaints...  ;)

This is the way I prefer to Q.

I like to get the grill nice and hot before I begin the session.  This process sanitizes the grates prior to cooking. I brush the grates before lighting the charcoal and just prior to loading the grate. Then when I'm finished cooking, I brush down the grates and apply some vegetable oil to prevent rusting.

As a grill becomes seasoned it builds up a layer of char that imparts a distinct flavor of it's own to the cooked food.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on November 30, 2010, 08:31:54 PM
Butter milk is a great marinade for fowl, the healthy bacteria and fats in butter milk help the meat start breaking down to become more tender.

For really good fried chicken.Start by marinading the chicken parts in buttermilk. Then dredge them in flour drop them in a pan full of hot lard and you will have the best fried chicken in the world. Coarse you have to add some other flavors but Im not giving away my secret mixture of eleven herbs and spices.

Thanks Colonel..er, Cap.  That sounds delicious!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on November 30, 2010, 08:39:21 PM

This is the way I prefer to Q.


Hey, wait a minute - didn't you say just a few posts ago that you scrub it so clean you could see yourself in it?
Which is it? Dirty or Clean?

BRING BACK THE CLOWN!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on November 30, 2010, 08:48:46 PM

This is the way I prefer to Q.


Hey, wait a minute - didn't you say just a few posts ago that you scrub it so clean you could see yourself in it?
Which is it? Dirty or Clean?

BRING BACK THE CLOWN!

The clown is sitting in front of this computer.  ;D

LOL

The water pan to the smoker is what I was referring to being cleaned.

But...the grill and smoker body are layered with charred goodness that should never be touched.

The grates however are cleaned as I described.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 03, 2010, 06:11:15 AM
The water pan to the smoker is what I was referring to being cleaned.

But...the grill and smoker body are layered with charred goodness that should never be touched.

The grates however are cleaned as I described.

This is what I meant by "cleaning" too.  When I said "nasty" it was more about having some gross looking water pan with all sorts of goop and an inch or two of water left sitting in it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on December 11, 2010, 12:05:12 PM
i seasoned this fish with olive oil, dizzy pig shakin' the tree and tsunami spin along with some sea salt.  crab stuffed potatoes...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e7134200.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1c2f1c1e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8ca94490.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bdfb6834.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e4512219.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/02f0db07.jpg)

thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on December 11, 2010, 01:21:08 PM
You have really nice lighting in your kitchen, or is that the camera?

Food looks great too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: EHall on December 11, 2010, 03:28:43 PM
If you want even better fried chicken, do what he mentions above only mix in some cornstarch with the flour... makes it extra crispy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on December 11, 2010, 09:18:31 PM
how about bacon wrapped duck breasts.....  soaked the duck in buttermilk overnight and seasoned it, wrapped it in bacon and grilled.....

Yumm!  What's the buttermilk do?


sorry, just saw this.  i think it may take some of the gamieness out of it.  some people use a jar of "italian dressing", but i can't stand that stuff.  i know people use buttermilk with deer, so i just went with it.  the duck was delicious.  maybe it would have been delicious anyway. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on December 11, 2010, 09:20:32 PM
You have really nice lighting in your kitchen, or is that the camera?

Food looks great too.

the camera is an iphone 4.  i don't know much about cameras, but we put a lot of time and thought into the lighting in our house when we designed it and we had a lighting specialist assist us in how many and what type.  she probably did a good job.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: jeffy on December 12, 2010, 09:18:39 AM
I set up my smoker yesterday for a big club event and smoked a bunch of malts for different folks, but also smoked some cheese and some whole hops.  The hops smelled fantastic and went into a hop back for a hoppy smoked amber ale.

The cheese was fantastic.  I cold smoked some sharp cheddar, some mozzarella and some sliced havarti all for about an hour over pecan wood chip smoke.  I don't think I've ever tasted cheese as delicious as that havarti.

<edit to change the type of cheese from muenster to havarti>
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 12, 2010, 04:55:27 PM
i seasoned this fish with olive oil, dizzy pig shakin' the tree and tsunami spin along with some sea salt.  crab stuffed potatoes...

Very nice!

I also like to grill salmon after marinating in a honey bourbon teriaki sauce. I get the grill as hot as I can get it and sear the fish direct. The caramelized outer layer really lends itself well to the fish.  It is fantastic! I'll try to post pics the next time I grill it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on December 13, 2010, 07:23:56 AM
tuna, sea salt, sesame seeds....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/890ae56e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e25d2385.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 13, 2010, 10:08:17 AM
I also like to grill salmon after marinating in a honey bourbon teriaki sauce. I get the grill as hot as I can get it and sear the fish direct. The caramelized outer layer really lends itself well to the fish.  It is fantastic! I'll try to post pics the next time I grill it.

This is a real easy and super tasty marinade for salmon that glazes up nicely:

3/4c maple syrup (I have also used honey)
1/4c soy sauce
a touch of sesame oil

Apply a generous amount of coarsely ground, fresh black pepper before grilling. 

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 13, 2010, 02:33:53 PM
Anyone made their own pastrami before?  I was thinking of trying it, and then possibly steam in beer to serve.  Our club has a potluck coming up in Feb, and you have to incorporate beer into the dish, so this was an idea that popped in my head.

So I started my pastrami yesterday.  Went with this recipe - http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/pastrami.html, but swapped the tenderquick out for salt and more sugar.

I'll smoke it with pecan wood on Wednesday.  Should be interesting.

One thing I was trying to figure out is the difference between pastrami and Montreal Smoked Meat.  I read some really awful and lengthy discussions on the chowhound forums, but I think the general consensus (not that one could be gleaned) is that MSM is made with a dry cure, and pastrami is made with a wet cure.  So maybe I am making MSM, I really don't know.  Or care.  As long as it is good.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on December 13, 2010, 02:49:17 PM
Anyone made their own pastrami before?  I was thinking of trying it, and then possibly steam in beer to serve.  Our club has a potluck coming up in Feb, and you have to incorporate beer into the dish, so this was an idea that popped in my head.

So I started my pastrami yesterday.  Went with this recipe - http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/pastrami.html, but swapped the tenderquick out for salt and more sugar.

I'll smoke it with pecan wood on Wednesday.  Should be interesting.

One thing I was trying to figure out is the difference between pastrami and Montreal Smoked Meat.  I read some really awful and lengthy discussions on the chowhound forums, but I think the general consensus (not that one could be gleaned) is that MSM is made with a dry cure, and pastrami is made with a wet cure.  So maybe I am making MSM, I really don't know.  Or care.  As long as it is good.
That looks like it should work. I cheat & just buy Corned Beef (It's cheap around Saint Patrick's Day), rinse it, give it a good coating of fresh coarse black pepper & coriander (run that through the pepper mill 1st) & smoke with hickory. Tastes great but I'm really interested in how this turns out. Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on December 14, 2010, 12:22:22 PM
I've been doing more cheese smoking, and it's generally turning out great.  The latest batch is a mix of cherry/hickory, and it's really nice.  I've been having trouble with the smokinlicious cherry dust, it just won't stay lit by itself.  I've been in touch with them and they are helping me trouble shoot, but it's still not going yet.

I bought some other dust from Maine Grilling Woods (http://www.mainegrillingwoods.com/), but I haven't tried it yet.  I got a sampler pack, it comes with packages of 10 different woods.  Each package is about 185 grams give or take, although the cedar was only 63 grams.  The total was 1687 grams, including the weight of the little plastic bags.  It looks like the pieces are quite a bit larger than the stuff from smokinlicious, so I'm not confident it will work well with the ProQ smoker, but I'll give it a try and let you know.

Does anyone have a source of dust that has worked reliably with a ProQ smoker?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on December 14, 2010, 03:37:59 PM
I'm sure somewhere in this thread I referenced PS Seasonings, but I've had mixed luck, good and bad with it, depending on the time.  Sure is cheap though!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on December 14, 2010, 04:03:37 PM
I've been looking at their stuff, their prices are great until you add in shipping.  Still good though.  So the same wood has worked better/worse depending on the batch you got or on when you tried it from the same batch?

I found this place (http://www.barbecuewood.com/-strse-Sawdust/Categories.bok) that is cheap and close to home, with free shipping on some stuff, but no dust right now.  And their dust looks really coarse though and I don't think it would work.  I emailed them though, asking if they knew how it works with a ProQ.  I might order some anyway to see.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on December 14, 2010, 04:22:24 PM
Have you tried this place?
http://www.amazenproducts.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=21

Their prices aren't quite as good as the PS Seasonings, but their dust is made for a similar product so I'd have more confidence in it working.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on December 15, 2010, 02:32:20 AM
I picked up a wedge of Smokehaus Blue Cheese on Sat. Whew! Unwrap and it's already smoky in the nose. Doesn't overshadow the salty pungency. Finally! Something moldy and smoky...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 15, 2010, 03:58:40 AM
Have you tried this place?
http://www.amazenproducts.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=21

Their prices aren't quite as good as the PS Seasonings, but their dust is made for a similar product so I'd have more confidence in it working.

Prices aren't bad. I'd give them a try. The 5lb standard looks like the deal to go with. It's worth a shot IMO.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on December 15, 2010, 04:09:45 AM
Hrm, smoked bleu... That's got me thinking, in the winter-time here a traditional dish is oven-baked camembert. Typically you slice it in half, on the horizontal axis of the cheese, put a spoonful of creme fraiche on top and put it in a 375 deg oven for about 20 minutes or until it starts to brown. I've seen elsewhere that some people cold smoke camembert, but it seems to me that combining the two would be a worthy endeavor.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 15, 2010, 04:37:01 AM
I picked up a wedge of Smokehaus Blue Cheese on Sat. Whew! Unwrap and it's already smoky in the nose. Doesn't overshadow the salty pungency. Finally! Something moldy and smoky...

Never tried it but it sounds tasty.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 15, 2010, 06:59:37 AM
My local cheese shop makes their own smoked stilton.  It's ok, not my favourite, I prefer unsmoked stilton.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: ryang on December 15, 2010, 08:17:10 AM
I've been doing more cheese smoking, and it's generally turning out great.  The latest batch is a mix of cherry/hickory, and it's really nice.  I've been having trouble with the smokinlicious cherry dust, it just won't stay lit by itself.  I've been in touch with them and they are helping me trouble shoot, but it's still not going yet.

I bought some other dust from Maine Grilling Woods (http://www.mainegrillingwoods.com/), but I haven't tried it yet.  I got a sampler pack, it comes with packages of 10 different woods.  Each package is about 185 grams give or take, although the cedar was only 63 grams.  The total was 1687 grams, including the weight of the little plastic bags.  It looks like the pieces are quite a bit larger than the stuff from smokinlicious, so I'm not confident it will work well with the ProQ smoker, but I'll give it a try and let you know.

Does anyone have a source of dust that has worked reliably with a ProQ smoker?

Have you tried smoking with pellets?  I've not had a single issue with that using the tin can/soldering iron method.
Also, if you've tried with pellets or other forms of wood, do you notice a difference using the dust?  Just curious.  I looked seriously at the ProQSmoker, but decided that $5 for a soldering iron was cheaper.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on December 15, 2010, 08:28:37 AM
Finally! Something moldy and smoky...

Sounds like you'd love licking the inside of my WSM a few weeks after I forget to scrub it down after a cook!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 15, 2010, 10:36:35 AM
I'm debating on what I want to BBQ and/or smoke over the holidays. I was thinking a Smoked Boston Butt might be in order or some Beef Tenderloin. Accompany that with some Smoked Salmon and my house IPA.

What's on your menu this holiday season folks?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on December 15, 2010, 10:43:17 AM
I've been thinking about a tenderloin en croute (Beef Wellington).  Seems rich, indulgent, and by God I might go so unspeakably far as to pair it with port.  Kind of costly, but ah well...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on December 15, 2010, 11:10:31 AM
I've been thinking about a tenderloin en croute (Beef Wellington).  Seems rich, indulgent, and by God I might go so unspeakably far as to pair it with port.  Kind of costly, but ah well...

Oh sounds so good. I know it may be heresy in a BBQ thread but I'd have Brussels sprouts with it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on December 15, 2010, 12:49:59 PM
Have you tried smoking with pellets?  I've not had a single issue with that using the tin can/soldering iron method.
Also, if you've tried with pellets or other forms of wood, do you notice a difference using the dust?  Just curious.  I looked seriously at the ProQSmoker, but decided that $5 for a soldering iron was cheaper.
I haven't tried it, and since I just ordered a bunch of dust I might not get to it soon :)  I do have some dust that doesn't really work in the ProQ though, so maybe that would be a good use for it.  So it's a can with some dust in it and you shove a soldering iron in it?  How long will it smoke for, and what kind of temperature rise do you see?

I've been in touch with a guy in Yakima who sells wood, when I get the new order I'll test it and then send some to him for replicating.  I'd rather order it from closer to home instead of having it shipped here from the east coast.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 15, 2010, 02:39:45 PM
So I started my pastrami yesterday.  Went with this recipe - http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/pastrami.html, but swapped the tenderquick out for salt and more sugar.

I'll smoke it with pecan wood on Wednesday.  Should be interesting.

Pulled this off the smoker after 4.5 hours when the internal hit 165F.  Wrapped in foil and towels, then tossed in a cooler for 2 hours.  Pulled it out, sliced some nice and thin, and slapped it on a slightly warmed piece of rye bread.  OH.  MY.  GOD.  So good!!!

Unbelievable how good this stuff is.  I ended up doing the dry cure for 4 days, but I think 3 as indicated in the recipe would be plenty (it is not over salted, but plenty salty enough for me).  I think I would also cut back the pepper in the 2nd rub to 2 tbsp; again, the pepper is not overdone, but I wouldn't want it any stronger, and I like spice.

I tossed the rest of it in the fridge to firm up.  I'm borrowing a meat slicer from a buddy tonight, so I'll shave it all up, split into portions, vacuum seal and freeze.

This was well worth it, I'll definitely be making this again.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on December 15, 2010, 02:42:15 PM
That sounds awesome, I'm glad it turned out well. :)  But where are the pictures?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 15, 2010, 03:13:47 PM
That sounds awesome, I'm glad it turned out well. :)  But where are the pictures?

Ok, Ok, I'll take some pics tonight after slicing it up.  It isn't red, as I left out the nitrates.  I was reading about sausage making a few days ago, and supposedly you can add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which will give it the same colour as using nitrates, but I really don't care.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 15, 2010, 08:46:11 PM
First things, first.  A beer.  For tonight, a glass of dry hopped, 4.5% saison:

(http://i535.photobucket.com/albums/ee358/markaberrant/pics857.jpg)

Here is my flat:

(http://i535.photobucket.com/albums/ee358/markaberrant/pics858.jpg)

And here is the finished product:

(http://i535.photobucket.com/albums/ee358/markaberrant/pics859.jpg)

After I got the meat split up and packaged, I made myself a "chef's sandwich" consisting of the all the end pieces that were full of peppery smoky goodness.  And then washed it down with another glass of saison. 

Twas a good night, indeed.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on December 15, 2010, 09:03:35 PM
That looks fantastic! :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 16, 2010, 05:07:19 AM
Great looking brisket mark!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on December 16, 2010, 07:38:59 AM
The non-nitrate cure keeps me doubletaking, as that doesn't "look" like cured meat, but its the salt that really does the job.  Looks great!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on December 16, 2010, 10:45:07 AM
Very nice!  Gotta love a well cooked brisket.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on December 16, 2010, 10:48:11 AM
Now we just need some rye bread, sauerkraut and mustard. Or Russian dressing.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on December 21, 2010, 06:34:19 PM
Drool...that looks like some nice brisket!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Mikey on December 21, 2010, 10:05:07 PM
Looks okay, but where is the smoke ring?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 22, 2010, 07:34:46 AM
Looks okay, but where is the smoke ring?

Just inside the edges of the dry rub?  I dunno, I can see it.  Also remember this was only smoked for 4.5 hours, I get a more pronounced smoke ring when I am smoking regular brisket for 12-15 hours.

You typically only get those ridiculously thick, bright red smoke rings if your fuel source is wood (most smokers just use wood for flavour), or you are adding enhancers.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 22, 2010, 07:38:22 AM
Looks okay, but where is the smoke ring?

Just inside the edges of the dry rub?  I dunno, I can see it.  Also remember this was only smoked for 4.5 hours, I get a more pronounced smoke ring when I am smoking regular brisket for 12-15 hours.

You typically only get those ridiculously thick, bright red smoke rings if your fuel source is wood (most smokers just use wood for flavour), or you are adding enhancers.

A good smoke ring is around 1/4 inch in thickness. The smoke rings is caused by nitric acid building up in the surface of meat, absorbed from the surface. This nitric acid is formed when nitrogen dioxide from wood combustion in smoke mixes with water in the meat. Basically it is a chemical reaction between the smoke and the meat.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on December 22, 2010, 07:49:50 AM
A good smoke ring is around 1/4 inch in thickness. The smoke rings is caused by nitric acid building up in the surface of meat, absorbed from the surface. This nitric acid is formed when nitrogen dioxide from wood combustion in smoke mixes with water in the meat. Basically it is a chemical reaction between the smoke and the meat.

Exactly, and you will get much less NO2 when the wood is just smoldering, as opposed to being the heat source.  As you say the other variable is moisture, so you can try using "green" wood, soaking it before using, or using a water pan.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on December 29, 2010, 03:34:35 AM
Here's a new commercial (in French) for Windows 7. This is why I only use Mac or Ubuntu.

http://www.microsoft.com/france/windows/windows-7/videos.aspx?vindex=26

--
Translation (rough in some parts, because he's talking way too fast):

"Hi, I'm Fred. I've got an American cousin. Here, it's cool. But... The food is not my thing.
So, I have an idea. I'll use my PC to show them "True French Gastronomy" from France, here in Texas.
"This is the food!"
"Ugh."
--

Hrm. Ribs, or escargot? I like me some parsley garlic butter, but I think I'll take ribs any day.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on December 29, 2010, 09:47:53 AM
some recent stuff.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/58b31120.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/74254f71.jpg)


firewire kabobs

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d8c8d0f5.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/38e4097b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6a1fc1d7.jpg)



flank steak

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/df1662cb.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e1ef189e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/97aa853f.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3dafb72f.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on December 29, 2010, 10:01:45 AM
Just in time for me to eat lunch!  :D

Great Lookin' Q as always... 8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 02, 2011, 02:24:52 PM
fatty stuffed w, chorizo

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/aa41485b.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 02, 2011, 08:10:44 PM
fatty stuffed w, chorizo

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/aa41485b.jpg)

You would make Emeril Lagasse proud.

Sounds great!  8)

I grilled two marinated pork tenderloins seasoned with Dizzy Dust direct on the Weber kettle last night. No pics but they were heavenly.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 02, 2011, 09:34:56 PM
fatty stuffed w, chorizo

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/aa41485b.jpg)

I did one with chorizo. Had a pan under the grate and there was probably half a quart of orange fat rendered off the fattie.

But it was good.  Yours looks crazy with that red chorizo in there.   
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 05, 2011, 11:33:58 PM
They guys at work are all up into the BBQ thang now. Taking pics of their Q and everything. Oh I feel like a proud parent!

The other day one showed me this link: http://www.looftlighter.com/ (http://www.looftlighter.com/) and I was impressed.  However I got one of these already: http://m.sears.com/productdetails.do?partNumber=00927801000P (http://m.sears.com/productdetails.do?partNumber=00927801000P).

Have to say 1050F will light some charcoal in a hurry. Had it going in less than a minute.

Goodbye rusty old starter chimney.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 06, 2011, 06:29:58 AM
Have to say 1050F will light some charcoal in a hurry. Had it going in less than a minute.
Goodbye rusty old starter chimney.

Did you just start doing this? I have a heat gun sitting in the garage... I'll have to give it a try.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 06, 2011, 07:45:43 AM
They guys at work are all up into the BBQ thang now. Taking pics of their Q and everything. Oh I feel like a proud parent!

The other day one showed me this link: http://www.looftlighter.com/ (http://www.looftlighter.com/) and I was impressed.  However I got one of these already: http://m.sears.com/productdetails.do?partNumber=00927801000P (http://m.sears.com/productdetails.do?partNumber=00927801000P).

Have to say 1050F will light some charcoal in a hurry. Had it going in less than a minute.

Goodbye rusty old starter chimney.


i switched to a bernzomatic mapp gas torch to light my grill.  i really like it, although some lump can be pretty sparkly and poppy.


http://www.bernzomatic.com/PRODUCTS/TORCHES/PROFESSIONALTORCHES/tabid/230/ctl/Detail/mid/1009/xmid/6942/xmfid/3/Default.aspx


oh yeah, i wear pit mitts and safety goggles and a hat when i light the grill.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: riverrat on January 06, 2011, 08:31:09 AM
I've been using a weedburner torch for a few months now.  My Egg cart that I built has plenty of room for the 20lb propane tank that I no longer use on the gasser. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 06, 2011, 10:23:59 AM
I use a standard chimney and a torch extension lighter. I use about three sheets of newspaper crumpled up in the bottom of the chimney and light the paper through the slots in the bottom of the chimney while the chimney is resting on the grill or smoker. It works without fail every time. I usually give the charcoal about 20-30 min to become fully lit then tranfer the charcoal to the grill or smoker.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on January 06, 2011, 12:25:19 PM
I use a standard chimney and a torch extension lighter. I use about three sheets of newspaper crumpled up in the bottom of the chimney and light the paper through the slots in the bottom of the chimney while the chimney is resting on the grill or smoker. It works without fail every time. I usually give the charcoal about 20-30 min to become fully lit then tranfer the charcoal to the grill or smoker.

Me too.  Pretty easy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: onthekeg on January 08, 2011, 10:44:15 AM
I'm a little late to the party here, but my GF and I did our first BBQ comp last summer and will be doing more in 2011.  We actually medaled in pulled pork!  10th out of 42, so I was happy.  We were 16th out of 42 overall.  I have upped the ante for 2011 by purchasing the Ol Hickory CTO, so I should be able to control the smoke much better than with the Traeger and UDS.

Here are my turn in boxes from that comp. if anyone is interested... ???
Brisket-Have a new slicing knife for 2011 22nd place
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f373/dalet56245/brisket.jpg)

Pulled Pork
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f373/dalet56245/pulledpork.jpg)

Ribs 14th place
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f373/dalet56245/ribs.jpg)

Chicken 20th place
(http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f373/dalet56245/chicken.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on January 08, 2011, 01:13:12 PM
I'm a little late to the party here, but my GF and I did our first BBQ comp last summer and will be doing more in 2011.  We actually medaled in pulled pork!  10th out of 42, so I was happy.  We were 16th out of 42 overall.  I have upped the ante for 2011 by purchasing the Ol Hickory CTO, so I should be able to control the smoke much better than with the Traeger and UDS.

Here are my turn in boxes from that comp. if anyone is interested... ???

Nice spread!  I'd be all over those in a heartbeat.  Cheers!!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 08, 2011, 01:14:32 PM
very nice!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on January 08, 2011, 03:03:34 PM
Great looking Q, Tim!  Makes me want to fire up my smoker.  It's 11*F today though and I'm not sure how well my WSM would do.  It's a workhorse, to be sure, but I'm not sure it could handle the tundra that is Minnesota in January.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 08, 2011, 06:58:07 PM
Congrats on placing so well in the comp! The que looks yummy!

Inspired and just in from the road I'm firing up the BGE to do smoked chicken wings and bacon wrapped garlic sausage. Used the heat-gun again. Took 30 seconds to get it going...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 08, 2011, 08:16:53 PM
Brisket is a one of the toughest meats to get perfect on the grill or smoker. I find it to be the most challenging cuts to perfect.

Congats on the comp Q.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 08, 2011, 09:19:39 PM
prepared and rubbed two slabs of babybacks to throw on in the morning.  pics to follow.  i've been wanting ribs for a minute now.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: onthekeg on January 09, 2011, 08:33:21 AM
Thanks for the feedback everyone!  I do appreciate it.

Matt- I had the UDS out last weekend during the storm smoking 60lbs of brats we made the day before.  I have found that the cold doesn't affect the smoker much if out of the wind, but humidity will.  If its foggy out, you really need to push it to hold temp.

Can't wait to see pictures of the ribs Deepsouth!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on January 09, 2011, 09:40:04 AM
No food but I did smoke some malt yesterday:
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011001.jpg)
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011002.jpg)
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011004.jpg)
Here's the new grill BTW
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/december2010039.jpg)
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/december2010040.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: onthekeg on January 09, 2011, 10:08:52 AM
No food but I did smoke some malt yesterday:


Nice Smoker!  What did you use for wood on your malt?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on January 09, 2011, 11:14:45 AM
This batch was apple from my neighbor's dead tree, Friday I brewed a batch with pecan smoked malt.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 09, 2011, 12:38:42 PM
Excellent addition corkybstewart!

Let us know how the malt turns out for you.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on January 09, 2011, 02:30:32 PM
No food but I did smoke some malt yesterday:
Are there holes poked in the bottom of those trays?  Do you stir the malt at all during the smoke?  Do you wet it?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on January 09, 2011, 02:44:55 PM
Yeah, there are holes all over the bottom and sides, and every 20 minutes or so I stir it.
I did a batch of pale rauchbier with my applewood smoked malt last year and it was the hit of our Oktoberfest, it really goes great with grilled bratwurst.
right now the malt is in a paper bag in my beer room.  It smells great, very heavily smoked so I probably will only use it for about 20% of the grain bill(after it sits a couple of weeks).
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on January 09, 2011, 02:48:45 PM
Cool, I've been thinking about trying to smoke some malt with that ProQ cold smoker I've been using to make cheese.  A lot of cheese.  I have lots of different types of dust I can use, so it should be fun to experiment.

How long did you smoke it for?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on January 09, 2011, 03:46:32 PM
Yesterday I let it sit about 2 hours in the smoker because I was cleaning my barn and didn't have time to mess with it.  Every time I walked past the smoker I'd stir the malt.  Once he apple chunks caught on fire I didn't have to do anything to the fire, I just closed all the doors and let it smolder.  I had figured the little pile of wood I used  would probably be gone in an hour but it just kept smoldering.
I used a roofing nail to punch the holes in the trays.  It makes a big enough hole to let smoke in but not have the malt fall through.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: markaberrant on January 09, 2011, 06:41:00 PM
Great looking Q, Tim!  Makes me want to fire up my smoker.  It's 11*F today though and I'm not sure how well my WSM would do.  It's a workhorse, to be sure, but I'm not sure it could handle the tundra that is Minnesota in January.

Me and my buddy up here in Canada have been cooking all winter, I have a UDS, he has a WSM, and it has been much colder than that.  As already mentioned, it is humidity and wind that can cause problems.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 09, 2011, 08:22:48 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b7cd1e2b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/27d025e0.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/fdd81fa8.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a8fbfd89.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a3634b7c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a3b460dd.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 09, 2011, 08:24:36 PM
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b7cd1e2b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/27d025e0.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/fdd81fa8.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a8fbfd89.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a3634b7c.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a3b460dd.jpg)

Some things require no words...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on January 09, 2011, 11:54:45 PM
Yesterday I let it sit about 2 hours in the smoker because I was cleaning my barn and didn't have time to mess with it.  Every time I walked past the smoker I'd stir the malt.  Once he apple chunks caught on fire I didn't have to do anything to the fire, I just closed all the doors and let it smolder.  I had figured the little pile of wood I used  would probably be gone in an hour but it just kept smoldering.
I used a roofing nail to punch the holes in the trays.  It makes a big enough hole to let smoke in but not have the malt fall through.
Awesome, thanks.  I'm going to give it a try eventually, but I don't have a smoked beer in the queue for a while, I still have 10 gallons of smoked dopplebock.  Well, a bit less than 10 :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on January 10, 2011, 10:23:12 AM
Some things require no words...

+1
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on January 10, 2011, 01:24:02 PM
MMM MMM MMM!  Those baby backs look real good Deepsouth!!!  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on January 10, 2011, 03:24:11 PM
Cool, I've been thinking about trying to smoke some malt with that ProQ cold smoker I've been using to make cheese.  A lot of cheese.  I have lots of different types of dust I can use, so it should be fun to experiment.

How long did you smoke it for?
How long and how cool do you have to go to smoke cheese?  The malt smoked at 90F which is just above the smoker's normal temp on a sunny day.  If I leave the door open and close the smokestack I should be able to keep the cheese cool, especially on a day like tomorrow where the high will be mid 30's.  What's your favorite smoked cheese?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on January 10, 2011, 09:48:08 PM
Cool, I've been thinking about trying to smoke some malt with that ProQ cold smoker I've been using to make cheese.  A lot of cheese.  I have lots of different types of dust I can use, so it should be fun to experiment.

How long did you smoke it for?
How long and how cool do you have to go to smoke cheese?  The malt smoked at 90F which is just above the smoker's normal temp on a sunny day.  If I leave the door open and close the smokestack I should be able to keep the cheese cool, especially on a day like tomorrow where the high will be mid 30's.  What's your favorite smoked cheese?

I've been going for about 7-10 hours (a full ProQ worth) to test the woods.  I've also been playing with how much of a gap I leave at the bottom of the box, more closed gives it a much more intense flavor.  When it's the smallest gap I can make it, It comes out to be a bit much for my wife - her favorite was a cherry wood smoked one that was a total PITA to keep lit and it ended up very lightly smoked since i had to keep opening the box and the dust didn't fully burn.

The temp has varied, but I added a small heating pad to the box (reptile type) to help keep it warm (which helps it stay lit), so it stays 10-20F above ambient.  I'm still smoking somewhere around 50-60F for the most part, but you can definitely go warmer.

All of the tests have been with cheddar so I can differentiate the flavors of the smoke.  Some come out more ashy than others when the smoke gets really intense.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 11, 2011, 05:46:08 PM
The temp has varied, but I added a small heating pad to the box (reptile type) to help keep it warm (which helps it stay lit), so it stays 10-20F above ambient.  I'm still smoking somewhere around 50-60F for the most part, but you can definitely go warmer.

All of the tests have been with cheddar so I can differentiate the flavors of the smoke.  Some come out more ashy than others when the smoke gets really intense.

Perhaps the colder months would be the most ideal to smoke some cheese. I wonder what the optimum temp for infusing the smoke without melting the cheese would be. I understand that keeping the cheese below 90F is best mainly because it will start to melt. I need to try smoking a block of some decent cheddar this winter.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 11, 2011, 08:56:02 PM
I have a bunch of quail coming up that more than likely will be a grilling fodder. Next is rabbit. For those following. Might be willling to send quail to some of you officinados.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on January 11, 2011, 11:54:20 PM
The temp has varied, but I added a small heating pad to the box (reptile type) to help keep it warm (which helps it stay lit), so it stays 10-20F above ambient.  I'm still smoking somewhere around 50-60F for the most part, but you can definitely go warmer.

All of the tests have been with cheddar so I can differentiate the flavors of the smoke.  Some come out more ashy than others when the smoke gets really intense.

Perhaps the colder months would be the most ideal to smoke some cheese. I wonder what the optimum temp for infusing the smoke without melting the cheese would be. I understand that keeping the cheese below 90F is best mainly because it will start to melt. I need to try smoking a block of some decent cheddar this winter.
I think an ambient temp between 50 and 70F would be best for my setup, just so it stays warm enough but not too warm.  With the heating bad, I think it will work under 40F.  It turns out great.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beer_crafter on January 13, 2011, 02:41:15 PM
Holy crap. 55 pages!

I smoke in a Weber kettle grill, and just got a smokenator for more capacity.

Here's what I know:
- Spare Ribs (St Louis Cut) are the ribs to use.  Baby Backs have no meat.
- A pork shoulder (boston butt) takes so long to do, I've made it 3-4 times, and every single time, it defeats me.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 13, 2011, 02:57:18 PM
Holy crap. 55 pages!

That's what I say everytime I see another post. What an awesome thread this is!  8)

I was watching a show on the best burgers and the consensus is that the best burgers are a blend of beef cuts. The one blend that I want to try is equal parts of Beef Short Rib, Beef Brisket and Sirloin steak. This blend should render a really fine burger. I need the attachment for my Kitchenaide mixer to facilitate the grinding. I have a hand grinder but it's a royal PITA.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: ethalacker on January 13, 2011, 03:03:24 PM

- A pork shoulder (boston butt) takes so long to do, I've made it 3-4 times, and every single time, it defeats me.


they do take a while.  I usually keep a 10 pounder on the smoker for 20-22 hours, but it is worth it to me.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 13, 2011, 03:05:03 PM
I smoke in a Weber kettle grill, and just got a smokenator for more capacity.

Me too!  I bought a smokenator a few years ago.  I then bought a very nice 2009 model Weber Smokey Mountain, and yet I find myself still using the smokenator for most cooks!  Great piece of equipment.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 03:34:43 PM
Holy crap. 55 pages!

I smoke in a Weber kettle grill, and just got a smokenator for more capacity.

Here's what I know:
- Spare Ribs (St Louis Cut) are the ribs to use.  Baby Backs have no meat.
- A pork shoulder (boston butt) takes so long to do, I've made it 3-4 times, and every single time, it defeats me.


'why do you feel the boston butt defeats you?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on January 13, 2011, 03:37:05 PM

- Spare Ribs (St Louis Cut) are the ribs to use.  Baby Backs have no meat.
- A pork shoulder (boston butt) takes so long to do, I've made it 3-4 times, and every single time, it defeats me.


Amen on spare ribs! More meat and about $2-3/lb cheaper.

My butts go about 14-16 hours for 8-9 pounders. That plus a mandatory one hour rest wrapped in foil and towel in a cooler. Going with something I saw on Cowgirl's Country Life blog and injecting my butt with Knorr Chipotle buillon mixed with beef stock and coating in a creole mustard before putting on my rub this weekend. Probably put it on around 10pm Friday night to be ready for Bal/Pit kickoff at 3:30p Saturday. My only concern is the low temps overnight, so I'm going to wake up every 3-4 hours to make sure fire is going well. Also going to spatchcock a whole chicken brined in beer and creole seasoning and also some homemade smoked sausage wrapped in cornhusks rather than hog casings. Gonna be a helluva game.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2011, 03:38:25 PM
Dont feel defeated. Low and slow man, low and slow. Oh man there is nothing like beating a but.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 13, 2011, 05:15:05 PM
I love this thread. You guys have helped me improve my Q tremendously. 

Those baby backs are worthless unless you go hot and fast (grilling)- I've never been happy with them in the smoker. I seek out the St Louis cut or cut it out of a slab of ribs myself.

My last pork butt went 17 hours at about 200. Came apart with my fingers. I did a 6.5# super-trimmed brisket on Sunday and overcooked it.  >:( Now it's chopped beef.

The sausage in the corn husk sounds intriguing. Let us know how it turns out.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 13, 2011, 05:27:12 PM
Spares are indeed my favorite too, I always "st louis cut" them, and serve the rib section for dinner, and scrounge the meat off the remainder for freezing and use as an ingredient of impeccable goodness.

As I've mentioned elsewhere, with ribs I find myself going "medium" instead of low and slow, lately.  The ribs I've done in an hour and a half often taste just as smokey, and are definately as tender/fall off the bone, as my low and slow versions.

Cold smoking some cheeses this weekend, and I DO mean cold smoking...hopefully it doesn't just freeze out there!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 06:38:12 PM
awe man, i love me some baby backs....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/18044504.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ec5ec853.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bcee4564.jpg)


but not quite as meaty for sure!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 06:41:09 PM
I got 4 slabs of spares for $1.79/lb the other day. Learned how to prep em on youtube, so now they're presentable. Before that I used to just throw the whole thing on.  :-[
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2011, 07:00:35 PM
Try this. Hit ctrl + and zoom in on deepsouth's ribs. You can tell they are perfect.

Man, I really wish we all lived close enough to have a pot luck. Imagine how good the food and drink would be.

Ill tell ya, I would under normal circumstances avoid a potluck but with you guys I would fly to get there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 07:06:02 PM
I think the real difference would be...
We are trying to impress each other with good food.
Quite often a potluck consists mostly of "what cheap crap can I make a ton of and put in a crock pot"
little money + little effort .


not that there's anything wrong with a crock pot  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 07:11:44 PM
Try this. Hit ctrl + and zoom in on deepsouth's ribs. You can tell they are perfect.

Man, I really wish we all lived close enough to have a pot luck. Imagine how good the food and drink would be.

Ill tell ya, I would under normal circumstances avoid a potluck but with you guys I would fly to get there.


gee thanks!!!  i'm still a rookie, but i try hard.  ;)

the things you post over in the cooking thread amaze me.  

and it would be worth a flight to have a potluck with this group for sure.   some of the most awesome and creative cookers i have seen!

cheers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2011, 07:23:49 PM
NAh, your not a rookie anymore. And I ahve had "Pro" bbq that didnt look nearly as nice as yours, or taste as nice im sure. Im not easily impressed. thats why idont go out to eat much. 

The ribs above appear to be pink to the bone are they cured? or did the smoke have enough time to get to the bone.

Very nice.

With the zoom I can almost smell them.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 07:29:51 PM
I smell sweet baby ray's when I zoom :D
What else is on the ribs?

I hate paying full price for half-assed. That's what usually keeps me from going out.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 07:33:48 PM
NAh, your not a rookie anymore. And I ahve had "Pro" bbq that didnt look nearly as nice as yours, or taste as nice im sure. Im not easily impressed. thats why idont go out to eat much.  

The ribs above appear to be pink to the bone are they cured? or did the smoke have enough time to get to the bone.

Very nice.

With the zoom I can almost smell them.

you are far too kind.  

i smoked those ribs for five hours using the "car wash mike" method.  no wood chips or anything, just lump.  i just cook them low and slow and let the egg do it's thing.  i put the ribs on refrigerator cold, so that could have something to do with being pink to the bone.  

we very rarely go out to eat, unless it's a place we know is good.  we go out for sushi and vietnamese and thai, but i pretty much cook everything else.

and even as a rookie, i can't say that there is a single bbq place where i have had stuff better than i've pulled off my egg in the past couple years i've had it.  that includes living in memphis and eating in every bbq joint from batesville, ms to jackson, tn.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 07:35:04 PM
I smell sweet baby ray's when I zoom :D
What else is on the ribs?

I hate paying full price for half-assed. That's what usually keeps me from going out.

on those, i used sea salt, sugar in the raw, dizzy pig dizzy dust and dizzy pig red eye express.  i sauced them with sweet baby rays the last 30 minutes.

cheers!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 13, 2011, 07:41:39 PM
I smell sweet baby ray's when I zoom :D
What else is on the ribs?

I hate paying full price for half-assed. That's what usually keeps me from going out.

I rarely eat out since it usually leaves me unhappy and unsatisfied. What I see here is folk who like a variety of good food and are willing to make it themselves. I'll make an exception for Vietnamese. Rare that I go out for that either these days.

And I believe for the most part my own BBQ is better than what is available at the best joints in town.  And I still think S&P or a brine is just as good as any rub.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 07:53:17 PM
I smell sweet baby ray's when I zoom :D
What else is on the ribs?

I hate paying full price for half-assed. That's what usually keeps me from going out.

I rarely eat out since it usually leaves me unhappy and unsatisfied. What I see here is folk who like a variety of good food and are willing to make it themselves. I'll make an exception for Vietnamese. Rare that I go out for that either these days.

And I believe for the most part my own BBQ is better than what is available at the best joints in town.  And I still think S&P or a brine is just as good as any rub.

i still need to read up on brining and try that.  and i'm never opposed to grilling with just some salt.  tonight i cooked a piece of sushi grade tuna with just salt and sesame seeds.  i never tire of damn near raw fish.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 13, 2011, 08:10:28 PM
we very rarely go out to eat, unless it's a place we know is good.  we go out for sushi and vietnamese and thai, but i pretty much cook everything else.

and even as a rookie, blah blah blah


Wife started cooking Thai in the last 4-5 years. Can't find anything worthwhile within 20 miles from home.

I don't think there are any rookies here, you're all overcritical of yourselves, just like the rest of us.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 13, 2011, 08:41:05 PM
i REALLY want to learn how to cook good thai.  we love that and we have below average places here.  i haven't tried at home yet as i don't know where to start. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 13, 2011, 09:08:04 PM
Get a can of coconut milk and red peppers, start with a coconut curry. You can use shrimp chicken lamb.

Make some peanut sauce for your Thai BBQ. Search some info on Satay its Indonesian but they make it in Thailand too. 

Knowing good BBQ you are half way there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 14, 2011, 06:09:32 AM
i REALLY want to learn how to cook good thai.  we love that and we have below average places here.  i haven't tried at home yet as i don't know where to start. 

Coconut milk, curry paste, fish sauce and fresh basil - those are the necessities, where the dish just ain't right without em.
Usually leftover steak or chicken, bell pepper, onion, garlic. Fry em all up in a little sesame oil, then add the above ingredients, simmer just a bit - serve over rice.

Coconut cream is only OK for the peanut satay - but then you gotta spice extra cuz its soooo sweet.

And yes it's cheating - you CAN make your own curry by mixing your own ingredients. But we're pretty happy with this.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 14, 2011, 06:44:44 AM
And rice noodles!  Love those things.

Go easy on galangal and kaffir lime leaves the first time...I overdid them and nearly swore off cooking thai food again because of it.

Fish sauce is essential...but...well, I go unauthentic and sub soy sauce cause the smell is too...authentic for me.

Jasmine rice is what you want with it too...the aroma is great when its cooking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 14, 2011, 07:16:38 AM
you guys rock.  i'll be visiting the asian supermarket very soon. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 14, 2011, 07:43:04 AM
Dont feel defeated. Low and slow man, low and slow. Oh man there is nothing like beating a but.

+1

Patience is the key to the Butt...plan on a 12+/-hr Q session.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 14, 2011, 07:46:56 AM
I love this thread. You guys have helped me improve my Q tremendously.  

Amen to that!

For a homebrewing forum, I think we kick butt!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 14, 2011, 07:57:50 AM
awe man, i love me some baby backs....
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ec5ec853.jpg)
but not quite as meaty for sure!

Very fine looking Q for sure!

What amount of lump did you use for the session and what temp range did you achieve?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 14, 2011, 09:18:22 AM
i used wicked good lump.  i cleaned out the egg and filled it to the top of the fire ring.  i put the ribs on at about 225 and it slowly rose to 250, where i held it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 14, 2011, 09:34:32 AM
Re eating out...I look on it primarily as reconnaissance!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beer_crafter on January 14, 2011, 09:52:53 AM
'why do you feel the boston butt defeats you?

Because every single time I've done it, after the 15-26 hours it takes, I've said "I am never doing that again!"

Deepsouth your baby backs look tremendous.  Next time you should try doing a rack of St Louis cut spare ribs, see if you like 'em better... you might.

I get a whole slab for $2/lb and trim 'em myself.  Here's how:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MGM_RRTUQ

The best part is that the end you trim off also goes on the smoker, and serves as a snack a few hours into the session.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on January 14, 2011, 10:09:49 AM
I have to say BUTTS are a FAV of mine!!  Wish it wasn't so cold right now or I'd be brewin' Saturday & Smokin' Sunday. Oh well...  Here are a few pics from my last butt adventure in Oct . First one came off @ ~9 hours & the last 2 stubborn ones @ ~14 hours. Go figure...  Cheers!!!

Just on the Q
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/DSCN1795.jpg)

Ready to pull the 1st one
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/DSCN1797.jpg)

The Char-Griller
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/DCAO0008.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on January 14, 2011, 10:34:10 AM
I have to say BUTTS are a FAV of mine!!  Wish it wasn't so cold right now or I'd be brewin' Saturday & Smokin' Sunday. Oh well...  Here are a few pics from my last butt adventure in Oct . First one came off @ ~9 hours & the last 2 stubborn ones @ ~14 hours. Go figure...  Cheers!!!

Words fail me.....
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 14, 2011, 10:40:13 AM
Here are a few pics from my last butt adventure in Oct .

If my firewall still let those pictures through after that line, it'll let anything through!   ;D 

BBQ looks great!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on January 14, 2011, 10:42:10 AM
Here are a few pics from my last butt adventure in Oct .

If my firewall still let those pictures through after that line, it'll let anything through!   ;D 

BBQ looks great!
Thanks for the chuckle!!!  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 14, 2011, 11:22:47 AM
i like big butts and i cannot lie.

nice.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 14, 2011, 06:09:02 PM
i like big butts and i cannot lie.

nice.

haha...

big butts rule!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 14, 2011, 06:31:04 PM
Not to be the contrary voice in the wilderness, but I go for smaller...a higher surface to meat ratio, exposed to spice and smoke.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 14, 2011, 06:51:50 PM
I'm planning on doing a packer Brisket this weekend. Should I let it come to room temp before placing it in the smoker?  And how long do you think it'll take to warm up to room temp? Overnight?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on January 14, 2011, 09:45:15 PM
I'm planning on doing a packer Brisket this weekend. Should I let it come to room temp before placing it in the smoker?  And how long do you think it'll take to warm up to room temp? Overnight?

I'd be weary of letting it sit out overnight. Brisket is the one cut of meat I have trouble smoking. There's such a fine line between undercooked, perfect and overcooked brisket. I need to try again, but right now I'm into butt love.

Speaking of butt, just put a 9 pounder on. Sprinkle of Obie-Cues BBQ Bomber, coat of creole mustard, generous rub of thrown together concoction including turbinado, crushed fennel seeds, cayenne, garlic and onion powder and a finishing sprinkle of the BBQ bomber after a few hours in the fridge wrapped up tight. Going with hickory for first 4-6 hours, then switching to charcoal and soaked apple and cherry chips for rest of smoke. Gonna be some good eats.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 14, 2011, 09:46:42 PM
"Wrapped up tight"


Why?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on January 15, 2011, 08:20:11 AM
"Wrapped up tight"


Why?

After I put my mustard and rub on, I always wrap in Saran wrap and put in fridge for a while. I unwrap it before cooking...Not sure why, I think I saw it somewhere.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 15, 2011, 11:18:53 AM
I'm planning on doing a packer Brisket this weekend. Should I let it come to room temp before placing it in the smoker?  And how long do you think it'll take to warm up to room temp? Overnight?

I'd be weary of letting it sit out overnight. Brisket is the one cut of meat I have trouble smoking. There's such a fine line between undercooked, perfect and overcooked brisket. I need to try again, but right now I'm into butt love.


A butt packer?

I put the 10 pound brisket out before bed and got up after 5-ish hours. Still kinda cold, but I'm thinking another couple hours and it'll be OK.

This time I'm putting it fat side down, maybe trim a little of it off and lay it on top of the brisket. Then a minimum of 6 hours at 250 and I'll check it for tenderness. Probably 10 hours will do it. Seems like the BGE cooks things quicker. This thread here had some decent advice: http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=57882 (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=57882)

Remembered I'm out of lump. Walmart here I come...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Robert on January 15, 2011, 12:11:28 PM
I'm at 15 hours on this thing. It's at 175ish. Had a rough night of smoking. 30F and a constant drizzle. All good though. Kicked up temp to about 250 around 11a and should be done in time for halftime of first game. Time to get second grill ready for the spatchcocked chicken. Marinating in the adobo sauce that they can chipotles in.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 15, 2011, 03:43:50 PM
I'm planning on doing a packer Brisket this weekend. Should I let it come to room temp before placing it in the smoker?  And how long do you think it'll take to warm up to room temp? Overnight?

I'd be weary of letting it sit out overnight. Brisket is the one cut of meat I have trouble smoking. There's such a fine line between undercooked, perfect and overcooked brisket. I need to try again, but right now I'm into butt love.


A butt packer?

I put the 10 pound brisket out before bed and got up after 5-ish hours. Still kinda cold, but I'm thinking another couple hours and it'll be OK.

This time I'm putting it fat side down, maybe trim a little of it off and lay it on top of the brisket. Then a minimum of 6 hours at 250 and I'll check it for tenderness. Probably 10 hours will do it. Seems like the BGE cooks things quicker. This thread here had some decent advice: http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=57882 (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=57882)

Remembered I'm out of lump. Walmart here I come...

Great link for smoking a butt pack....errrr I mean packer brisket.  ;) I've read that one before at the bretheren site. I'm not sure how much different your brisket will behave on the egg vs. the WSM but I have to agree that 250F and fork tender are the two main criteria. The rubs and/or marinades are all personal preference but I like to go heavy on the dry rub for this cut.

You are going to be really happy with this cut if your time and temps are on the mark.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 15, 2011, 04:53:05 PM
That BBQ brethren is a nice forum. Lots of good info there.

Sometimes I get the urge to sign up on one of these cooking sites just to start a brewing thread.  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 15, 2011, 06:10:53 PM
That BBQ brethren is a nice forum. Lots of good info there.

Sometimes I get the urge to sign up on one of these cooking sites just to start a brewing thread.  ;D


i'm on there.   they actually have a homebrewing sub-forum!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 16, 2011, 02:19:55 PM
Same name over there?

I cant seem to find the brewing thread.

Is there some talk of Argentinian style BBQ? Or are those guys anti Argentina. Any tandoori talk?

Im gonna sign in.

I have a cement mixer tandoori oven build coming up. Maybe Ill start over there with that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 16, 2011, 02:59:33 PM
Same name over there?

I cant seem to find the brewing thread.

Is there some talk of Argentinian style BBQ? Or are those guys anti Argentina. Any tandoori talk?

Im gonna sign in.

I have a cement mixer tandoori oven build coming up. Maybe Ill start over there with that.

once you join, you can join the homebrew sub-forum and then it will appear in the forums list.  i'm the same name over there...

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=58

(link to hb forum)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 16, 2011, 05:58:35 PM
I did the brisket for 11 hours until the flat was tender to the probe. Fat-side down is definitely the way to go in the Egg.

I'm very pleased with the results. What I'm seeing that's difficult about a brisket is that it is two dissimilar but tough cuts of meat. And it's a fine line between tender and dry for the flat.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 16, 2011, 07:07:29 PM
I did the brisket for 11 hours until the flat was tender to the probe. Fat-side down is definitely the way to go in the Egg.

I'm very pleased with the results. What I'm seeing that's difficult about a brisket is that it is two dissimilar but tough cuts of meat. And it's a fine line between tender and dry for the flat.

The brisket is the toughest cut to master. I can make it just right one time and too dry the next without changing anything knowingly. I think it has also has alot to do with the cut.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 16, 2011, 07:49:00 PM
Oh but the rewards!  :D

Tried to find the thick fatty and uniform brisket in it's weight class.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 16, 2011, 07:57:44 PM
So what is in the BGE os it ceramic or clay or something? Is the BGE a tandoor?


(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:5QAhoUHySwrPWM:http://www.sepiamutiny.com/sepia/images/BukharianTandoor.jpg&t=1)

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRb2HH_vv1_9A8TJzkpKcDhvoTBx0gv4kfDFLln_GkogaW6EkMn9w)

(http://www.alislam.org/gallery2/d/40980-2/abl.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3096/3136779943_9b5796b0a4_b.jpg)

I want to build one like the above but with an old heavy cement mixer drum. Just have to figure out the clay part.

http://piers.thompson.users.btopenworld.com/




Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 16, 2011, 08:01:11 PM
"Derived from an ancient clay cooker called a "kamado," the modern Big Green Egg has undergone many improvements since it was introduced in 1974. Especially significant is replacement of the clay used in early models with durable space-age ceramics developed specifically for Big Green Egg to make the EGG® virtually indestructible under ordinary cooking conditions."
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 16, 2011, 08:10:04 PM
holy crap. it is a tandoor. http://www.nakedwhiz.com/kamadotheword/kamadotheword.htm

ever tried any of this in it?

(http://www.indigo-chelsea.co.uk/Editor/assets/tandoori%20oven.jpg)

(http://www.moghulcuisine.com/images/tandoori2.jpg)

(http://images.fxcuisine.com/blogimages/chicken-tandoori-12.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 17, 2011, 06:43:52 AM
Yeah, tandoori style cooking is my one draw for the BGE...  beats me how I'd be able to stick gravity defying naans onto the walls of the thing though.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 17, 2011, 07:19:43 AM
I did the brisket for 11 hours until the flat was tender to the probe. Fat-side down is definitely the way to go in the Egg.

I'm very pleased with the results. What I'm seeing that's difficult about a brisket is that it is two dissimilar but tough cuts of meat. And it's a fine line between tender and dry for the flat.

The brisket is the toughest cut to master. I can make it just right one time and too dry the next without changing anything knowingly. I think it has also has alot to do with the cut.

yeah they are....  i did one yesterday.  it turned out good, not great, but good.  and it wasn't a packer, rather a flat. 

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ac880547.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e6b5972e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c22d0702.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f35a2825.jpg)


also did some nature well tbones and ribeye steaks the night before.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/90128935.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6e68c244.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2bab0872.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on January 17, 2011, 07:49:17 AM
Yeah, tandoori style cooking is my one draw for the BGE...  beats me how I'd be able to stick gravity defying naans onto the walls of the thing though.

How do you go about doing tandoori in one anyway? get rid of plate setter et al and put everything on a stick? I'd love to try it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 17, 2011, 11:58:01 AM
Great looking steaks and Q there DS. I was doing brisket sandwiches with coleslaw. No sauce needed. Got polenta instead of the cornbread though I'll be whipping a batch up fairly soon.

Brisket sandwiches everyday last week for lunch and forecast is the same for this week. Then chili and chopped out of the scraps.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 17, 2011, 12:17:27 PM
Great looking steaks and Q there DS. I was doing brisket sandwiches with coleslaw. No sauce needed. Got polenta instead of the cornbread though I'll be whipping a batch up fairly soon.

Brisket sandwiches everyday last week for lunch and forecast is the same for this week. Then chili and chopped out of the scraps.

awesome!  you mush have done a packer!?  i wanted to do one, but i didn't have room in the refrigerator for the leftovers from one!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 17, 2011, 12:32:19 PM
I actually did two. The first was 6.5# super-trimmed and already seasoned. Overcooked it but even so pretty tasty. Been eating on it  in various forms all week. Did a 10# untrimmed packer perfectly Saturday. I just can't eat it all. :o Some will get sliced and vac-packed for the old folks.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 17, 2011, 12:39:07 PM
Then chili and chopped out of the scraps.

Leftover brisket makes awesome chili!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 01:14:42 PM
Here is the cement mixer that I want to convert to a tandoor.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00427.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00431.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00433.jpg)

I cant seem to find any good info on the clay to use. From what I understand it is just pushed and built up on the inside and then fired by maintaining a fire in it for a few days.

MAybe just regular terracotta form the art store?

Funny that I heard a lot of people convert kegs into a tandoor.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 17, 2011, 07:21:31 PM
They can get quite hot from what I understand. I like how they cook the naan and roti on the side of the tandoor as Nic had mentioned defying gravity. Quite an art to cooking in a tandoor.

(http://www.tandooronoxford.com.au/images/tandoor.jpg)

Cap...how about furnace brick in the bottom and then high temp refractory material formed and lined on the inside.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 07:41:56 PM
I was thinking refractory cement. Thats what we use to set up forges. But isn't it toxic?  

Yeah hot is the way for a of tandoori recipes, sometimes 400-500 degrees. but some recipes call for low and slow, like lamb roasts and stuff. some style tandoori are big enough to roast whole lambs.

At the Indian restaurant I go too they have taken me in the kitchen to see the tandoor, its wood fired and huge. I would say 50-75 gallons, if you will.  They build  a big fire in the AM to get the whole thing hot. Then they just maintain a small pile of coals in the bottom for the days cooking.

Oh yeah, they showed me the bread to. Didnt look that hard, just have to be good at getting your hand in and out quick with out hitting the sides of the opening with your arm. They reach in with the bread on a cushion covered in a dish towel. They press it on the sides. then when it is done they pull it out with their fingers. They do not flip it.

Here is someone doing it. they use a tool. I swear my guy used his hands.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltADJfQRwtk

This guy has a nice set up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUdAdIkbXXo

This guy has a gas fired one. I think he is remveing it with his hand.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejoVGxL7ySk

They make them this way in Urumqi for when it comes time to loose the wife. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdHqFMnIO-Y

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 17, 2011, 08:52:04 PM
I was thinking refractory cement. Thats what we use to set up forges. But isn't it toxic?  
[/quote

Refractory cement is what they use to build the pizza ovens...  ???
Breathing the dust, refractory or not will give you cancer.
What are firebricks made of? That's what they use for the floor of the pizza ovens...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 09:12:05 PM
oh really. i thought the pizza ovens were stone ore some composite.

They lay the food right on refractory cement or is there another layer?  

Maybe that refractory cement will work. I might even have some.

I think it is just regular concrete with Aluminum something or other. Some people mix in fiberglass.

Ok, looks like there are a bunch of different things that fall under refractory. I think the one I am looking for is fire clay. I need to form it inside si it follows the tear drop small of the mixer, which is an ideal shape for a tandoor.

Indian BBQ Baby.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 17, 2011, 09:42:59 PM
I think the term you seek is "alumina" and it is used to line kilns and is also used in ceramic.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 17, 2011, 09:49:24 PM
Oh yeah, alumina, thats what my tig cups are made of. They are pink.

But I think it is calcium aluminate. Which is I guess just alumina and calcium mixed? Im not sure.


BBQ style, Oh Yeah.

(http://img.labnol.org/di/gandhi.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on January 18, 2011, 07:40:27 AM
I've seen several tandoor designs using a trash can (or keg) with an inverted terra cotta pot, bricks, and vermiculite.  Seems like something you could fashion pretty simply, cap.  The one guy had his design up to 419...celsius!!!!!!!! on the first burn.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 18, 2011, 07:59:40 AM
after not getting burned last night, i cooked a few things.

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b6c5f1bf.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b7c500af.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c1e4a271.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6b671a8e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/dfe29a86.jpg)

thanks for looking!!!


and a quick note on flashbacks.....

i was going to put food on my Big Green Egg last night and i had the bottom draft door about 1/3rd open and the top was set to hold a temp of 350-400 degrees.

when i walked out to the egg, i noted the temp to be 350 degrees. i slowly lifted the top to "burp" the egg and noticed no smoke coming out. everything seemed fine.....

i then lifted the top of the egg and everything started happening in what seemed to be slow motion.

a fire started in the bottom and for some reason, i began backing up. the fire traveled up into the top of the egg and big long tongue of fire came toward me, head level, and i could actually feel the heat on my forehead and shoulder. fortunately, i had backed far enough away to avoid any burns whatsoever.

just a heads up.... your grill doesn't have to it's hottest possible to get a pretty decent flashback.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 18, 2011, 10:37:42 AM
Great looking Q deepsouth as usual!  8)

Hey Cap...here's a link for Tandoori Ovens. They use a special clay mixture for the liner of the oven.

http://www.goldentandoors.com/products/restaurant-tandoors.htm
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 18, 2011, 12:44:36 PM
I've only seen a few hints of the "flashback"... I usually don't go over 350 but it's good to know it can happen that low.

DS Nice rock hens. Did cooking side by side with the fish affect the flavor any? And I gots to gets me some scallops. Big time.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 18, 2011, 02:30:19 PM
Great looking Q deepsouth as usual!  8)

Hey Cap...here's a link for Tandoori Ovens. They use a special clay mixture for the liner of the oven.

http://www.goldentandoors.com/products/restaurant-tandoors.htm

I wonder what is "special" about their special clay. http://www.traditionaloven.com/articles/101/what-is-fire-clay-and-where-to-get-it

I think I have to mix up something like this. Thick enough to sculpt in and form the walls. I suppose shrinkage is the real problem.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 18, 2011, 03:24:02 PM
I've only seen a few hints of the "flashback"... I usually don't go over 350 but it's good to know it can happen that low.

DS Nice rock hens. Did cooking side by side with the fish affect the flavor any? And I gots to gets me some scallops. Big time.


i don't think i got any crossover flavor, but i could be wrong.  it was getting late, so i had to cook it all at once or have a mad hungry family chasing me down!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 18, 2011, 07:15:38 PM
Great looking Q deepsouth as usual!  8)

Hey Cap...here's a link for Tandoori Ovens. They use a special clay mixture for the liner of the oven.

http://www.goldentandoors.com/products/restaurant-tandoors.htm

I wonder what is "special" about their special clay. http://www.traditionaloven.com/articles/101/what-is-fire-clay-and-where-to-get-it

I think I have to mix up something like this. Thick enough to sculpt in and form the walls. I suppose shrinkage is the real problem.


You would need to form it to the walls of the mixer and fire it somehow. You could start by adding a lit chimney of charcoal at a time. Maybe research some brick manufacturers. That may lead you down the correct path.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 18, 2011, 07:44:14 PM
Thats what I was thinking. Maybe find that fire clay mix above and then form it into the mixer and smooth it out. Then let it air dry. After it is dry build a big fire in it and maybe around it and burn the crap out of it. Not very precise but it may work.

Those guys making those ovens in that above web site are not putting those ovens in a kiln for sure.

They must be fired with just a wood fire.

There is not much info out there at all. Gotta find someone who's brain I can pick.

There is some info on the fire bricks made with fire clay. (All regular refractory cement and ceramic comes from fire clay) which is clay that is loaded with bauxite.

There is lots of other refractory materials but might not be good for an oven.

its a tough one.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 18, 2011, 07:53:59 PM
ask over on the brethren forum.  those guys know shedloads.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 18, 2011, 08:04:00 PM
Yeah, I should ask over there. Ill stop in later.

Looks like raku clay is a good option. I dont think that is refractory clay at all though and fires at low temps.

Here is a good blog, scroll down for pics of his fabrication. http://oildrumtandoor.blogspot.com/

OK registered over at the brethren but cant post yet. Waiting for a mod to approve me. As soon as I can Im gonna start the tandoor thread.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 20, 2011, 12:54:55 PM
Then chili and chopped out of the scraps.

Leftover brisket makes awesome chili!

I'm reporting back that I find brisket based chili to be superior in all ways to any other type of chili. Unbelievable. Now I'm going to have to smoke a brisket just so I can make chili!  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: roguejim on January 20, 2011, 01:14:56 PM
Two questions.

Does anyone have a brisket chili recipe?

Are you guys mopping your brisket?  I've got a couple of Paul Kirk mops that I use, but I'm getting a little tired of the Worcestershire flavor that they impart. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: chumley on January 20, 2011, 02:50:02 PM
I don't mop a brisket.  I give it a rub overnight, smoke it, then I will take it out, wrap it in extra heavy duty aluminum foil with 12 oz. of Negra Modelo or similar dark beer) and bake it in the oven for another hour and a half or so to finish it off.

As far as brisket chili recipes, just take your favorite recipe and swap out brisket for the chuck/tri-tip/venison/whatever.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 20, 2011, 03:28:17 PM
I don't mop a brisket.  I give it a rub overnight, smoke it, then I will take it out, wrap it in extra heavy duty aluminum foil with 12 oz. of Negra Modelo or similar dark beer) and bake it in the oven for another hour and a half or so to finish it off.

As far as brisket chili recipes, just take your favorite recipe and swap out brisket for the chuck/tri-tip/venison/whatever.
Yup regular recipe. My recipe usually calls for two pounds of raw meat so I only used 1.75 pounds of cubed Brisket point. It was nice that I didn't have to cook it first.

Oh and I added a 16oz can of Coors. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 20, 2011, 05:47:28 PM
Then chili and chopped out of the scraps.

Leftover brisket makes awesome chili!

I'm reporting back that I find brisket based chili to be superior in all ways to any other type of chili. Unbelievable. Now I'm going to have to smoke a brisket just so I can make chili!  ;)

I won't steer you wrong on purpose Euge.

Awesome stuff huh.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 20, 2011, 05:50:01 PM
Two questions.

Does anyone have a brisket chili recipe? Just use your favorite chili recipe but sub the smoked brisket for the beef

Are you guys mopping your brisket?  I've got a couple of Paul Kirk mops that I use, but I'm getting a little tired of the Worcestershire flavor that they impart. 

I've mopped and I've smoked them dry with no real big difference IMO...If anything the mopping infuses more flavor.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 22, 2011, 06:26:01 PM
no seasoning on the tenderloin.  wrapped in chorizo and sprinkled with simply marvelous pecan rub....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/9cfd4b4d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c639d3fc.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/fb5bec2f.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e093e722.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2406b346.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/da695715.jpg)


pink in the middle, just like i like it....


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/11243bc8.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a2b42404.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5dba9f5f.jpg)


thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 23, 2011, 06:56:29 AM
That is some awesome pron right there!  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on January 23, 2011, 11:18:47 AM
I find myself looking at the grills more than the food. Is that wrong? Is something wrong with me? :-\

Great looking tenderloin there DS. Instead of Beef Wellington you have Pancho Villa! And I'm partial to asparagus. But they haven't seen the Egg yet. Do you blanch them first?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on January 23, 2011, 11:24:27 AM
What temp did you pull the loin from the grill deepsouth?

Great looking Q as usual.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 23, 2011, 03:06:21 PM
I find myself looking at the grills more than the food. Is that wrong? Is something wrong with me? :-\

Great looking tenderloin there DS. Instead of Beef Wellington you have Pancho Villa! And I'm partial to asparagus. But they haven't seen the Egg yet. Do you blanch them first?


pancho villa!  i like that.

olive oil, salt and pepper and on the grill.  they are so good that way.  simple yet delicious.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 23, 2011, 03:08:01 PM
What temp did you pull the loin from the grill deepsouth?

Great looking Q as usual.  8)

crazy thing was, i checked near the smaller end, from the side and got a read of 170 and freaked out and pulled it off and it was cooked perfectly rather than undercooked.  i'm going to guess i must have been 140-150 (?).
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on January 23, 2011, 06:24:15 PM
In other words things were getting hot so you pulled your pork off?

My daughter thinks Im funny. She is two.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 23, 2011, 07:36:06 PM
boneless leg of lamb seasoned with garlic and olive oil, salt and pepper.  seared it and then roasted it at 350......

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3a44d4bc.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a86fb7cb.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/9b720d58.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/eb6ee0d2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a10b815d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/260c62f1.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e7c3d4c6.jpg)

thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on January 23, 2011, 07:36:42 PM
In other words things were getting hot so you pulled your pork off?

My daughter thinks Im funny. She is two.

exactry!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: beerocd on January 23, 2011, 07:43:38 PM
So, I grilled some hanger steaks tonight. Basically turns out like the best skirt steak you've ever had.
I had no clue what I was doing, cleaning it was a byotch - the silvery vein running down the middle is some work.
I got it good, ended up with two tenderloin looking things. I double butterflied it, flat and thin like a skirt steak.
Next time I will grill it as a tenderloin and slice it like a london broil. Montreal seasoning, lump, mesquite.

So, being my first time - it was ugly. Not picture worthy, but definitely tasty.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 07, 2011, 07:29:20 AM
i cooked a few things this superbowl weekend......



that phatty was (50/50) beef and pork, stuffed with blue cheese, seasoned with salt and pepper and simply marvelous season all and wrapped in a bacon weave (my first one).  i smoked it over royal oak and applewood chips....



the wings were seasoned with salt and pepper, simply marvelous spicy apple and dizzy pig tsunami spin and ragin' river and smoked over royal oak and applewood chips....



the kabobs were steak, shrimp, squash, zuccini, baby portabllos and yellow bell peppers, seasoned with simply marvelous season all, salt and pepper and some dizzy pig shakin' the tree





(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8cff4981.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/9e7442ba.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f7ce2b12.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2bbc7b94.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3b7e25aa.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/559b48f7.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ddf169b4.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/169c736a.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b8e9771b.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a68a7841.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8be641ed.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/59737841.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6c21671f.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/eae97047.jpg)





thanks for looking!!!

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 07, 2011, 07:42:01 AM
Fancy looking Q!

I grilled some chicken breasts marinated in mojo crillo on Saturday. We had a Southwestern grilled chicken salad.

Sorry...no pics.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 13, 2011, 06:52:28 PM
i attended a 90th birthday party for my grandmother today, so the pasta was not homemade.....

i halved some garlic cloves and roasted them.  no pics of this....

i sauted in a pan in olive oil, onions, bacon, roasted garlic, anchovies & capers...

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c42725f4.jpg)

grilled some corn.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/96da856a.jpg)

grilled the shrimp.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bb6ab054.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/cede26fd.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/78458bd8.jpg)

added shrimp to the pan.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/c8ebdb07.jpg)

added panna and a bit of milk......

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/8b2861b0.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/53f04209.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/cf048167.jpg)

made some roasted garlic bread on the grill.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/525501f3.jpg)


and earlier today, i made zippylip's peanut butter cup.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f795ac8a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5c3ac760.jpg)


and i'm stuffed.



thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 13, 2011, 08:12:06 PM
Fine looking Q as usual!

I made some chicken wings on the grill direct with a generous dusting of Dizzy Dust last night. I am really starting to take a liking to wings on the grill. I used the Weber kettle with one chimney of hardwood charcoal briquettes evenly spread across the kettle grate. The Dizzy Dust was the secret.

Wings along with my house IPA was a winner!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on February 14, 2011, 11:32:44 AM
Very fine shrimp dish! I hope grandma enjoyed it!

Do you ever have a problem with the shrimp falling through the grate?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 14, 2011, 01:05:34 PM
Very fine shrimp dish! I hope grandma enjoyed it!

Do you ever have a problem with the shrimp falling through the grate?

thanks!  grandma didn't come over, but i'm sure she would have dug it!

so far, so good.  i've probably lost less than a half dozen shrimp and i've probably grilled 20 lbs since shrimp season started.  i lost the smallest shrimp last night.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 14, 2011, 01:06:09 PM
Fine looking Q as usual!

I made some chicken wings on the grill direct with a generous dusting of Dizzy Dust last night. I am really starting to take a liking to wings on the grill. I used the Weber kettle with one chimney of hardwood charcoal briquettes evenly spread across the kettle grate. The Dizzy Dust was the secret.

Wings along with my house IPA was a winner!


thanks.  i'll have some wings and a hb ipa please!!!  i love the dp seasonings!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tumarkin on February 14, 2011, 01:09:43 PM
re shrimp (or other small stuff) falling through the grill.... get a stainless grilling basket!!! they come in a variety of shapes & sizes. great invention for grilling anything small - shrimp, scallops, veggies. makes great grilled potatoes - cut em into cubes, toss 'em with a little olive oil and put 'em in the basket at the side of your grill. fine eating.

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on February 14, 2011, 10:28:41 PM
Here are some pics of recent efforts, my wife thinks I'm a lunatic taking pictures of food so you'll never se a photo of the finished product
tonight was garlic/rosemary coated boneless leg of lamb:
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/febbarbeque2011003.jpg)
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/febbarbeque2011005.jpg)
Ribs and taters a couple of weeks ago:
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011030.jpg)
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011036.jpg)
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011038.jpg)
Chicken breasts and bacon for grilled chicken salad:
(http://i362.photobucket.com/albums/oo65/rocdoc1/jan2011025.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on February 14, 2011, 11:30:55 PM
It's nice to see someone doing lamb. Really, it's a personal favorite. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 15, 2011, 06:59:14 AM
i had a nice piece of fresh salmon and i hit it with some salt and pepper and some dizzy pig raging river.  i had never grilled avacados before.  i hit them with salt and pepper and dizzy pig shakin' the tree.  both turned out awesome!

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/16a31c67.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0a7e1742.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/be25b40d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/1e9db573.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/f989627a.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a7a05d00.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/08e26859.jpg)


thanks in advance for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 15, 2011, 07:03:33 AM
Here are some pics of recent efforts, my wife thinks I'm a lunatic taking pictures of food so you'll never se a photo of the finished product
tonight was garlic/rosemary coated boneless leg of lamb:

that's stellar!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: maxieboy on February 15, 2011, 08:07:44 AM
Very fine shrimp dish! I hope grandma enjoyed it!

Do you ever have a problem with the shrimp falling through the grate?

thanks!  grandma didn't come over, but i'm sure she would have dug it!

so far, so good.  i've probably lost less than a half dozen shrimp and i've probably grilled 20 lbs since shrimp season started.  i lost the smallest shrimp last night.


Gam gam didn't come to her own b'day party?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 15, 2011, 08:12:25 AM
Very fine shrimp dish! I hope grandma enjoyed it!

Do you ever have a problem with the shrimp falling through the grate?

thanks!  grandma didn't come over, but i'm sure she would have dug it!

so far, so good.  i've probably lost less than a half dozen shrimp and i've probably grilled 20 lbs since shrimp season started.  i lost the smallest shrimp last night.


Gam gam didn't come to her own b'day party?

the party was at a community center and there was food there.  this was just what i cooked for dinner.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 15, 2011, 09:25:18 AM
Here are some pics of recent efforts, my wife thinks I'm a lunatic taking pictures of food so you'll never se a photo of the finished product
tonight was garlic/rosemary coated boneless leg of lamb:

that's stellar!

+1

Wow...nice to see those ribs hangin' in there like that.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on February 15, 2011, 10:11:30 AM
i had a nice piece of fresh salmon and i hit it with some salt and pepper and some dizzy pig raging river.  i had never grilled avacados before.  i hit them with salt and pepper and dizzy pig shakin' the tree.  both turned out awesome!
Very nice!  I hadn't considered grilling avocados before, I'll have to try that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on February 15, 2011, 10:39:38 AM
It's nice to see someone doing lamb. Really, it's a personal favorite. :)
We really wanted grilled salmon, but all we could find was farm raised or imported from China.  Next choice were the lamb T-bone chops, also not available so the boneless leg portion was the best we could find.  We eat a lot of lamb, it's one of my favorite foods when cooked right.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 15, 2011, 12:24:48 PM
i had a nice piece of fresh salmon and i hit it with some salt and pepper and some dizzy pig raging river.  i had never grilled avacados before.  i hit them with salt and pepper and dizzy pig shakin' the tree.  both turned out awesome!
Very nice!  I hadn't considered grilling avocados before, I'll have to try that.


HIGHly recommended!  next up with them is grilled guacamole.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on February 15, 2011, 01:12:36 PM
i had a nice piece of fresh salmon and i hit it with some salt and pepper and some dizzy pig raging river.  i had never grilled avacados before.  i hit them with salt and pepper and dizzy pig shakin' the tree.  both turned out awesome!
Very nice!  I hadn't considered grilling avocados before, I'll have to try that.


HIGHly recommended!  next up with them is grilled guacamole.
Oooh, will you roast the tomatoes, garlic, and onions too?  Or just the avos and make as usual?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 15, 2011, 03:19:46 PM
i had a nice piece of fresh salmon and i hit it with some salt and pepper and some dizzy pig raging river.  i had never grilled avacados before.  i hit them with salt and pepper and dizzy pig shakin' the tree.  both turned out awesome!
Very nice!  I hadn't considered grilling avocados before, I'll have to try that.


HIGHly recommended!  next up with them is grilled guacamole.
Oooh, will you roast the tomatoes, garlic, and onions too?  Or just the avos and make as usual?

i know i'm going to roast the avos, garlic and tomatos, but not the onions.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on February 15, 2011, 05:05:59 PM
Let us know how it is. :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on February 16, 2011, 01:58:11 AM
My dad used to do simple grilled chicken on the weekends once it started getting warmer out, and this weekend is supposed to be sunny and 60 degrees, so I'm gonna go for it. What I need, though, are good side recommendations (grilled, preferrably). Any ideas? Something healthy would be best, but I'd love to hear what you guys have done as far as "interesting" or "non-standard" bbq-based sides go.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on February 16, 2011, 06:00:02 AM
Yeah, I remember when wings were super cheap.  We used to eat them a lot with our modified Frank's hot sauce - delicious.  I had a roommate 15 years ago or so when I was working the late shift, and every couple of weeks when he felt like staying up late he'd make wings and we'd hang out drinking beers and dining in fine style. Good times.   ;D

I like your idea of selling mesquite in Europe euge, it would make an awesome road trip.  Ship them all to Antwerp and then load up a truck and drive around Germany selling them all.  Then load up the truck again and drive around France.  Repeat with different countries until the whole shipping container is gone.  You might not make a ton of money, but maybe it would pay for itself. :)

Update, my local gardening shop now sells mesquite wood chips (and hickory, and maple!!!!) so I hope you guys hadn't bought the truck yet.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 16, 2011, 07:46:10 AM
My dad used to do simple grilled chicken on the weekends once it started getting warmer out, and this weekend is supposed to be sunny and 60 degrees, so I'm gonna go for it. What I need, though, are good side recommendations (grilled, preferrably). Any ideas? Something healthy would be best, but I'd love to hear what you guys have done as far as "interesting" or "non-standard" bbq-based sides go.

I like asparagas, corn, red peppers, red onion, potatoes....just to name a few.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 16, 2011, 07:59:38 AM
Any ideas? Something healthy would be best, but I'd love to hear what you guys have done as far as "interesting" or "non-standard" bbq-based sides go.

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/a7a05d00.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/9e7442ba.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2416a173.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5dba9f5f.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/27d025e0.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/eeaa5406.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/5737dee1.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/074aaa08.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/29f6a5cd.jpg)



Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on February 17, 2011, 03:16:31 AM
Ah, endives and asparagus, that's the ticket! Now to find asparagus that won't cost me an arm and a leg...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on February 17, 2011, 06:35:23 AM
Ah, endives and asparagus, that's the ticket! Now to find asparagus that won't cost me an arm and a leg...
In a couple of months France will be overflowing with excellent cheap asparagus, but it's all white.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on February 17, 2011, 07:29:24 AM
Ah, endives and asparagus, that's the ticket! Now to find asparagus that won't cost me an arm and a leg...
In a couple of months France will be overflowing with excellent cheap asparagus, but it's all white.

That's ok, I should have some green food coloring left over from St Patty's day.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 20, 2011, 07:19:31 PM
lucked up on a couple tri-tips today, so i decided to make fajitas....

rubbed the tri-tip down with some chili-lime rub with sea salt as well as some fresh cracked pepper.  i used dizzy pig pineapple head on the peaches.  oil and salt and pepper on the vegetables. grilled everything....


(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7620ef7d.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/12a76600.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ab3f8056.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6ead8e04.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b69b0dd4.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/cd11f310.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b6ebf3a8.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3d7bfe7b.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/4da31c50.jpg)


thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 21, 2011, 08:31:42 PM
Tried to do my own sauce this weekend. It was good but it just lack something. I think I got a good base.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 21, 2011, 08:37:20 PM
Tried to do my own sauce this weekend. It was good but it just lack something. I think I got a good base.

Recipe please.  ::) :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 21, 2011, 09:38:39 PM
Tomatos canned from the garden, 8oz of tomato sauce..........
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 21, 2011, 10:00:05 PM
vinegar, molasses, papkrika
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 21, 2011, 10:04:36 PM
chilli powder, hmm....


dark brown sugar, onion, salt, pepper, and OJ

cook for 2 hrs at least
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 21, 2011, 10:13:50 PM
PM for the amounts. It does great for shreaded laying hens.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on February 23, 2011, 01:39:42 AM
The old rusted pit has been transformed. Rising from the ashes and grease it now has a new glorious role: fire pit.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TWTELSN9uSI/AAAAAAAAAf8/57cPunL9jyI/s640/2011-02-20%2018.20.02.jpg)

Meanwhile the HEB bird is a-cookin. And that's fresh garlic Polish sausage. It was a nice weekend.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TWTDX5TEZ6I/AAAAAAAAAf8/bA_6ZLLItzE/s640/2011-02-20%2018.14.41.jpg)
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TWTDx0HFunI/AAAAAAAAAf8/EAhkjfmCqsE/s640/2011-02-20%2018.15.08.jpg)



Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 23, 2011, 05:27:40 AM
PM for the amounts. It does great for shreaded laying hens.

I am liking the recipe. (mouth is watering)  ::)...BBQ sauce recipes have always been a fascination of mine.

Thanks for that!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 23, 2011, 05:28:54 AM
The old rusted pit has been transformed. Rising from the ashes and grease it now has a new glorious role: fire pit.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TWTELSN9uSI/AAAAAAAAAf8/57cPunL9jyI/s640/2011-02-20%2018.20.02.jpg)

Meanwhile the HEB bird is a-cookin. And that's fresh garlic Polish sausage. It was a nice weekend.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TWTDX5TEZ6I/AAAAAAAAAf8/bA_6ZLLItzE/s640/2011-02-20%2018.14.41.jpg)
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TWTDx0HFunI/AAAAAAAAAf8/EAhkjfmCqsE/s640/2011-02-20%2018.15.08.jpg)





I like the half barrel fire pit.

Looks like you have the BGE workin' nicely.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 24, 2011, 07:24:13 AM
so, tri-tip is hard to find down here, so when i see them, i usually buy two.  the family loves cow, so this isn't a problem with them.



i seasoned the tri-tip with a heavy dose of sea salt, some dizzy pig raising the steaks and some dizzy pig red eye express.  i got the egg up to about 650 and seared it low on the spider and then put it on top of the adjustable rig and knocked the temp back to 350 until it hit an internal of 140 and let it rest for 10 minutes.  had mini sweet peppers and a nice salad on the side.....



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7866bf58.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/aabab970.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/abaf4c54.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3e463e0b.jpg)



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/60f7cdd0.jpg)



thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 24, 2011, 07:33:18 AM
Very fine!

Tri-tip is great for making chili but it's hard to find around here as well. I need to stop by my local butcher and leave him my cell#.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 24, 2011, 07:42:56 AM
thanks!  i have never tried making chili with it.  do you grind it?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 24, 2011, 07:45:11 AM
thanks!  i have never tried making chili with it.  do you grind it?

Yes. I grind it to a "chili grind" which is a rough grind. Tri-tip is primarily used in chili competition cook-offs.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on February 24, 2011, 11:51:50 AM
I can get it pretty easily. Think it's the same price as skirt steak- which is ridiculously overpriced at $7 per pound.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 24, 2011, 12:15:51 PM
it's about $8/lb down here unless you get lucky and it's still $6 and change.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 25, 2011, 09:38:47 PM
Ok here it is, sorry for the Delay.
2 TBS of vegatable oil
1 Medium onion Minced
1 8oz of Tomato sauce
28 oz of whole canned tomatoes
3/4 distilled vinegar
1/4 cup of dark brown sugar
2 TBS of moleasses
1TBS of sweet paprika
1 TBS of chili powder
2 tsp of liquid smoke ( I didn't use this)
1 tsp of salt
1tsp of pepper
1/4 cup of OJ
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 26, 2011, 10:08:24 AM
Ok here it is, sorry for the Delay.
2 TBS of vegatable oil
1 Medium onion Minced
1 8oz of Tomato sauce
28 oz of whole canned tomatoes
3/4 distilled vinegar
1/4 cup of dark brown sugar
2 TBS of moleasses
1TBS of sweet paprika
1 TBS of chili powder
2 tsp of liquid smoke ( I didn't use this)
1 tsp of salt
1tsp of pepper
1/4 cup of OJ


There's a good balance between the acidity and the sugar in your recipe. Looks good!

Thanks for posting the recipe.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on February 26, 2011, 05:19:34 PM
You guys put sauce on your BBQ? Why?

Did some beef chuck ribs today as per Robert Rodriguez. Did I post that cooking video yet? Ill post it again.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGOQ_npS4pI

Man these things are firken delicious. Just sinful.

If you do it look for nice marbled chuck ribs. I noticed some were very lean.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01062.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01063.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01072.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01074.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01075.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01078.jpg)

To put sauce on these would be a deadly sin, BBQ sauce is for Philistines.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 26, 2011, 05:56:18 PM
Very nice work Cap!

Long time no post.

Thanks for posting.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 26, 2011, 06:04:02 PM
those are banGin' cap.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on February 26, 2011, 06:26:41 PM
The beef ribs I get usually aren't that meaty. To me it looks like they trim most of the meat off for ground chuck. Cap did you ask for untrimmed ribs?

Looks mighty tasty. And I forgo the sauce too these days. Why bother? The flavor of the meat, the smoke and whatever spices used are enough I've discovered.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 26, 2011, 07:01:15 PM
another non-saucer here.   when i do pulled pork or beef, i will us a bit of homemade vinegar sauce on the second sandwich.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 27, 2011, 07:09:16 PM
It was a pretty good weather day here, so I decided to smoke a whole turkey. I brined the turkey in my favorite turkey brine for 24hrs.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010553.jpg)

on the WSM smoker.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010563.jpg)

2.5hrs at 325F.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010565.jpg)

To the plate.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010570.jpg)

Hope you enjoyed the Q because I did!

I just thought I'd also post the new addititon. FedEX dropped it off yesterday. I'm stoked!  8)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010556.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on February 27, 2011, 08:15:20 PM
 8) wow. Ill bet that thing set ya back a few bucks.

When ya posting some pic updates on the brewery? Seems like you are getting close to being pro.

I gots ta get me some of that bluesman beer.  ;)

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on February 27, 2011, 08:33:02 PM
that's baller.  the bird and the blichmann. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on February 27, 2011, 08:34:53 PM
Hey, I bet that Blichman thing would make a nice smoker.  ;D

Bring it up Ron, I will take the plasma cutter to it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on February 27, 2011, 09:49:54 PM
Tuck the wings in so they don't get burnt, just a note for next time. Time to start a peltier cooling thread for conicals now. I'm going to be glued to that one. Was that bird 15#? gust wondering, bet it was a broad breasted white. Lovely birds.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 28, 2011, 05:46:15 AM
Hey, I bet that Blichman thing would make a nice smoker.  ;D

Bring it up Ron, I will take the plasma cutter to it.

 ;D

lol
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on February 28, 2011, 05:49:39 AM
Tuck the wings in so they don't get burnt, just a note for next time. Time to start a peltier cooling thread for conicals now. I'm going to be glued to that one. Was that bird 15#? gust wondering, bet it was a broad breasted white. Lovely birds.

Yea, I forgot to tuck the wings in this time. It was a 12.5lb gobbler. Tastes heavenly especially after brining.

Peltier cooling...that sounds interesting.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on March 01, 2011, 10:02:57 PM
I got inspired by the pictures of grilled asparagus so tonight I tried it with some Pacific rockfish.  I made a mop of shallots and garlic sauteed in butter and olive oil with a little paprika salt and pepper.  Keep in mind that my wife is a French farm girl and she still thinks asparagus are white and should be served with a nice vinaigrette, but she tore into those grilled asparagus like she had been eating them all her life.  That's definitely a dish to be added to the repertoire.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 01, 2011, 11:00:07 PM
I loooove asparagus.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 02, 2011, 01:33:53 AM
You guys put sauce on your BBQ? Why?

Did some beef chuck ribs today as per Robert Rodriguez. Did I post that cooking video yet? Ill post it again.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGOQ_npS4pI

Man these things are firken delicious. Just sinful.

If you do it look for nice marbled chuck ribs. I noticed some were very lean.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01062.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01063.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01072.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01074.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01075.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC01078.jpg)

To put sauce on these would be a deadly sin, BBQ sauce is for Philistines.

JEEZ M CROW that looks amazing. Got any non-closeup pics of the raw meat? I'm wondering what it looks like before cooking so I know what to ask for. Watched that Rodriguez thing too, Planet Terror was an EXCELLENT movie.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 02, 2011, 05:50:40 PM
I don't have any pics, but I smoked five racks of baby backs last weekend for a family get together (ok, actually it was my birthday).  I rubbed with Dizzy Dust and smoked with equal parts white oak, cherry, and apple chunks.  Served the ribs with collard greens and dumplings, home made slaw and butter buns, and plenty of homebrew.  Honestly, I don't think pics would have done it justice.  It might have been the best bbq-based meal I've ever had. 8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 02, 2011, 05:55:27 PM
I don't have any pics, but I smoked five racks of baby backs last weekend for a family get together (ok, actually it was my birthday).  I rubbed with Dizzy Dust and smoked with equal parts white oak, cherry, and apple chunks.  Served the ribs with collard greens and dumplings, home made slaw and butter buns, and plenty of homebrew.  Honestly, I don't think pics would have done it justice.  It might have been the best bbq-based meal I've ever had. 8)

Sounds really good!

You should know Matt...I was just planning my next visit to the Sam's Club this weekend and I have baby backs on the top of the list. They will be on the smoker Sunday. This is the plan anyway. I am becoming a really big fan of the Dizzy Pig rubs. I recently purchased the sampler pack. So many rubs...so little time.   :)

Oh...and Happy belated B-day!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 02, 2011, 07:05:18 PM
Quote
Served the ribs with collard greens and dumplings, home made slaw and butter buns, and plenty of homebrew.

That's probably healthier than most people eat. Sounds fantastic. Happy birthday.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 02, 2011, 07:42:54 PM
Thanks for the birthday props.   :D

Ron, this was the first time I've used Dizzy Dust and I have to say it was fantastic.  I really want to try some of the other rub varieties, especially the Swamp Venom.  Good luck with the rib smoke on Sunday!

Oh, I forgot to add that the collard greens were infused with morita chiles (chipotles).  The chiles gave a little heat and a nice smoky spice.  Got the recipe here: http://www.chow.com/recipes/28707-collard-greens-with-dumplings.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 04, 2011, 03:30:45 AM
Any of you guys ever tried Grill Grates? http://www.grillgrate.com/index.php

For $60 I'm thinking I might have to go for some, if for no other reason than it seems it'd be easier to cook smaller things.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 04, 2011, 05:35:31 AM
Any of you guys ever tried Grill Grates? http://www.grillgrate.com/index.php

For $60 I'm thinking I might have to go for some, if for no other reason than it seems it'd be easier to cook smaller things.

Pretty cool design. I installed cast iron grill grates on my Weber Gas grill some time ago and really like the performance. The grillgate.com grates look like they could be worth a try. What are they made out of...?

If you decide to get them, let us know how they work out for you.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 04, 2011, 06:02:16 AM
Any of you guys ever tried Grill Grates? http://www.grillgrate.com/index.php

For $60 I'm thinking I might have to go for some, if for no other reason than it seems it'd be easier to cook smaller things.

Pretty cool design. I installed cast iron grill grates on my Weber Gas grill some time ago and really like the performance. The grillgate.com grates look like they could be worth a try. What are they made out of...?

If you decide to get them, let us know how they work out for you.

Pretty sure they're made out of Hard Anodized Aircraft Aluminum. I think Maglites are made of the same stuff. I'm waiting to hear back from the mfg to see how heavy they are for a Large BGE kit (they custom cut them to fit inside the BGE). If it's under 20 lbs that'll ship via USPS fairly cheaply.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 04, 2011, 11:35:51 AM
Any of you guys ever tried Grill Grates? http://www.grillgrate.com/index.php

For $60 I'm thinking I might have to go for some, if for no other reason than it seems it'd be easier to cook smaller things.

Pretty cool design. I installed cast iron grill grates on my Weber Gas grill some time ago and really like the performance. The grillgate.com grates look like they could be worth a try. What are they made out of...?

If you decide to get them, let us know how they work out for you.

Pretty sure they're made out of Hard Anodized Aircraft Aluminum. I think Maglites are made of the same stuff. I'm waiting to hear back from the mfg to see how heavy they are for a Large BGE kit (they custom cut them to fit inside the BGE). If it's under 20 lbs that'll ship via USPS fairly cheaply.

Not for one second do I believe it prevents/controls flareups. But interesting design. I can see using it for shrimp, scallops, veggies etc. Things that can fall through the grate.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 08, 2011, 12:15:15 AM
Did some ribs (St Louis) and pinto beans at the same time. I only lightly seasoned the ribs. This time I courted death by quick-soaking the beans for an hour then low and slow in the pit for six hours. The ribs @ 225F were done in 5 hours then wrapped in foil and a towel for another hour until the beans were pulled.

It all turned out awesome though the beans were nasty gassy. Combine that with fatty pork and well... you get the idea. ;)

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TXLNGjo76VI/AAAAAAAAAkE/awz1Rx88zkY/s512/2011-03-05%2017.49.24.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TXWDpzv60nI/AAAAAAAAAk8/90a3FVHHkJc/s640/2011-03-06%2000.33.57.jpg)

Probably my best ever and it's all gone.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 08, 2011, 05:34:02 AM
Awseome Euge!  8)

I picked up several pounds of babybacks the other day for this weekends smoke.

Can't wait!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on March 08, 2011, 09:09:38 AM
I've had the Q itch for way too long now.  Wifey picked up some Pork Ribs ($1.57/lb) & Loins ($1.88/lb) last weekend. Now they're just sittin' in the freezer watin'.  Never done Canadian Bacon (A.K.A. Buckboard Bacon) before. That's first on the list if it ever warms up & quits snowing.  Prolly just use the basic Tenderquick recipe to start with. Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 08, 2011, 09:14:49 AM
I've had the Q itch for way too long now.  Wifey picked up some Pork Ribs ($1.57/lb) & Loins ($1.88/lb) last weekend. Now they're just sittin' in the freezer watin'.  Never done Canadian Bacon (A.K.A. Buckboard Bacon) before. That's first on the list if it ever warms up & quits snowing.  Prolly just use the basic Tenderquick recipe to start with. Cheers!!!

Nice!  8)

Here's my recommendation.

http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on March 08, 2011, 09:56:19 AM
I've had the Q itch for way too long now.  Wifey picked up some Pork Ribs ($1.57/lb) & Loins ($1.88/lb) last weekend. Now they're just sittin' in the freezer watin'.  Never done Canadian Bacon (A.K.A. Buckboard Bacon) before. That's first on the list if it ever warms up & quits snowing.  Prolly just use the basic Tenderquick recipe to start with. Cheers!!!

Nice!  8)

Here's my recommendation.

http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/
Hey Ron, I actually have the dizzypig recipe saved in my BBQ recipe folder. Definitely going to give it a shot some day. Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 08, 2011, 10:35:27 AM
The best deal seems to be the 2# bulk DP instead of the 8oz bottles. And yes I could use that much.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 08, 2011, 10:47:20 AM
I used the Dizzy Pig Cow Lick on some T-bone steaks I Q'd up last Saturday evening on my Weber Kettle. I took pics but haven't downloaded them yet. This was the first time I tried Cow Lick and liked it alot. Adds a spicy, peppery twang to the beef.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 10, 2011, 03:29:09 AM
I FINALLY found a butcher who wouldn't look at me cross-eyed when I asked him for a special order. The cut of beef ribs Cap threw in the smoker are called "Plat Cote," basically short ribs but the whole rack as opposed to sliced up. But what I'm most excited about was him being OK with my order of a couple of 7-cm thick "cote de bouef avec os" otherwise known as the TOMAHAWK CUT.

(http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/meats/beef/images/cowboy-steak-200_000.jpg)

Hopefully I'll have those tomorrow and will throw them on the grill (and have a cigar) while I brew Saturday.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 10, 2011, 04:13:19 AM
Bone-in rib-eye? Except that really tasty bit is trimmed off. I'm sure it is made into something awesome.

I get the "tomahawk cut" reference. Supposed to be more of an American cowboy style cut- to the French, I mean. Nice marbling, and the thickness is right.

I've done the really hot and rest then lower temp approach and visa versa. Phil you got a method?

And also started making noise trying to find Cap's cut. Seems it's untrimmed finger ribs around here? I see the rack it comes from but they trim them almost to the bone usually. Damn shame but that's hamburger.

I'm doing another rack of ribs and a boneless chuck roast this weekend. The pork will be brined. Salt and pepper for the beef. BGE can handle it...

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 10, 2011, 06:35:57 AM
Bone-in rib-eye? Except that really tasty bit is trimmed off. I'm sure it is made into something awesome.

I get the "tomahawk cut" reference. Supposed to be more of an American cowboy style cut- to the French, I mean. Nice marbling, and the thickness is right.

I've done the really hot and rest then lower temp approach and visa versa. Phil you got a method?

And also started making noise trying to find Cap's cut. Seems it's untrimmed finger ribs around here? I see the rack it comes from but they trim them almost to the bone usually. Damn shame but that's hamburger.

I'm doing another rack of ribs and a boneless chuck roast this weekend. The pork will be brined. Salt and pepper for the beef. BGE can handle it...



I'm gonna cook it using the "T-Rex" BGE method. http://web.mac.com/philhanna/iWeb/philhanna@mac.com/TREXing%20a%20Steak.html

Although frankly I'm not sure about that. I have my water oven, and I may cook them sous vide to rare, and then sear them 90 sec a side (turn after 45 for marks) on the egg cranked to full throttle.

Re tomahawk, that's a name I learned from Ditka's steakhouse in Chicago; Paulina Meat Market coined it, I think: https://www.paulinameatmarket.com/?p=newsletter

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 10, 2011, 07:47:59 AM
Here's a take on ribs that I'm in favor of...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwiTjWBgUy8&feature=related
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on March 10, 2011, 08:48:23 AM
Here's a take on ribs that I'm in favor of...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwiTjWBgUy8&feature=related
Those look great!  Never thought about using brown sugar that way. That's on the list for sure!  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 10, 2011, 09:01:51 AM
Here's a take on ribs that I'm in favor of...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwiTjWBgUy8&feature=related
Those look great!  Never thought about using brown sugar that way. That's on the list for sure!  Cheers!!!

I'm going to  try this method out on the baby backs I'm smoking this weekend.

I'll post pics!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on March 10, 2011, 10:28:34 AM
Re tomahawk, that's a name I learned from Ditka's steakhouse in Chicago; Paulina Meat Market coined it, I think:
I had a tomahawk at a local steakhouse a couple of years ago - awesome!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 11, 2011, 03:12:38 AM
Re tomahawk, that's a name I learned from Ditka's steakhouse in Chicago; Paulina Meat Market coined it, I think:
I had a tomahawk at a local steakhouse a couple of years ago - awesome!

Wife just gave me the good news, Tomahawks are ready to be purchased. Two  of 'em, 2.3 inches thick each. I may be homebrewing with another homebrewer for the VERY FIRST TIME Saturday, which is why I'm sorta celebrating. We got them from this butcher: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Barone+Gilles,+6+Rue+March%C3%A9+St+Honor%C3%A9,+75001+Paris,+France&aq=0&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=51.576045,135.263672&ie=UTF8&hq=Barone+Gilles,+6+Rue+March%C3%A9+St+Honor%C3%A9,&hnear=75001+Paris,+%C3%8Ele-de-France,+France&z=16

He's two blocks from the Louvre, and is supposedly the best butcher in Paris. We'll see how the steaks turn out and yes of course I'm gonna post pics :-)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on March 12, 2011, 10:21:10 PM
Since I had my big smoker grill built my old beloved Brinkmann has sat lonely on the sidelines.  But last week I was poking around in the barn and found a rotisserie I bought at a garage sale about 10 years ago, still unopened in the box.  I spent about 4 hours last weekend modifying the Brinkmann to accommodate the rotisserie and tonight I tried it out. 
I roasted a chicken over charcoal and pecan wood, and it turned out great.  It's going to take a few tries to get the heat intensity and charcoal placement figured out but the family is stoked about having another cooking option.  My son was not so happy, he hoped to be able to take the old grill home in Texas.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2011, 01:57:18 AM
Speaking of modifications, has anyone ever modified an old gas grill to use with charcoal?  I think I'm going to take the burners out of my old one and add a grate.  Anything else I should think about?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on March 13, 2011, 06:06:10 AM
I've never "modified" one.  But I did have one that the regulator died on and wasn't worth fixing so I just took the tank off and started using charcoal in it.  Worked fine.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2011, 07:40:28 AM
Speaking of modifications, has anyone ever modified an old gas grill to use with charcoal?  I think I'm going to take the burners out of my old one and add a grate.  Anything else I should think about?

You should take into account the grease and spent coal falling through the grate. I don't know what kind of grill you're using but it probably has a slot in the bottom for grease collection, in any event you may want to consider a charcaol catch basin below the grill housing for ease of removing grease and ash.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 13, 2011, 02:13:15 PM
Speaking of modifications, has anyone ever modified an old gas grill to use with charcoal?  I think I'm going to take the burners out of my old one and add a grate.  Anything else I should think about?

You should take into account the grease and spent coal falling through the grate. I don't know what kind of grill you're using but it probably has a slot in the bottom for grease collection, in any event you may want to consider a charcaol charcoal catch basin below the grill housing for ease of removing grease and ash.

+1

My neighbor has 2 modified gas grills and they appear to work well for him. He'll fire them both up with wood when feeding the extended family and friends. The wood burns down to coals, and it appears to work really well. At least the food I've had from them tastes great.

I'd look into the dampers though. You gotta have some sort of air-flow control.
Title: Re: BBQ Style Heat Gun
Post by: euge on March 13, 2011, 02:54:17 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TXwMzDKfTTI/AAAAAAAAAoE/h3OURg5OxGo/s640/2011-03-12%2016.46.38.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/TX05QiOblNI/AAAAAAAAACo/klkFFWqq10M/s640/2011-03-12%2018.24.40.jpg)
Took some pics before lunch...
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/TX050t7GtnI/AAAAAAAAACo/_zfJI-ErmOU/s640/2011-03-13%2016.35.31.jpg)
Smoked Chuck tacos!
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/TX07K0PBy2I/AAAAAAAAACo/MtHq_Im5LCk/s640/2011-03-13%2016.44.57.jpg)

I did some brined ribs and a chuck roast in the Egg yesterday. The ribs took 5 hours and the chuck roast 9- with a foiling mid-way.

All I did was pepper the ribs. They turned out perfect. The chuck got S&P and was coming apart. At 3am (Spring-forward >:() any pic taking inclinations were absent.

But I did take a video starting the fire! Please enjoy...

Heatgun BBQ Firestarter (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLFNdsNgacg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on March 13, 2011, 03:06:39 PM
[Slobber] That looks yummy![/slobber]

 Need to know more about this heat gun. Please elaborate.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 13, 2011, 03:18:37 PM
[Slobber] That looks yummy![/slobber]

 Need to know more about this heat gun. Please elaborate.

Thank you.

The heatgun is a Craftsman that'll go to 1050F, fairly expensive since it has Steinel guts but I think a $9 Harbor-Freight jobbie would work too. Several of my colleagues have bought the HF heatgun based on my fire-lighting testimonial. They haven't got back to me on how well it works for them.

As long as I have an outlet and the gun I will never light another pit any other way.

Think I will go and get some more ribs and do them this evening. They never seem to last very long... ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 13, 2011, 03:23:37 PM
i did my very first spare ribs today on the egg.  they turned out very good.  most moist ribs i've ever cooked....  spritzed them with apple juice, apple cider vinegar and cigar city jai lai oaked ipa....  seasoned one rack with simply marvelous season all sweet and spicy and the other half with season all and cherry.  sauced with blues hog the last 45 minutes or so.....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b82abfbb.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6d745456.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d88c76bc.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/b80ae7b9.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0821aaf4.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/3af9e92e.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/40a569c2.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/aa002b0d.jpg)

thanks for looking!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on March 13, 2011, 03:25:16 PM
Harbor Freight Drill Master 96289 $12.99

http://www.harborfreight.com/1500-watt-dual-temperature-heat-gun-572-1112-96289.html

On order 8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on March 13, 2011, 04:45:03 PM
You should take into account the grease and spent coal falling through the grate. I don't know what kind of grill you're using but it probably has a slot in the bottom for grease collection, in any event you may want to consider a charcaol catch basin below the grill housing for ease of removing grease and ash.
Good call.

I'd look into the dampers though. You gotta have some sort of air-flow control.
Another great point.  I can drill some holes and add some metal plates that can be moved to adjust the air flow.  Should be easy.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 13, 2011, 06:17:28 PM
Deepsouth congratulations on the "first time"... I take it's on the Egg and not first time ever... :D

Just threw two more racks of St Louis cut in the egg. I rubbed the ribs with rice vinegar first and then added the secret rub. First time with vinegar myself. Got the idea from the bbq pit boys on youtube. The rub penetrated the meat immediately.

Harbor Freight Drill Master 96289 $12.99

http://www.harborfreight.com/1500-watt-dual-temperature-heat-gun-572-1112-96289.html

On order 8)

Press it into service immediately. Life is too short to waste it lighting fires... ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 13, 2011, 06:19:07 PM
Thanks for the rib tip. Will have to check into that.

These were my first spares ever.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 13, 2011, 06:45:24 PM
Those spares look amazing deepsouth!  I also slather mine in yellow mustard before applying rub.  But I may look into the vinegar tip euge mentioned.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 13, 2011, 07:00:09 PM
Thanks for the rib tip. Will have to check into that.

These were my first spares ever.

Well that's even better! You'll do lots of em in the future I bet!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 13, 2011, 07:17:54 PM
Great lookin' ribs deepsouth!

I smoked a couple racks of babybacks on the WSM today.

I used Dizzy Dust and brown sugar with a mop sauce during the smoke.

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010585.jpg)

(http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r156/repricej/P1010587.jpg)

They are probably the best I've done to date.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 13, 2011, 07:20:52 PM
beautiful racks there!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 13, 2011, 07:24:56 PM
Those are some of the best baby backs I've ever seen, Ron!  Nice job!

How much brown sugar do you add to the Dizzy Dust?  And how does a mop sauce differ from a traditional wash?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 13, 2011, 07:37:40 PM
Nice bark. I'm getting hungry...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 14, 2011, 02:40:08 AM
Re tomahawk, that's a name I learned from Ditka's steakhouse in Chicago; Paulina Meat Market coined it, I think:
I had a tomahawk at a local steakhouse a couple of years ago - awesome!

Wife just gave me the good news, Tomahawks are ready to be purchased. Two  of 'em, 2.3 inches thick each. I may be homebrewing with another homebrewer for the VERY FIRST TIME Saturday, which is why I'm sorta celebrating. We got them from this butcher: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Barone+Gilles,+6+Rue+March%C3%A9+St+Honor%C3%A9,+75001+Paris,+France&aq=0&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=51.576045,135.263672&ie=UTF8&hq=Barone+Gilles,+6+Rue+March%C3%A9+St+Honor%C3%A9,&hnear=75001+Paris,+%C3%8Ele-de-France,+France&z=16

He's two blocks from the Louvre, and is supposedly the best butcher in Paris. We'll see how the steaks turn out and yes of course I'm gonna post pics :-)

BEHOLD THE MEAT

(http://philliplamb.com/steak_before.jpg)

Nice bit of CharCrust hickory on there. After T-Rexing (675 deg F for 90 sec per side, reduce temp to 400 f after a 20 min rest, cook 5.5 min per side):

(http://philliplamb.com/steak_after.jpg)

We had friends over (unfortunately they gave up alcohol for lent, so I had to have a beer all by my lonesome), these things were GONE in about 20 minutes. That was some good meat right there.

*update* my server is down at the moment. Meat will return shortly.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 14, 2011, 02:46:45 AM
For scale, that's the ceramic top to a large BGE, ~10" diameter.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 14, 2011, 06:38:05 AM
Those are some of the best baby backs I've ever seen, Ron!  Nice job!

How much brown sugar do you add to the Dizzy Dust?  And how does a mop sauce differ from a traditional wash?

I add about 1/8" layer over the dizzy dust and it melts into the meat after about 20 min.

For the mop sauce:

1 cup Apple Cider vinegar
1 cup beer
1/4 cup soy sauce
salt
fresh ground black pepper

I mop it on the ribs every 30 min or thereabouts to help keep the meat from drying out. The brown sugar helps the meat create a really nice bark.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 14, 2011, 06:40:42 AM

BEHOLD THE MEAT

(http://philliplamb.com/steak_after.jpg)

We had friends over (unfortunately they gave up alcohol for lent, so I had to have a beer all by my lonesome), these things were GONE in about 20 minutes. That was some good meat right there.

Hear...hear...behold the meat!  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on March 14, 2011, 09:23:00 AM
BEHOLD THE MEAT
(http://forums.mycotopia.net/attachments/trip-inn/142051d1253497850-cider-potassium-sorbate-homer-drool.gif)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 14, 2011, 10:31:12 AM
Nice bit of CharCrust hickory on there. After T-Rexing (675 deg F for 90 sec per side, reduce temp to 400 f after a 20 min rest, cook 5.5 min per side):

I've used this method. Works really well with a good thick steak. I can smell those tomahawks all the way over here...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on March 15, 2011, 04:39:56 AM
Very nice gents!  Makes me hungry just lookin' at 'em.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 20, 2011, 05:18:33 PM
i cooked a couple pork butts on the big green egg overnight.  massaged the butts a few hours before i cooked them with yellow mustard and the following...  simply marvelous season all, simply marvelous sweet and spicy, dizzy pig red eye express, burnt fingers rub, sea salt and sugar in the raw.  cooked them about 16 hours and then wrapped them in foil and into a cooler they went, covered with a beach towel, for about two and a half hours.

threw some red beans and rice together at the same time (on the stove)....  onions, salt pork, a ham hock, cubed ham & conecuh smoked sausage.....

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Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 20, 2011, 05:50:13 PM
Now that I just slobbered all over my keyboard,  ;D  I can tell you... that is some fabulous looking Q!

Well done as usual...Love the Boston Butt.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 20, 2011, 07:46:26 PM
That looks like some might fine eatin. And me not having had dinner yet. Such cruelty. ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 26, 2011, 07:01:55 PM
tonight's tri-tip

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/2ccd1116.jpg)

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/7a022a34.jpg)

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Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 26, 2011, 07:48:59 PM
Lookin good.  Served on rolls?

Hey, do you let the meat come to room temp before throwing it on the grill?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 26, 2011, 07:54:54 PM
we ate it sliced as seen with potatoes with onions and peppers and rosemary garlic bread from a local very nice bakery we have in town.  a vietnamese-american girl trained in france.  a treat for us down here.

i pulled this out three+ hours before it hit the grill.  
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 26, 2011, 08:10:47 PM

i pulled this out three+ hours before it hit the grill.  

I try to do the same. Seems to me it makes a big difference in cooking time. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 26, 2011, 08:14:12 PM

i pulled this out three+ hours before it hit the grill. 

I try to do the same. Seems to me it makes a big difference in cooking time. 

i've thought about hot tubbing, but leaving it out seems to work well for me. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 27, 2011, 07:01:34 AM
I like using tri-tip for making chili. The meat texture really lends itself well for that but I haven't tried Q'ing one yet. That sounds great and looks even better deepsouth.

Great lookin' Q as usual!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on March 27, 2011, 09:02:07 AM
I like using tri-tip for making chili. The meat texture really lends itself well for that but I haven't tried Q'ing one yet. That sounds great and looks even better deepsouth.

Do you cube the tri-tip for chili, or have it ground?  I've been trying various chili recipes looking for "the one", and read somewhere that coarse-ground (chili grind) tri-tips are excellent in chili.  I don't have a meat grinder, so the butcher would have to do it for me, but it sounds delicious!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 27, 2011, 09:31:20 AM

i pulled this out three+ hours before it hit the grill. 

I try to do the same. Seems to me it makes a big difference in cooking time. 

i've thought about hot tubbing, but leaving it out seems to work well for me. 

I've done that too in a pinch. It actually works well if the meat is vac-packed.

I like using tri-tip for making chili. The meat texture really lends itself well for that but I haven't tried Q'ing one yet. That sounds great and looks even better deepsouth.

Do you cube the tri-tip for chili, or have it ground?  I've been trying various chili recipes looking for "the one", and read somewhere that coarse-ground (chili grind) tri-tips are excellent in chili.  I don't have a meat grinder, so the butcher would have to do it for me, but it sounds delicious!

Tri-tip is bottom sirloin so it should make great chili! Though I'd do it on the grill first then cube or grind.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 27, 2011, 11:25:59 AM
I like using tri-tip for making chili. The meat texture really lends itself well for that but I haven't tried Q'ing one yet. That sounds great and looks even better deepsouth.

Do you cube the tri-tip for chili, or have it ground?  I've been trying various chili recipes looking for "the one", and read somewhere that coarse-ground (chili grind) tri-tips are excellent in chili.  I don't have a meat grinder, so the butcher would have to do it for me, but it sounds delicious!

I recommend grinding but that's just my preference. I prefer a more consistent texture for my chili and a "chili grind" allows for that. Just ask the butcher to give you a "chili grind".

I also like Euge's recommendation of grilling then grinding if you have the ability that sounds like a great idea.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 27, 2011, 11:32:23 AM
One could roughly chop the chilled cooked meat then pulse it in a food-processor to break it up.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 28, 2011, 01:50:26 AM
we ate it sliced as seen with potatoes with onions and peppers and rosemary garlic bread from a local very nice bakery we have in town.  a vietnamese-american girl trained in france.  a treat for us down here.

i pulled this out three+ hours before it hit the grill.  

They sell Bánh mì there? If so, and you haven't tried it, get some. Now that's a sandwich.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 28, 2011, 06:17:52 AM
we decided it was time for some homemade pasta again and i had one package of shrimp left in the freezer along with a pound of crabmeat, so i figured alfredo would be on the menu yesterday. the missus worked all weekend, so it was quite a job to get the necessary hour here and hour there to make this, but the baby co-operated and i got it done.

pasta is....

7.5 oz all purpose flour
3.5 oz semolina flour
3 eggs
1.5 tbs olive oil
pinch of salt (large)

alfredo is....

2 cloves chopped garlic
2 green onions
quart bag of shrimp
1 lb crabmeat
1 pint heavy whipping cream
2 cups grated parmesan regiano
1/4 cup butter
2 tbs olive oil
pepper to taste
fresh parsley to garnish



(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ef15b7c5.jpg)

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Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 28, 2011, 06:30:19 AM
One of my favorite Italian Pasta dishes is Seafood Alfredo. I like to use Locatelli cheese in the sauce as it gives a nice spicyness to the sauce. Very nice deepsouth. Homemade pasta really makes that dish come together nicely.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on March 28, 2011, 06:57:31 AM
Italians seem to have a thing against cheese and fish/seafood, but I've never really had that problem, especially with shrimp.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 28, 2011, 07:19:14 AM
Italians seem to have a thing against cheese and fish/seafood, but I've never really had that problem, especially with shrimp.

i'm italian and the wife and i were talking about that last night.  i've had some really nice fish dishes with chesse as a component.  also some great shrimp and crabmeat au gratin. 

but, over in the motherland, i don't recall ever seeing a fish dish with cheese in it.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: jeffy on March 28, 2011, 07:44:10 AM
Italians seem to have a thing against cheese and fish/seafood, but I've never really had that problem, especially with shrimp.

I was watching a "Chopped" episode last week and one of the judges acted like cheese and seafood was against the law or something.  I'm not sure I understand why.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on March 28, 2011, 07:56:34 AM
Cheese makes just about anything better - including fish.  Of course the right cheese w/ the right fish is important. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on March 28, 2011, 08:12:46 AM
On Chopped, it was probably Scott Conant.  He owns Scarpetta, a high end Italian place in NYC and franchised a bit, I think.  IIRC, he criticized it without even tasting it.  I hate snobby rules.  People would never have paired pinot noir with salmon if the "white wine with fish" people were treated as gospel.

I think the reasoning is that the cheese is usually Parmigiano Reggiano, which is quite strong, and that it overpowers the delicate nature of fish.

OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut, but I'm going to put it on linguine with white clam sauce, or other things with shrimp or crab.  Mornay sauce is meant for seafood.  And if the food has a lot of garlic in it, the "delicate nature of the fish" argument goes out the door.  Balance is everything, and you do need to taste what's in it.  But if you like it, ignore what the snobs tell you.  Keep an open mind and don't be afraid to experiment.

This is a bit OT for BBQ, but it's one of those foodie things that comes up.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 28, 2011, 08:38:03 AM
it was scott conant, iirc.   i like the guy, but i hate hard and fast rules.   
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 28, 2011, 09:26:03 AM
Balance is everything, and you do need to taste what's in it.  But if you like it, ignore what the snobs tell you.  Keep an open mind and don't be afraid to experiment.

+1

Balance is very important when it comes to food in general. Too much salt, sugar or any spice will kill a great recipe. Typically speaking, this rule applies to bbq and beer as well...and there are some exceptions but again it's a general rule of thumb to keep in mind when cooking and/or grilling.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on March 28, 2011, 06:30:57 PM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut, but I'm going to put it on linguine with white clam sauce, or other things with shrimp or crab. 

Mmmmmmm, linguine with white clam sauce.  That's good eatin, right there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 28, 2011, 07:22:46 PM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut, but I'm going to put it on linguine with white clam sauce, or other things with shrimp or crab. 

Mmmmmmm, linguine with white clam sauce.  That's good eatin, right there.

Exactly what I made today for lunch. Except the clam-sauce was canned (Cento brand) from Italy. Regardless of being canned it was very tasty. And I only used the slightest bit of freshly micro-planed parmsean since the flavor was indeed delicate.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on March 28, 2011, 09:16:28 PM
I like using tri-tip for making chili. The meat texture really lends itself well for that but I haven't tried Q'ing one yet. That sounds great and looks even better deepsouth.
Do you cube the tri-tip for chili, or have it ground?  I've been trying various chili recipes looking for "the one", and read somewhere that coarse-ground (chili grind) tri-tips are excellent in chili.  I don't have a meat grinder, so the butcher would have to do it for me, but it sounds delicious!
I recommend grinding but that's just my preference. I prefer a more consistent texture for my chili and a "chili grind" allows for that. Just ask the butcher to give you a "chili grind".

I also like Euge's recommendation of grilling then grinding if you have the ability that sounds like a great idea.

Thanks...I prefer ground beef, too.  Grilling and then grinding it would add a nice smoky note to the chili - I'd like to give that a try, but it'll have to wait until my kitchen becomes better equipped...
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on March 29, 2011, 06:15:19 AM
I have a grinder (hand-crank) & this sounds awesome.  I may have to pick up some tri-tip & smoke it for some chili once the weather gets a bit better around here (Seattle - rainy all week... month...). 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on March 29, 2011, 07:34:13 AM
On Chopped, it was probably Scott Conant.  He owns Scarpetta, a high end Italian place in NYC and franchised a bit, I think.  IIRC, he criticized it without even tasting it.  I hate snobby rules.  People would never have paired pinot noir with salmon if the "white wine with fish" people were treated as gospel.

I think the reasoning is that the cheese is usually Parmigiano Reggiano, which is quite strong, and that it overpowers the delicate nature of fish.

OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut, but I'm going to put it on linguine with white clam sauce, or other things with shrimp or crab.  Mornay sauce is meant for seafood.  And if the food has a lot of garlic in it, the "delicate nature of the fish" argument goes out the door.  Balance is everything, and you do need to taste what's in it.  But if you like it, ignore what the snobs tell you.  Keep an open mind and don't be afraid to experiment.

This is a bit OT for BBQ, but it's one of those foodie things that comes up.

Parmesan will go well if grated on a fish with stronger flavor such as salmon.  We grill salmon with salt, black pepper and some  cheese grated on it.  Try it, you'll like it! ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on March 29, 2011, 07:41:37 AM
Parmesan will go well if grated on a fish with stronger flavor such as salmon.  We grill salmon with salt, black pepper and some  cheese grated on it.  Try it, you'll like it! ;D
I Love red thai curry on salmon.  They have a dish at The Pike in seattle that's salmon, stuffed w/ crab, on a bed of baby spinach and topped with a spicy red thai curry sauce.  It's awesome & I've done similar at home. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: denny on March 29, 2011, 08:21:51 AM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut

I've got a recipe for cashew crusted halibut that has Parmesan in it.  Just a bit, but it really ups the flavor.  OTOH, I'd never just put Parm directly onto the fish.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 29, 2011, 09:43:05 AM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut

I've got a recipe for cashew crusted halibut that has Parmesan in it.  Just a bit, but it really ups the flavor.  OTOH, I'd never just put Parm directly onto the fish.

Just the word "crusted" in combination with fish sounds great to me Denny.  :)

That recipe might go well on a cedar plank placed on the grill.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: denny on March 29, 2011, 10:04:10 AM
Just the word "crusted" in combination with fish sounds great to me Denny.  :)

That recipe might go well on a cedar plank placed on the grill.

I think the cedar might overpower it.  I'll save that for wild Chinook salmon!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on March 29, 2011, 10:06:42 AM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut

I've got a recipe for cashew crusted halibut that has Parmesan in it.  Just a bit, but it really ups the flavor.  OTOH, I'd never just put Parm directly onto the fish.

OK, that does sound good.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: denny on March 29, 2011, 10:07:12 AM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut

I've got a recipe for cashew crusted halibut that has Parmesan in it.  Just a bit, but it really ups the flavor.  OTOH, I'd never just put Parm directly onto the fish.

OK, that does sound good.

I'll post it when I get home today.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 29, 2011, 10:42:56 AM
I think the no-cheese-with-fish "rule" may also have to do with how that combination affects the palate. Fish can be pretty oily (it's full of healthy fatty acids) and it can leave your palate with a certain slickness. Adding cheese, which has a high fat content may lead to palate oversaturation as far as a rich mouthfeel. This is why fish is often accompanied by citrus, which cuts the oiliness. The palate thing may be more of an issue for European diners who seem to be more sensitive to pairings that affect mouthfeel. Over here in the good u s of a, we tend to take more of an if-it-tastes-good-together-do-it! approach.  :P
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on March 29, 2011, 11:34:53 AM
I have a grinder (hand-crank) & this sounds awesome.  I may have to pick up some tri-tip & smoke it for some chili once the weather gets a bit better around here (Seattle - rainy all week... month...). 

I'm in the 'burbs north of Seattle - gotta grill in the rain, or you cain't hardly ever grill!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: denny on March 29, 2011, 11:36:27 AM
OK, so I don't have a need to grate Parmesan on my halibut

I've got a recipe for cashew crusted halibut that has Parmesan in it.  Just a bit, but it really ups the flavor.  OTOH, I'd never just put Parm directly onto the fish.

OK, that does sound good.

I'll post it when I get home today.

Recipe is here...

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=6697.msg80550#msg80550
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 31, 2011, 01:11:09 AM
Chicken and beer bratwurst. St Louis spare-ribs done with home-made mustard. I bought a new spice grinder and reduced the rub to a fine powder. Light application coupled with the mustard is wonderful. The spices just soak in. Thank-you gentlemen for the mustard tip.

The ribs went for 5 hours at 225. Each time I think I've surpassed myself. Where next? :)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/TZQbbQlZqYI/AAAAAAAAAD0/wzJaVEAWGMI/s640/2011-03-31%2001.10.00.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: phillamb168 on March 31, 2011, 01:13:08 AM
Chicken and beer bratwurst. St Louis spare-ribs done with home-made mustard. I bought a new spice grinder and reduced the rub to a fine powder. Light application coupled with the mustard is wonderful. The spices just soak in. Thank-you gentlemen for the mustard tip.

The ribs went for 5 hours at 225. Each time I think I've surpassed myself. Where next? :)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/TZQbbQlZqYI/AAAAAAAAAD0/wzJaVEAWGMI/s640/2011-03-31%2001.10.00.jpg)

*Droooooooooooool*

You already have my shipping address Euge, just send 'em over when you can. Dry ice should keep everything fresh. Thanks!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 31, 2011, 04:36:38 AM
The ribs went for 5 hours at 225. Each time I think I've surpassed myself. Where next? :)

Very nice work Euge. The Q looks fabulous.  8)

Now it's time to experiment with diffent temps, times, rubs and sauces.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on March 31, 2011, 05:09:10 AM
banGin euge!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on March 31, 2011, 06:04:05 AM
I have a grinder (hand-crank) & this sounds awesome.  I may have to pick up some tri-tip & smoke it for some chili once the weather gets a bit better around here (Seattle - rainy all week... month...). 

I'm in the 'burbs north of Seattle - gotta grill in the rain, or you cain't hardly ever grill!
True, and I do often, but when Summer is on the way I long for those loooong sunlight days where I smoke all day.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on March 31, 2011, 06:05:31 AM
Chicken and beer bratwurst. St Louis spare-ribs done with home-made mustard. I bought a new spice grinder and reduced the rub to a fine powder. Light application coupled with the mustard is wonderful. The spices just soak in. Thank-you gentlemen for the mustard tip.

The ribs went for 5 hours at 225. Each time I think I've surpassed myself. Where next? :)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/TZQbbQlZqYI/AAAAAAAAAD0/wzJaVEAWGMI/s640/2011-03-31%2001.10.00.jpg)

Yum yum! My first smoking of the year will be pretty soon (a few weeks or so).  I'm gonna probably over-do it.  Ribs, chicken, a pork roast to smoke & slice for lunch meat, etc.  Can't wait!  :) 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on March 31, 2011, 10:08:44 AM
I have a 9 pound brisket that I'm going to split in half.  My daughter and I are going to have a marinade, rub/mop throw down when the weather gets a little nicer.  She's a major foodie and a pretty darn good cook for a young'un!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 31, 2011, 11:41:40 AM
I have a 9 pound brisket that I'm going to split in half.  My daughter and I are going to have a marinade, rub/mop throw down when the weather gets a little nicer.  She's a major foodie and a pretty darn good cook for a young'un!

Really nice Jim...post some pics for our viewing pleasure.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 31, 2011, 02:16:56 PM
Speaking of brisket, has anyone ever made Kansas City "burnt ends"?  I saw an episode of Man vs. Food the other day where he was at Oklahoma Joe's.  It featured burnt ends, which are apparently a specialty in KC (maybe nicneufeld can confirm this?).  They basically start by smoking a whole brisket for about 12-15 hours.  Then they separate the point and the flat and one of them (I can't remember which) gets re-rubbed and put back in the smoker for about another 8 hours.  The finished product gets chopped into 1.5" cubes known as burnt ends.  They looked amazing!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on March 31, 2011, 02:20:27 PM
The burnt ends I've seen (never done) are cut off the thin edge of the point after the brisket is done. Then chopped up, sauced in a pan & back on the smoker. I've eaten burnt end sammies and they are great!! Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on March 31, 2011, 04:34:55 PM
I don't think you start out making burnt ends.  They are a by-product.  And delicious.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on March 31, 2011, 04:52:43 PM
I don't think you start out making burnt ends.  They are a by-product.  And delicious.

I've seen the aforementioned on TV, but down here it's the inedible dried, charred bits that you wouldn't serve. Instead it gets magically turned into delicious chopped beef.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on March 31, 2011, 05:46:12 PM
Serious eats posted this example of bunt ends of brisket.

(http://newyork.seriouseats.com/images/20090702-RUBburntends.jpg)

Man vs. Food - Kansas City BBQ - Destroyer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuvsyoKl3Wo

Enjoy!  ;D 8) ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on March 31, 2011, 05:49:14 PM
Needs sauce.  But yeah.  Some honest food there.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: johnf on April 01, 2011, 08:28:43 AM
I guess a true burnt end is just what is left on the board after you slice a brisket. Back in the day (like before my time) you could request these on your plate at a restaurant. Calvin Trillin wrote an article I think in the 70s about how good burnt ends were and, voila, everyone started asking for them. Problem is, you get a portion of burnt ends off of an entire brisket that serves 20 people. So restaurants in KC do set out to make burnt ends and they are on the menu everywhere. A modern KC burnt end can be any part of the brisket but is often the point (this makes good sense as the point makes really fatty slices anyway). Most of them have the KC style (sweet tomato based and thick) sauce on them in great quantity. I know Smokin' Gun's serves them without sauce, can't think of another where they come that way. When I make brisket, I typically do burnt ends from the point for the reason above, I don't like point slices. They also seem to reheat better than slices.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on April 01, 2011, 09:03:55 AM
Meh, just give me good honest brisket that is properly done, and it should have enough crust on the edges anyway.  Burnt ends are fine but I tend to go for normal brisket, or sausage.  And KC style sauce is not as sweet as popular wisdom says, impressions being often drawn from commercial sauces that claim to be "KC style".  That molasses-thick stuff you get at your grocery store isn't the real/good stuff!  Gates Original and Extra Hot for example are thinner and have some great zip to them...

Oh, and Oklahoma Joe's?  Way, way, way overrated.  Their food to me is average/mediocre (overly sweet and funky tasting sauce, average meat, way too much salt on fries) but what sealed my dislike for them is how they are perceived to be the best KC BBQ by outsiders (Anthony Bourdain et al), when they are more a competition BBQ team turned storefront that happens to be in Kansas City than indicative of traditional Kansas City BBQ.  Arthur Bryants and Gates are the progenitors, and I'm also fond of Fiorellas Jack Stack and LC's (his brisket is perfection!).  And a few other little tiny shops...some of them are one room shacks with cookers outside, but they do good food.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 01, 2011, 09:19:35 AM
I guess a true burnt end is just what is left on the board after you slice a brisket.

Well it is in my house anyway.  8)

There's nothing that goes to waste from a good smoked brisket.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 01, 2011, 09:22:37 AM
Arthur Bryants and Gates are the progenitors, and I'm also fond of Fiorellas Jack Stack and LC's (his brisket is perfection!).  And a few other little tiny shops...some of them are one room shacks with cookers outside, but they do good food.

Have you been to AB's or Gates?

I've been told they are the best around.  :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on April 01, 2011, 09:53:52 AM
Serious eats posted this example of bunt ends of brisket.

(http://newyork.seriouseats.com/images/20090702-RUBburntends.jpg)

Man vs. Food - Kansas City BBQ - Destroyer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuvsyoKl3Wo

Enjoy!  ;D 8) ;)

What's that white stuff on the left side of the plate?  Bread, you say?   Doesn't look like anything I'd eat.  Where I live bread has a crispy crust and gives you a bit of a fight when you bite into it. ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 01, 2011, 09:57:01 AM
What's that white stuff on the left side of the plate?  Bread, you say?   Doesn't look like anything I'd eat.  Where I live bread has a crispy crust and gives you a bit of a fight when you bite into it. ;)

Yea...reminds me of the stuff my mother use to pack in my lunch when I was a youngster.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 01, 2011, 10:02:18 AM
I guess a true burnt end is just what is left on the board after you slice a brisket.

Well it is in my house anyway.  8)

There's nothing that goes to waste from a good smoked brisket.

Not s crumb or scrap gets wasted. My favorite part is the point, and if I'm not using it for sandwiches it becomes chili. When I smoke a brisket a lot of the fat gets rendered out.

That white thing is just there to wipe yer fingers on and feed to the dog... 8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on April 01, 2011, 10:49:46 AM
Have you been to AB's or Gates?

I've been told they are the best around.  :-\

Yeah, I'm not as sold on Arthur Bryants myself.  Sauce just doesn't win me over.  I've heard it went downhill a bit but I've only been in KC since the late 80s.  Gates however I quite like!

I get a decent amount of BBQ just from being at work, whenever we receive out of town/country guests the company always tends to get BBQ for them since its a KC thing.

Oh, and white bread?  THAT is authentic...the cheaper the better!  Makes a nice bed for a pile of smoked italian sausage with pickles and sauce.  I like serious, real bread as much as the next guy but cheap processed white bread is just right for BBQ.  It's there to sop up meat juices and sauce and basically fuse to your plate.   ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: nicneufeld on April 01, 2011, 10:52:02 AM
There's nothing that goes to waste from a good smoked brisket.

Except for that, what, 20% of weight loss that occurs during smoking?

I wonder if you used a drip pan and saved the melted out fat, strained it and purified it slightly.  Would it make a good cooking fat?  Like rendered bacon lard, except...well....awesomer?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 01, 2011, 11:01:26 AM
There's nothing that goes to waste from a good smoked brisket.

Except for that, what, 20% of weight loss that occurs during smoking?

I wonder if you used a drip pan and saved the melted out fat, strained it and purified it slightly.  Would it make a good cooking fat?  Like rendered bacon lard, except...well....awesomer?

I use a drip pan. What's left is pretty nasty.

The amount of fat collected off a single rack of ribs is alarming. A brisket even more so. For a BBQ grill session some fat on the coals is a good thing. In a 12 hour smoke this becomes a problem, causing weird smells and uneven coal-burning in the BGE.


Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 01, 2011, 11:28:35 AM
what's cookin' on the grill this weekend?  here is what i've got planned....

friday..... fried mississippi pond raised catfish and french fries  (not grilled, but what the hey!)

saturday..... fresh salmon and crab stuffed potatoes

sunday..... st. louis spares, smoked bologna, and i'm grinding up lamb and the cutoffs of the spare ribs and making ground lamb/pork

it's going to be a smokin' weekend.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tygo on April 01, 2011, 11:36:10 AM
friday..... fried mississippi pond raised catfish and french fries  (not grilled, but what the hey!)

How do you do your catfish?  I tried it once recently and I ended up with something that tasted like fried, overly greasy breading.  I think I put the fish in the pan too early but is there anything you do to bump up the flavor?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 01, 2011, 11:42:27 AM
what's cookin' on the grill this weekend?  here is what i've got planned....

friday..... fried mississippi pond raised catfish and french fries  (not grilled, but what the hey!)

saturday..... fresh salmon and crab stuffed potatoes

sunday..... st. louis spares, smoked bologna, and i'm grinding up lamb and the cutoffs of the spare ribs and making ground lamb/pork

it's going to be a smokin' weekend.

Sounds good to me.

I was pondering this very question. I dunno...maybe a spatchcocked chicken with a pesto sauce.  :-\

The forecast calls for rain tomorrow but Sunday's looking like a good Qday.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 01, 2011, 11:43:13 AM
friday..... fried mississippi pond raised catfish and french fries  (not grilled, but what the hey!)

How do you do your catfish?  I tried it once recently and I ended up with something that tasted like fried, overly greasy breading.  I think I put the fish in the pan too early but is there anything you do to bump up the flavor?


it sounds like your grease may have not been hot enough?  i make sure my grease stays at 350 degrees.  i use "fish fry seasoned" brand fish fry and spice it up a bit with some additional tony chachere's seasoning.  sometimes i use an egg wash, but often, i just go without.  

another thing i do sometimes is soak the fish in louisiana hot sauce for 20-30 minutes before frying.  that will give it a little kick for sure, but not too much.

the pond raised stuff from the delta, i don't do that with.

hope that helps.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 03, 2011, 04:20:36 PM
lamburgers, salmon, bologna, spare ribs....

(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/54869697.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/d9996ba8.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/bca951c1.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/0b2969e8.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/73927fb5.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/6abb7506.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e1756a22.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/69249810.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e4709f76.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/fea0e60a.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/ae19088c.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/e01d2e15.jpg)
(http://i756.photobucket.com/albums/xx201/deepsouth1970/91fd73fb.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 03, 2011, 05:55:22 PM
Those ribs look farkin awesome. Well done Sir. I can smell them from here.

Was this over four nights or an orgy of BBQ this weekend? And the whole bologna... Interesting.

I just tossed a smallish brisket into the egg. Only $1.73 per for choice packer.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: johnf on April 03, 2011, 06:04:40 PM
Those ribs look farkin awesome. Well done Sir. I can smell them from here.

Was this over four nights or an orgy of BBQ this weekend? And the whole bologna... Interesting.

I just tossed a smallish brisket into the egg. Only $1.73 per for choice packer.

Good price on the brisket!

I haven't paid below $3 in a while but I live down the street from a grocery store that sells them perfectly trimmed, about a quarter inch of fat, and I like the convenience.

They also carry Wicked Good Charcoal and nice wood chunks in a bunch of varieties (varies but typically have grape, plum, apple, cherry, pecan, oak, hickory, mesquite, persimmon).

http://www.mcgonigles.com/
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 03, 2011, 06:37:44 PM
That's some awesome bbq deepsouth. You are truly dedicated to your Q. The ribs look lip smackin' farkin' delicious.  8)

I know what you did this weekend. If I ever get down your way, I need to look you up.

Well done as usual.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 04, 2011, 09:20:12 AM
Hey Deepsouth,  I'd be happy with just a few scraps from that Q! That's some fine lookin' grub!  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on April 04, 2011, 11:14:58 AM
Nice looking lamb burgers!  We make lamb burgers pretty regularly in the summer.  We spice ours with garlic, mint, serrano pepper, salt and pepper.  We top them with roasted poblano peppers and use a homemade mint yogurt sauce as a condiment.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: jeffy on April 04, 2011, 12:35:20 PM
Nice looking lamb burgers!  We make lamb burgers pretty regularly in the summer.  We spice ours with garlic, mint, serrano pepper, salt and pepper.  We top them with roasted poblano peppers and use a homemade mint yogurt sauce as a condiment.
That sounds delicious!  I'll have to rememeber to try that.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 04, 2011, 01:43:16 PM
Nice looking lamb burgers!  We make lamb burgers pretty regularly in the summer.  We spice ours with garlic, mint, serrano pepper, salt and pepper.  We top them with roasted poblano peppers and use a homemade mint yogurt sauce as a condiment.


that sounds great.  this was my first time to grind lamb myself.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 11, 2011, 06:05:38 AM
Here's what we had for supper Saturday night. I brined the ~8 lb. turkey for 18 hours and then smoked it with Apple & Hickory @ 325-350F until 165F in the thigh. It was really moist & tasted great.  Cheers!!!

(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%209%202011/DCAO0026.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 11, 2011, 06:21:18 AM
Here's what we had for supper Saturday night. I brined the ~8 lb. turkey for 18 hours and then smoked it with Apple & Hickory @ 325-350F until 165F in the thigh. It was really moist & tasted great.  Cheers!!!

(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%209%202011/DCAO0026.jpg)
Just curious what you use in your brine? 

I've taken to brining my chickens/turkeys in white wine - just the chep stuff, but it make them come out SO dang tender!

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 11, 2011, 06:26:42 AM

Just curious what you use in your brine? 

I've taken to brining my chickens in white wine - just the cheap stuff, but it make them come out SO dang tender!
Pretty basic actually, but it makes for a very moist & tasty bird...

Ingredients
1 gallon Ice water
1/2 gallon tap water
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup Kosher salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 teaspoon all spice
1/2 teaspoon celery seed

Directions
Put ice water in a plastic food grade bucket.

Bring the 1/2 gallon of water to a boil & remove from heat.

Add the spices & stir until dissolved. Then chill. (used a cold water bath)

Add to the ice water.

Put the turkey in the brine and make sure it's completely covered. I used a heavy dinner plate to hold it down.

Put the bucket in the fridge.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 11, 2011, 06:31:56 AM
Here's what we had for supper Saturday night. I brined the ~8 lb. turkey for 18 hours and then smoked it with Apple & Hickory @ 325-350F until 165F in the thigh. It was really moist & tasted great.  Cheers!!!

Very nice!

Smoked Turkey is one of my favorites.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 11, 2011, 06:42:08 AM

Just curious what you use in your brine? 

I've taken to brining my chickens in white wine - just the cheap stuff, but it make them come out SO dang tender!
Pretty basic actually, but it makes for a very moist & tasty bird...

Ingredients
1 gallon Ice water
1/2 gallon tap water
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup Kosher salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 teaspoon all spice
1/2 teaspoon celery seed

Directions
Put ice water in a plastic food grade bucket.

Bring the 1/2 gallon of water to a boil & remove from heat.

Add the spices & stir until dissolved. Then chill. (used a cold water bath)

Add to the ice water.

Put the turkey in the brine and make sure it's completely covered. I used a heavy dinner plate to hold it down.

Put the bucket in the fridge.


That's pretty similar to mine.  I just subsitute the wine for 1/2 or more of the water. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on April 11, 2011, 09:29:04 AM
Pics of brisket rub throwdown with my daughter:

Split brisket in half
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Photo0160.jpg)
With rub, hers on top, mine on bottom
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Photo0163.jpg)
Cooked
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Photo0167.jpg)
Hers
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Photo0168.jpg)
Mine
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Photo0169.jpg)
On a crispy roll
(http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/kk32/redbeerman/Photo0170.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on April 11, 2011, 09:30:42 AM
So who won?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 11, 2011, 09:31:53 AM
So who won?

Yea Jim...who's the big winner.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on April 11, 2011, 09:39:38 AM
Judges deemed it a tie ;).  As for the competitors,  I liked hers best, she liked mine.  Hers was more spicy with a cayenne/brown sugar base, mine was sweeter with brown sugar and powdered chipotle.  Can't say what all she put in hers.  Mine was a combo of powdered homegrown mesquite smoked chipotle, brown sugar, salt, green peppercorn, onion powder, garlic powder, and a combo spice powder I found in the spice rack of unknown composition and origin, but it tasted good so I used a little. ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on April 11, 2011, 09:41:26 AM
So is there a blend where you can take the parts you like of each and make a better rub?  Both sound great.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on April 11, 2011, 09:49:18 AM
I would stick with her basic recipe and maybe sweeten it up just a hair.  I like the fire of the cayenne,  The smokiness of the chipotle gets lost IMO.  They were both smoked with hickory and cooked for seven hours ~ 225F.  You could pick it apart with a fork, but it still held up well for slicing.  Nice and tender.  She said mine had better bark.  That could have been positioning on the grate though.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 11, 2011, 09:56:35 AM
I would stick with her basic recipe and maybe sweeten it up just a hair.  I like the fire of the cayenne,  The smokiness of the chipotle gets lost IMO.  They were both smoked with hickory and cooked for seven hours ~ 225F.  You could pick it apart with a fork, but it still held up well for slicing.  Nice and tender.  She said mine had better bark.  That could have been positioning on the grate though.

Brisket is one of the toughest (no pun intended) meats to BBQ. I was at a cookoff last year where this guy I know that has been competing and has won medals in some local comps smoked a brisket for us. It was good by all means but was just a tad bit on the tough side. He told me that brisket is his nemesis. I think the key to great brisket is low and slow with a good bark but a nice bite (spice). I like to use a dry rub that has some heat and a well balanced bbq sauce (sweet/spicy) for serving.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 13, 2011, 08:25:47 AM
briskets both look good.  that's a difficult cut for sure.  sometimes brisket can turn out bad even if one does everything properly. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 13, 2011, 08:28:11 AM
Just out of curiosity (something I'm considering trying) has anyone used red wine to brine/marinade a cut of beef before smoking? 

I use white wine for my chickens, I'm just wondering how red would do w/ beef(?)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 13, 2011, 09:25:34 AM
Just out of curiosity (something I'm considering trying) has anyone used red wine to brine/marinade a cut of beef before smoking?  

I use white wine for my chickens, I'm just wondering how red would do w/ beef(?)

Absolutely.

I've used red wine as a flavor component in marinades before. I would blend it with some salt, spices and sugar along with a small amount of olive oil and soak overnight. There are varying ways to use red wine as a marinade. Do a quick internet search and you'll find assorted recipes using red wine marinades for beef. I like using it for kebobs best.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 13, 2011, 09:32:43 AM
Just out of curiosity (something I'm considering trying) has anyone used red wine to brine/marinade a cut of beef before smoking?  

I use white wine for my chickens, I'm just wondering how red would do w/ beef(?)

Absolutely.

I've used red wine as a flavor component in marinades before. I would blend it with some salt, spices and sugar along with a small amount of olive oil and soak overnight. There are varying ways to use red wine as a marinade. Do a quick internet search and you'll find assorted recipes using red wine marinades for beef. I like using it for kebobs best.

You pretty much described my plan.  Mixing the wine w/ the salt, sugar, etc. etc. for an overnight brining (my standard).  Cool.  Smoking this weekend it is! 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: redbeerman on April 13, 2011, 09:35:30 AM
A cheap, but drinkable burgundy type wine (pinot noir) works great with brisket.  Just through in some crushed garlic, onion, salt and pepper, and additional spices of your choosing and let sit overnight in the fridge.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 13, 2011, 10:01:27 AM
Will have to try the wine brine. Wasn't sure if it was appropriate to do this with a brisket. I have an injector. Hmmm. Possibilities.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Bret on April 13, 2011, 10:04:07 AM
I love to marinate lamb chops in red wine, garlic, and rosemary before grilling.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 13, 2011, 10:07:52 AM
Will have to try the wine brine. Wasn't sure if it was appropriate to do this with a brisket. I have an injector. Hmmm. Possibilities.

That's likely what I'll be trying it on - a brisket.  Overnight (or more) brining and then into the smoker sloooooow & low.   8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on April 13, 2011, 10:12:00 AM
I love to marinate lamb chops in red wine, garlic, and rosemary before grilling.

+1.  Remember salt and pepper, too.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Bret on April 13, 2011, 10:14:34 AM
I love to marinate lamb chops in red wine, garlic, and rosemary before grilling.

+1.  Remember salt and pepper, too.
[/quote
Goes without saying, no?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: gordonstrong on April 13, 2011, 10:22:37 AM
For me it does, but some people can be quite literal.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Bret on April 13, 2011, 10:46:41 AM
For me it does, but some people can be quite literal.
Homebrewers? Literal? Ya think?  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 13, 2011, 11:26:49 AM
For me it does, but some people can be quite literal.
Homebrewers? Literal? Ya think?  ;D

I'll take that with a grain of salt. ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 13, 2011, 11:32:41 AM
For me it does, but some people can be quite literal.
Homebrewers? Literal? Ya think?  ;D

I'll take that with a grain of salt. ;)


Plain, iodized or kosher?  ;) 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 13, 2011, 11:35:37 AM
For me it does, but some people can be quite literal.
Homebrewers? Literal? Ya think?  ;D

I'll take that with a grain of salt. ;)



Plain, iodized or kosher?  ;)  
Kosher!  It's Soooo flavorful...  Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 13, 2011, 12:18:42 PM
Speaking of salt...anybody use sea salt?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 13, 2011, 12:35:06 PM
Speaking of salt...anybody use sea salt?

I've been using it more in my cooking lately.  You need less for the same salty taste, so lower sodium intake. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 13, 2011, 12:36:21 PM
Speaking of salt...anybody use sea salt?

Yes. Called "Solar Salt" for my water softener. I use it for all of my salt needs- though the flavor benefits are best after cooking.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Bret on April 13, 2011, 12:59:22 PM
For me it does, but some people can be quite literal.
Homebrewers? Literal? Ya think?  ;D

I'll take that with a grain of salt. ;)

but what about the pepper?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on April 13, 2011, 05:04:27 PM
Speaking of salt...anybody use sea salt?

 I though ALL salt was sea salt. That stuff the dig out of the ground in Utah was once a sea bed, wasn't it?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 13, 2011, 05:48:29 PM
Speaking of salt...anybody use sea salt?

 I though ALL salt was sea salt. That stuff the dig out of the ground in Utah was once a sea bed, wasn't it?

I knew someone would ask this question.

Sea salt is produced through evaporation of seawater, usually with little processing, which leaves behind some trace minerals and elements depending on its water source. These insignificant amounts of minerals add flavor and color to sea salt, which also comes in a variety of coarseness levels.
 
Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits. Table salt is more heavily processed to eliminate trace minerals and usually contains an additive to prevent clumping. Most table salt also has added iodine, an essential nutrient that appears naturally in minute amounts in sea salt.
 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on April 14, 2011, 05:51:20 PM
Speaking of salt...anybody use sea salt?

 I though ALL salt was sea salt. That stuff the dig out of the ground in Utah was once a sea bed, wasn't it?

I knew someone would ask this question.

Sea salt is produced through evaporation of seawater, usually with little processing, which leaves behind some trace minerals and elements depending on its water source. These insignificant amounts of minerals add flavor and color to sea salt, which also comes in a variety of coarseness levels.
 
Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits. Table salt is more heavily processed to eliminate trace minerals and usually contains an additive to prevent clumping. Most table salt also has added iodine, an essential nutrient that appears naturally in minute amounts in sea salt.
 

 It had to be the Tubercle :P
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on April 14, 2011, 06:56:44 PM
Sea salt is the only way to go. In fact its all you really need.  Find a Korean Grocery store. They have the good stuff for cheap.

Got the new shop BBQ goin. Today we broke its cherry with some meat.

It used to be our wood burning stove used for heat. Just rigged it up into a double drum smoker. Works great!!!!

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00542.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00528.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00534.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00537.jpg)

Work lunches just got a whole lot better!  ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on April 14, 2011, 07:00:17 PM
Got the new shop BBQ goin. Today we broke its cherry with some meat.
Wow!  That's awesome.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on April 14, 2011, 07:03:40 PM
Thanks Tom, and a belated congratulations on your victory. You gonna turn this organization upside down and shake it to its core or what? Shake things up and get rid of the dead wood and all of that?   ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 14, 2011, 07:25:39 PM
Broke it's cherry with some meat... ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on April 14, 2011, 07:43:07 PM
Thanks Tom, and a belated congratulations on your victory. You gonna turn this organization upside down and shake it to its core or what? Shake things up and get rid of the dead wood and all of that?   ;D
If it ain't broke . . . ;)

If I find any dead wood I'll be sure to get rid of it though. ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 15, 2011, 07:22:08 AM
Sea salt is the only way to go. In fact its all you really need.  Find a Korean Grocery store. They have the good stuff for cheap.

Got the new shop BBQ goin. Today we broke its cherry with some meat.

It used to be our wood burning stove used for heat. Just rigged it up into a double drum smoker. Works great!!!!

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC00542.jpg)


Work lunches just got a whole lot better!  ;D

Shazaaam!

I thought it looked familiar. I remember it was used as a wood stove when I was there a few months ago. That's a creative design.

Nice work Cap!  I'll have to stop in for lunch someday.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on April 15, 2011, 07:36:45 AM
Cap, I can't tell from the pictures but what connects the 2 drums?  How do you control the heat and smoke?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: ccarlson on April 15, 2011, 08:42:42 AM
Cap, I can't tell from the pictures but what connects the 2 drums?  How do you control the heat and smoke?

If you look very closely at the far end, between the 2 barrels, there's a flue pipe that connects the 2. They sell kits to to make barrel heaters like this. I have one in my shop and it can be zero degrees outside and my poorly insulated shop will stay comfortable to work in with only a sweatshirt on. 

Never heard of one used for barbecue, but why not?   If you control the intake air, which I can with my system, you can control the heat, somewhat. Great idea!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 15, 2011, 10:58:59 AM
Cap, I can't tell from the pictures but what connects the 2 drums?  How do you control the heat and smoke?

If you look very closely at the far end, between the 2 barrels, there's a flue pipe that connects the 2. They sell kits to to make barrel heaters like this. I have one in my shop and it can be zero degrees outside and my poorly insulated shop will stay comfortable to work in with only a sweatshirt on. 

Never heard of one used for barbecue, but why not?   If you control the intake air, which I can with my system, you can control the heat, somewhat. Great idea!

This ^^^^ is what I'm thinking as well.

Hey Cap...how do you regulate the temp?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on April 15, 2011, 11:19:11 AM
At one of the drilling rigs I used to work one the drilling engineer had one similar, but it was made of steel casing and weighed about 600 pounds.  He had 3 4" pipes connecting the top smoker and the bottom firebox.  It used steel discs like a regular chimney flue to open or shut the 3 connectors to regulate heat and smoke.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on April 15, 2011, 03:39:06 PM
There is the single pipe that is about six inches in dia. It has a dampener in it. This wa the first trial run and it works fantastic for ribs and chicken. I was hitting like 225-250 with a dense hot coal bed and a good campfire size fire. I thought it would be way hot but no.

I was able to control the heat by either removing some hot coals and logs or adding some. I always build a fire by the BBQ foir this purpose.

I only was able to check the surface temp of the metal. Not sure how accurate of an indication of the internal temp this would be. It was 225 on top of the top drum, and 250 on the bottom of the top drum.

I actually want to be able to get it around three hundred for beef ribs and brisket. Im hoping that if I lay in some fire brick into the fire box portion hoping that this will hold and radiate more heat.

I If that doesn't get me hotter Im gonna weld some plates between and from drum to drum conduct more heat from the fire.

Or maybe make some sort of conductors that are removable when I want lower temps.

This is an awesome smoker and Im pretty sure the entire conversion can be done using the kit and mechanical fasteners as opposed to welding.

We just built a fire about 7AM threw on a bunch of ribs and chicken using only salt and pepper then fed it a log or two ever half hour or hour and by 11 AM the chicken was done. At about 1 the pork ribs were done. No wrap, no real attention and the ribs came out friken perfect. Juice, tender with a still a bit of pull and tooth feel.

Im not sure how much the kit is for these stoves but I highly recommend considering this route for a BBQ. Its cheap, and works great.

Beef ribs are next. Gonna do some temp tests first though. Ill report back on my findings.

YEah Ron, you gotta come up and check it out, you WILL want one!

There is gotta be something left on the brewstand. Is it all hooked up yet?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 15, 2011, 06:07:43 PM
Well thought out. You could even vent it with some forced air to ramp up the heat if you wanted. Fabulous work Cap.

Salt and fire.  8)

I will have the brewstand complete in the next few weeks with pics posted.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on April 15, 2011, 06:36:13 PM
doesn't seem it at first thought but real easy to hit low temps in this thing. In the winter im gonna get some cold smoking goin. gonna make some lox for sure.

Instead of a fire in the bottom drum, ill put an electric hot plate and a pie pan of saw dust and chips.

WTF happened to the Ethnic cooking thread? Guess the BBQ thread is taking the lead.  ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 15, 2011, 06:40:06 PM
You got to keep feedin it cap. ;)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 15, 2011, 07:17:14 PM
WTF happened to the Ethnic cooking thread? Guess the BBQ thread is taking the lead.  ;)

When there's BBQ talk...people are listening. I know I am.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on April 15, 2011, 07:45:44 PM
I actually want to be able to get it around three hundred for beef ribs and brisket. Im hoping that if I lay in some fire brick into the fire box portion hoping that this will hold and radiate more heat.

I If that doesn't get me hotter Im gonna weld some plates between and from drum to drum conduct more heat from the fire.

Or maybe make some sort of conductors that are removable when I want lower temps.


If you can put another of the 6" pipes at the other end you should be able to up the temps.  With a good damper in there you can still go low by putting the meat at one end and opening the damper at the other. 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: capozzoli on April 15, 2011, 08:06:05 PM
I was thinking that, but with the single pipe and damper, even witht the damper closed it is very hot at that area and will expose the food to direct heat. If you look on the pics of the inside of my set up the food and even racks are moved away from this area. . Its so hot there that anything you put above it will burn. My worry with that is that it will remove much of the usable cooking area.

This just may mean that it needs better dampers. However, if the damper is open, you cant put any food above it.

Though this is how they are typically done.

(http://www.thesmokering.com/pits/metalpit/bigbaby/bigbaby.gif)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 16, 2011, 10:05:48 AM
win!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 17, 2011, 08:52:50 AM
I BBQ'd yesterday and will be today as well.

Yesterday was 1 rack of spareribs & 1 rack of baby backs:

The un-sauced half of the spareribs (My wife prefers hers w/o sauce.  I like some with, some w/o.):
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/208578_1827203691999_1597506659_1785032_2856761_n.jpg)

Here's the sauced half of the spareribs (the smaller half - SO yummy!):
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/218005_1827203972006_1597506659_1785033_8068015_n.jpg)

And the spareribs - 1/2 sauced, 1/2 not (Sorry -bit of flash flare on this one):
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/206858_1827204212012_1597506659_1785034_1619169_n.jpg)

For today - a whole chicken (nothing to see pre-smoked), and this piece of brisket.  I love the purple.  It's been in red wine & spices overnight.  After this pic I dry-dubbed it & put it back in the fridge for an hour and a half before I start smoking:
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/216817_1827204572021_1597506659_1785036_5518483_n.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 17, 2011, 10:15:19 AM
The cut of brisket, dry-rubbed and ready for the smoker:
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/216009_1827340975431_1597506659_1785241_116779_n.jpg)

The chicken, ready for the smoker (I put it breast side down for the 1st hour):
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/205782_1827340855428_1597506659_1785240_233399_n.jpg)

The Chicken & Brisket in the smoker - away we go!
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/205200_1827363575996_1597506659_1785278_2060499_n.jpg)

More photos this evening when everything comes out of the smoker.  ;D 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 17, 2011, 10:30:48 AM
Excellent looking Que Mr Monger.

The purple brisket was a little unnerving at first but at least we know what to expect now. ;) I don't sauce my ribs anymore, though not adverse to it. Just never seems to need it.

Ah the whole chicken... You must investigate "spatchcocking" for your whole chickens. It works well with either grilling or smoking.

And do you have spices and fruit in the water pan?

Sigh. I did sausage, center-cut St Louis ribs and turkey legs on Friday with hickory. Sorry no pics. The turkey legs are tha bomb. We're having fiesta here, so the smoked turkey legs at the booths are running upwards of $10 each! :o I'm smoking them for less than a dollar apiece. ;D
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 17, 2011, 12:56:02 PM
Excellent looking Que Mr Monger.

+1

Very nice work.  8)

What kind of smoker do you have..can you post some pics when you get a chance?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 17, 2011, 07:45:45 PM
Excellent looking Que Mr Monger.

+1

Very nice work.  8)

What kind of smoker do you have..can you post some pics when you get a chance?

I have THIS (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Outdoors-Smoky-Mountain-21-Gas-Smoker/12429508) smoker.  The only unfortunate part is it's 16" width, meaning I have to cut rib racks cause I can't fit 'em on the rack whole.  I want to step up to one I saw with a 22 1/2" width.  And I haven't tried adding fruit or spices to the water pan.  I'll have to try that! 

Here's the finished brisket:
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/205043_1828131915204_1597506659_1786802_4078430_n.jpg)

You can still taste the red wine in it too.  Very tasty. 

The chicken came out great too, but I haven't uploaded that pic yet.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 18, 2011, 06:48:50 AM
Thanks. Nice Q Beer Monger!

I've always wanted a smoker box like you see at many establishments but settled for the WSM 18" which I really like. I can control temps very well and it's easy to maintain, not to mention it makes great bbq.

I want to do another round of ribs this weekend. I have tried the 3-2-1 method and the last batch was smoked for 2.5 hrs and then foiled during cooling which turned out well. I'm not sure how I will approach this next batch.  :-\
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 18, 2011, 07:22:06 AM
Thanks. Nice Q Beer Monger!

I've always wanted a smoker box like you see at many establishments but settled for the WSM 18" which I really like. I can control temps very well and it's easy to maintain, not to mention it makes great bbq.

I want to do another round of ribs this weekend. I have tried the 3-2-1 method and the last batch was smoked for 2.5 hrs and then foiled during cooling which turned out well. I'm not sure how I will approach this next batch.  :-\


It's funny, 'cuase I meant to do the 3-2-1 method w/ my ribs, but I got off track & foiled them w/ apple juice at the 2 hour mark.  So it woun'd up being 2-2-2 method.  It actually worked out quite well.  I was very happy with the ribs - and they were still fall-off-the-bone tender.  :) 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: deepsouth on April 18, 2011, 07:20:35 PM
great looking q, but how did that brisket get purple again?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 19, 2011, 07:48:29 AM
Sunday's BBQ. Chuckie & a couple pastramis. Neighbor brought over a couple pork roasts so we threw those on as well.

(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2017%202011/DSCN2264.jpg)

(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2017%202011/DSCN2263.jpg)

Pork Roasts are on the bottom grate.
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2017%202011/DSCN2265.jpg)

Pastramis
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2017%202011/DSCN2268.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: Beer Monger on April 19, 2011, 08:32:22 AM
great looking q, but how did that brisket get purple again?

It was marinaded overnight in red wine & spices.  I had enough wine that I didn't have to dilute it at all.  You could still taste the wine in the finished brisket.  Very yummy! 

Nice lookin' Q there, Hamilton!  :) 
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 19, 2011, 09:48:55 AM
Sunday's BBQ. Chuckie & a couple pastramis. Neighbor brought over a couple pork roasts so we threw those on as well.

Pastramis
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2017%202011/DSCN2268.jpg)

Looks tasty!

How did you prep the pastrami or did you buy them already cured.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 19, 2011, 09:57:43 AM
Sunday's BBQ. Chuckie & a couple pastramis. Neighbor brought over a couple pork roasts so we threw those on as well.

Looks tasty!

How did you prep the pastrami or did you buy them already cured.

I bought them curred around St. Patrick's Day. They were crazy cheap for $1.49/lb. All I do is soak them in cold water in the fridge for a couple days to get some of the salt out, and change the water a few times. Then dry, coat with olive oil and cracked coriander & pepper.  Smoke @ ~250F with hickory to 165F. Foil with water & finish to 200F.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 19, 2011, 10:57:05 AM
Chuck roast from the smoker is farkin awesome! Takes about as long as a brisket when I do one- about 9-10 hours but it's well worth it. Shred for sandwiches or tacos when still warm (just comes apart) or chill and slice the next day.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 19, 2011, 11:03:24 AM
Chuck roast from the smoker is farkin awesome! Takes about as long as a brisket when I do one- about 9-10 hours but it's well worth it. Shred for sandwiches or tacos when still warm (just comes apart) or chill and slice the next day.
Amen to that!!  This one didn't take quite as long due to its puny size but all the flavor was there, and oh so tender. Cheers!!!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 25, 2011, 12:12:29 PM
Some smokin Q from Friday. Spatchcocked Cornish game hens dressed with bacon and turkey thighs. Beef sausage and creole boudin. The turkey thighs stole the show.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_BGa2L64KQdY/TbXG-K-y21I/AAAAAAAAApE/WfZ29o1fDdU/s640/2011-04-22%2019.50.56.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on April 25, 2011, 12:20:13 PM
Nice euge.  I did two spatchcocked chickens this weekend, no pics.  One rubbed with a sweet bbq rub, the ther with just salt and pepper.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 25, 2011, 12:28:39 PM
Ham & a Butt last weekend. Everyone said BBQ for Easter. Who am I to disagree.  ;D  Also a DIY Chimney Starter, A.K.A. Gasser Side Burner that's now portable.  Cheers!!!

The Ham (top) & Butt (bottom)
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2277.jpg)

The Ham when it was pulled:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2287.jpg)

The Butt when it was pulled:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2290.jpg)

Pulled Pork:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2291.jpg)

Chimney Starter DIY Project:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/DSCN2345.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 25, 2011, 07:17:13 PM
Nice Q gentlemen!

I had the typical American BBQ weekend. Hot Dogs and Hamburgers last night and Marinated Bonless Chicken Breasts tonight. I was planning to smoke some ribs but the weather wasn't cooperating. Lots of rain this past weekend.

Next weekend I'll fire up the smoker...weather permitting.  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on April 25, 2011, 07:32:03 PM
Ham & a Butt last weekend. Everyone said BBQ for Easter. Who am I to disagree.  ;D  Also a DIY Chimney Starter, A.K.A. Gasser Side Burner that's now portable.  Cheers!!!

Pulled Pork:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2291.jpg)


The brown handle things - pork pullers? 
That is some tasty lookin' food.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: boulderbrewer on April 25, 2011, 07:49:42 PM
Courious on why you did bacon with the cornish hens. Did it add to the flavor of them?

Just for the record I would have been all over that grill like a rabid dog!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on April 25, 2011, 09:44:57 PM
Courious on why you did bacon with the cornish hens. Did it add to the flavor of them?

Just for the record I would have been all over that grill like a rabid dog!

Ah good to see ya posting brother... :)

Used the bacon to keep them moist since they get smoked for 2-3 hours. Adds a bit of flavor too. Works even better with a regular sized chicken. With those I rub butter (can be compound) under the skin and then bacon on top. Phenomenal.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: hamiltont on April 26, 2011, 06:42:41 AM
Ham & a Butt last weekend. Everyone said BBQ for Easter. Who am I to disagree.  ;D  Also a DIY Chimney Starter, A.K.A. Gasser Side Burner that's now portable.  Cheers!!!

Pulled Pork:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2291.jpg)


The brown handle things - pork pullers? 
That is some tasty lookin' food.
They're called Bear Paws, and they're amazing!  I bought them on ebay for ~$10.  Here's a link to an active listing:

http://cgi.ebay.com/BEAR-PAWS-MEAT-HANDLERS-KITCHEN-BBQ-SMOKER-GRILL-FORKS-/160569929325?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2562b6ae6d (http://cgi.ebay.com/BEAR-PAWS-MEAT-HANDLERS-KITCHEN-BBQ-SMOKER-GRILL-FORKS-/160569929325?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2562b6ae6d)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on April 26, 2011, 06:49:25 AM
Courious on why you did bacon with the cornish hens. Did it add to the flavor of them?

Just for the record I would have been all over that grill like a rabid dog!

 Ah good to see ya posting brother... 8)

Used the bacon to keep them moist since they get smoked for 2-3 hours. Adds a bit of flavor too. Works even better with a regular sized chicken. With those I rub butter (can be compound) under the skin and then bacon on top. Phenomenal.

+1

Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: fatdogale on April 27, 2011, 08:18:57 PM
Ham & a Butt last weekend. Everyone said BBQ for Easter. Who am I to disagree.  ;D  Also a DIY Chimney Starter, A.K.A. Gasser Side Burner that's now portable.  Cheers!!!

Pulled Pork:
(http://i1116.photobucket.com/albums/k566/tjhamilton/BBQ/April%2022%202011/DSCN2291.jpg)


The brown handle things - pork pullers? 
That is some tasty lookin' food.
They're called Bear Paws, and they're amazing!  I bought them on ebay for ~$10.  Here's a link to an active listing:

http://cgi.ebay.com/BEAR-PAWS-MEAT-HANDLERS-KITCHEN-BBQ-SMOKER-GRILL-FORKS-/160569929325?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2562b6ae6d (http://cgi.ebay.com/BEAR-PAWS-MEAT-HANDLERS-KITCHEN-BBQ-SMOKER-GRILL-FORKS-/160569929325?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2562b6ae6d)


Cool...thanks for the link!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on May 14, 2011, 08:36:45 PM
Who sez I don't eat my vegetables? :D Mustard greens with smoked turkey, sausage and chile from the neighbor. Simmered until tender- 2 hours.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/Tc9IcMS-hcI/AAAAAAAAAHs/8wqVTTMA3Ck/s640/2011-05-14%2022.22.06.jpg)

I've been on a BBQ kick and  getting back to the roots: Grill chicken in the 300-325F range for about 90 minutes. Mop with sauce while turning every 10 minutes, last 40 minutes or so.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/Tc9IPhwUBhI/AAAAAAAAAHo/sy1vkDQQ2r0/s640/2011-05-14%2022.21.00.jpg)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: weazletoe on May 14, 2011, 08:45:32 PM
Should have taken pic, but I NAILED the ribs tonight! Rubbed them in equal parts brown sugar and paprika. Kosher salt, fresh cracked pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, chilli powder, bit of cumin, and just a pinch of oregano. Smoked them at 225* for about 3 1/2 hours, over charcoal, with mesquite, and finished with some oak. They were so good, they didn't even need sauce, but I still could not resist carmelizing a little Baby Rays on them. The bottoms did get a bit blackened. Next time, I am going to use my bullet water smoker, to prevent that. Today, I just used the Weber charcoal grill. Thanks to you all on here who have spent the last year helping me this down. I finally can bbq a rib worthy of my homebrew.  8)
  (and bonus...the dude that blackened the pig last weekend now knows what a real rib should taste like)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on May 15, 2011, 06:57:04 AM
Courious on why you did bacon with the cornish hens. Did it add to the flavor of them?

Just for the record I would have been all over that grill like a rabid dog!

Ah good to see ya posting brother... :)

Used the bacon to keep them moist since they get smoked for 2-3 hours. Adds a bit of flavor too. Works even better with a regular sized chicken. With those I rub butter (can be compound) under the skin and then bacon on top. Phenomenal.
When I was in college back in the 70's I had a little side business smoking turkeys for professors' parties.  There was a little butcher shop that sold whole slab bacon for almost nothing.  My trick was to balance the slab of bacon on top of the turkey so that it would baste for the 16-20 hours the turkey smoked.  I made a little money and got invited to lots of good parties.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 15, 2011, 11:11:28 AM
One of the biggest weekends for BBQ is rapidly approaching. I'm planning to fire up the smoker on Memorial Day. I'm thinking a Turkey and some ribs are in order. I'll probably smoke the Turkey first with high heat and then throw the ribs on as the temp drops. I want to pick up some Poblanos and probably some corn.

Nice pics Euge!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tubercle on May 15, 2011, 06:28:34 PM
Who sez I don't eat my vegetables? :D Mustard greens with smoked turkey, sausage and chile from the neighbor. Simmered until tender- 2 hours.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/Tc9IcMS-hcI/AAAAAAAAAHs/8wqVTTMA3Ck/s640/2011-05-14%2022.22.06.jpg)


EUGE. you sure those ain't collards?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: weazletoe on May 15, 2011, 06:38:46 PM
I want to pick up some Poblanos and probably some corn.
[/quote

I just grabbed me a few pablanos today. Gonna roast them, and stuff the with chirizo and bacon.  8) (oh, and top them with cheese, of course)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 15, 2011, 06:51:19 PM
I want to pick up some Poblanos and probably some corn.

I just grabbed me a few pablanos today. Gonna roast them, and stuff the with chirizo and bacon.  8) (oh, and top them with cheese, of course)

I know you've probably seen or tried pepper poppers. How about a Poblano pepper popper with sharp cheddar and bacon and then smoked over Hickory.

bbqlicious!  8)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on May 15, 2011, 06:56:35 PM
Who sez I don't eat my vegetables? :D Mustard greens with smoked turkey, sausage and chile from the neighbor. Simmered until tender- 2 hours.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/Tc9IcMS-hcI/AAAAAAAAAHs/8wqVTTMA3Ck/s640/2011-05-14%2022.22.06.jpg)


EUGE. you sure those ain't collards?

It's mustard greens alright. Water, chicken stock, sugar, vinegar and a chile. Smoked turkey and sausage. I could have went with collards but prefer mustard greens
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: weazletoe on May 15, 2011, 09:12:41 PM
[
I know you've probably seen or tried pepper poppers. How about a Poblano pepper popper with sharp cheddar and bacon and then smoked over Hickory.

bbqlicious!  8)

  THat sounds really great! I make buffalo turds quite often. I think it was here I saw them. Jalapino halved, stuffed with cream cheese, a little smokie, then put back together, wrapped in bacon and grilled. They are a huge hit up in the mountains, camping.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: tschmidlin on May 18, 2011, 11:25:51 AM
I'm hoping to get some input on an idea I have.

I use my grill as a smoker, because that's what I have.  I also have a cold smoker I use to make cheese.  The smoke level on my hot smoked food is never as high as I want it to be, mostly because the grill just doesn't seal well.  I've tried using foil snakes to seal the edges and all that, but this time I'm thinking of trying something different.

Normally I'll let a pork roast stand at room temp for a while before putting it on, so what if instead of just leaving it covered on the counter I use the cold smoker to start giving it a nice smokiness?  Then after an hour or so, move it to the grill for the next 10 or 12 hours to finish.

Any concerns with this?  Any suggestions to give me a more intense smoke flavor with the equipment I have?
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: ryang on May 18, 2011, 11:40:18 AM
Tom,
That works pretty well.  I've done it a few times now because my smoker doesn't seal to well either.  Hammer two birds with one stone... put the meat and cheese on there, then hot smoke the meat and presto, smoked meat and cheese.

I've been on a sassafrass kick lately, so that's been my wood of choice lately.  Very smooth, subtle spice smoke.  Quite good with brisket and havarti.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 18, 2011, 11:52:59 AM
I'm hoping to get some input on an idea I have.

I use my grill as a smoker, because that's what I have.  I also have a cold smoker I use to make cheese.  The smoke level on my hot smoked food is never as high as I want it to be, mostly because the grill just doesn't seal well.  I've tried using foil snakes to seal the edges and all that, but this time I'm thinking of trying something different.

Normally I'll let a pork roast stand at room temp for a while before putting it on, so what if instead of just leaving it covered on the counter I use the cold smoker to start giving it a nice smokiness?  Then after an hour or so, move it to the grill for the next 10 or 12 hours to finish.

Any concerns with this?  Any suggestions to give me a more intense smoke flavor with the equipment I have?

This may sound like the obvious but it's the key to smoke flavor intensity...time and temperature.

The key to smoke flavor intensity is low heat and longer smoking time. Knowing your equipment is half the battle just like brewing. Adjusting the grill/smoker temp can be a daunting task but is imperative to producing a desired result. I recommend getting a remote temp sensor if you don't already have one, try to get a handle on your grill temps, specifically understanding how to adjust them by tweaking the vents and heat intensity to achieve the desired result.

I've never tried cold and hot smoking in conjunction but I think if one can harness the temp control of their smoker/grill they will ultimately win the battle of smoke flavor intensity.

One of the biggest challenges for me has been temp control and once I was able to harness the temp control on my smoker I was able to produce much better BBQ.  :)
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: weazletoe on May 18, 2011, 12:08:04 PM
I did some ribs last weekend. They were the best I've done to date. Tried my rub a little different, and it was great. I went about 50/50 brown sugar to paprika. Tossed in some kosher salt, fresh cracked pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, chili poweder, cumin, and oregano (just a bit) it was great!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: euge on May 18, 2011, 12:34:41 PM
Tom, often to get an increased "smoke flavor" I'll put the meat in before it comes to temp in the smoker. I've found that below 200 the flavor is smokier- especially when I put wood chunks in there. However, one runs the risk of creosote which to me is similar to fusels in that I can taste it. It actually burns in the tissues of the mouth and I'm none too fond of what it imparts. I think this is what professionals refer to as "backyard smoke". Having done it a bunch of times both ways my Q is better without backyard smoke.

I'd just try to lower your temps to 200-225 and keep it there. Don't think smoke escaping is your culprit. Though that would lead to a draughty smoker which would cause temp fluctuations.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: brewmichigan on May 18, 2011, 01:18:20 PM
Just bought my first Weber one-touch gold this last weekend. I did some brats, fish, and green beans in tin-foil the first day. What should be my first smoking project? I was thinking some ribs. Here's to many great years of grilling and smoking on my new weber.

Also, any good tips for smoking on the weber grills. I bought the 22.5 grate version.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: weazletoe on May 18, 2011, 01:41:36 PM
That is what I use also. I have a water smoker, but tend to use my Webber more often. If you are doing ribs, heat them indirect. Keep your heat on one side, and ribs on the other. I did two racks, so one had to be right over the heat. It was crispy fried on the bottom, but the rack set off to the side was perfect. I also cut the top off a pop can and put water in it, and set it on the grate. That help keeps the smoke from drying your meat out.
  A pork roast is always a cool thing to smoke. Nothing better than pulled pork!
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: corkybstewart on May 18, 2011, 01:51:25 PM
I did some ribs last weekend. They were the best I've done to date. Tried my rub a little different, and it was great. I went about 50/50 brown sugar to paprika. Tossed in some kosher salt, fresh cracked pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, chili poweder, cumin, and oregano (just a bit) it was great!
I keep a bunch of dry rub handy-it's got pretty much the same stuff as yours, but no sugar.  The night before I cook my ribs I dissolve some dark brown sugar in water to make a fairly heavy syrup and baste that onto the ribs.  Then I coat the ribs with my dry rub and let it sit overnight in the fridge.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: brewmichigan on May 18, 2011, 07:15:28 PM
Has anyone ever used any of those weber rib racks or indirect charcoal holders? Just wondering if their worth the money.
Title: Re: BBQ Style
Post by: bluesman on May 18, 2011, 07:21:21 PM