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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: euge on July 26, 2010, 03:47:12 AM

Title: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on July 26, 2010, 03:47:12 AM
My stable:

Henckels 8" Fine Edge Pro Santoku

Henckles 8" Fine Edge Pro bread knife

Cheap razor sharp Asian market special

Solid 3" hollow-ground-paring

The thin Santoku works well as a Chef's knife for dicing but can butcher too. Good all purpose knife. Amazingly the $7 Asian knife is by far my sharpest and de-bones and fillets well. Doubles as cheese-knife. A real work-horse.

I keep them all sharp with an Aluminum oxide stone

What do you have? How about an ideal knife/brand? One that you'd leave to your kids in the will... ;)

Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tygo on July 26, 2010, 11:59:56 AM
I have an eight piece Wusthof Classic set that I've added to over the years.  Last addition was a 6" Cooks Knife which gets a lot of use.  I'd like to add a santoku which will fill the last slot in the block I've got and then I think I'll consider my set complete.  Also have an eight piece set of Henckles steak knives. 
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: nicneufeld on July 26, 2010, 12:28:05 PM
I have an array of cheap knives...two Walmart santokus that are dull as butter knives (don't really use them), and a decent small utility knife, then three forschner beauties...a 12" slicing knife, a 4" utility knife, and an 8" chef's knife.  Those last two are my standbys. 
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: beerocd on July 26, 2010, 12:53:27 PM
Wusthoff classic 8pc set in block, Pampered Chef Santoku and Chefs knife.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: theDarkSide on July 26, 2010, 01:04:41 PM
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_zy9HEcoBsLM/TE2HufkGHNI/AAAAAAAAABw/K0GcBkZL6-Y/s144/lightSaber.jpg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on July 26, 2010, 01:50:48 PM
i have more knives than i can use.  we have a complete set of cutco knives but we host a foreign exchange student from solingen germany every year.  they always bring knives from wusthof and robert herder rostfrel every year (those are my favorites)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: beerocd on July 26, 2010, 02:32:20 PM
i have more knives than i can use.  we have a complete set of cutco knives but we host a foreign exchange student from solingen germany every year.  they always bring knives from wusthof and robert herder rostfrel every year (those are my favorites)

Strange person sleeping in your house that carries extremely sharp knives in his suitcase...  :o

Never heard of rostfrel - is that super duper high end?
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: hermsman on July 26, 2010, 02:52:06 PM
SWMBO has a complete set of Cutco knives.

My knives are:
Furi Coppertail 8"
Furi Coppertail 5"
My new favorite Shun Ken Onion 8" Chefs knife

The Shun rocks. SWMBO is beginning to think she may switch to my Shun.

Cooking is FUN ;D
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tubercle on July 26, 2010, 02:57:19 PM
I must have at least 30 kitchen/chef knives ;D

I use about 3 of them :-[
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on July 26, 2010, 03:43:55 PM
What do you have? How about an ideal knife/brand? One that you'd leave to your kids in the will... ;)



Winner of ATK tests and what their chefs use....Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox 8" Chef's knife.  It's only $25 and it ROCKS!  Same thing with their $6 6 inch paring knife!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: flapjack on July 26, 2010, 04:07:31 PM
I currently have the Wusthof:

CLASSIC Paring knife -  (3")
CLASSIC hollow edge Santoku -  (5")
CLASSIC Cook´s knife - (9")
CLASSIC Boning knife -  (6")

I think my next addition will be a good offset bread knife
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: dbeechum on July 26, 2010, 04:12:39 PM
Like Denny, I have several Forschner stamped knifes (paring, boning, bread), but I will admit this is my workhorse. Love this knife.

http://shop.messermeister.com/8-Inch-Chef-s-Knife.html
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: k4df4l on July 26, 2010, 04:41:15 PM
What do you have? How about an ideal knife/brand? One that you'd leave to your kids in the will... ;)



Winner of ATK tests and what their chefs use....Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox 8" Chef's knife.  It's only $25 and it ROCKS!  Same thing with their $6 6 inch paring knife!

Me three...great bang for the buck everyday knives
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: nicneufeld on July 26, 2010, 05:16:24 PM
Forschners are great, but I have to admit that I did pay a bit extra for rosewood handles on mine!  I dunno, not as ergonomic or easy to clean as the fibrox version but I love rosewood!  My last bass build had a laminate rosewood top.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on July 26, 2010, 05:27:36 PM
One thing I like about the Fibrox is that it gives you a really good grip when it's wet.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on July 26, 2010, 05:42:26 PM
We have a mishmash of all kinds of stuff, much of it without a brand name. We have two Henckels Zwilling Twin Grip knives which were closeouts and have very thin blades.

My wife was using the chef's knife about a month ago and while cutting green onion caught the corner of her left index finger cutting through the nail and the skin and the pulp and essentially amputated a cleanly cut chunk out of the corner of her finger. Since there was no blood supply to reattach the excised piece and no flap to stitch we had to go get the angled edge chemically cauterized to stop the bleeding. As far as knives go, I'm thinking on which will shear through the nail and pulp and skin on a finger is good for everyday cooking tasks  ;)

Here's my dream knives:
http://www.kramerknives.com/
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on July 26, 2010, 05:59:56 PM
Within 5 min. of opening the aforementioned Forschner chef's knife, I'd taken off the end of my left thumb with virtually no pressure on the knife.  I'd never had a knife that sharp before.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on July 26, 2010, 06:14:32 PM

Never heard of rostfrel - is that super duper high end?

I don't know if it is high end or not. I like them better than the wusthof the kids have brought.  they are not stainless, just very sharp steel but they need good care since they are not stainless.  I have never seen them in the USA and if not for our solingen guests would not have them.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: hopfenundmalz on July 26, 2010, 06:47:03 PM
Rostfrei literaly translates to "Rust Free".  It is stainless steel.
So if it will rust, it could be a low grade of stainless, or a special blade from a company that is named Rostfrei.
Is it this company?  I was not familiar with that one.  Wife has Henkels Profi S.  
http://www.rsg-solingen.de/d/index.php
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on July 26, 2010, 07:31:01 PM
the knives are made by robert herder in solingen.  it must be a rust free version of their thin carbon steel blade. who knows, but they are sharp and stay that way.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: hopfenundmalz on July 26, 2010, 07:41:33 PM
So looking around I see that this company does make carbon steel knives.  High carbon steel can be very sharp and will hold the edge.  Can rust like you say.
http://www.herdermes.be/en/enkk01.htm
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: gordonstrong on August 07, 2010, 03:41:46 PM
I use a MAC Professional Series 9.5" Chef's Knife for serious work. It's shaped like a French chef's knife, but has a thinner Japanese-style blade ground to a lower angle (15 vs 20). I like it when I have a lot of work to do since it has a longer blade, is wicked sharp, and is lighter than the German knifes I ordinarily use. If it's good enough for Thomas Keller, Eric Ripert, Hubert Keller and Gordon Ramsay, it's good enough for me.

I have a full set of Wusthof Classics; not sure what came in it and what I've added over the years. But I mainly use the 8" Chef's Knife for day to day stuff. Sometimes I'll grab one of the longer paring knives as well; I think it's 3.5 or 4"  Several specialty knives I only use for single purposes (flexible fish filleting knife, boning knife, bread knife, small curved paring knife, cleaver, carving set). I store them in the large Wusthof knife block. My wife uses the 6" Chef's Knife and the Santoku.

Random old Chicago Cutlery knife I use to open packages. Obscure cheese knifes that were a gift. Chinese chef's knife.

Chef's Choice 120 knife sharpener, F. Dick diamond steel, special sharpener for the MAC knife. Large rectangular BOOS cutting board, large round bamboo cutting board.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on August 07, 2010, 03:49:59 PM
Gordon, I've been thinking of getting a Boos board, but when I look at reviews on the web I find quite a few people who are dissatisfied with them due to splitting.  How old is yours and have you had any trouble with it?  How do you care for it?
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on August 07, 2010, 04:33:16 PM
What do you have? How about an ideal knife/brand? One that you'd leave to your kids in the will... ;)



Winner of ATK tests and what their chefs use....Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox 8" Chef's knife.  It's only $25 and it ROCKS!  Same thing with their $6 6 inch paring knife!

I don't doubt it at all.  In Anthony Bourdain's book Kitchen Confidential, he says most serious chefs don't spend a lot on knives.  The celebrity chefs might, but your average workhorse chefs/line cooks use inexpensive (but not necessarily "cheap") ones.  That said, I have a Wüstoff Classic 8-pc set with an additional Wüstoff santoku chef's knife, and a Chicago Cutlery cheese knife.   ;)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: gordonstrong on August 07, 2010, 04:35:03 PM
It's a Boos block, 15x20x1.25, maple.  I've had it about 5 or 6 years; I got it when I got the MAC knife.  I needed a larger board to safely work with the larger knife.  It's not safe to have a knife that's bigger than your board; it can get knocked off easily.  

I wipe it down after I use it, wash it if it needs it, and oil it occasionally with butcher block oil. I store it on its side so it can dry. I have a big butcher block island in the kitchen where I use it. I lay the board flat, usually with a damp kitchen towel underneath it to keep it from sliding around.

I see no signs of splitting. I'd associate that with being in a very dry environment, or stressing it somehow. I oil my boards every few months, I guess. It's a big honkin' piece of wood.  I think you'd have to be hitting it awfully hard (splitting coconuts or chopping up beef shanks) or have it spanning a gap when using it to have it split. Even then, the force would be applied across the grain not with it. Are the people with problems using them to practice Chuck Norris roundhouse kicks or something?

If it did split, I'd just take it to the shop, saw off the split, joint it, reglue it, and clamp it. Properly glued joints are stronger than wood. Anyone with basic woodworking skills could do that or probably make something very similar from scratch.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: gordonstrong on August 07, 2010, 04:44:28 PM
Quote
I don't doubt it at all.  In Anthony Bourdain's book Kitchen Confidential, he says most serious chefs don't spend a lot on knives.  The celebrity chefs might, but your average workhorse chefs/line cooks use inexpensive (but not necessarily "cheap") ones. 

I seem to remember quote was in the context of something like "get one of these and you're halfway to making that fuzzy-headed Emeril your b****."  Probably my favorite line in the book.

Didn't he say that he liked Global knives?  Light and surgically sharp.  I tried them but hated the handles.  Slippery and surgically sharp is almost as bad a combination as bourbon barrels and sulfur sticks.  He was against the German knives primarily due to weight, certainly a problem for people who will be using them all day, every day.  I see the difference using the MAC knife; it's much less fatigue-inducing over the long haul.

Line cooks don't get paid much so they're also less likely to have expensive gear.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on August 07, 2010, 07:42:17 PM
I don't doubt it at all.  In Anthony Bourdain's book Kitchen Confidential, he says most serious chefs don't spend a lot on knives.  The celebrity chefs might, but your average workhorse chefs/line cooks use inexpensive (but not necessarily "cheap") ones.

When I bought my last Forschner/Victorinox, the guy at the knife shop said "You and every cook in town"!

Gordon, thanks for the info on the Boos block.  Makes me feel more comfortable spending the $$ they ask for them!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on August 07, 2010, 10:09:43 PM
Quote
I don't doubt it at all.  In Anthony Bourdain's book Kitchen Confidential, he says most serious chefs don't spend a lot on knives.  The celebrity chefs might, but your average workhorse chefs/line cooks use inexpensive (but not necessarily "cheap") ones. 

I seem to remember quote was in the context of something like "get one of these and you're halfway to making that fuzzy-headed Emeril your b****."  Probably my favorite line in the book.

Didn't he say that he liked Global knives?  Light and surgically sharp.  I tried them but hated the handles.  Slippery and surgically sharp is almost as bad a combination as bourbon barrels and sulfur sticks.  He was against the German knives primarily due to weight, certainly a problem for people who will be using them all day, every day.  I see the difference using the MAC knife; it's much less fatigue-inducing over the long haul.

Line cooks don't get paid much so they're also less likely to have expensive gear.

Yep, he recommended Global.  Although, even they've gotten a bit pricey in the last few years.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on August 07, 2010, 10:10:33 PM
FWIW, my mother-in-law's Boos block rocks!  She's had it for a couple of years now and it's ultra handy and so durable.  I can't imagine it splitting.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: k4df4l on August 08, 2010, 01:01:02 PM
Within 5 min. of opening the aforementioned Forschner chef's knife, I'd taken off the end of my left thumb with virtually no pressure on the knife.  I'd never had a knife that sharp before.

LOL..about a week after I got my set, I wound up plunging one into my arm (reached for something past the drying rack where the knife was sitting blade up, I didn't see it).  While the ER doctor was threading a few stitches, she mentioned I was lucky that the knife was so sharp; it did no damage beyond the actual incision. :D



The gadget/gear lust in me occasionally considers getting some fancy knives but then I use these and they just work so well that it squashes the urge.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: morticaixavier on November 08, 2010, 09:29:21 PM
I have a 9 inch henkle santuko that I bought as my first 'nice' knife about 7 years ago and I use daily. I also have the 6 inch french chefs, 6 inch santuko that I hardly ever use unless my big santuko is dirty, a cheapish paring and a really cheap stamped henkle bread knife. I can't imagine ever needing to buy more knives at this point. Maybe a new bread knife down the line somewhere.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: nicneufeld on November 08, 2010, 10:29:09 PM
I have one of these...

(http://images.denhams.com.s3.amazonaws.com/505/505lot367.jpg)

I have yet to use it in the kitchen, though.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2010, 02:29:30 AM
I have a set of Chicago Cutlery knives that I want to replace with some really good knives.
I've been doing a little research and have found that alot of chefs like the Japanese stainless knives.

Like this Global. Pricey though.

http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=135722&ref=http%3A%2F%2Fgourmetfood%2Eabout%2Ecom%2Fod%2Fwheretobuygourmetfoods%2Ftp%2Fchefknife%2Ehtm
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: phillamb168 on November 09, 2010, 09:34:14 AM
I have one of these...

(http://images.denhams.com.s3.amazonaws.com/505/505lot367.jpg)

I have yet to use it in the kitchen, though.

Hey, that's an enfield bayonet right? My dad has one exactly like this, and a matching Enfield 308 from WWI, both complete with a King's Armory stamp.

Don't think it'll work for the filet mignon, though I'm sure you could bag a Turkey.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: phillamb168 on November 09, 2010, 09:36:02 AM
I have a set of Chicago Cutlery knives that I want to replace with some really good knives.
I've been doing a little research and have found that alot of chefs like the Japanese stainless knives.

Like this Global. Pricey though.

http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=135722&ref=http%3A%2F%2Fgourmetfood%2Eabout%2Ecom%2Fod%2Fwheretobuygourmetfoods%2Ftp%2Fchefknife%2Ehtm

One of the most important things when choosing a set of knives is to see how it feels in your hand. Global is nice, but it doesn't fit my hand well; my Wustofs fit perfectly. Make sure you go to some place like Sur La Table to try a bunch of different handle styles, and pick the one that's most comfortable. Don't spend a lot of money on flashy knives because if they're not comfortable, you'll never use them, and that would be sad.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: nicneufeld on November 09, 2010, 01:16:29 PM
Hey, that's an enfield bayonet right? My dad has one exactly like this, and a matching Enfield 308 from WWI, both complete with a King's Armory stamp.

Don't think it'll work for the filet mignon, though I'm sure you could bag a Turkey.

Yep, that specific one isn't mine, but I have the 1907 Wilkinson bayonet with my 1918 Lee Enfield SMLE No1MKIII*.  Years ago I used to shoot it, now its a wall hanger and my newer (WWII era) No4MkI Enfields are more for shooting.  Those bayonets are pretty fearsome, like a small sword.  Read a story about a Boer War engagement where the Brits were finally about to charge the enemy position, and upon hearing the cry to fix bayonets, the Dutchies promptly lost heart and sent up the white flag.

Sorry for the threadjack.  British military history is one of my other obsessions.  Ummm...on topic...I hardly use any other knives now than my Forschner 8" chefs.  I'll clean it every time rather than get one of my other already clean knives.  Great buy!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bluesman on November 09, 2010, 02:44:47 PM
I have a set of Chicago Cutlery knives that I want to replace with some really good knives.
I've been doing a little research and have found that alot of chefs like the Japanese stainless knives.

Like this Global. Pricey though.

http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=135722&ref=http%3A%2F%2Fgourmetfood%2Eabout%2Ecom%2Fod%2Fwheretobuygourmetfoods%2Ftp%2Fchefknife%2Ehtm

One of the most important things when choosing a set of knives is to see how it feels in your hand. Global is nice, but it doesn't fit my hand well; my Wustofs fit perfectly. Make sure you go to some place like Sur La Table to try a bunch of different handle styles, and pick the one that's most comfortable. Don't spend a lot of money on flashy knives because if they're not comfortable, you'll never use them, and that would be sad.

Great advice. You're not the first person who has told me that.  I will definitely try them out for size, fit and feel before I make a purchase.
Thanks!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: redbeerman on November 09, 2010, 05:42:36 PM
We have a set of Wusthof's that are probably 30 years old.  We've had to replace the paring knife and the carver (which I broke on a piece of frozen cheese, don't ask :-X)  They are the best AFAIAC.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on November 09, 2010, 06:47:17 PM
I like my henckels and just had them sharpened - wow, what a difference!

ATK liked a relatively cheap chef's knife, around $30.  A Victorinox I think.  Bouef.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: phillamb168 on November 09, 2010, 07:19:02 PM
ATK liked a relatively cheap chef's knife, around $30.  A Victorinox I think.  Bouef.

ATK? Is that like SWMBO?

I'd also recommend something slightly more underhanded, which is, once you go to the store and find the knife that's right for you, order the actual set on Amazon. Typically wayyyy cheaper. The AHA used to have an affiliate code but I dunno where to find it, if you use it your purchase will send like 1% of the purchase price to AHA.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on November 09, 2010, 08:04:22 PM
ATK liked a relatively cheap chef's knife, around $30.  A Victorinox I think.  Bouef.

ATK? Is that like SWMBO?
Sorry, it's America's Test Kitchen (http://www.americastestkitchen.com/).  They have a TV show and website and stuff, really great cookbooks too.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: onthekeg on January 07, 2011, 09:14:31 PM
Here is a good read on kitchen knives.
http://leitesculinaria.com/36739/writings-how-to-buy-cooking-knives.html

And here is a knife care and sharpening lesson
http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/topic/26036-knife-maintenance-and-sharpening/
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weithman5 on January 07, 2011, 09:51:41 PM
thought about this thread the other day. our annual visit by kid from solingen germany is coming up near easter.  hoping for another robert herder rostfrei knife.  still my favorite 
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: weazletoe on January 08, 2011, 04:33:09 AM
Gordon, I've been thinking of getting a Boos board, but when I look at reviews on the web I find quite a few people who are dissatisfied with them due to splitting.  How old is yours and have you had any trouble with it?  How do you care for it?

 I;ve got a bambo cutting board. What's the difference between that and a Boos board? Should I set my bambo board on fire, and replace it?  :-\
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tumarkin on January 08, 2011, 01:25:26 PM
a Boos board is a high-quality board and a great tool, but a bamboo board will work very well and should serve many years. I've read that they also provide some anti-bacterial protection. generally you want to use a wood, bamboo or composite plastic board. having several boards in varying sizes is very helpful is you do much cooking. you don't want to cut on glass, marble, steel, glass etc. all of these will dull a knife, roll the edge, etc.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: onthekeg on January 08, 2011, 08:38:27 PM
Also, wood cutting boards are generally better since the bacteria will dry out in the board and die.  On plastic or other boards there may be moisture in the cuts that will allow the bacteria to stay viable.  Also to add to what Mark mentioned, having different color boards is the best to ensure you don't use a board that cut raw meat when you happen to slice up a salad.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bluefoxicy on April 07, 2011, 07:15:03 PM
My wife was using the chef's knife about a month ago and [...] we had to go get the angled edge chemically cauterized to stop the bleeding.

Martin Yan says to curl your fingers, not extend, etc etc, or else you make a mistake and you will not have a finger.

He was not joking.  It was funny but he was not joking.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bluefoxicy on April 07, 2011, 07:26:02 PM

 I;ve got a bambo cutting board. What's the difference between that and a Boos board? Should I set my bambo board on fire, and replace it?  :-\

Some have told me bamboo is too hard (damage the knife), some have told me it's just fine.  Teak is considered the best; I'm looking at a 2 inch thick endgrain Proteak 16x12 board for my large, to replace plastic composite my parents bought me when I moved out (which I have always hated, since day one).  Every few years when the damage gets extensive enough that the scratches and gashes don't just heal shut upon getting wet, I'll plane an eighth inch off and buff it smooth, and there you go.

That is, of course, a $75 cutting board.  The fact that I can resurface it (it does NOT have a juice channel, something I specifically selected against!) is my major buying decision.  I have a  pattern of paying slightly more than reasonable prices for one-time purchases, and indulging myself in luxury in that way:  a $40 pine Hangiri that'll crack and dry in 1-2 years (and never work well anyway) vs $100 for the same thing in resin-rich cypress (that'll last for a lifetime).  Of course I have access to a planer, orbital sander, etc.  You don't want to go spending $100 on a cutting board and then every 2 years find someone you can pay $40 to resurface it for you, that's just stupid.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Joe Sr. on April 07, 2011, 07:41:22 PM
If you're in Chicago, this is a great place for butcher block cutting boards: http://www.yelp.com/biz/a-butcher-block-factory-outlet-chicago

You're buying from the factory and the price for a monster end-grain board is phenomenal.  I'm still using the one I bought in 1994.  A little love and occasional oil and my kids can use it when I die.

PLUS, you're steps from the old Schoenhoff Brewery which is defunct but the buildings are still there.  I was told ages ago there's an old artesian well on-site.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: brewmichigan on April 12, 2011, 07:27:40 PM
I like my henckels and just had them sharpened - wow, what a difference!


I have some Henckels, which I like, and they need to be sharpened. I hone them every time I use them now to help hold the edge but I can see some tiny dings in the blade. Where should I look to get them sharpened? I'm not even sure where to start.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tumarkin on April 12, 2011, 07:35:19 PM
I'd suggest that you buy a compound (two-sided) stone and learn to sharpen them yourself. It's not that difficult, and there are lots of videos and how-tos on the web. If you'd prefer to get it done, call some of the kitchen specialty shops in your area or look under knife sharpening. Warning - they certainly don't all do a good job, so if you can get recommendations from friends that might be a good place to start.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on April 12, 2011, 08:29:34 PM
The aluminum oxide stone I have cost about $8 at the Asian market by my house. Was quite easy to pick up the technique of sharpening. Look on YouTube for examples.

My understanding is that having them done can run a much as $10 a blade. Forget that. 
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on April 12, 2011, 08:40:23 PM
I like my henckels and just had them sharpened - wow, what a difference!


I have some Henckels, which I like, and they need to be sharpened. I hone them every time I use them now to help hold the edge but I can see some tiny dings in the blade. Where should I look to get them sharpened? I'm not even sure where to start.
My local grocery store has a drop-off / pick-up day every couple of weeks.  The guy who sharpens them takes them to his shop, sharpens them, and brings them back the next day.  I can recommend him if you're in Redmond WA, but I have no idea if a similar service elsewhere would do as good of a job.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on April 12, 2011, 08:44:11 PM
This one came highly recommended.  It's easy to use and does a killer job.

http://www.amazon.com/Chefs-Choice-2-Stage-Manual-Sharpener/dp/B00075M2AY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1302640995&sr=8-1
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on May 09, 2011, 12:30:07 PM
I'm learning to use water stones, one paring knife I had was so dull I went back to my old Arkansas stones to get it in shape for the water stones.

I just remodeled our kitchen so after years of cheap knives decided to invest some money. I got some Henckels Pro S and they are nice, but a bit on the heavy side. I also found a neat site, http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/ and purchased a knive from them. It is a 170mm Santuko from Ryusen and is Tsuchime Damascus (basically hammered damascus). It is a beauty and I have NEVER seen a knife so sharp. It sliced through paper as if it were air.
(http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Ryusen-Blade.JPG)
(http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Ryusen%20Tsuchime%20SP2.JPG)

The odd thing was the shipping was direct from Japan and I had the knife two days later. Shipping from them is $7 no matter what you order, but of course nothing is inexpensive. Care has to be taken since most of their knives do not have a 50/50 bevel. It remains to be seen if I will be able to sharpen the knife correctly when the time comes.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on May 14, 2011, 11:27:23 PM
New knife arrived today, Sakura damascus. Took forever to get here from Israel, but the knife is made in Japan and is a beauty.
(http://www.kitchen-chef-knife.com/knifebuy.jpg)
(http://www.kitchen-chef-knife.com/SakuraLayers.JPG)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on May 15, 2011, 01:53:23 AM
Japan by way of Isreal? Nice knife dude. Looks like a double bevel edge?
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on May 15, 2011, 11:30:44 AM
Actually the Sakura and the Ryusen are both 50/50 and both are so sharp it is ridiculous. The blades are really thin on both as well. I'll probably try to stay in that world as much as possible as I build the collection. I'm really digging having some neat knives to play with. With the damascus you have to immediate dry the knife after washing to avoid any rust.

I think the guy in Israel has Sakura make them for him. I'm no expert on Japanese knives, but I think Sakura generally makes more pocket and utility knives. Often the knives from one Japanese company are forged by another.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: thirsty on May 15, 2011, 12:41:20 PM
I just use an old Cutco for almost everything and a poplar cutting board I made myself. Sharpening a knife yourself is not that hard,  as said above, the web is full of how to videos. There's a good one out there of a guy who sharpens his knife and then shaves off his beard with it.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on May 15, 2011, 02:58:48 PM
Both of those knives are very attractive and right up my alley. Already thinking of Christmas and any presents I might want. ;)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on May 16, 2011, 01:37:57 PM
I just noticed the Ryusen I purchased is sold out at JCK. The Sakura is available on ebay or via a Yahoo site, either way it's coming for Ori Pas in Israel and ebay is less expensive http://www.kitchen-chef-knife.com/buy_now.html (EDIT - should mention the Sakura is more German in styling than Japanese, reminds me a lot of my Pro S from Henckels)

On Japanese Chefs Knives there are TONS of items. I got mine off the Specials page http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SPECIALS.html but there are page after page (left hand column) for various manufacturers.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on August 19, 2011, 11:30:59 AM
I may be pulling the trigger on a Zwilling Kramer soon...

http://www.popsci.com/gadgets/article/2011-05/video-master-bladesmith-bob-kramer-visits-popsci-shows-his-chops
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_DflxWA8lU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRPrswhMdAc&feature=relmfu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUdrRE7W0b4&feature=relmfu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUbkPdkUDuo&feature=relmfu

http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-180374/Bob-Kramer-Carbon-Steel-Chefs-Knife

Review and side by side comparison with actual handmade Kramer
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php?1424-Kramer-Zwilling-10-quot-Chef-s-Knive-arrived
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on August 19, 2011, 05:42:21 PM
Thoe thmoove!

Awesome!

I'm looking askance at my pathetic little Henckels. :-\
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on August 19, 2011, 05:59:19 PM
Funny, I was sharpening my wife's 15 year old Wusthof knives for her yesterday evening, and thought about how this thread had died off. 

Cause and effect?  Coincidence?  ESP?

Dooooo eeeeeeee ooooooo oooooooo (Theremin music)

(the knives are in great condition still, after 15 years of daily use).
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on August 19, 2011, 06:09:01 PM
I might have mentioned my $8 8" chef's knife? Bought it in the kitchenware aisle at the local supermarket. Remember thinking these cheap Chinese made knives are looking pretty much like the mid-range Henckels... So I bought one and proceeded to put an edge on it- a proper one.

At first I thought this knife's steel is too soft and it won't hold an edge. Wrong! It's my favorite now and it'll shave the hair right off toot sweet. Scary. Banging out cheap high quality knives at a quarter of the price of even the low-end "quality" blades? Probably the same factories that're banging out drop forged Henckels' Fine Edge Pro or International.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on August 19, 2011, 06:12:44 PM
Two words:
Solingen Stainless
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on August 19, 2011, 06:18:07 PM
I have a dollar store German knife (probably bought at some kitchen store for a song) and I ran it nearly into the ground and have sharpened it back more than a few times.

I will say once I got a hold of one of the Japanese Damascus knives and realized just how sharp that thing was, I was hooked. I looked at the Kramer Shun, but it was heavy and not what I was after.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: nicneufeld on August 19, 2011, 07:34:03 PM
I think the perfect balance for me between thriftiness and quality is Forschner...a good chef's knife around 30 bucks, and I use it daily, love it.

Now, I can't look down my nose at you guys with your 300+ dollar knives...to me its just a tool and simple and reasonably replaceable is the order of the day for me, but I understand the desire to have the nicer quality things for your hobbies.  I mean, you guys might be OK with a cheap tourist Calcutta sitar, whereas I dream of a nice finely crafted Hiren Roy or vintage Kanai Lal... :D
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on August 19, 2011, 08:17:55 PM
I am one frugal SOB, but frugal doesn't mean cheap. I've still got an old Farberware chef's knife I could use as a hammer if I needed to and the beauty is if I need to cut a pumpkin and do need a hammer, I can pull that puppy out. We have two Henckels which are ice hardened with very thin SS blades which are in truth all the knives we would probably ever need, but they will never be able to slice a rolled piece of magazine paper. My ProS Henkels are nowhere near as sharp as my Ryunsen Damascus knife (earlier in the thread). I can see that Kramer in my knive drawer already... ;)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on August 19, 2011, 10:27:38 PM
I think the perfect balance for me between thriftiness and quality is Forschner...a good chef's knife around 30 bucks, and I use it daily, love it.

I'm with ya....after I saw that it was the knife ATK used and recommended, I bought the 8" chef's knife.  AMAZING!  Within a week, I was back buying a Forschner paring knife....$6 and it's one of the best knives I've ever owned.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 23, 2011, 12:14:28 PM
Haven't pulled the trigger on that SLT Zwilling Kramer yet, but did get the wife a Knuckle Sandwich "Big Stick" and "Dragon Dagger". Cool looking for sure, but the shape doesn't thrill me much. Of course there is only one person they need to appease ;)
(http://www.ergochef.com/prodimages/Guy8inchcheflargeiso.jpg)

(http://www.ergochef.com/prodimages/GuysUtilitylargeiso.jpg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: morticaixavier on September 23, 2011, 03:06:56 PM
I was at a craft fair type thing the other day and saw a blacksmith who was making his own damascus steel kitchen knives. Ooooh I wanted one of those. It was $250.00 for a small santuko type knife but given that he said it took about 14 hours for each knife that sounds pretty reasonable to me. and pretty
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 23, 2011, 03:44:29 PM
I've got a couple of damascus. One is a Japanese design with a super thin super sharp blade. The other while Japanese is really a German design with a thicker, more hefty design. Both are great and both were reasonable, but no exactly inexpensive.

I'm really aching for the Kramer from SLT, but $320 is a bit on the pricey side for something to cut vegetables and meat ;)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: 1vertical on September 25, 2011, 05:38:59 AM
I have an eggerling Damascus Protech Brend II...but it ain't in da kitchen  ;)
(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT-bncXTqqw7RdeCGhZdqw6cOhJvw7kn8xIXHarTaVbuXI8At7Rfg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: narvin on September 25, 2011, 02:33:31 PM

My wife was using the chef's knife about a month ago and while cutting green onion caught the corner of her left index finger cutting through the nail and the skin and the pulp and essentially amputated a cleanly cut chunk out of the corner of her finger. Since there was no blood supply to reattach the excised piece and no flap to stitch we had to go get the angled edge chemically cauterized to stop the bleeding.

I did this exact thing last weekend!  Stupid... but in my case it was such a shallow glance that the bleeding stopped with some pressure.

This was with a new Calphalon 7" Santoku from BBB... $29.95.  Sharp as all hell, although I don't know if I like the feel as much as an 8" chef knife.

(http://s1.proxy04.twitpic.com/photos/large/407256448.jpg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 25, 2011, 03:48:30 PM
Imagine the entire corner gone from where you cut all the way down to the board and you'ld have what she did...it was NASTY!

BTW - now she wants the Guy Fieri paring knife...  ::)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on September 25, 2011, 05:19:54 PM
Imagine the entire corner gone from where you cut all the way down to the board and you'ld have what she did...it was NASTY!

BTW - now she wants the Guy Fieri paring knife...  ::)

Hopefully you guys are holding the items to be cut correctly. All five fingers tucked in out of the way. And I don't look away during the act even if someone is talking to me.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: narvin on September 25, 2011, 05:53:51 PM
Imagine the entire corner gone from where you cut all the way down to the board and you'ld have what she did...it was NASTY!

BTW - now she wants the Guy Fieri paring knife...  ::)

Hopefully you guys are holding the items to be cut correctly. All five fingers tucked in out of the way. And I don't look away during the act even if someone is talking to me.

In theory, yes.  Not really sure what I was doing this time though.  Despite the sloppiness I mostly hit the nail since the knife was almost parallel to my finger.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 25, 2011, 06:25:19 PM
She was chopping down on the board and came around and clipped the corner. It happened so fast she wasn't even aware it had happened until later and pulled away from the board without even a drop of blood, but left that corner of the finger on the board...nasty!!!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on September 25, 2011, 07:27:42 PM
Vorpal Blade... :o
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 26, 2011, 01:07:56 AM
Here's the knife she cut the end with. Actually a darn good and very thin bladed knife. (image from ebay auction)
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Henckels-Zwilling-Large-Knife-Twin-Grip-Friodur-Germany-/00/$%28KGrHqYOKjoE4jN0sEKYBORz,28yZQ%7E%7E0_3.JPG)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on September 26, 2011, 07:59:35 AM

I did this exact thing last weekend!  Stupid... but in my case it was such a shallow glance that the bleeding stopped with some pressure.

This was with a new Calphalon 7" Santoku from BBB... $29.95.  Sharp as all hell, although I don't know if I like the feel as much as an 8" chef knife.

(http://s1.proxy04.twitpic.com/photos/large/407256448.jpg)

Guess the 8" woulda taken it off down to the first knuckle.  I'm sure that would feel much better...    :D
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 26, 2011, 11:20:28 AM
I just bought some new Microplane graters. One was coarse and replaced our old plastic microplane which broke. In taking the cover off I didn't realize it snapped and tried to slide it off. It took a hunk out of my ring finger on my right hand. It doesn't take much with sharp objects to end up missing piece of fingermeat ;)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: 1vertical on September 27, 2011, 05:06:36 AM
I just bought some new Microplane graters. One was coarse and replaced our old plastic microplane which broke. In taking the cover off I didn't realize it snapped and tried to slide it off. It took a hunk out of my ring finger on my right hand. It doesn't take much with sharp objects to end up missing piece of fingermeat ;)
>>>1vert>>>> dreams of freshly microplane grated black perigord truffles....mmmmm....
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: phillamb168 on September 27, 2011, 08:19:41 AM
I just bought some new Microplane graters. One was coarse and replaced our old plastic microplane which broke. In taking the cover off I didn't realize it snapped and tried to slide it off. It took a hunk out of my ring finger on my right hand. It doesn't take much with sharp objects to end up missing piece of fingermeat ;)

FIRST on my list of things to get when I visit the old country. The microplane, not the finger pieces.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 27, 2011, 12:49:57 PM
I'll bet we have 5 or 6 of them. Before we had a plastic one and after 10 years or so it broke, now I'm getting the professional ones - they do real good at removing finger meat!
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on September 27, 2011, 05:24:47 PM
I got the microplane home-series coarse grater. To me it isn't coarse but fine. Regardless it works well and I've gotten a lot out of one goodly sized chunk of Parmesan.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on September 27, 2011, 07:54:21 PM
You need to get what they call Extra Coarse
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31cPmZ-3X7L._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on October 12, 2011, 09:59:46 PM
Does anyone have a favorite filet knife they'd recommend?  I've got a 50lb box of Coho fresh (well, frozen) from Alaska that I need to get ready for the smoker.  I think I need a nice flexible one at least 7" long.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: maxieboy on October 12, 2011, 11:06:04 PM
Does anyone have a favorite filet knife they'd recommend?  I've got a 50lb box of Coho fresh (well, frozen) from Alaska that I need to get ready for the smoker.  I think I need a nice flexible one at least 7" long.

I've used Rapala filet knives for 35 years. LOTS of fish filleted. No issues and reasonably priced.
I like these grippy handles:
http://www.rapala.com/products/knives/soft_grip_fillet/ (http://www.rapala.com/products/knives/soft_grip_fillet/)

Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on October 13, 2011, 12:02:13 AM
Does anyone have a favorite filet knife they'd recommend?  I've got a 50lb box of Coho fresh (well, frozen) from Alaska that I need to get ready for the smoker.  I think I need a nice flexible one at least 7" long.

I've used Rapala filet knives for 35 years. LOTS of fish filleted. No issues and reasonably priced.
I like these grippy handles:
http://www.rapala.com/products/knives/soft_grip_fillet/ (http://www.rapala.com/products/knives/soft_grip_fillet/)
Awesome, thanks for the recommendation.

Any others?
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on October 13, 2011, 12:41:11 AM
I think mine came from Gander Mtn, I'm sure there are betters, but it works great.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: Pinski on October 13, 2011, 12:43:44 AM
I've had my Henckels for 22 years, Rapala is my go-to backup.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on October 13, 2011, 03:14:12 AM
This is my goto fillet knife for quite a while now.  Kinda pricey up front, but has worked out to cost about $6.70 per year (so far).  Shows no signs of slowing down.  (I clean fish several times a week)

(http://www.cutleryandbeyond.com/images/products/detail_2184_W014625018.JPG)

7" Wusthof Grand Prix II

I am a knifephile.  I like quality.  Not all well made knives are expensive, although most are.  Not all expensive knives are well made.

I'm paticularly fond of Solingen rostfrei for my kitchen.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on October 13, 2011, 04:47:00 AM
I decided to order the rapala, we'll see how that goes.  For $15 and as many people as recommend them, I figure it's worth it.  I might spring for another one some other time, but this should get me through that box of salmon.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: 1vertical on October 13, 2011, 05:11:15 AM
When I get into filet on some trout, (salmanoid) I had such good luck with 2
knives....one was an el cheepo electric that I use to cut thru the coarse work,
then I would swap over to the rapala for the fine detail work like the "Y" bones
on the ribs and any skinning.  Catfish and bass and seafood are another animal,
but that dang ole cheepo electric sure makes short work of a big cleaning job.

Edit: That was a Black & Decker electric btw.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on October 13, 2011, 03:42:55 PM
If you get Cook's Illustrated,  the current issue has reviews and recommendations for Kitchen knives.  The $29.95 Forschner chef's knife is the winner against knives costing over 3x as much.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: tschmidlin on October 13, 2011, 04:13:00 PM
If you get Cook's Illustrated,  the current issue has reviews and recommendations for Kitchen knives.  The $29.95 Forschner chef's knife is the winner against knives costing over 3x as much.
They've been recommending that knife for years.  If I needed another chef's knife, I'd consider it for sure.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on October 13, 2011, 05:06:38 PM
If you get Cook's Illustrated,  the current issue has reviews and recommendations for Kitchen knives.  The $29.95 Forschner chef's knife is the winner against knives costing over 3x as much.
They've been recommending that knife for years.  If I needed another chef's knife, I'd consider it for sure.

Yep, I bought min on their recommendation a couple years back.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on October 13, 2011, 06:35:16 PM
Chef's knives are less than ideal for cleaning fish.  They do well for parts of the job (heavy cutting).
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on October 13, 2011, 07:05:58 PM
Chef's knives are less than ideal for cleaning fish.

Which is why CI recommended a very inexpensive Forschner boning knife, too.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on October 13, 2011, 08:09:07 PM
I'm not overly fond of Victorinox knives.  They are good knives, no doubt, but I like knives with a little more heft to them.

(Victorinox makes Forschner)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: denny on October 13, 2011, 09:43:43 PM
I'm not overly fond of Victorinox knives.  They are good knives, no doubt, but I like knives with a little more heft to them.

(Victorinox makes Forschner)

Yep, I know bout the manufacturer.  And I understand what you're saying about heft.  It was one of the first things I noticed about them, and CI even mentions it.  But once I adjusted to it, I loved them.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on October 13, 2011, 10:31:35 PM
Now THIS is knife porn  (note the street address):

Randall Made Knives (http://www.randallknives.com/index.php)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: dbeechum on October 13, 2011, 11:14:57 PM
(note the street address):

You may have had to live in Orlando to get that bit of humor. :)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: punatic on October 13, 2011, 11:49:35 PM
(note the street address):

You may have had to live in Orlando to get that bit of humor. :)

Nestled amongst the topless bars and the trolling streetwalkers is the Mecca of custom knifemaking... 
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: maxieboy on October 14, 2011, 12:13:16 AM
I decided to order the rapala, we'll see how that goes.  For $15 and as many people as recommend them, I figure it's worth it.  I might spring for another one some other time, but this should get me through that box of salmon.

Money well spent. Maintain the edge(check it often and touch it up when needed, especially when using one knife and going through rib bones. Rib bones will take their toll, unless you use the butterfly method.) and it will give many years of service. Let us know how it goes.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on January 03, 2012, 12:34:09 PM
Another knife pin up...
http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-893461/Bob-Kramer-Carbon-Damascus-Chefs-Knife
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on January 03, 2012, 07:36:02 PM
Another knife pin up...
http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-893461/Bob-Kramer-Carbon-Damascus-Chefs-Knife

That is one gorgeous knife! Pricetag not so much. :-\ I love the watered steel knives.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on January 03, 2012, 10:17:39 PM
I meant to post this awhile back about the Guy Fieri knives. I got them for my wife and they are nice and sharp, but the Draggon Dagger is the cat's meow for cutting sandwiches in half. I am sure it has other uses, but that is my favorite knife for that task and I've never seen one work better for that task!
(http://iweb.cooking.com/images/products/enlarge/258683e.jpg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: MDixon on January 28, 2012, 09:42:33 PM
Put my hand on the $300 Zwilling Kramer today. I like the feel of it with the exception of the fit between the handle and the front metal. It seemed sloppy on the one I handled and had a slightly rough edge. It was a display model at SLT, but just didn't have the feel I believe it should...it could be a fluke, but I'm not dropping 300 beans on a knife without some perfection.
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on January 28, 2012, 11:47:32 PM
Put my hand on the $300 Zwilling Kramer today. I like the feel of it with the exception of the fit between the handle and the front metal. It seemed sloppy on the one I handled and had a slightly rough edge. It was a display model at SLT, but just didn't have the feel I believe it should...it could be a fluke, but I'm not dropping 300 beans on a knife without some perfection.

I agree! Didn't pull the trigger on a shorter version of a knife I already own due to a small defect. Funny thing is after checking the one I do have- it has the same small defect! :D
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bluefoxicy on January 30, 2012, 12:32:25 AM
(http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/409466_2786719940502_1033398210_2762916_2064669430_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: euge on January 30, 2012, 03:31:01 AM
Cool! You got a description?
Title: Re: Kitchen Knives
Post by: bluefoxicy on January 30, 2012, 06:31:14 AM
Cool! You got a description?

Honing steel.  Santoku--sharp little bastard, too.  Deba bocho--I can sanmai oroshi a mackerel perfectly for some reason (took me two tries), and chicken seems to fear this blade.  Chisel grind Nakiri bocho--look up katsuramuki and jabara-giri, I need serious practice with this one.  Serrated knife--bread slicer, tomato slicer, that kind of thing, versatile tool... the teeth up front point forward, at the rear point back, the center three teeth are neutral, so when you push you get bite and when you draw you get bite and this matters very much.

For my chosen knives, technique is extremely important.

The Deba can cleave a fish spine with the rear of the blade, but it's nowhere near easy in the center and you can't do it with the tip.  The tip can transmit back the feel of tougher connective tissue and bone as they're cut and touched, so you can know what's happening inside and out of sight.  There is a reason that blade is that precise shape, thick, chisel cut, and yet the blade face makes a sizable chunk of the blade at the tip wane into a very thin blade.

The Nakiri I use as an Usuba, similar blades really--Nakiri is technically a non-professional Usuba, there is little difference except that the Nakiri usually doesn't carry a chisel grind.  Mine does.  It is specifically for making special kinds of cuts on vegetables.  I can chop a carrot into flowers with the damn thing--a pentagon first, then round the tips off and make cuts into the sides, and you have a floral shape.  Slice that up and you have decorative flowers.  It takes practice--practice I don't yet have.  Likewise, katsuramuki is usually learned by daily practice for three or more years.

The use of the santoku eludes me.  The bread knife I have some technical material on; the santoku, not so much.  I've used it successfully with a pulling technique and a pushing technique, to varying degrees of success--slicing the tops off strawberries (core and the unripened white part) works best with a pulling technique so far, but that may be abuse.  German chef's knife skills don't translate directly, but are adaptable.  Honestly, I question this knife's shape--see the Kai Wasabi Santoku for comparison.