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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: micsager on April 20, 2010, 11:40:46 PM

Title: Light Munich Malt
Post by: micsager on April 20, 2010, 11:40:46 PM
I find myself with about 70 pounds of Munich malt.  all light.  Anyone got a good recipe to use this as a base malt for a 10 gallon system.  I'm looking to use 20-25 of the Munich per batch.  I have a pretty good selection of specialty malts, so all suggestions are welcome......

My favorite beer styles are Ambers, IPA's, Reds.  But would sure like to try a lager, but Munich is probably to dark for that, eh?
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: MDixon on April 20, 2010, 11:58:46 PM
Not all light Munich are the same. Who's light Munich and what is the Lovibond rating?
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: blatz on April 21, 2010, 01:16:00 AM
But would sure like to try a lager, but Munich is probably to dark for that, eh?

so what do you think munich is used for??

bocks, dunkels, fest biers all use munich, with the former 2 using it up to 100% of the grist.

As MDixon said - more info is needed.
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: The Professor on April 21, 2010, 02:27:24 AM
It makes a fantastic lager as 100% of the grist.
I also use at least some in practically every ale I make as well, and have always used a hefty proportion of it in my Wee Heavy...there's probably no good reason not to use 100% there too.

Experiment !!! 
Besides the fact that it's your beer,   there are no rules anyway, at least none worth slavishly adhering to (except for maybe sanitation).
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: rogergreene on April 21, 2010, 07:49:06 AM
i have always wanted to do 100% munich with german alt yeast.  although waiting four weeks for it to lager is a long time!

i will be trying a 100% dark munich in a few weeks.  that should be tasty!
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: Hokerer on April 21, 2010, 02:05:30 PM
although waiting four weeks for it to lager is a long time!

The trick to making the waiting more palatable is to make sure you've got plenty of other homebrews on tap
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: a10t2 on April 21, 2010, 02:56:54 PM
In addition to the lagers that have already been mentioned, I use 20-25% in ambers and IPAs, and sometimes 5-10% in things like a porter or stout that I want to have a nice complex malt character.

Munich I is like Frank's Red Hot. I put that #### in everything.
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: weithman5 on April 21, 2010, 03:08:04 PM
i put frank's red hot in almost everything as well.  like it much better than tabasco. never brewed with it so now how about a recipe with

munich malt
starch packing peanuts (i am determined to try them sometime)
and frank's red hot.
 
maybe some day but

if you don't hear from me.  it didn't work.
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: The Professor on April 21, 2010, 04:32:18 PM
The trick to making the waiting more palatable is to make sure you've got plenty of other homebrews on tap

 +1000

Brew a lot and brew often.  I'm really big on well aged brews so I  usually alternate between brewing a batch of my everyday 'house' ale and a batch or two of things that benefit from long aging.  That way, there's always something around that helps me keep my mitts of those certain brews that are undergoing the good magic that happens with aging.
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: micsager on April 21, 2010, 04:59:40 PM
But would sure like to try a lager, but Munich is probably to dark for that, eh?

so what do you think munich is used for??

bocks, dunkels, fest biers all use munich, with the former 2 using it up to 100% of the grist.

As MDixon said - more info is needed.

I know all those used Munich, I didn't know they used that %.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: micsager on April 21, 2010, 05:02:28 PM
thanks everyone!  this forum is great. 
Title: Re: Light Munich Malt
Post by: tom on April 21, 2010, 05:33:38 PM
Not all light Munich are the same. Who's light Munich and what is the Lovibond rating?
+100.
One maltster's Light Munich might be 7L and another's 10. One maltster's Dark Munich might be 10 and another's 20.