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Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: tonyp on October 25, 2013, 08:20:12 PM

Title: 67% ABV beer
Post by: tonyp on October 25, 2013, 08:20:12 PM
Quote
Lewis, 27, said: “You’re not supposed to drink more than 35ml in one sitting. It should Be poured like it’s whisky.”

Scots pals who brewed world's strongest beer unveil new lethal recipe.. after fans claim first drink was too weak (http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scots-pals-who-brewed-worlds-2485696)

Pretty crazy but I would love to try it.
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: cornershot on October 25, 2013, 09:28:29 PM
Sorry but there ain't no yeast that can ferment to 67.5% so that means it's just a high test whiskey with some beer in it and that ain't beer! It's beer-flavored whiskey.
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: cheshirecat on October 25, 2013, 09:30:39 PM
Hats off to creativity and pushing limits but I am in the camp that think these types of "beers" aren't really beer. The few times I've had super high strength beers, like Brew Dogs, it wasn't very good beer nor very good hard alcohol. 
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: morticaixavier on October 25, 2013, 10:29:16 PM
Sorry but there ain't no yeast that can ferment to 67.5% so that means it's just a high test whiskey with some beer in it and that ain't beer! It's beer-flavored whiskey.

I am pretty sure they manage to get this high mostly with yeast. It's possible the freeze concentrate it at some point but you can get a really really high ABV with progressive feeding along.

start out with 1 gallon of 1.090 or so wort, when that has attenuated out most of the way add another gallon of 1.100 wort, this will result in a gravity somewhere in the middle 1.050ish. that's easy on yeast. it attenuates most of the way and you hit it with a gallon of 1.200 wort. at some point the yeast will die form the alcohol, and I am sure it's well before 67.5 percent but might well be upwards of 20% as there are wines that are close to that. so at that point you have to remove some water to get the rest of the way. enter eisbeir.

Most of the time what will hold the yeast back is the high wort gravity and resulting osmotic pressure rather than the high beer ABV.

but anyway. If someone offered me a sip I'd taste it but I agree. it's not really beer.
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: klickitat jim on October 25, 2013, 11:03:33 PM
Beer: water barley hops yeast... +distillation
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: HoosierBrew on October 26, 2013, 12:10:11 AM
At 134 proof, you would have to age that for......ummm......a while for it to taste a whole lot better than rushed (even by moonshine standards) shine.  At that abv, not buying that there's no disitillation anywhere in the process. There's a reason that even distilleries get rid of the "overproof" runnings.
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: cornershot on October 26, 2013, 07:26:41 PM
To reach 67% through freeze concentration would leave behind all of the bad stuff that heat distillation would remove. I think a 67% eisbeer would be mildly poisonous.
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: Jimmy K on October 28, 2013, 04:13:36 PM
... at some point the yeast will die form the alcohol, and I am sure it's well before 67.5 percent ... Most of the time what will hold the yeast back is the high wort gravity and resulting osmotic pressure rather than the high beer ABV.

I buy high ABV fermentation, but considering 70% ethanol is a standard sanitizing and preserving liquid in biology, I can't figure this out. Especially if they don't even try to explain it.
 
 
Title: Re: 67% ABV beer
Post by: erockrph on October 28, 2013, 05:07:34 PM
... at some point the yeast will die form the alcohol, and I am sure it's well before 67.5 percent ... Most of the time what will hold the yeast back is the high wort gravity and resulting osmotic pressure rather than the high beer ABV.

I buy high ABV fermentation, but considering 70% ethanol is a standard sanitizing and preserving liquid in biology, I can't figure this out. Especially if they don't even try to explain it.

Agreed. I can buy reaching the mid 20's %ABV via fermentation. Anything above that would require distillation or fractional freezing of some sort.