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General Category => Ingredients => Topic started by: dannyjed on July 24, 2010, 03:05:12 AM

Title: Rye Malt
Post by: dannyjed on July 24, 2010, 03:05:12 AM
I just tasted my first Denny Rye IPA and I love the wonderful spiciness of the rye malt combined with the Columbus hops. I was just wondering if anybody has used rye malt in other beer styles besides IPA?   ;D
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: euge on July 24, 2010, 03:54:28 AM
I like to use rye in my Brown ales. Adds a little spicyness which I think compliments the dark malts.

I've never had Denny's recipe unless Michelob's Rye IPA is the same... It's awesome and quite difficult to find.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: denny on July 24, 2010, 04:10:24 PM
Wow, Euge, I guess you'er about the last one!  ;)

Besides browns, rye is great in APA and porter.  You can also use it in something with a Belgian yeast, too.  Just think of a recipe where you want a bit of spiciness and a full mouthfeel, and you can add some rye in.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: ipaisay on July 24, 2010, 09:55:53 PM
I have never really tasted or had that "spiciness" from rye in a beer.  Eating it as I am milling it I do get some spiciness (especially if the malt is fresh). However,  i have always had that great "mouthfeel" that rye gives in the finished beer.  I will add rye to different beers to help build a mouthfeel even when you want the beer to finish dry.  I think that is why it really works well in an IPA.

Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: akr71 on July 25, 2010, 03:06:09 PM
How about a roggenbier  ;D
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: Malticulous on July 25, 2010, 08:28:52 PM
How about a roggenbier  ;D
Yummy!
I think I'll make an American Rye. I have no clue what that is. I'll just have too toss something together.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: rabid_dingo on July 27, 2010, 01:05:37 AM
Roggen rye, that sound right up my alley. I have some home smoked malts for it. Should be fun.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: dmtaylor on July 27, 2010, 12:17:03 PM
I think you're confusing roggen with rauch.  Roggen is German for rye.  Rauch means smoked.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: dannyjed on July 27, 2010, 01:15:04 PM
thanks for the responses and I think I will try some rye in my next porter.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: mikeypedersen on July 27, 2010, 02:47:35 PM
I have never really tasted or had that "spiciness" from rye in a beer.  Eating it as I am milling it I do get some spiciness (especially if the malt is fresh). However,  i have always had that great "mouthfeel" that rye gives in the finished beer.  I will add rye to different beers to help build a mouthfeel even when you want the beer to finish dry.  I think that is why it really works well in an IPA.
Sounds like you are probably under the threshold for % of your rye malt to get that spicy character.  That's fine because it sounds like you are getting what you want, but if you decide to go for the spiciness, you probably need to step up your rye malt percentage of your grist.  I think Denny's recipe calls for around 20% rye malt and it definitely has a nice crisp little spicy character to it, especially in the finish.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: kgs on July 27, 2010, 03:11:40 PM
I have never really tasted or had that "spiciness" from rye in a beer.  Eating it as I am milling it I do get some spiciness (especially if the malt is fresh). However,  i have always had that great "mouthfeel" that rye gives in the finished beer.  I will add rye to different beers to help build a mouthfeel even when you want the beer to finish dry.  I think that is why it really works well in an IPA.
Sounds like you are probably under the threshold for % of your rye malt to get that spicy character.  That's fine because it sounds like you are getting what you want, but if you decide to go for the spiciness, you probably need to step up your rye malt percentage of your grist.  I think Denny's recipe calls for around 20% rye malt and it definitely has a nice crisp little spicy character to it, especially in the finish.

According to the version of Denny's recipe in Beersmith (which btw conflicts slightly with other versions out there--it lists flaked wheat, versus wheat malt), yes, it's about 18%. I did a version that due to various calamities ended up 15% rye malt, and that spicy flavor was still very much there.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: akr71 on July 27, 2010, 04:18:57 PM
I think you're confusing roggen with rauch.  Roggen is German for rye.  Rauch means smoked.

hmm, a smoked rye beer sounds like a fun experiment though...  Google Translate calls it geräucherte Roggenbier

Anybody done one before?  What did you think of it?
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: dmtaylor on July 27, 2010, 06:43:38 PM
The so-called "spiciness" of rye must be under my threshold then as well, AND under my friends' thresholds.  I have used 40% rye malt in an American rye ale and while I did get the motor oil and huge creamy head (there's nothing else on earth like it), I got no spiciness -- just breadiness.  Very pleasant, and worth making again sometime.  But not spicy in any way, except maybe from the Hallertauer hops.

Yeah, that's right -- I'm the jerk who thinks everyone else's perceptions are wrong.  But it's not entirely your fault.  You must all be looking so hard for pumpernickel and caraway seeds that you can imagine that it is there.  I don't know........
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: wfaris on August 20, 2010, 01:19:48 AM
I have had great luck with my rye cream ale recipe.  Take a normal cream ale recipe and add a pound of rye malt, change the hops to saaz.  Ferment cold with either an american ale yeast or a kolsch yeast.  Tasty stuff!

Wayne
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: Malticulous on August 31, 2010, 10:26:17 PM
Just now I tried my American rye (with flaked rye) half and half with a very strong extra Stout. It's outstanding. The rye character is lost but the two blended together is out of this world good.
Title: Re: Rye Malt
Post by: rabid_dingo on August 31, 2010, 10:37:34 PM
I think you're confusing roggen with rauch.  Roggen is German for rye.  Rauch means smoked.

Oops, Roggen rauch then...Still sounds good.