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General Category => Ingredients => Topic started by: zimcod on February 21, 2017, 12:39:02 am

Title: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: zimcod on February 21, 2017, 12:39:02 am
I recently had a friend bring up a very valid point to me:

When it comes to adding spices, fruit, etc... there seems to be about 45 different ways people on blogs and forums and books tell you.

Ex. I was researching on how to add coffee to my imperial stout recipe and I read about grinding it up, keeping it whole, adding it during the mash, adding it during the boil, adding it during primary, adding it during secondary, "hopbacking" it, frenchpressing it into an extract, letting it sit in highproof, making a cold brew out of it and the list goes on. 95% of the sources didn't explain why, how, or the flavor contributions especially when it comes to the acidity of coffee. I find this to be true in a lot of additions to beer, there seems to be a lot of gaps as to why certain methods are used over others when it comes to sanitizing and adding adjuncts, as well as their overall effects on flavor, aroma, and color.

Are there any reliable resources (preferably one spot, such as a book) that explain adjunct additions in depth? thank you 
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Stevie on February 21, 2017, 08:50:26 am
It's all based on experience. "I did this and it worked, i bet it would work for you too."

When it comes to coffee I like cold brew because I like the flavor and I can dose the keg to my tastes.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: HoosierBrew on February 21, 2017, 09:16:42 am
When it comes to adding spices, fruit, etc... there seems to be about 45 different ways people on blogs and forums and books tell you.


There's a reason for that - in brewing there are multiple ways to do many things. Hopping, adding coffee, spices, etc, can be used in different ways to satisfactory results. Steve is right - it comes down to experience with multiple approaches to find the one you like best. No one publication has the 'right' way to do everything because it's subjective. For example, I like to coarsely crush coffee beans and add them at the end of fermentation, sample each day untilthe flavor is where I want, then package. As for hopping, I like to whirlpool hop/steep, and dry hop in the keg. Other brewers here have different approaches.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: dmtaylor on February 21, 2017, 09:59:20 am
Ask the guy who makes the best version of whatever it is that you have ever tasted, and ignore all others.  Everyone has an opinion, but only the best guy knows the best way.  Or gal, of course, of course.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: denny on February 21, 2017, 10:03:38 am
My ROT is that if the addition is for flavor or aroma (as opposed to only fermentables) add it as late as possible.  For something that has sugar, add it to a secondary fermenter.  For something like coffee or liquor, add at packaging.  For coffee, I use 2 methods...I add some coarsely cracked beans to a secondary, which gives me aroma and a bit of flavor.  Then at packaging I add strong espresso to taste.  By doing it that way you don't have to guess at the amount to add.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: reverseapachemaster on February 21, 2017, 10:37:09 am
The reason you see so many options is because there's isn't one right answer. Coffee is a really good example. There are a lot of ways to add it to beer. They all work and will give different character. OTOH some potential additions have a more limited range of useful preparations or techniques.

This is one of those topics where explaining what you want from the adjunct in a question is likely to net the better answer than reading all possible options and picking out of the dark.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: bayareabrewer on February 21, 2017, 10:39:01 am
I recently had a friend bring up a very valid point to me:

When it comes to adding spices, fruit, etc... there seems to be about 45 different ways people on blogs and forums and books tell you.

Ex. I was researching on how to add coffee to my imperial stout recipe and I read about grinding it up, keeping it whole, adding it during the mash, adding it during the boil, adding it during primary, adding it during secondary, "hopbacking" it, frenchpressing it into an extract, letting it sit in highproof, making a cold brew out of it and the list goes on. 95% of the sources didn't explain why, how, or the flavor contributions especially when it comes to the acidity of coffee. I find this to be true in a lot of additions to beer, there seems to be a lot of gaps as to why certain methods are used over others when it comes to sanitizing and adding adjuncts, as well as their overall effects on flavor, aroma, and color.

Are there any reliable resources (preferably one spot, such as a book) that explain adjunct additions in depth? thank you

I've never heard of a book that delves deep into the subject. It'd be interesting to read

. I've heard that the "biotransformation" of hops that is all the rave right now might also be applicable to coriander and some other spices.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: dmtaylor on February 21, 2017, 11:06:36 am
I've heard that the "biotransformation" of hops that is all the rave right now might also be applicable to coriander and some other spices.

In theory, I think biotransformation is possible.  In practice, I think it's a bunch of hype that doesn't actually do much of what they say.  But maybe that's just me, always the skeptic until someone hands me a blind triangle experiment, which never ever happens.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: denny on February 21, 2017, 11:23:42 am
I've heard that the "biotransformation" of hops that is all the rave right now might also be applicable to coriander and some other spices.

In theory, I think biotransformation is possible.  In practice, I think it's a bunch of hype that doesn't actually do much of what they say.  But maybe that's just me, always the skeptic until someone hands me a blind triangle experiment, which never ever happens.

Dave, I can assure you biotransformation is real and to me, undesirable.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: dmtaylor on February 21, 2017, 11:30:06 am
I've heard that the "biotransformation" of hops that is all the rave right now might also be applicable to coriander and some other spices.

In theory, I think biotransformation is possible.  In practice, I think it's a bunch of hype that doesn't actually do much of what they say.  But maybe that's just me, always the skeptic until someone hands me a blind triangle experiment, which never ever happens.

Dave, I can assure you biotransformation is real and to me, undesirable.

If anything, your conclusion of "undesirable" has been my tentative conclusion as well.  I've been turned off by many of the new and supposedly exciting Bretts and sours and American wilds.  I think the Belgians of old know more what the heck they're doing.  But, opinions (from me, anyway) don't mean a whole helluva lot either.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: zimcod on February 21, 2017, 04:53:06 pm
Would a book about variations on adding different adjuncts, spices, fruits at various points for reasons x, y, z and pros and cons as to why different methods are used and which methods to avoid be a good resource? It is a subject matter that fascinates me and that sometimes even how you would boil/ heat one ingredient from a very similar one differs greatly. I'm in planning stages of writing a book about sanitary ways of adding ingredients to beer but was wondering if there is interest and how needed this information is. With that thought in mind, would you guys say this is something that would be a great resource or too broad of a topic? (Because I definitely don't mind slowly writing a new encyclopedic source in this regard)

for an example of formatting: http://www.brewjayofficial.com/blog/2017/2/21/grapefruit-meets-beer

I'm very open to suggestions and constructive criticism, thanks!
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Andor on February 26, 2017, 03:23:20 pm
I recently had a friend bring up a very valid point to me:

When it comes to adding spices, fruit, etc... there seems to be about 45 different ways people on blogs and forums and books tell you.

Ex. I was researching on how to add coffee to my imperial stout recipe and I read about grinding it up, keeping it whole, adding it during the mash, adding it during the boil, adding it during primary, adding it during secondary, "hopbacking" it, frenchpressing it into an extract, letting it sit in highproof, making a cold brew out of it and the list goes on. 95% of the sources didn't explain why, how, or the flavor contributions especially when it comes to the acidity of coffee. I find this to be true in a lot of additions to beer, there seems to be a lot of gaps as to why certain methods are used over others when it comes to sanitizing and adding adjuncts, as well as their overall effects on flavor, aroma, and color.

Are there any reliable resources (preferably one spot, such as a book) that explain adjunct additions in depth? thank you


For coffee I do a cold brew and add at packaging. My dosage is 2.5 oz of freshly ground coffee steeped in 16oz cold water for 24 hours. For me the results are perfect. The essence of whatever coffee I use comes through without the burnt acidic flavors that would clash with the flavors of the stout. I just tapped a coffee oatmeal stout with this method and it's aroma is like sticking your nose in a bag of fresh coffee beans. I got the idea for the cold brew method from a zymurgy article
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: jjpeanasky on February 27, 2017, 06:32:22 pm

For coffee I do a cold brew and add at packaging. My dosage is 2.5 oz of freshly ground coffee steeped in 16oz cold water for 24 hours. For me the results are perfect. The essence of whatever coffee I use comes through without the burnt acidic flavors that would clash with the flavors of the stout. I just tapped a coffee oatmeal stout with this method and it's aroma is like sticking your nose in a bag of fresh coffee beans. I got the idea for the cold brew method from a zymurgy article
Is that for a 5 gallon batch?

-Josh Peanasky
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Andor on March 01, 2017, 05:47:13 am

For coffee I do a cold brew and add at packaging. My dosage is 2.5 oz of freshly ground coffee steeped in 16oz cold water for 24 hours. For me the results are perfect. The essence of whatever coffee I use comes through without the burnt acidic flavors that would clash with the flavors of the stout. I just tapped a coffee oatmeal stout with this method and it's aroma is like sticking your nose in a bag of fresh coffee beans. I got the idea for the cold brew method from a zymurgy article
Is that for a 5 gallon batch?
-Josh Peanasky


Yes, well I brew 5.25 but close enough
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: bayareabrewer on March 01, 2017, 02:08:52 pm
Speaking of adjuncts, has anyone used this? http://www.traderjoes.com/fearless-flyer/article/1708


It's the Trader Joe's coffee concentrate
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Stevie on March 01, 2017, 02:17:20 pm
I'm sure it's as good as most others. It is more concentrated at a 1:2 ratio versus 1:1 that most cold brews recommend. It's about the same volume of coffee I would shoot for from a half pound of coffee. Big bang with little volume.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Phil_M on March 01, 2017, 08:54:46 pm
Didn't someone on here put Autocrat coffee syrup in a beer?
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: dmtaylor on March 02, 2017, 06:01:37 am
Didn't someone on here put Autocrat coffee syrup in a beer?

I haven't, but that sounds tasty to me... I'm sure you'd need to use at least a whole jug or two of it, plus it has a lot of sugar so you'd need to account for that in your recipe.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Phil_M on March 02, 2017, 07:57:13 am
Yeah...I'm thinking Autocrat in a milk stout...maybe find a nice British milk stout that calls for sugar adjucts, use the sugar in the Autocrat to that end...
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: dmtaylor on March 02, 2017, 08:12:45 am
Keep in mind, the sugars are fermentable.  Need to be added before fermentation is complete, and of course in a milk stout, need to use lactose to bring up the sweetness since that is unfermentable.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: jimmykx250 on March 02, 2017, 05:05:19 pm
Can anyone share their coldbrew technique for coffee?


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Title: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Stevie on March 02, 2017, 07:46:25 pm
Add coffee to water and let sit. ;)

For beer I use 8oz of coffee in a 2 quart Mason jar filled to the top with bottled water. Use a hop sack to contain the grounds. I like the results from steeping at room temp over in the fridge, but I like the fridge for settling out fine bits. Because of this I normal go for about 12 hours on the counter and then another 8 or so in the fridge. It's ok to shake it up from time to time, the key to clear extract is to not stir it up to much before pulling the sack and decanting decanting. This procedure will get you a quart plus some. I like to add a quart and then add half and half to the rest.

The wife just bought me one of these for Christmas and it's a bit small for a half pound, but works well for everyday use at about 5-6 oz for 1:1 concentrate. The screen is really well made and sturdy.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01ATJ6AJG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_wInUyb36B6ZKJ
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Pricelessbrewing on March 02, 2017, 08:33:09 pm
I use cold brew in my coffee stouts regularly, and have drank that cold brew before. It's good, I would have no qualms with using it. Although I'm not sure it adheres to LODO procedure  ;)
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: jimmykx250 on March 03, 2017, 02:19:29 am
Add coffee to water and let sit. ;)

For beer I use 8oz of coffee in a 2 quart Mason jar filled to the top with bottled water. Use a hop sack to contain the grounds. I like the results from steeping at room temp over in the fridge, but I like the fridge for settling out fine bits. Because of this I normal go for about 12 hours on the counter and then another 8 or so in the fridge. It's ok to shake it up from time to time, the key to clear extract is to not stir it up to much before pulling the sack and decanting decanting. This procedure will get you a quart plus some. I like to add a quart and then add half and half to the rest.

The wife just bought me one of these for Christmas and it's a bit small for a half pound, but works well for everyday use at about 5-6 oz for 1:1 concentrate. The screen is really well made and sturdy.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01ATJ6AJG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_wInUyb36B6ZKJ
Thanks im a coffee guy but never tried it cold. I will now.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Lazy Ant Brewing on March 04, 2017, 05:33:59 am
I recently had a friend bring up a very valid point to me:

When it comes to adding spices, fruit, etc... there seems to be about 45 different ways people on blogs and forums and books tell you.

Ex. I was researching on how to add coffee to my imperial stout recipe and I read about grinding it up, keeping it whole, adding it during the mash, adding it during the boil, adding it during primary, adding it during secondary, "hopbacking" it, frenchpressing it into an extract, letting it sit in highproof, making a cold brew out of it and the list goes on. 95% of the sources didn't explain why, how, or the flavor contributions especially when it comes to the acidity of coffee. I find this to be true in a lot of additions to beer, there seems to be a lot of gaps as to why certain methods are used over others when it comes to sanitizing and adding adjuncts, as well as their overall effects on flavor, aroma, and color.

Are there any reliable resources (preferably one spot, such as a book) that explain adjunct additions in depth? thank you

I've never heard of a book that delves deep into the subject. It'd be interesting to read

. I've heard that the "biotransformation" of hops that is all the rave right now might also be applicable to coriander and some other spices.
Title: Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
Post by: Lazy Ant Brewing on March 04, 2017, 05:45:12 am
Biotransformation is just another fancy term for an organic chemical reaction--thank goodness yeast do this or we wouldn't have beer at all!

That some strains of yeast can chemically react with some of the organic compounds in hops isn't any different in principal from the hundreds of other organic chemical reactions that occur during fermentation to make the liquids we crave.