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General Category => Ingredients => Topic started by: capozzoli on March 26, 2010, 10:43:07 PM

Title: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: capozzoli on March 26, 2010, 10:43:07 PM
Got some hop rhizomes from wzl46 today. Dude has been hookin me up!!

 With great anticipation I plan on planting them.

Should I just till some soil and add some fertilizer?

Any other green thumb tricks I should know about.

Not much of a green thumb myself, grew some plants closely related to hops years ago but not sure that it is the same.

Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on March 26, 2010, 11:58:03 PM
I don't know if it's the right way, but I dug a hole in our lovely clay about the size of a 5 gallon bucket, filled it in most of the way with soil and composted manure (50/50), planted the rhizome, then piled a good mound of 50/50 on top of it. Once they poked up I mulched.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: bluesman on March 27, 2010, 03:36:50 PM
I would start them out in a small pot (1 gallon) with some decent potting soil to get them somewhat rooted and then transfer them in May to their permanant home in the ground. Pick a location that gets a good amount of sun in your house for now like a window sill.  You will need to fertilize them at some frequency after they have established. Read this article and go from there.

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue2.3/montell.html
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: denny on March 27, 2010, 03:42:02 PM
I dig a hole (not as big as a 5 gal. bucket, though!), add compost, and stick 'em in the ground.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: bluesman on March 27, 2010, 03:46:45 PM
I dig a hole (not as big as a 5 gal. bucket, though!), add compost, and stick 'em in the ground.

+1

Organic compost is the best for hops.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: diybrewing on March 27, 2010, 06:14:54 PM
For planting rhizomes the best way to do it is a dig a hole about 1 foot deep. Fill with a 50/50 blend of compost and dirt. Plant the rhizomes so that they have the white vine looking parts about 1 inch under the ground and they should be pointed up. Then top with a layer of compost. Water until saturated once a week and then let dry.over the week. Do this for the first two months then start watering every other week. After about a month or when your vines are about 1 foot start training them.

You should start them in a pot if your outside temperature is still going below freezing every night. But if you are in a warmer climate then you can just start them outside.
If you want to download our growing guide just click http://www.diybrewing.com/recipes/hop pamphlet.doc (http://www.diybrewing.com/recipes/hop pamphlet.doc)
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: babalu87 on March 27, 2010, 11:04:04 PM
I dig a hole (not as big as a 5 gal. bucket, though!), add compost, and stick 'em in the ground.

Compost FTW

Also, put them on a little bit of a hill and create something of a moat in the middle.
One: To keep the nasty beasts away  :P
Seriously, the hill will prevent them from rotting early in their life and the moat will provide even moisture to said hill.

Good luck, hop growing is very rewarding  8)
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: capozzoli on March 28, 2010, 11:29:12 PM
Thanks guys, this really helps. I planned on doing it today but ran out of time.

Im gonna ddo it tomorrow

Its been pretty warm around here.

I have a bunch of ground hogs, skunks and rabbits out there. Wondering now what I can do to keep them away?
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on March 29, 2010, 12:40:21 AM
I dig a hole (not as big as a 5 gal. bucket, though!), add compost, and stick 'em in the ground.

I'm guessing your soil isn't 4 solid feet of red clay and shale.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: bluesman on March 29, 2010, 01:31:19 AM
I dig a hole (not as big as a 5 gal. bucket, though!), add compost, and stick 'em in the ground.

I'm guessing your soil isn't 4 solid feet of red clay and shale.

Gotta love our soil in these parts.  ::)
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: babalu87 on March 29, 2010, 01:26:04 PM
I dig a hole (not as big as a 5 gal. bucket, though!), add compost, and stick 'em in the ground.

I'm guessing your soil isn't 4 solid feet of red clay and shale.

Gotta love our soil in these parts.  ::)

Nickname of the part of my town that we live in is Rock Village................took about three years of work to get the gardens soil where we wanted it.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on March 29, 2010, 01:57:16 PM
Could be worse. Up by my in-laws, any "digging" requires blasting. Neighbors had a pool put in a couple years back. That was interesting.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: corkybstewart on April 03, 2010, 01:13:40 PM
Plant them where they'll get plenty of sun.  Also remember that the roots grow amazingly fast so you'll need to plant them in a place you can get to them to trim the roots every 2 or 3 years.  Also don't plant them near tomatoes, I don't remember why but they don't like each other.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on April 07, 2010, 03:48:07 PM
Just out of curiosity, what happens if you don't trim the roots back? I just tried doing mine last week and I pulled out a good twelve footer. Got me wondering if I was hurting production by doing that. The big concern I had was the varieties intermingling, but I couldn't decide if intermingled feeder roots had any impact on that.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: bluesman on April 07, 2010, 03:57:51 PM
I don't pull the roots. The crown is the heart of the hops and should be left untouched. I only clip the vines back in the fall. I leave about 12" of vine exposed above ground.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: dhacker on April 07, 2010, 05:55:41 PM
Hmmm . . I'm certainly no gardening expert, but I have never heard of trimming the roots on any established plant as a matter of maintenance. What's the thinking behind that?
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on April 07, 2010, 06:00:12 PM
Well, for my part it was unintentional. I was digging in a circle around the hill with a sharpened e-tool (best. gardening. implement. ever.) to make sure the rhizomes weren't spreading and I sliced clean through this root. So I pulled it out.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: b-hoppy on April 08, 2010, 04:57:01 AM
no big loss.  there's plenty more where that came from.  you're lucky you didn't hit one of the BIG ones that go straight down.  when you hit one-a-them-boys your foot usually bounces off the shovel and you end up limping for a couple days.  i've learned just to go down about the depth of the spade as that's where most of the rhizomes are.  if you happen to miss one or two, they usually rear their heads in a week or so.  just go back in and sever their tie from the crown.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: corkybstewart on April 08, 2010, 06:28:08 PM
Just out of curiosity, what happens if you don't trim the roots back? I just tried doing mine last week and I pulled out a good twelve footer. Got me wondering if I was hurting production by doing that. The big concern I had was the varieties intermingling, but I couldn't decide if intermingled feeder roots had any impact on that.
If you don't trim the roots back they will take over your yard.  You're not cutting near the main crown so it doesn't hurt the plants at all.  The roots can grow 2 or 3 feet per year in every direction, then you start having sprouts coming up all along those roots.  I guess that's fine if you have all the room in the world, but it would also make it very hard to trellis the bines if they cover an area 5 or 6 feet in diameter per plant.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: b-hoppy on April 08, 2010, 09:08:38 PM
roots and rhizomes are two different structures.  rhizomes are underground vegetative stems with shoots/buds capable of producing new plants.  roots are primarily involved with water and nutrient uptake.  they have no buds so they pose no threat when it comes to your hop plant taking over an area.  they're just down there doin' their thing.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on April 09, 2010, 12:56:57 AM
That was my understanding as well.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: pinnah on April 09, 2010, 11:22:35 AM
roots and rhizomes are two different structures. 

Is it true that roots do not have the ability to sprout?

I would really be in trouble if they did. 
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: b-hoppy on April 09, 2010, 11:59:51 AM
that's right.  no buds, no sprouts.  sometimes it's kinda tough to determine which is which being that in many cases they're growing in very close proximity and certain rhizomes have very small buds that are hard to see let alone feel.  if you run your fingers down along the rhizome you can usually feel little bumps(nodes) about 6 inches apart if you can't see the buds.  the roots are mostly smooth and (usually) a little darker.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on April 09, 2010, 01:25:32 PM
I normally look for the buds poking up out of the ground where they oughtn't be, but this year I thought I'd try that cutting indiscriminately around the hill thing. I'm not sure I'd do that again.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: capozzoli on April 10, 2010, 09:33:21 PM
I have them in a bucket now. Are they ready to transfer and start training them on a trellis or something?

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04403.jpg)

Wow, I think I am in love.

Thanks for the introduction Paul.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on April 11, 2010, 03:55:39 AM
Yup, plant 'em. You want a couple more? I just cut off a couple rhizomes today.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: capozzoli on April 11, 2010, 09:31:44 PM
Sure, I would love to have more. Can one have to many?

I was also wondering. What is the process for taking them with me when I move? Cause I really want to move. I hate it here.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: MrNate on April 12, 2010, 02:09:47 AM
I, uh, sort of lost them. I think I may have chucked them in the yard and mowed over them. I do have more that I haven't cut yet under my deck if you see yourself coming up this way anytime soon.

When I moved I dug up the root ball, put it in a bucket, and replanted at the new place. They're insanely hardy. So much so that some people consider them weeds. Crazy people, like my sister in law who drove herself crazy trying to get rid of them in her back yard.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: gimmeales on April 16, 2010, 03:29:14 PM
a general question - I got Rhizomes about 3 weeks ago and they've sat in my fridge since then.  From what I'm hearing I should put them in a planter before transplanting to the yard?  Am I too late to get them in the ground this year?

Also, what can be used to contain the Rhizomes in their planted area?  Any kind of in-ground 'box' they can be put it?  I'd prefer not to have to dig up my yard to keep them from taking over!
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: rjharper on April 16, 2010, 04:30:54 PM
Also, what can be used to contain the Rhizomes in their planted area?  Any kind of in-ground 'box' they can be put it?  I'd prefer not to have to dig up my yard to keep them from taking over!

Generally, you can use any regular, cheap ol' plastic planter with drainage holes, and bury the whole thing.  It keeps most of the roots in check, plus you can pack it with really a really good soil/compost/manure mix, and dig it up if you ever move.  Wish I;d done that, come to think of it...
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: bluesman on April 16, 2010, 04:35:54 PM
I have them in a bucket now. Are they ready to transfer and start training them on a trellis or something?

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC04403.jpg)

Wow, I think I am in love.

Thanks for the introduction Paul.

Agreed. Transplant them now. Get some good organic potting soil and gig a 5 gallon bucket size hole. Dump in the potting soil and transplant the hops.
Title: Re: Planting hop rhizomes
Post by: gimmeales on April 16, 2010, 08:07:32 PM
Generally, you can use any regular, cheap ol' plastic planter with drainage holes, and bury the whole thing.  It keeps most of the roots in check, plus you can pack it with really a really good soil/compost/manure mix, and dig it up if you ever move.  Wish I;d done that, come to think of it...

Ahh cool - easy enough.  Thanks!