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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: guerrinha on January 01, 2016, 01:37:42 PM

Title: Long time maturing ale
Post by: guerrinha on January 01, 2016, 01:37:42 PM
Hi everyone!

Happy new year to you all!

In December/2014 I made an ale with extract, had it fermenting for like 3 weeks, got a good FG and etc.

Then I did as I always do, and leave it at - 3C to mature (in primary). I usually do that for a week. The problem is that it's been there for a year now! hahaha (yes, I had some problems)

I have two questions:

1. will it be a drinkable beer after bottled?
2. are there any yeasts alive there to grant me some co2 after I put some priming sugar and bottle it?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: klickitat jim on January 01, 2016, 01:54:52 PM
Fun! Get a little pack of dry champagne yeast and add about 1/3 of it to the bottling bucket when you prime.
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: guerrinha on January 01, 2016, 01:59:53 PM
Thanks for answering!
I don't have access to that here (in my city in Brasil).
Can I use some normal beer yeast? if so, how many grams? should I activate it normally?

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Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: klickitat jim on January 01, 2016, 02:12:34 PM
Yes normal yeast is fine. I just prefer champagne because it doesn't change the flavor. But no worries. It only takes a little bit because you'll only need to ferment the priming sugar. If you are using dry yeast 1/3 of a pack will do, if liquid like Wyeast, maybe the same, 1/3 - 1/2 a smack pack. I wouldn't worry about hydrating or proofing. But you might warm the beer up to room temp so you dont shock the yeast. Yeast should be about the same temp as what you are pitching them to.
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: brewinhard on January 01, 2016, 02:28:52 PM
+1 to what Jim said. Any dry yeast will work for this process and will not impart any flavors due to the minimal activity going on when consuming the small amount of priming sugar.  I think it would be a good idea to rehydrate the yeast which will give it a better chance of evenly mixing with the beer for proper priming.
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: klickitat jim on January 01, 2016, 02:36:43 PM
+1 to what Jim said. Any dry yeast will work for this process and will not impart any flavors due to the minimal activity going on when consuming the small amount of priming sugar.  I think it would be a good idea to rehydrate the yeast which will give it a better chance of evenly mixing with the beer for proper priming.
Probably a good idea as long as its bug free water. As to bottling yeast selection, you'd just want to avoid anything odd. Like I wouldn't use belgian yeast to condition a light lager.

Actually there's probably some wisdom in using the same yeast as the beer so it doesn't ferment lower than the primary yeast did. To make the point, imagine doing a big stout with english yeast, then conditioning with brett... kaboom
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: brewinhard on January 01, 2016, 02:38:16 PM
+1 to what Jim said. Any dry yeast will work for this process and will not impart any flavors due to the minimal activity going on when consuming the small amount of priming sugar.  I think it would be a good idea to rehydrate the yeast which will give it a better chance of evenly mixing with the beer for proper priming.
Probably a good idea as long as its bug free water. As to bottling yeast selection, you'd just want to avoid anything odd. Like I wouldn't use belgian yeast to condition a light lager.

Maybe that's what your helles is missing?   ;D
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: klickitat jim on January 01, 2016, 02:39:31 PM
+1 to what Jim said. Any dry yeast will work for this process and will not impart any flavors due to the minimal activity going on when consuming the small amount of priming sugar.  I think it would be a good idea to rehydrate the yeast which will give it a better chance of evenly mixing with the beer for proper priming.
Probably a good idea as long as its bug free water. As to bottling yeast selection, you'd just want to avoid anything odd. Like I wouldn't use belgian yeast to condition a light lager.

Maybe that's what your helles is missing?   ;D
Yes, its missing that LOL
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: guerrinha on January 01, 2016, 03:04:23 PM
got it guys! will do that now! thanks for the tips!

I will use a s05. I will warn you if everything went fine in few weeks.

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Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: tommymorris on January 01, 2016, 03:06:07 PM

Hi everyone!

Happy new year to you all!

In December/2014 I made an ale with extract, had it fermenting for like 3 weeks, got a good FG and etc.

Then I did as I always do, and leave it at - 3C to mature (in primary). I usually do that for a week. The problem is that it's been there for a year now! hahaha (yes, I had some problems)

I have two questions:

1. will it be a drinkable beer after bottled?
2. are there any yeasts alive there to grant me some co2 after I put some priming sugar and bottle it?

Thanks!
I think you should try a sample before bottling. If it sat on the yeast cake for a year their could be some autolysis (yeast dying and leaving off flavors).
Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: guerrinha on January 01, 2016, 05:01:58 PM
hey alestateall!
I tasted! it's not showing any off flavours (to my limited tasting skills)
I already started bottling! thanks for the attention.

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Title: Re: Long time maturing ale
Post by: tommymorris on January 08, 2016, 02:03:23 AM

hey alestateall!
I tasted! it's not showing any off flavours (to my limited tasting skills)
I already started bottling! thanks for the attention.

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Awesome! Glad it worked out. Time to make another batch.