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General Category => Beer Recipes => Topic started by: alestateyall on October 19, 2013, 09:15:12 PM

Title: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on October 19, 2013, 09:15:12 PM
I am a big fan of session beers that capture a style but have less calories and alcohol. I think more breweries should brew session beers.

I wanted an American Brown Session Ale. So I decided to shrink a recipe and see how it turned out. I am ecstatic. This beer has a lot of brown ale character with 1040 OG, 4.1% ABV, and 130 calories. I love this beer.

Taste: starts with a mild chocolate flavor.  Flavor ends with good dose of citrus and a lingering very mild (pleasant) bitterness. Dry finish.

Here is the recipe.

Batch size: 6 gallons
OG: 1040
SG: 1008
ABV: 4.1%
SRM: 14.9
5.66# Rahr Premium Pilsner malt
2.35# Rahr 2-row malt
0.4# Chocolate malt
0.26# Caramel 40 malt
0.2# Victory malt
0.15# Honey malt

0.75 oz Cascade (6.8%) @ 60
0.25 oz Cascade (6.8%) @ 15
1 whirlfloc tablet @ 15
1 oz Zythos (10.9%) @ flame out
1 pkg. US-05 yeast @ 64F

Mash at 150F for 1 hour.

Potential improvements: this beer might be improved with some Carapils/carafoam or other malt to increase the body. Might also just increase the mash temp. Also, I subbed pilsner malt because I was nearly out of 2-row. Using all 2-row might be better.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: garc_mall on October 19, 2013, 11:33:02 PM
Increase the mash temperature. A LOT. I mash my Session beers (both hoppy and sweet) at 162, otherwise they end up too dry. IMO, Mash temperature increases don't affect the sweet/bitter ratio very much. Adding crystal type malts (Cara-anything) will increase the sweetness.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 20, 2013, 12:45:27 AM
+1 to mashing high for a session beer.  I would go no lower than 158 up to the mentioned 162. That looks pretty solid !
Title: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on October 20, 2013, 02:14:38 AM
Thanks for the tips, guys. I will try a higher mash temp with future milds.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: klickitat jim on October 20, 2013, 02:33:54 AM
I'm going to do the same with my brown. Get it down around 1.040-45
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: guitalele81 on October 21, 2013, 01:02:26 AM
Nice recipe! Will Will definitely try something similar soon.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: cornershot on October 21, 2013, 01:24:46 AM
American mild is an oxymoron! That's just not how 'merica does things! But it needs to change!
Nice recipe but IMO it needs more hops and a less attenuative, yet still American, yeast. Maybe WLP041?
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: The Professor on October 21, 2013, 03:31:42 AM
American mild is an oxymoron! That's just not how 'merica does things!...

You mean "that's not how 'merica overdoes things."   ;D
Seriously though, I think the recipe looks great (it's actually quite similar to a brew I do once in a while).

I really wouldn't change any of the ingredients or ratios.  I agree that it would probably be better though with a yeast other than S-05.
If you're using dry yeast, I'd be more inclined towards something like S-04. 
It'll still be an "American Mild" because you made it in America.  8)
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: erockrph on October 21, 2013, 04:11:54 AM
I really wouldn't change any of the ingredients or ratios.  I agree that it would probably be better though with a yeast other than S-05.
If you're using dry yeast, I'd be more inclined towards something like S-04. 
It'll still be an "American Mild" because you made it in America.  8)

Agreed. Since the gravity is so low you can even get away with using something like WY1968 even if you're not set up to make a starter. I don't know why "American" has come to mean "no yeast character".
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: garc_mall on October 21, 2013, 04:18:15 AM
WY1272 is also a good one for session beers if you want to have an "American" strain. It provides a little more character, and supports the malt.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on October 21, 2013, 12:23:05 PM
The first thing I will do to decrease attenuation is increase the mash temp. But changing yeast is a good option too.

Re: needing more hops. Beersmith put the IBU at 22.6. I wanted to make sure I didn't over do it with such a small gravity. With more finish gravity I think you could support more hops.

That being said I like the hops where they are.

PS. American Mild is a bit of an oxymoron.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: morticaixavier on October 21, 2013, 02:47:23 PM
American mild is an oxymoron! That's just not how 'merica does things! But it needs to change!
Nice recipe but IMO it needs more hops and a less attenuative, yet still American, yeast. Maybe WLP041?

let's remember, Mild is the opposite of Old not the opposite of strong. so in that sense, given that we are still a pretty young nation I would say that an American mild is perfectly appropriate.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: The Professor on October 21, 2013, 03:48:00 PM
let's remember, Mild is the opposite of Old not the opposite of strong. so in that sense, given that we are still a pretty young nation I would say that an American mild is perfectly appropriate.

RIGHT!!  Good point.
Historically, the term "mild" has nothing whatsoever to do with ABV or hopping rate.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: gmac on November 05, 2013, 03:49:07 AM
Should have read this before posting pretty much the exact same question. But I want to get even lower, 3 to 3.5 ABV.
And I also did mis-use mild as opposed to stale. But I'm sure you know what I meant.
Title: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on December 15, 2014, 03:51:42 AM
I made a second batch of this beer with some changes.

Major change: fermented with Danstar Windsor. OG 1043. SG 1018. ABV 3.3%. Mash temp was 152F.

I thought with those numbers I would have a nice full bodied mild.  But actually, the beer tastes very thin/watery.

I think I will try WLP002 next time.

The other change was using English Chocolate malt. That plus the Windsor yeast give this beer a more English taste than I wanted.

Edit: on rereading the thread there a few other good yeast choices for next time suggested. I want something more attenuative than Windsor (and cleaner) and less attenuative than US-05.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: dmtaylor on December 15, 2014, 02:25:42 PM
Major change: fermented with Danstar Windsor. OG 1043. SG 1018. ABV 3.3%. Mash temp was 152F.

I thought with those numbers I would have a nice full bodied mild.  But actually, the beer tastes very thin/watery.

I am not surprised.  While Windsor doesn't attenuate very well at all, it TASTES like it does and makes for a very watery beer.  Not the thing you'd want in an American mild.

Yeah, WLP002 or maybe WLP004 will get you the low attenuation and fuller body that you want.  And if you ferment really cool around 60 F, both of these will make a relatively clean tasting beer as well.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: denny on December 15, 2014, 06:51:11 PM
I made a second batch of this beer with some changes.

Major change: fermented with Danstar Windsor. OG 1043. SG 1018. ABV 3.3%. Mash temp was 152F.

I thought with those numbers I would have a nice full bodied mild.  But actually, the beer tastes very thin/watery.

I think I will try WLP002 next time.

The other change was using English Chocolate malt. That plus the Windsor yeast give this beer a more English taste than I wanted.

Edit: on rereading the thread there a few other good yeast choices for next time suggested. I want something more attenuative than Windsor (and cleaner) and more attenuative than US-05.

Great!  However, I'm sticking with an American mild.  Only domestic ingredients and American flavor characteristics.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: HoosierBrew on December 15, 2014, 06:55:14 PM
Denny, you've been using 1450 for it lately, right?  I could see the mouthfeel being a help in that beer.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on December 15, 2014, 06:57:22 PM

I made a second batch of this beer with some changes.

Major change: fermented with Danstar Windsor. OG 1043. SG 1018. ABV 3.3%. Mash temp was 152F.

I thought with those numbers I would have a nice full bodied mild.  But actually, the beer tastes very thin/watery.

I think I will try WLP002 next time.

The other change was using English Chocolate malt. That plus the Windsor yeast give this beer a more English taste than I wanted.

Edit: on rereading the thread there a few other good yeast choices for next time suggested. I want something more attenuative than Windsor (and cleaner) and more attenuative than US-05.

Great!  However, I'm sticking with an American mild.  Only domestic ingredients and American flavor characteristics.
That's what I want too. Yours is more of a session APA/IPA. Mine was more of a shrunk American Brown (but not this time unfortunately).
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: denny on December 15, 2014, 09:54:34 PM
Denny, you've been using 1450 for it lately, right?  I could see the mouthfeel being a help in that beer.

Yep, all batches have been 1450.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: denny on December 15, 2014, 09:55:27 PM

That's what I want too. Yours is more of a session APA/IPA. Mine was more of a shrunk American Brown (but not this time unfortunately).

But you;re using British ingredients, right?
Title: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on December 15, 2014, 10:03:23 PM

That's what I want too. Yours is more of a session APA/IPA. Mine was more of a shrunk American Brown (but not this time unfortunately).

But you;re using British ingredients, right?
Sorry. I want mine to taste American (clean, American hops). I tried low fermentation temp with the Windsor hoping for a clean ferment.  I probably could have asked the forum for guidance and not gone there. But learning by doing is fun too.

I brewed with what I had on hand. I had Windsor and English chocolate so I used those in place of American ingredients.

As an aside, I am trying to empty my brew closet, so, I can start ordering my recipes one at a time.  Then, I will order exactly the ingredients I want rather than compromise based on what I have on hand. I only brew once per month so it is taking a while.
Title: Re: American Mild
Post by: HoosierBrew on December 15, 2014, 10:26:42 PM

That's what I want too. Yours is more of a session APA/IPA. Mine was more of a shrunk American Brown (but not this time unfortunately).

But you;re using British ingredients, right?
Sorry. I want mine to taste American (clean, American hops). I tried low fermentation temp with the Windsor hoping for a clean ferment.  I probably could have asked the forum for guidance and not gone there. But learning by doing is fun too.

I brewed with what I had on hand. I had Windsor and English chocolate so I used those in place of American ingredients.

As an aside, I am trying to empty my brew closet, so, I can start ordering my recipes one at a time.  Then, I will order exactly the ingredients I want rather than compromise based on what I have on hand. I only brew once per month so it is taking a while.
'
Actually, I like the session American Brown idea too. You could pack a lot of flavor in a 'small' beer like that. And FWIW I used 1450 in the standard American Brown I just made. It might be the best yeast choice for an American session beer IMO - it attenuates pretty close to 1056, but the full mouthfeel it gives makes it seem like it doesn't.

EDIT - I need to brew something like Denny's and what you're talking about. Good ideas.
Title: American Mild
Post by: alestateyall on December 15, 2014, 10:49:05 PM
I will try the 1450. I like that yeast. Actually, since the forum has been talking about lately I have wanted to try it in several brews.


Tommy M.
Starkville, MS