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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: beerocd on November 14, 2009, 01:54:27 AM

Title: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on November 14, 2009, 01:54:27 AM
Dunno about you guys but I just lose my mind when the omlette doesn't slip right out, picture perfect. So I've mostly been buying a new one every 12-18 months. Where'd the non-stick part go?  :-\
Anyhow - longest lasting pan I've had to date is from Pampered Chef - around 3 years, and about time for another one.
Anyone got something better? (buttload of butter is not the right answer)

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tubercle on November 14, 2009, 02:01:18 AM
I use my wife's great-grandmothers cast iron skillet. Nothing sticks to it.

I don't use pots or pans with a non-stick coating. That crap is poisonous.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tygo on November 14, 2009, 02:05:31 AM
I really liked my Calphalon non-stick omelet pan for about 4.5 years.  Then the non-stick stuff started to flake off.  With heavy use I just don't think they last that long.  I'm thinking of getting and conditioning a cast iron skillet for eggs and meat and a stainless steel tri-ply saute pan for everything else.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on November 14, 2009, 03:19:03 AM
Tubercle, you don't do omlettes in cast iron do you?
I know the wonders of cast iron, have 4 pans and a dutch oven for bread baking.
Use cast iron for pretty much everything but eggs.

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: pdbreen on November 14, 2009, 03:21:32 AM
I've got all kinds of all-clad, but I just love my Lodge cast iron!  I only have one (got it to make cornbread), but it's become my everyday pan.

No soap for you!
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 14, 2009, 03:38:54 AM
Non stick pans or Teflon or whatever, is like the training wheels of cooking.

Just let go and get real pans. They will last a life time.

Al-clads are great.

Omelets come out of a well seasoned cast iron pan great.

The most important rule is timing. Hot pan, cold oil food wont stick.

For me non stick pans suck. But I can see how they are useful to the every day guy.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tygo on November 14, 2009, 04:01:24 AM
I agree capozzoli.  I don't see myself buying any non-stick pans again.  It's either stainless or cast iron from here on out.  Although I do have my eye on a porcelain enamel dutch oven...
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 14, 2009, 04:15:50 AM
O yeah man. That sounds sweet!

Im in the market for a new dutch oven. Man, even the old used ones are not cheap.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: narvin on November 14, 2009, 04:23:55 AM
Lodge Logic pre-seasoned cast iron skillets rock.  About $25 wherever you can find them (got mine at Bass Pro Shops).  Pre-sesasoned, 12 " skillet that is great for the stove, or camping, or anything.  As long as you keep it seasoned, it will never stick.

America's Test Kitchen rated this the top bargain for non-stick pans, too.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tygo on November 14, 2009, 06:14:10 AM
The cast iron dutch ovens are relatively inexpensive.  But yeah, the porcelain enamel ones are not cheap at all.  Which is why I don't have one yet.  But they look very nice.  I'm trying to reboot my homebrewing system at the moment so my expendable $ are going there instead of the cooking hobby.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: nicneufeld on November 14, 2009, 01:36:48 PM
Non stick pans or Teflon or whatever, is like the training wheels of cooking. 

Generally I agree, and I like my stainless pans most of all (they are hand me downs, and not supreme quality, but they do the job), but I have seen a lot of respectable expert cooks wielding (I should stress not hawking) non-stick pans on occasion.  In recent memory, Jacques Pepin and she who is your avatar!

I occasionally use a non-stick griddle pan for breakfast stuff...but all the rest of the nonstick stuff got scraped and destroyed and has since gone in the trash.  I don't like working with cast iron, so its stainless steel and LOTS of BUTTER for me!  :D
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: scottyb on November 14, 2009, 02:09:22 PM
The cook in our family, the wife, has had two Emeril cook pans for two years now and she says they are the best non-stick she has ever used.  We also have/use cast iron and SS Wolfgang Puck pots and pans.  Recently she found a 3 gal Calphalon stock pot on Amazon for $30 and a Calphalon flat iron griddle for $5 at a yard sale.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 14, 2009, 02:57:29 PM
I have an All-Clad non-stick omelette pan that's been working great for several years.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: nicneufeld on November 14, 2009, 03:16:54 PM
Cap I just thought what all the forumites need to chip in and get you for your birthday or something...a non-stick crock pot!!!!

 ;D  ;)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on November 14, 2009, 04:09:01 PM

For me non stick pans suck. But I can see how they are useful to the every day guy.

OK, since you said I suck (or am I being too sensitive?) I went ahead and tried making omelettes this morning.
I used a tablespoon of butter, and was able to flip them even - they just look a little more rustic than what I was serving out of the non-stick. The higher sides of the pan make it more difficult to flip, and I have to wear an ove-glove; but I was surprised that I was actually able to turn out some decent omelettes.

Sometimes you just need a little shove from a fellow brewer.  ;)

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 14, 2009, 06:00:27 PM
Aw man, I didnt mean to imply that you suck. :)

And non stick pans are great for eggs.

Just that once you figure it out, you dont need nonstick.

They are also great for amateurs.

Jack and Julia only use non stick because they are demonstrating to the masses. Not necessarily pros, lie us.

Try these tips to get some non-stick action from cast iron or SS.

First and most of all, cold oil hot pan. Meaning heat the pan up really well then add oil immediately before you add the eggs, or food to be cooked.

There are a couple of inherent problems with butter. One is that if you add a pat of butter to the pan by the time it melts it will be as hot as the pan itself before adding the eggs. They will most likely stick.

Also the milk solids in the butter can start to burn before the egg is well cooked. Also the browning milk solids can make the egg brown more easily as well. Some find this brown on the eggs, scrambled or fried, undesirable.

Try making clarified butter. It is not very hard and works great in all of your cooking where frying or sauteing in butter is desired.

This is also called ghee in Indian cooking.

Here is Alton Browns method for making clarified butter.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/ghee-recipe/index.html.

If you apply the hot pan cold oil method with the ghee, you will get great omelets every time. With a clarified butter flavor like no other.

Now, let me tell you about fritatas. You cook them in your oven. You will cook a fritata once and you will never go back to omelets again. Trust me.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: smurfe on November 14, 2009, 10:10:06 PM
I have two non-stick skillets. A 12 inch Caphalon and a 6" All Clad. Both are around 10 years old. The 12" gets used a lot, almost daily. Keys to those are never ever ever ever use a metal utensil in them or even a wooden spoon. Use silicon utensils and use moderate heat as well. Also, when you wash them, never put them in the dishwasher or use any kind of abrasive scouring pad, even the nylon. That said though, I use a 12" All Clad stainless skillet the most here and occasionally the cast iron skillet that I have that was my grandmothers and it probably 60-70 years old. We use a lot of cast iron cookware. I have a Le Creuset Dutch oven and a Batali Risotto Pan which is just a large coated cast iron saucier pan. Love these pieces and are very non-stick as well.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 15, 2009, 12:20:26 AM
I love using cast iron.  I have a Le Creuset dutch oven and a braising pan -- awesome cookware.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tygo on November 15, 2009, 02:45:42 AM
I love using cast iron.  I have a Le Creuset dutch oven and a braising pan -- awesome cookware.

The dutch oven is one of the porcelain enamel ones?  I'm assuming they're pretty low maintenance as opposed to bare cast iron, right?
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 15, 2009, 01:41:33 PM
Yes, it's enameled cast iron, so it's not as much maintenance as the bare stuff.  I use a raw cast iron skillet for toasting/roasting chiles (fresh and dried), garlic, onion, and for making homemade tortillas.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 15, 2009, 03:57:17 PM
Made a fritata this AM.

It is made with eggs, bacon, broccoli, potatoes and bread with some tomato slices and parm cheese on top.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-6.jpg)

Just precook your potatoes and broccoli. and put them in a oiled oven pan.

In a bowl add eggs, chopped bacon, salt pepper, herbs and spices if desired. A fist full of cubed bread(stale is best) and a teaspoon of baking powder.

Mix well and set aside till the bread gets soft and wet.

Then put the egg mixture on top of the of the veg in the oven pan, top with cheese and tomatoes if desired. Put into a 35o degrees oven until it rises and a tooth pick comes out clean.

Good stuff......too hell with omelets, too much trouble.  ;) and you dont need a non-stick pan to make them.

you can also make a lot for more people with out the added labor of making each omelet. Just use a bigger pan and more eggs.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-9.jpg)

Another good thing about this dish is you can make it with eggs and just about anything that is in the fridge. You can use rice, tortillas, even pasta. It is great with tomato sauce on them or gravy.


Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on November 15, 2009, 04:04:37 PM

They are also great for amateurs.


I made a fritata with crushed potato chips a couple of times, saw it in a food mag. The potato chips rehydrate while they're cooking. Omelettes just seem faster.
You popped up your pictures while I was posting, I've done it in a LARGE cast iron pan and then flip it out onto a serving plate.

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Jon on November 15, 2009, 07:17:47 PM
Made a fritata this AM.

It is made with eggs, bacon, broccoli, potatoes and bread with some tomato slices and parm cheese on top. 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie001-6.jpg)

Just precook your potatoes and broccoli. and put them in a oiled oven pan.

In a bowl add eggs, chopped bacon, salt pepper, herbs and spices if desired. A fist full of cubed bread(stale is best) and a teaspoon of baking powder.

Mix well and set aside till the bread gets soft and wet.

Then put the egg mixture on top of the of the veg in the oven pan, top with cheese and tomatoes if desired. Put into a 35o degrees oven until it rises and a tooth pick comes out clean.

Good stuff......too hell with omelets, too much trouble.  ;) and you dont need a non-stick pan to make them.

you can also make a lot for more people with out the added labor of making each omelet. Just use a bigger pan and more eggs.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Pie002-9.jpg)

Another good thing about this dish is you can make it with eggs and just about anything that is in the fridge. You can use rice, tortillas, even pasta. It is great with tomato sauce on them or gravy.




That is not a frittata its a casserole. A frittata is started in a skillet on the stove and finished in the oven. Although what you have made looks and I bet tastes very good.  ;)

Dont fear non-stick pans. They are not a crutch like some would like you to believe. There are plenty of "Real" Chefs that use them. The best place to get them is your local restaurant supply store. They are cheap there and tend to outlast the more expensive department store brands. 

Not trying to step on anyones toes, just my opinion. SWMBO says I have plenty of them. :)

Jon
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 15, 2009, 09:49:22 PM
No worries about stepping on toes there Jon. Debating is learning.

Ill have to disagree with you on the frittata thing though. I learned how to make frittatas when I worked as an Italian chef. And I learned it from old timers. So I would like to THINK I know w little bit about Italian food.

 The only reason to start it on the stove is when it is really big and thick, cause if its thick and cooked in the oven the eggs will over cook on the outside before they completely cook on the inside.

You can make them on the stove top, the oven or both. Doesn't make a difference. Basically it is an omelet that isn't turned and folded over. instead it is made like above.

For me the oven method  works best  when busy cause you can just throw everything into the pan pour over the eggs and be done with it.

Now . casserole, that is a different story all together. Around here that means a hodge podge of 'whatever' baked in the oven.

Like my moms tuna casserole surprise. eeewww

As for the nonstick pans. I just don't like them. I want to cook with metal tools, not plastic ones. Nothing wrong with using them. Its just that if food doesn't stick for you on regular pans then why use non stick?
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Jon on November 15, 2009, 10:04:58 PM
It's hard to argue the point when you learned it from where it came from. In any case your recipe will be in my oven next sunday morning.

99% of the time when I cook inside it's with SS or Cast Iron. The other 1% is non-stick. SWMBO dosent like the brown stuff in her eggs. Out side it's cast iron grates.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 15, 2009, 10:10:57 PM
I know what you mean about the brown on eggs. My wife is the same way.

I only like the brown on eggs when cheese is involved.

I do have a non stick pan though. It is a tawa pan, a special pan for making Indian and Ethiopian pan breads. Mostly I use it for making injeras. I cant do it with out a nonstick pan, not sure I ever will.

I need a non stick brew kettle so my extract brews dont burn so easily.  ::)


Oh and you know when we make that egg dish the most? When we go down the shore for a weekend. We stuff it with potatoes, asparagus, scallops, shrimp, and crab meat. Then we top it with wads of provolone cheese.

OMG, so f-in good!
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on November 16, 2009, 02:19:41 AM
... when I worked as an Italian chef.
 

Just saw your pic in another thread....

(http://www.printedclothing.com/contents/media/pc525%20never%20trust%20a%20skinny%20chef.jpg)

j/k  ;)

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on November 16, 2009, 02:39:26 AM
I need a non stick brew kettle so my extract brews dont burn so easily.  ::)
Just turn your burner off when you add the extract.
No non stick brew kettle needed :)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 16, 2009, 02:45:40 AM
HA! that is funny.

I used to have an apron that said that.

I wasn't so skinny when I worked as a cook, that is for sure.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tubercle on November 16, 2009, 05:42:09 PM
My wife's great-grandmother's frying pan. Must be ~ 100 years old. Slick as glass and an omelet will slide right out.
I've got about a half dozen cast pans but this is my favorite because the sides are a little deeper. Just right for cornbread. Of all of the pots and pans I have this is the workhorse. That and my cast dutch oven.

 Hasn't had a drop of soap in it since we got it about 20 years ago.

 (http://i720.photobucket.com/albums/ww207/tubercle_photo/DSCN1355.jpg)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on November 16, 2009, 10:06:55 PM
Love them, and works ten times better than non stick.  

A lot of people think it takes a long time , perhaps 100 years to build a seasoning like that. Its not true. When you get new pans just keep a clean paint brush around. Then heat the pans up in the oven. Brush them with oil and let them heat up. Store them in the oven and ever time you turn on the oven brush the pans with a coating of oil. After doing this several times it will bake on thick and you will have beautifully seasoned cast iron.

Then like said above never use soap.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: riverrat on November 16, 2009, 10:26:43 PM
New cast iron pans tend to have a rough texture to them, while really old ones are smooth.  Is this due to cheaper casting process now, lack of seasoning, lack of use, something else?  I have a couple old cast iron pans (skillet dutch oven, etc.) and a couple newer cast iron pans (griddle, wok, etc...). 

My favorite and most used pan by far (including the new set of all-clad pans) is my old cast iron skillet, because of the smooth finish, excellent food it makes, and easy cleanup (small amount of hot water poured in after food is removed while pan is still hot).
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on November 16, 2009, 10:29:35 PM
New cast iron pans tend to have a rough texture to them, while really old ones are smooth.  Is this due to cheaper casting process now, lack of seasoning, lack of use, something else? 

The roughness in the old pan has been worn down over the years and filled in with "seasoning".

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on November 16, 2009, 10:30:22 PM
Now that is cool. Cast Iron is the way to really cook.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: chauncey on December 01, 2009, 08:58:57 AM
OK – time for my two cents.

All my pans are Calphalon – the hard-anodized ones. I can’t use anything with a non-stick coating because I have birds, and just one slip where you overheat the pan (and who hasn’t), and the birds are dead. It also causes liver damage in humans, but not to the point where you die from it. The government used to publish the dangers of non-stick, but the lobby got it quashed. With some care and the correct temperature, the hard-anodized ones work just as well. My wife likes egg white omelets, and that’s a real test for any pan.

I used to use cast iron, and they work really well when seasoned, but I find that the coating comes off when you cook something with tomatoes in it. Once I discovered Calphalon, I just kept on buying it. Of course I lost a bunch of my cast iron when my lame California surfer roommate put them in the dishwasher because, as he said, “They were really dirty, man.”  I calmly pointed out that it wasn’t “dirt”, but about 10 years of careful seasoning. They were of course solid rust, and I just threw them all in the dumpster.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on December 01, 2009, 03:36:04 PM
Here's the dutch oven I use. Great for Hungarian Goulash.

(http://media.rei.com/media/rr/5b8e11ec-169a-4f9a-9e4d-498e6d9e3564.jpg)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 02, 2009, 06:32:19 PM
Here's the dutch oven I use. Great for Hungarian Goulash.

(http://media.rei.com/media/rr/5b8e11ec-169a-4f9a-9e4d-498e6d9e3564.jpg)

That's my bread pan!

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 06, 2009, 04:02:59 PM
Yuo guys ever seen one of these?

(http://www.factsurplus.co.uk/images/dutch-oven-s_orig.jpg)

This is a "real" Dutch oven. It has a lid with a lip to hold hot coals on top. They usually have legs too.

Here is an image of someone using a Dutch oven in a technique called The Stack.

(http://www.dream-adventures.com/images/do_stack.jpg)

Using dutch ovens with hot coals works especially well if you have a fire place or a wood burning stove. Works great out by the BBQ also.

Of coarse we all know what a real Dutch Oven is...right?
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 06, 2009, 04:27:53 PM
Meh, those are for people who get their rocks off by going to the reenactment thingys. Where you camp out and try to be more primitive than the other guy. And then argue about the spoon you're using or the matches you used to light the fire not being period appropriate.  ???

So, I can be period approriate - or I can actually use it.
I went with the latter; works great in the oven. (Also not period appropriate)

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 06, 2009, 04:40:46 PM
They have those civil war reenactments right down the street from my house. Man is it loud. They should let those people use real ammo.

I want a Potjie pot.

The stew is called potjie, so is the pot.

(http://www.biltongmakers.com/atlas-pot-1.jpg)

(http://www.backtonaturegear.com/knottypine/cooking/PotjieGroupWaterWB.jpg)

(http://gogas.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/potjie-master1.jpg)

(http://www.sa-eshop.com/recipes_Samp+Bean-Potjie_clip_image002.jpg)


.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on December 06, 2009, 06:28:48 PM
Capp...I think you want what's in the pot first.  ;D

I really like that BESTDUTY 10. I think cast iron is the way to go for cooking soups and stews. They're genuine in their tradition too.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 06, 2009, 07:18:24 PM
Capp...I think you want what's in the pot first.  ;D

Didn't want to say anything - could be his wife in the pot. Has that digital camera stamp on it so.......

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 06, 2009, 11:18:45 PM
Not my wife.

But is that the kinda cooks helper we all dream of or what?
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: denny on December 07, 2009, 04:44:20 PM
No, I'm pretty sure there are a lot of people who don't dream of that kind of cook's helper.  Please remember that what you think is funny or appropriate may not be for all, and this is intended to be an all inclusive forum.  I'm not gonna tell ya what to do or edit your post, but I'd appreciate it if you'd remove that pic.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 07, 2009, 11:23:13 PM
Gone, and sorry.

I didnt think that that pic was over the top. And maybe you are right, perhaps she would not make the best cooks helper. Especially if she tried that after the stew was cooking in the kettle.

At the request of some other forum members I also removed the black dude. While he was most likely not intoxicated he was topless and perhaps even bottomless.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bonjour on December 08, 2009, 04:02:21 AM
While I appreciate the "art" of it (I really do)  we are trying to keep this whole forum completely family rated, well except for the beer.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: nicneufeld on December 08, 2009, 02:37:52 PM
I saw "potjie" and I immediately thought Boer...I'll have to try some sort of stew like that over the fire sometime.  I have an inordinate interest in the history of colonial South Africa, particularly the conflicts in the late 1870s and at the turn of the century (2nd AngloBoer War).
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: babalu87 on December 08, 2009, 04:48:41 PM
I want the one on the bottom here

https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/product1_new.asp?menu=logic&idProduct=4044

(https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/storeimages/%7B3ACF279C-E6FE-497B-BB51-E38B573E9D33%7D_LCC3.jpg)

NOT the combo, I have three dutch ovens as it is.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on December 08, 2009, 05:03:23 PM
For the collectors out there...

From 1865 until 1957, Griswold Manufacturing Co. of Erie, Pa., made cast-iron implements that each had a distinctive mark on the back of the piece. The name Griswold is easily recognizable, but the company also used "Erie," "Erie PA" or "Erie PA USA," according to Antiques.About.com.

http://www.roanoke.com/extra/wb/204446

http://www.griswoldcookware.com/history.htm

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_9hKv1CCs0us/SdjpBIKlXOI/AAAAAAAAAlQ/AIhT0Lw7ATc/s400/DSC_0028.JPG)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: redbeerman on December 08, 2009, 08:32:59 PM
No worries about stepping on toes there Jon. Debating is learning.

Ill have to disagree with you on the frittata thing though. I learned how to make frittatas when I worked as an Italian chef. And I learned it from old timers. So I would like to THINK I know w little bit about Italian food.

 The only reason to start it on the stove is when it is really big and thick, cause if its thick and cooked in the oven the eggs will over cook on the outside before they completely cook on the inside.

You can make them on the stove top, the oven or both. Doesn't make a difference. Basically it is an omelet that isn't turned and folded over. instead it is made like above.

For me the oven method  works best  when busy cause you can just throw everything into the pan pour over the eggs and be done with it.

Now . casserole, that is a different story all together. Around here that means a hodge podge of 'whatever' baked in the oven.

Like my moms tuna casserole surprise. eeewww

As for the nonstick pans. I just don't like them. I want to cook with metal tools, not plastic ones. Nothing wrong with using them. Its just that if food doesn't stick for you on regular pans then why use non stick?

Cap, you may have learned from old timers, but maybe they weren't doing it right either ;),  I was taught to use a skillet, too.  As far as nonstick goes, you don't need it if the pan is the right temperature before you add the grease (or other cooking substrate).  The cooking food actually floats on top of a thin layer of whatever while it is cooking.  I use stainless stuff all the time , stuff only sticks if I do something stupid, like leave it on too long or don't let the pan heat up enough first.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 08, 2009, 08:51:31 PM


Ill have to disagree with you on the frittata thing though. I learned how to make frittatas when I worked as an Italian chef. And I learned it from old timers. So I would like to THINK I know w little bit about Italian food.
You can make them on the stove top, the oven or both. Doesn't make a difference. Basically it is an omelet that isn't turned and folded over. instead it is made like above.
Now . casserole, that is a different story all together. Around here that means a hodge podge of 'whatever' baked in the oven.
Cap, you may have learned from old timers, but maybe they weren't doing it right either ;),  I was taught to use a skillet, too.

So to recap -
capp says eggs n stuff  in the oven is a frittata and stuff without eggs is a casserole.

redbeer says it's a casserole because it's in a casserole dish, and a fritata if it's in a skillet. no mention of eggs.

Is this the basic idea?

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: redbeerman on December 08, 2009, 08:56:54 PM
Frittata is with eggs in a skillet.  Sorry for the confusion. :P
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 08, 2009, 09:20:28 PM
Frittata is with eggs in a skillet.  Sorry for the confusion. :P

Eggs in a skillet = fritata
Eggs in a casserole dish = casserole

I got it now, right?

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 12:05:49 AM
Eggs sauteed in a pan then folded over with other ingredients inside = omelet

Eggs with other ingredients mixed in then baked on the stove top or oven in pan or casserole = fritata


Im not really sure where casserole falls in there. I know a casserole to be an oven pan. I also know a few dishes that are called casserole, tuna, green bean etc. I dont know of any "casserole" recipes for eggs.

In my experience... when someone brings out a dish that they call casserole, do what ever you can to leave. FAST!

Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 09, 2009, 12:42:14 AM
Eggs sauteed in a pan then folded over with other ingredients inside = omelet

Eggs with other ingredients mixed in then baked on the stove top or oven in pan or casserole = fritata


Im not really sure where casserole falls in there. I know a casserole to be an oven pan. I also know a few dishes that are called casserole, tuna, green bean etc. I dont know of any "casserole" recipes for eggs.

In my experience... when someone brings out a dish that they call casserole, do what ever you can to leave. FAST!



So when they saute my ingredients in a pan - then ladle on the eggs over that. It's a frittata?
I like my ingredients in the fold of the omelette. I'm just after the nuances of egginess, now. I thought the casserole thing died a while back - but it does seem to bug you.  ::)

-OCD
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 01:15:12 AM
Doesnt bug me in a bad way, it is just interesting.

It may be like colloquial nomenclature or something. dumplings vs pot stickers for example.

A horse by any other name......

I like omelets too. But I really like fritattas. Especially when we have a family get togethers down the shore. We usually make a giant frittata with asparagus, potatoes, buttery homemade croutons, scallops, shrimp topped with sliced ripe fresh jersey beef steaks and cheese. Some blistering strong coffee and you have a Capozzoli's summer time hangin on the beach all day breakfast.

It would just be to much of a PITA to make seafood omelets for everyone.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 09, 2009, 01:42:18 AM
I like the frittatas big and thick, kinda gibanica sized.
And I like my OMELETTES made as omelettes. Not baby frittatas. That's all.

Hey, funny, this thread kinda went full circle. Pretty much started with omelettes.

-OCD

Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on December 09, 2009, 01:48:20 AM
Eggs sauteed in a pan then folded over with other ingredients inside = omelet

Eggs with other ingredients mixed in then baked on the stove top or oven in pan or casserole = fritata


Im not really sure where casserole falls in there. I know a casserole to be an oven pan. I also know a few dishes that are called casserole, tuna, green bean etc. I dont know of any "casserole" recipes for eggs.

In my experience... when someone brings out a dish that they call casserole, do what ever you can to leave. FAST!




Here's the Wikipedia version...

Casserole
 
A casserole, from the French for "saucepan", is a large, deep pot used both in the oven and as a serving vessel. The word casserole is also used for the food cooked and served in such a vessel, with the cookware itself called a "casserole dish". In British English, this type of dish is frequently also called a bake, coinciding with the cooking technique used to cook casseroles.


So there you have it. Anything cooked or baked in that dish is a casserole.  ;)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 02:00:09 AM
So is lasagna a casserole?  :o

 
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on December 09, 2009, 02:14:45 AM
I suppose I could put some dandelions in my casserole dish and it would satisfy the definition.  ;D
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 04:11:48 AM
casserole
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tubercle on December 09, 2009, 12:07:34 PM
So is lasagna a casserole?  :o

 

  Yes, so is mac & cheese.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: babalu87 on December 09, 2009, 06:03:35 PM
Brownies are a casserole?

Chicago Deep Dish Pizza is a casserole?

Apple crisp is a casserole?

I could go on but I think my point has been made
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: tubercle on December 09, 2009, 06:58:15 PM
Brownies are a casserole?

Chicago Deep Dish Pizza is a casserole?

Apple crisp is a casserole?

I could go on but I think my point has been made

 point taken.

 I've always thought of a casserole as a style more than the ingredients. Adding multiple ingredients in a "casserole" dish and baking to make a single side serving always comes to mind. Desserts and main dish doesn't seen to apply.
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: babalu87 on December 09, 2009, 07:04:44 PM
This thread needs some Cassoulet

DROOLING
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 09, 2009, 09:14:32 PM
Chicago Pizza stands on it's own. It cannot be lumped in with other dishes. :D
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 10:38:48 PM
Lasagna was not the best example for the argument against the homogeneous use of the word casserole. 

Lasagna is the Italian word for casserole. That is to say that lasagna refers to the pot in which the dish is cooked in.

In this country the dish has taken on the name of the pan. Lasagna  ::)

Yeah, lets get a cassolet going. Nothing like a big baked mass of beans, sauerkraut and sausage to get ya goin.

Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 09, 2009, 10:49:15 PM
You being funny  ??? - cassoulet is the name of the pan too, a la lasagna. (Looks like pasulj to me)
This should really go into a Peasant food topic. Lot's of good stuff popping up here.
Who'd ever thing to look in non-stick pans?

-OCD


Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: capozzoli on December 09, 2009, 11:24:21 PM
yeah really. Start a Peasant food thread. There is a comfort food thread although I guess that isnt the same.

Maybe we need a hybrid cuisine thread too. Made some hot dogs tonight. They were a mix between Jersey rippers (deep fried dogs) and Chicago dogs. Used dill pickles tomatoes, celery seed.

Cant make authentic Chicago dogs in Philly. Cant get sport peppers, neon green relish or poppy seed hot dog buns. :-[
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: beerocd on December 10, 2009, 12:15:01 AM
yeah really. Start a Peasant food thread. There is a comfort food thread although I guess that isnt the same.

Maybe we need a hybrid cuisine thread too. Made some hot dogs tonight. They were a mix between Jersey rippers (deep fried dogs) and Chicago dogs. Used dill pickles tomatoes, celery seed.

Cant make authentic Chicago dogs in Philly. Cant get sport peppers, neon green relish or poppy seed hot dog buns. :-[

Great - hot dog recipes....
First you need one of those hot dog carousels.(I'm not kidding! hot, cool, hot, cool eventually gives it this carmelization - just WOW) Good fresh buns - steamed. Mustard, onion, relish, cuke sliver, tomato slices - celery salt. Sports are good - pepperocinis are good too.

I guess owning the carousel takes it out of the peasant category.  :)

Rippers rock!

Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: bluesman on December 10, 2009, 12:41:12 AM
yeah really. Start a Peasant food thread. There is a comfort food thread although I guess that isnt the same.

Maybe we need a hybrid cuisine thread too. Made some hot dogs tonight. They were a mix between Jersey rippers (deep fried dogs) and Chicago dogs. Used dill pickles tomatoes, celery seed.

Cant make authentic Chicago dogs in Philly. Cant get sport peppers, neon green relish or poppy seed hot dog buns. :-[

Now that's what I'm talking about!

(http://roadfooddigest.com/image.axd?picture=WindowsLiveWriter/IfItsTuesdayThisMustBeaChicagoHotDog_D489/8214_3.jpg)
Title: Re: Non stick pans
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on December 10, 2009, 10:22:08 PM
yeah really. Start a Peasant food thread. There is a comfort food thread although I guess that isnt the same.

Maybe we need a hybrid cuisine thread too. Made some hot dogs tonight. They were a mix between Jersey rippers (deep fried dogs) and Chicago dogs. Used dill pickles tomatoes, celery seed.

Cant make authentic Chicago dogs in Philly. Cant get sport peppers, neon green relish or poppy seed hot dog buns. :-[

Now that's what I'm talking about!

Droooooooooooooool...

(http://roadfooddigest.com/image.axd?picture=WindowsLiveWriter/IfItsTuesdayThisMustBeaChicagoHotDog_D489/8214_3.jpg)