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General Category => Extract/Partial Mash Brewing => Topic started by: billbentley on April 06, 2010, 09:51:40 AM

Title: full boil
Post by: billbentley on April 06, 2010, 09:51:40 AM
Is there any advantage to using a full boil in extract brewing in the outcome?
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: parkerd21 on April 06, 2010, 04:47:13 PM
From what I understand it can make a difference especialley in hop utilization.  I use a partial grain/extract method and have read about a technique to increase hop utilization.  At the beginning of the boil add 1/3 to 1/2 of the extract, add the hops according to schedule, and then add the remaining extract with about 15 minutes left in the boil. Add it slowly while stirring to keep it from going straight to the bottom of the pot and scorching. One trick is to  mix some of the wort into the jug and disolve the syrup before pouring it in. It seems to  work for me. Good Luck.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: etbrew on April 08, 2010, 10:44:42 PM
I haven't been doing full boils because of equipment limitations so I started using the method mentioned in the previous post where I use half the malt extract for the full boil and add the rest near the end of the boil.  I've been much happier with the beers and I've been using less hops because hop utilization is greatly increased. 
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: Hokerer on April 09, 2010, 12:39:40 AM
I haven't been doing full boils because of equipment limitations so I started using the method mentioned in the previous post where I use half the malt extract for the full boil and add the rest near the end of the boil.  I've been much happier with the beers and I've been using less hops because hop utilization is greatly increased. 

Just to save you a lot of typing in the future, you'll be happy to know that "the method..." is commonly referred to as the Extract-late method.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: mnstorm99 on April 09, 2010, 11:25:56 AM
Your beer will alway benefit from a full boil, I just always had a hard time trusting the water your topping off with.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: kgs on April 09, 2010, 03:00:59 PM
I don't know if this is sufficient, but this is why I preboil and cool (covered) about 2 gallons of water in a smaller stockpot... even if I think I have a full boil.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: parkerd21 on April 09, 2010, 04:27:49 PM
I just finished brewing an Imperial IPA using the extract late method and so far it's the best beer I've done. I hit the O.G. just about dead on and the it's very hop forward which I like. It's just about done primary fermentation. Another day or so and I'll be dry hopping.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: euge on April 09, 2010, 05:47:12 PM
Common convention prefers a full boil when doing extract. However, it is perfectly acceptable to do a partial boil and top off with cool water either preboiled or out of the tap.

Hop utilization isn't affected so much that can't be compensated by the addition of another half ounce of hops. The main concern is the Maillard reaction effect (caramelization). The wort can get a little darker and maybe the flavor affected. Additional toffee notes in your ESB isn't always a bad thing, but brewer's don't like deviations from their expectations. ;)  

It's just a tool in the brewer's hands. Understand the rules then bend them to your will...



Title: Re: full boil
Post by: MDixon on April 09, 2010, 07:26:19 PM
euge - Maillard Reactions = darkening = melanoidins (colors, high molecular weight pigments), but those reactions are NOT caramelization.

Caramelization happens at temps much higher than occur in boiling wort.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: euge on April 09, 2010, 10:44:00 PM
Thanks. Never thought of it that way. Learn something new everyday.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: MDixon on April 10, 2010, 12:41:05 AM
I think what confuses people is the Maillard Reactions can create flavors which accompany the melanoidins which can present themselves as a depth of caramel flavor, but IMO it's important to realize caramel flavors do not automatically mean caramelization occurred and melanoidins are really colors/darkening or perhaps better stated, they are pigments.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: tat2pompadore on May 23, 2010, 02:56:58 PM
With all of the reading I have done, and such.  I agree with all of the above comments.  I would like to add, the full boil also helps break down protiens for a clearer end result.  So far so good on my brews.  As new as I am to this fine craft.  I hope this helps too.
Title: Re: full boil
Post by: dave1 on October 05, 2010, 06:15:10 PM
I am new to AHA and I know this is a dated posting but here goes. My beer was so-so and seldom had a head.  I re-read Charlie's book and found that I wasn't bringing the wort to a full boil for the "ususal" 55 minutes.  As I added ingredients I would TIME 55 minutes but not BOIL for 55 minutes. After adjusting this my beers now have much more body and a nice head.