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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: lumpyloaf on June 05, 2017, 09:46:15 PM

Title: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: lumpyloaf on June 05, 2017, 09:46:15 PM
 hello all, I just brewed an Ale. 10lbs American pale  2row (aka briess I believe), .5 lbs crystal 60, 1 lb table sugar, 1 oz Bravo hops, and 1 packet of US-05 dry yeast.  I did a brew in a bag method in a 5 gallon pot and would add boiling water as needed during my hop boil time in order to finish with about 5 gallons, more like 4.75 gallons.  My OG was 1.064, and I am curious to know if anyone could tell me what sort of FG I should be shooting for? I will be checking with a hydrometer to see what I end up with, I just threw this recipe together real quick but have no idea what sort of ABV I may end up with!
Thanks!
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: ynotbrusum on June 05, 2017, 09:58:19 PM
Folks will tell you about the Fast Ferment Test, which can give you a fairly quick determination that is batch specific for final gravity.  However, that requires pulling some of the wort off at the point of chilling, prior to fermentation.  My guess based on the recipe - and it is a complete WAG here - would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.010.  At this point simply let it ferment out and gravity test it at the end after activity subsides.  Done = 3 days with no change in gravity.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!  Cheers.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: Nathan on June 05, 2017, 10:01:21 PM
The sugar should lighten the body and that yeast attenuated well so should finish fairly dry I don't know your mash or fermentation temps but sounds like more of a pint or two kind of beer rather than a session ale for an all day fishing trip


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Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: The Beerery on June 05, 2017, 10:02:51 PM
Folks will tell you about the Fast Ferment Test, which can give you a fairly quick determination that is batch specific for final gravity.  However, that requires pulling some of the wort off at the point of chilling, prior to fermentation.  My guess based on the recipe - and it is a complete WAG here - would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.010.  At this point simply let it ferment out and gravity test it at the end after activity subsides.  Done = 3 days with no change in gravity.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!  Cheers.

Actually my FFT is pulled off after yeast is pitched. This way it more accurately represents actual attenuation characteristics of the yeast used.

Just go ahead and pull a few hundred or so ml and put it on a stir plate, or if you don't have one a sanitized jar works, and then shake it every time you remember/walk by. In a day or 2 you should have a very close representation of your FG. Easy peasy.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: lumpyloaf on June 05, 2017, 10:23:08 PM
Thanks for the feedback! I was expecting a lower OG, which is why I added the sugar. My mash temp was a pretty consistent 154.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: Phil_M on June 05, 2017, 10:40:00 PM
I'm drinking an all-grain beer of mine that was mashed at 152 for an hour, and also features a pound of sugar. (Invert syrup, in my case.) OG was 1.052.

Mine finished at 1.002, but still has plenty of body. If your beer finishes this low, make sure you're careful with how you carbonate it. Too much CO2, and it'll definitely get thin. Aim for a more British level of carbonation, and things will be fine.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: brewinhard on June 05, 2017, 11:20:18 PM
If your mash thermometer is properly calibrated I would bet you will finish anywhere between 1.008 and 1.014.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: ynotbrusum on June 06, 2017, 11:43:00 AM
Folks will tell you about the Fast Ferment Test, which can give you a fairly quick determination that is batch specific for final gravity.  However, that requires pulling some of the wort off at the point of chilling, prior to fermentation.  My guess based on the recipe - and it is a complete WAG here - would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.010.  At this point simply let it ferment out and gravity test it at the end after activity subsides.  Done = 3 days with no change in gravity.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!  Cheers.

Actually my FFT is pulled off after yeast is pitched. This way it more accurately represents actual attenuation characteristics of the yeast used.

Just go ahead and pull a few hundred or so ml and put it on a stir plate, or if you don't have one a sanitized jar works, and then shake it every time you remember/walk by. In a day or 2 you should have a very close representation of your FG. Easy peasy.

Yes, I would take that to be before fermentation has taken hold with the batch....if the OP caught it quickly enough, he could grab the sample that same day as pitching.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: The Beerery on June 06, 2017, 01:42:16 PM
Folks will tell you about the Fast Ferment Test, which can give you a fairly quick determination that is batch specific for final gravity.  However, that requires pulling some of the wort off at the point of chilling, prior to fermentation.  My guess based on the recipe - and it is a complete WAG here - would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.010.  At this point simply let it ferment out and gravity test it at the end after activity subsides.  Done = 3 days with no change in gravity.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!  Cheers.

Actually my FFT is pulled off after yeast is pitched. This way it more accurately represents actual attenuation characteristics of the yeast used.

Just go ahead and pull a few hundred or so ml and put it on a stir plate, or if you don't have one a sanitized jar works, and then shake it every time you remember/walk by. In a day or 2 you should have a very close representation of your FG. Easy peasy.

Yes, I would take that to be before fermentation has taken hold with the batch....if the OP caught it quickly enough, he could grab the sample that same day as pitching.

No, actually.. here:
http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/uncategorized/the-easy-fast-ferment-test-fft/
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: ynotbrusum on June 06, 2017, 02:29:40 PM
By "yes", I meant that I agree with you.  Not being snarky.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: The Beerery on June 06, 2017, 02:39:02 PM
By "yes", I meant that I agree with you.  Not being snarky.


No worries, I didn't take it as such. Just posted the link for clarification on my part.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: BrodyR on June 07, 2017, 02:56:07 AM
Folks will tell you about the Fast Ferment Test, which can give you a fairly quick determination that is batch specific for final gravity.  However, that requires pulling some of the wort off at the point of chilling, prior to fermentation.  My guess based on the recipe - and it is a complete WAG here - would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.010.  At this point simply let it ferment out and gravity test it at the end after activity subsides.  Done = 3 days with no change in gravity.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!  Cheers.

Actually my FFT is pulled off after yeast is pitched. This way it more accurately represents actual attenuation characteristics of the yeast used.

Just go ahead and pull a few hundred or so ml and put it on a stir plate, or if you don't have one a sanitized jar works, and then shake it every time you remember/walk by. In a day or 2 you should have a very close representation of your FG. Easy peasy.

Yes, I would take that to be before fermentation has taken hold with the batch....if the OP caught it quickly enough, he could grab the sample that same day as pitching.

No, actually.. here:
http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/uncategorized/the-easy-fast-ferment-test-fft/

Good idea. Much easier than the traditional method I've tried (from Kai I think)
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: Big Monk on June 07, 2017, 03:12:43 AM
Folks will tell you about the Fast Ferment Test, which can give you a fairly quick determination that is batch specific for final gravity.  However, that requires pulling some of the wort off at the point of chilling, prior to fermentation.  My guess based on the recipe - and it is a complete WAG here - would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.010.  At this point simply let it ferment out and gravity test it at the end after activity subsides.  Done = 3 days with no change in gravity.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!  Cheers.

Actually my FFT is pulled off after yeast is pitched. This way it more accurately represents actual attenuation characteristics of the yeast used.

Just go ahead and pull a few hundred or so ml and put it on a stir plate, or if you don't have one a sanitized jar works, and then shake it every time you remember/walk by. In a day or 2 you should have a very close representation of your FG. Easy peasy.

Yes, I would take that to be before fermentation has taken hold with the batch....if the OP caught it quickly enough, he could grab the sample that same day as pitching.

No, actually.. here:
http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/uncategorized/the-easy-fast-ferment-test-fft/

Good idea. Much easier than the traditional method I've tried (from Kai I think)

Works like gangbusters and is more representative of the actual batch.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: narvin on June 07, 2017, 04:35:45 AM
hello all, I just brewed an Ale. 10lbs American pale  2row (aka briess I believe), .5 lbs crystal 60, 1 lb table sugar, 1 oz Bravo hops, and 1 packet of US-05 dry yeast.  I did a brew in a bag method in a 5 gallon pot and would add boiling water as needed during my hop boil time in order to finish with about 5 gallons, more like 4.75 gallons.  My OG was 1.064, and I am curious to know if anyone could tell me what sort of FG I should be shooting for? I will be checking with a hydrometer to see what I end up with, I just threw this recipe together real quick but have no idea what sort of ABV I may end up with!
Thanks!

1.011.

Seriously though... there are a lot of variables here.  but with that amount of sugar, the OG, and US-05, pretty much any mash temp should get you down to 1.008 - 1.012 I'd think.
Title: Re: What FG should I be shooting for
Post by: narvin on June 07, 2017, 04:40:14 AM
I'm drinking an all-grain beer of mine that was mashed at 152 for an hour, and also features a pound of sugar. (Invert syrup, in my case.) OG was 1.052.

Mine finished at 1.002, but still has plenty of body. If your beer finishes this low, make sure you're careful with how you carbonate it. Too much CO2, and it'll definitely get thin. Aim for a more British level of carbonation, and things will be fine.

Curious, which yeast strain?  Some people get superattenuation like this but I never have, even with a true pitch of Dupont cultured yeast (made it to 1.004).  Not judging  :D