Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: richardt on May 14, 2010, 02:18:02 PM

Title: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: richardt on May 14, 2010, 02:18:02 PM
Does anyone have a good Filet Manhattan recipe?  I got a craving for it and I can't find a good recipe online.

I used to go to a restaurant in Daytona Beach, FL (Rosario's) that served an awesome succulent filet mignon marinated in whiskey or bourbon and vermouth and crusted with peppercorns.  It was usually accompanied by sauteed portobello mushrooms (similar "manhattan" marinade sauce) and peas/french onions.

I also wonder about how long to marinade-so any suggestions would be welcome.

If you've got a great steak au poive recipe--I'd love to see it, too!

Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on May 14, 2010, 02:23:29 PM
For steak au poivre, it doesn't get much better than this.  Like many of Ina's recipes, it's based on Julia Child's.  Obviously, you don't need to use filet.  I actually prefer top sirloin or even ribeye.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/filet-of-beef-au-poivre-recipe/index.html
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: blatz on May 14, 2010, 02:47:16 PM
hmm - that looks damned tasty, matt.

richardt - I have all Ina's books and can tell you that they are the most 'weathered' cookbooks in my house, so don't hestitate to give that one a try!
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: nicneufeld on May 14, 2010, 02:56:29 PM
I like the idea of adapting steak au poivre to bourbon/vermouth, ala "Manhattan".  Bourbon having that rich caramel sweetness combined with the savory, herbal bitterness of sweet vermouth, sounds like a perfect reduction glaze for a good steak with some peppercorns and mushrooms!
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: blatz on May 14, 2010, 03:08:37 PM
yeah, I'm going to have to give this recipe a shot.  *mouth watering*
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: bluesman on May 14, 2010, 03:33:21 PM
I like the idea of adapting steak au poivre to bourbon/vermouth, ala "Manhattan".  Bourbon having that rich caramel sweetness combined with the savory, herbal bitterness of sweet vermouth, sounds like a perfect reduction glaze for a good steak with some peppercorns and mushrooms!

...and a splash of some aged balsamic for a little kick. :)
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: richardt on May 14, 2010, 03:45:37 PM
I like the idea of adapting steak au poivre to bourbon/vermouth, ala "Manhattan".  Bourbon having that rich caramel sweetness combined with the savory, herbal bitterness of sweet vermouth, sounds like a perfect reduction glaze for a good steak with some peppercorns and mushrooms!

...and a splash of some aged balsamic for a little kick. :)

Quite possible now that you mention it, Bluesman.
It was so savory and complex--all the tastebuds were saying something!
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: capozzoli on May 14, 2010, 04:04:36 PM

Awesome dish, that recipe is good just replace that can beef broth with homemade demi glace. That is what makes it so good in fine steak house. That and dry aged beef.

For the demi glaze. (How ever you spell that word.) make a beef stock with bones and reduce it by half even two thirds. Then add some Burgundy wine. 

We make a fillet beef wellington with home made pastry crust. Then sear the cracked grren pepper corn crusted fillets leaving them rare. Then wrap them in the dough. Bake on high tll the crust is golden brown. Serve on top of a thick demi glaze beef stock and red wine reduction.  To die for!
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: nicneufeld on May 14, 2010, 04:49:56 PM
That beef wellington sounds fantastic.  Sadly most of these recipes aren't in the cards because lately I balk at buying meat that exceeds $2 a lb.

Kudos on the balsamic addition, I agree!  I might even like a sprinkling of worcestershire...maybe a bit too heavy handed, but its salty, fermented tang goes great with beef.
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: capozzoli on May 14, 2010, 05:02:10 PM
Nic, do you have any good butchers around you? For me the grocery store is never the place to buy meat. Half of them dont even have a decent butcher employed.

I go to the Italian market or a couple of other family butcher shops. I get the "freezer pleasers" There are some pretty good deals and in comaprison to the grocery store prices it is like half. 

Korean stores are usually great for good meat prices too.

Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: nicneufeld on May 14, 2010, 05:52:37 PM
Most of the specialty meat / butcher places around here move in the opposite direction...up in price.  I might consider the Korean shop, though, as they had some lovely looking extremely thin sliced beef or veal another person in line was buying.  It's a bit too far out of the way though for regular stopping by.
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: richardt on May 14, 2010, 06:21:36 PM
PP-thanks for the link to Ina's site. Never heard of her until now (but better late than never).

So, should I just adapt Ina's recipe for steak au poive and substitute the bourbon and vermouth in place of brandy/cognac?
How much of each and for how long?  I'm still looking for a recipe to follow.  Somebody w/ experience want to make up one?
I'm not the best at vague directions.  I'm more of a mise en place / follow-the-instructions kind of guy.

Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: beerocd on May 14, 2010, 08:39:37 PM
I balk at buying meat that exceeds $2 a lb.

So it's white meat and the other white meat for you then. But red peppers were 3.59/lb here last week. So vegetarian isn't necessarily cheaper.
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: nicneufeld on May 14, 2010, 09:09:28 PM
Sometimes I get ground beef for 1.88 a lb!  I'm not a huge ground beef fan but it made a very tasty keema stuffing for samosas.  But generally speaking you're right, I eat a lot of chicken and some pork, and I have a large store of smoked corned beef in the freezer that was cheap at the time too.  Pepper prices shot up last week I noticed too.  Passed on them!  :D 
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: capozzoli on May 14, 2010, 09:49:03 PM
I just got back from the produce place. Capsicums were $3.99 per lb. WTF. Time to grow a garden!

I was going to make Sicilian tripe in tomato gravy with fried peppers.  Guess Im gonna have to settle for Neapolitan style with peas. 
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: beerocd on May 15, 2010, 01:34:12 AM
I just got back from the produce place. Capsicums were $3.99 per lb. WTF. Time to grow a garden!

Oh, I gotta have at least 1000 sq ft of garden going - what ticked me off is I want to make gyros. I need marjoram. Got 2 sets of sprouts going already but I need the spice now. It's like ten million dollars for one of those McCormick spice bottles!!!  No time to run to the ethnic stores for affordable stuff.  >:(



Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: nicneufeld on May 15, 2010, 12:36:56 PM
I can get green bell peppers for cheap, but red peppers were over 3 bucks a piece.  I would like to do a roasted red pepper cream sauce with pasta next week, but my plans are flexible if these prices don't come down...
Title: Re: Filet Manhattan Recipe
Post by: beerocd on May 15, 2010, 07:47:24 PM
Official word on the Gyros... AWESOME!
I'm too far out from the big city to be able to get good gyros. I was up late watching Alton Brown and there's the gyros show. So I'm not claiming it to be my own, but I can vouch for it being pretty darn good. I made his tzatziki sauce too, with the mint. Not what I'm used to, but very tasty.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/gyro-meat-with-tzatziki-sauce-recipe/index.html (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/gyro-meat-with-tzatziki-sauce-recipe/index.html)

Oh, and for those of us who don't make our own breads daily, if you brush the pitas with oil and water and slap em on a hot skillet, they will turn out fantastic.