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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: narcout on July 22, 2017, 02:56:45 pm

Title: Imperial Rustic
Post by: narcout on July 22, 2017, 02:56:45 pm
I just kegged a batch of saison fermented with Imperial Rustic.  It has a pretty interesting flavor - tart and dry with a bit of citrus and maybe some bubblegum?

It fermented from 1.054 to 1.004, which is around 92% AA.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it tastes when it's cold and carbonated.

I pitched and held at 68 for two days, then let it rise to 74 over the next 4 or 5 days.  I think it was done some time ago, but I didn't get around to kegging it until today, which is 2 weeks from pitching.

The double cell count is nice; no starter for this batch.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on July 22, 2017, 03:00:00 pm
I just kegged a batch of saison fermented with Imperial Rustic.  It has a pretty interesting flavor - tart and dry with a bit of citrus and maybe some bubblegum?

It fermented from 1.054 to 1.004, which is around 92% AA.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it tastes when it's cold and carbonated.

I pitched and held at 68 for two days, then let it rise to 74 over the next 4 or 5 days.  I think it was done some time ago, but I didn't get around to kegging it until today, which is 2 weeks from pitching.

The double cell count is nice; no starter for this batch.


I still have some bottle conditioned Rustic saison left, and I used basically the same temp profile and ended up @ 1.004 as well. It's a really nice beer.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: Stevie on July 22, 2017, 03:01:24 pm
I get a lot of bubblegum in the aroma, but not much in the flavor until third or fourth generation. I don't think I ever got it that low, but I don't add much simple sugars.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewinhard on July 23, 2017, 03:35:44 pm
I just kegged a batch of saison fermented with Imperial Rustic.  It has a pretty interesting flavor - tart and dry with a bit of citrus and maybe some bubblegum?

It fermented from 1.054 to 1.004, which is around 92% AA.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it tastes when it's cold and carbonated.

I pitched and held at 68 for two days, then let it rise to 74 over the next 4 or 5 days.  I think it was done some time ago, but I didn't get around to kegging it until today, which is 2 weeks from pitching.

The double cell count is nice; no starter for this batch.


I still have some bottle conditioned Rustic saison left, and I used basically the same temp profile and ended up @ 1.004 as well. It's a really nice beer.

Jon,

Do you remember what temp(s) you mashed yours at?
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on July 23, 2017, 04:06:42 pm
I just kegged a batch of saison fermented with Imperial Rustic.  It has a pretty interesting flavor - tart and dry with a bit of citrus and maybe some bubblegum?

It fermented from 1.054 to 1.004, which is around 92% AA.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it tastes when it's cold and carbonated.

I pitched and held at 68 for two days, then let it rise to 74 over the next 4 or 5 days.  I think it was done some time ago, but I didn't get around to kegging it until today, which is 2 weeks from pitching.

The double cell count is nice; no starter for this batch.


I still have some bottle conditioned Rustic saison left, and I used basically the same temp profile and ended up @ 1.004 as well. It's a really nice beer.

Jon,

Do you remember what temp(s) you mashed yours at?


Though I've been step mashing a lot, this one was a straight 149F for 90 mins, Rob.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: 69franx on July 23, 2017, 10:23:29 pm
I've done the same, 149 for 90 minutes and went from 1.054 to 1.004/5 if I recall.

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Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: zwiller on July 24, 2017, 08:46:59 am
Never got bubblegum with Blaugies but it has a particular aroma and taste.  Pretty hard to pin it down but I have seen cassia as a descriptor.   Kinda like cinnamon but I could see one pick it up as bubblegum-ish.  House saison uses 10% white sugar instead of 90m mash (30m) and I hit single digits.  I used a similar ferment schedule but plan to take it into the 80s with some heat on next one.  Also plan to try hochkurz too.   
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on July 24, 2017, 09:29:34 am
To me, it's  pretty earthy and spicy mostly, with a little fruitiness in aroma, but not so much in flavor.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: bayareabrewer on July 24, 2017, 11:19:56 am
Never got bubblegum with Blaugies but it has a particular aroma and taste.  Pretty hard to pin it down but I have seen cassia as a descriptor.   Kinda like cinnamon but I could see one pick it up as bubblegum-ish.  House saison uses 10% white sugar instead of 90m mash (30m) and I hit single digits.  I used a similar ferment schedule but plan to take it into the 80s with some heat on next one.  Also plan to try hochkurz too.   

YES! I'm not alone. I've been using this yeast a bit, and I swear there are cinnamon and cedar notes to it. I absolutely love this yeast.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: narcout on July 24, 2017, 11:36:39 am
Also plan to try hochkurz too.   

I used a hockkurz mash on this one (150° for 40 minutes and 163° for 30 minutes).
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: stpug on July 24, 2017, 12:11:51 pm
I have a straight-up saison fermented with 3726 (Wyeast equivalent to Rustic; Blaugies) with 9% turbinado invert.  It started at 1.046 and is currently at 1.005, but I'm expecting about 003-004 as the true FG.  Pitch at 72F, natural ramp to ~82F over 24hrs, assisted ramp to 90F over 12hrs (36hrs post-pitch), left there for 4 days, primed and kegged.  I have yet to pick up on cassia, but definitely get the bubblegum/juicy_fruit character plus some lower-level underlying earthy/woody quality.  Hochkurz 146/160/170 for 45/20/15min.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewinhard on July 24, 2017, 03:21:40 pm
I just kegged a batch of saison fermented with Imperial Rustic.  It has a pretty interesting flavor - tart and dry with a bit of citrus and maybe some bubblegum?

It fermented from 1.054 to 1.004, which is around 92% AA.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it tastes when it's cold and carbonated.

I pitched and held at 68 for two days, then let it rise to 74 over the next 4 or 5 days.  I think it was done some time ago, but I didn't get around to kegging it until today, which is 2 weeks from pitching.

The double cell count is nice; no starter for this batch.


I still have some bottle conditioned Rustic saison left, and I used basically the same temp profile and ended up @ 1.004 as well. It's a really nice beer.

Jon,

Do you remember what temp(s) you mashed yours at?


Though I've been step mashing a lot, this one was a straight 149F for 90 mins, Rob.

Thanks Jon. Good to know as I was concerned about going too low with a mash rest for fear of a higher gelatinization temp (currently working with Barke Pilsner and Pale malts). I have about 8% sugar going into the boil and will prob just do a 60-75 min mash.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: coolman26 on July 25, 2017, 09:42:18 pm
To me, it's  pretty earthy and spicy mostly, with a little fruitiness in aroma, but not so much in flavor.
Mine is at 06 now, and I get earthiness and spice too. My split w 565 is at the same gravity. Pitched at 65 and let it go in the laundry room. Only got up to about 70. When it slowed I put it outside and let it go to 85. I was surprised how different the 2 yeasts are. I went 147/161/171. Really like the Rustic, thanks for the recommendation Jon.


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Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: coolman26 on July 30, 2017, 08:00:23 am
Kegging my Rustic today. Both the 565 and Rustic are finished at 04. Rustic is earth, spice and fruity. It is more complex with a smoothness I don't get in the 565. My 75 year old Mother tried their final gravity samples. In her words, "I'm digging that Rustic, when that one is finished bring me a growler." 565 seems to have more hop bitterness, where the Rustic is a touch more sweet.


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Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on July 30, 2017, 08:03:29 am
Kegging my Rustic today. Both the 565 and Rustic are finished at 04. Rustic is earth, spice and fruity. It is more complex with a smoothness I don't get in the 565. My 75 year old Mother tried their final gravity samples. In her words, "I'm digging that Rustic, when that one is finished bring me a growler." 565 seems to have more hop bitterness, where the Rustic is a touch more sweet.


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That's funny. Definitely better bring her a growler. :D
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: narcout on August 13, 2017, 03:06:59 pm
I finally got around to tapping this keg.  I'm not really picking up bubblegum anymore.  The finish is very nice: dry and tart with some citrus (grapefruit and lemon?).

For having the same final gravity, it tastes a lot dryer to me than would a similar beer fermented with 3711. 

I'm only on my first pint, but I think I prefer the flavor of 3711 or 3724.  This seems a bit more mild, but maybe I should try fermenting it warmer or using it in a blend.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: narcout on August 20, 2017, 09:48:58 am
Does anyone else find that this yeast drops out really quickly?

(http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff164/narcout/IMG_1565.jpg) (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/narcout/media/IMG_1565.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: stpug on August 20, 2017, 10:01:14 am
Does anyone else find that this yeast drops out really quickly?

(http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff164/narcout/IMG_1565.jpg) (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/narcout/media/IMG_1565.jpg.html)

3726 drops pretty bright for me, but is somewhat dependent on grain choice usage too.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on August 20, 2017, 10:04:38 am
Yeah,  I think it drops pretty easily compared to most saison strains.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 07, 2017, 12:06:41 am
I was brewing with a chest crud and somehow let my starters of WY3724 (started the night before) get up to one at 97F, the other at 101F, by leaving the temp controller probe outside of the fridge for an hour or two before pitching.  doh!

Anyway, pitch temp in each of 2 buckets including starter + one additional activator packet (59% viability) into 1.055 SG wort, was at 92F.  I held it via 2-stage temp controller and thermowell to 91F for a day and then dropped it to 90F, and as expected both fermenters stalled at 1.032, as recorded on day 5 of the ferment.

FWIW, it was Mosher's Saison Buffoon recipe, mashed at 149F for 90 minutes, and 10% piloncillo sugar added at the beginning of the boil.

One day later I totally lucked out and from my LHBS got two cans of 4-days-since-canned Rustic Saison and pitched them pretty cold (1 per 5.5 gal bucket), per their pitching directions, and since then have maintained the 90F ferment beer temp.

3 days later beer was at 1.016, and 2 days after that, which is today, the beer is at 1.007, and I gently stirred both fermenters for good luck and to hurry it along at the high temp on day 11 of the ferment.

The co-ferment is nice although the Rustic dominates.  The hydro sample today is still quite clean flavor, and the main impression now is that juicy fruity flavor, plus some background flavor from limited additions of orange peel, coriander and grains of paradise added last 5 minutes of the boil.  Based on reading this thread I expect the beer will finish at around 1.004 in 2 or 3 more days, and probably no more than 4 days from now I'm expecting to cold crash a day or 2 and then keg and carbonate in the kegerator, and let it condition for at least 3 weeks.  Do you think that after it's carbed in the kegerator that it would be better to condition in the wine cellar at 57F, or in the kegerator at 34F?  Or would that matter?  I expect that flavors would complex and come together more quickly at the higher temp when conditioning.

I'm used to getting some bubblegum from the 3724, but don't get that any more after the co-ferment yeast addition.

I wish I had not gotten distracted with the temp controller probe on brew day, but I sure hope that at this temp it will still yield a clean enough flavored beer.  So far I'm satisfied that I'll enjoy the final beer.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: zwiller on September 07, 2017, 10:21:55 am
I am with you (and there are studies that prove this) that esterification occurs more rapidly at warmer temperatures but IMO Blaugies doesn't really need it.  That said, I find many other strains tend to be quite "hot" for awhile and need the extra time> I once got into a long PM with a very experienced belgian brewer and I picked his brain how to achieve brewing them as good as they do and he said, "stay out of the beer" (age it).  He said 6mo min preferable a year.  I did a tripel and bottled a dozen/kegged the rest.  Tasted pretty dang good young but forced myself to keep a few 6mos and SOB he was right.  The esters popped and it was more "belgian" for lack of a better term. 
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: Stevie on September 07, 2017, 10:54:14 am
I agree with the waiting. If you ferment hot, wait. It's worth it
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 07, 2017, 10:57:33 am
Thanks guys.  I'll try to be patient.   ::)
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: stpug on September 07, 2017, 12:50:58 pm
I may be down the wrong path here, but my experience with 3726 (Blaugies), which should be the same as Rustic, is that fermented fairly warm (83-90F) will produce elevated esters.  Now, I'm sure this is somewhat dependent on overall recipe composition, but even a simple lager-like recipe produces the classic fruity, bubblegum esters with present-but-subdued phenolics very quickly.  And by "very quickly" I mean like 4-5 days.  I generally ferment 3726 at 85-90F (depending on recipe formulation) and am kegging on day 2-5, after which it is either (previously) force carbed or (now) keg conditioned/spunded until proper pressure, and the overall yeast characteristics are very apparent in these beers.  The only time I've found a subdued yeast character was with a cool (for 3726) ferment in the low 70s.

I also have a few bottles of a simple, average saison I brewed 12 months ago.  At the time it was as I described above, but now it's just lack luster.  Most of the estery character has faded to a level too low to truly be considered a "saison" (at least in my book).

This is just the experiences I've had with 3726 and I can see it differs from other experiences.
That's homebrewing :D
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: zwiller on September 07, 2017, 01:13:28 pm
I may be down the wrong path here, but my experience with 3726 (Blaugies), which should be the same as Rustic, is that fermented fairly warm (83-90F) will produce elevated esters.  Now, I'm sure this is somewhat dependent on overall recipe composition, but even a simple lager-like recipe produces the classic fruity, bubblegum esters with present-but-subdued phenolics very quickly.  And by "very quickly" I mean like 4-5 days.  I generally ferment 3726 at 85-90F (depending on recipe formulation) and am kegging on day 2-5, after which it is either (previously) force carbed or (now) keg conditioned/spunded until proper pressure, and the overall yeast characteristics are very apparent in these beers.  The only time I've found a subdued yeast character was with a cool (for 3726) ferment in the low 70s.

I also have a few bottles of a simple, average saison I brewed 12 months ago.  At the time it was as I described above, but now it's just lack luster.  Most of the estery character has faded to a level too low to truly be considered a "saison" (at least in my book).

This is just the experiences I've had with 3726 and I can see it differs from other experiences.
That's homebrewing :D

Not at all...  Looks like I wasn't clear and my rant about aging was misplaced  ;D but I tried to say Blaugies does not need aging> "Blaugies doesn't really need it".  I totally agree with your findings and the quick turn time is one big reason I love this yeast. 
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on September 07, 2017, 01:33:36 pm
I may be down the wrong path here, but my experience with 3726 (Blaugies), which should be the same as Rustic, is that fermented fairly warm (83-90F) will produce elevated esters.  Now, I'm sure this is somewhat dependent on overall recipe composition, but even a simple lager-like recipe produces the classic fruity, bubblegum esters with present-but-subdued phenolics very quickly.  And by "very quickly" I mean like 4-5 days.  I generally ferment 3726 at 85-90F (depending on recipe formulation) and am kegging on day 2-5, after which it is either (previously) force carbed or (now) keg conditioned/spunded until proper pressure, and the overall yeast characteristics are very apparent in these beers.  The only time I've found a subdued yeast character was with a cool (for 3726) ferment in the low 70s.

I also have a few bottles of a simple, average saison I brewed 12 months ago.  At the time it was as I described above, but now it's just lack luster.  Most of the estery character has faded to a level too low to truly be considered a "saison" (at least in my book).

This is just the experiences I've had with 3726 and I can see it differs from other experiences.
That's homebrewing :D

Not at all...  Looks like I wasn't clear and my rant about aging was misplaced  ;D but I tried to say Blaugies does not need aging> "Blaugies doesn't really need it".  I totally agree with your findings and the quick turn time is one big reason I love this yeast. 


Agreed
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 07, 2017, 01:41:26 pm
I know a lot can change from hydro sample to conditioned beer, but based on my last couple hydro samples I'm hoping that the Bluagies isn't a little one dimensional.

I realize that fermentation temps and schedule, yeast health, etc. all play into what you can squeeze out of a yeast in terms of getting a full spectrum, i.e. earthiness, spice, fruit, esters and phenols, of course specific characteristics of the yeast(s) used.

But would any of you characterize the Blaugies fermented at high temp as a bit one dimensional - as in juicy fruity?

I'm hoping the yeast profile flavors will become more complex than what I'm tasting now.
Title: Imperial Rustic
Post by: Stevie on September 07, 2017, 02:53:48 pm
My high temp experience is with 3724 and 3711. I haven't bottled in a while, so haven't taken Rustic over 80° and even then left it relatively cool until day 3.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 07, 2017, 04:41:35 pm
I would be surprised if you haven't been dialing in closer to the sweet spot, and gathered from others' posts too.  I just figured I might as well keep it high, also in hopes that the 3724 would kick back in for more of a duplex co-ferment.  I'm sure it will be fine and good though.  I'll report back in a few weeks.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: stpug on September 07, 2017, 05:46:16 pm
I may be down the wrong path here, but my experience with 3726 (Blaugies), which should be the same as Rustic, is that fermented fairly warm (83-90F) will produce elevated esters.  Now, I'm sure this is somewhat dependent on overall recipe composition, but even a simple lager-like recipe produces the classic fruity, bubblegum esters with present-but-subdued phenolics very quickly.  And by "very quickly" I mean like 4-5 days.  I generally ferment 3726 at 85-90F (depending on recipe formulation) and am kegging on day 2-5, after which it is either (previously) force carbed or (now) keg conditioned/spunded until proper pressure, and the overall yeast characteristics are very apparent in these beers.  The only time I've found a subdued yeast character was with a cool (for 3726) ferment in the low 70s.

I also have a few bottles of a simple, average saison I brewed 12 months ago.  At the time it was as I described above, but now it's just lack luster.  Most of the estery character has faded to a level too low to truly be considered a "saison" (at least in my book).

This is just the experiences I've had with 3726 and I can see it differs from other experiences.
That's homebrewing :D

Not at all...  Looks like I wasn't clear and my rant about aging was misplaced  ;D but I tried to say Blaugies does not need aging> "Blaugies doesn't really need it".  I totally agree with your findings and the quick turn time is one big reason I love this yeast.

Ahh! Very good then; my findings seem to match yours fairly well.  I definitely misunderstood your earlier post, and that's not the first or last time that happens to me ;D.  It's reassuring to know that others experiences are similar to mine.  I've still not tried 3724 simply because I can't kick the Blaugies train  8)
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: stpug on September 07, 2017, 05:51:39 pm
I know a lot can change from hydro sample to conditioned beer, but based on my last couple hydro samples I'm hoping that the Bluagies isn't a little one dimensional.

I realize that fermentation temps and schedule, yeast health, etc. all play into what you can squeeze out of a yeast in terms of getting a full spectrum, i.e. earthiness, spice, fruit, esters and phenols, of course specific characteristics of the yeast(s) used.

But would any of you characterize the Blaugies fermented at high temp as a bit one dimensional - as in juicy fruity?

I'm hoping the yeast profile flavors will become more complex than what I'm tasting now.

Well, "juicy fruit gum" is definitely a ester character I get from 3726 but it is generally coupled with the lesser-present phenolics (spicy, peppery; not clove) and an "earthiness", in addition to the added tartness the yeast creates.  I would not call it one dimensional but, to me, it's more fruit-centric, as opposed to the french saison strain that's more spicy/peppery (to me at least).

I wonder if you current findings are a result of the 3724 bulk fermentation followed by the Rustic finishing fermentation?  It will be interesting to see what you think as it finishes up and conditions.  I'll keep my fingers crossed for you that it's game picks up a bit downstream.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 07, 2017, 06:02:42 pm
Thanks stpug - right to the gist of my question -- and I hope i'm not hijacking here.  I'm getting a bit tired of 3711 and looking to get more into "classic" saison, although as others have said 3711 works very well with some fruit or spice background saisons - and is great in one of Major's beers I have brewed at least a couple times -his lime leaf ginger saison.

No doubt this beer will have plenty going on - will check in later.  I'm actually pretty excited and happy.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on September 07, 2017, 06:45:43 pm
Similarly, I get fruity esters from this strain more than other saison strains, but never fruity ester alone. There's always an earthiness at the various temp schedules I've used, and a subtle pepper.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: zwiller on September 08, 2017, 07:44:15 am
Similar here and far from one dimensional.  I get fruit, pepper, and this woodsy, cassia type thing that I could see some call earthy.  I would call 3711 one dimensional tho.  Quick, dry, but blah.  I can see it working with a spice or fruit version. 

I tend to think the magic is formed early on so maybe you missed out?  You owe it to yourself to try solo Blaugies before ruling it out. 
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 08, 2017, 04:19:19 pm
Similar here and far from one dimensional.  I get fruit, pepper, and this woodsy, cassia type thing that I could see some call earthy.  I would call 3711 one dimensional tho.  Quick, dry, but blah.  I can see it working with a spice or fruit version. 

I tend to think the magic is formed early on so maybe you missed out?  You owe it to yourself to try solo Blaugies before ruling it out.

I was looking at some old brew notes (Nov 2011) for a Kaffir (lime leaf and ginger) Saison, which is the only time I brewed solo 3726 or ever even used it before, and at that time fermented one bucket with the 3726 (77F pitch eventually up into low 80's), and the other bucket with 3711.  I kegged the 3711 batch and bottled the Blaugies batch - both of which attenuated well. 

I recall that what has been stated here is true, namely that the 3726 was flavorful and enjoyable more so young, and had a smoother fruitier profile than the 3711 (no surprise there), but that after probably a year in the bottle, it became uninteresting.  My notes said that at kegging the 3726 had a smooth, lemony, vinous flavor if that sounds at all familiar at lower ferment temp.

Anyway, I'll drink this current batch more quickly, and straight from the kegerator after maybe 2 weeks conditioning. 
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 10, 2017, 04:01:13 pm
I went back to Markowski's "Farmhouse Ales" seeking recipe inspiration for a re-pitch batch, and saw that he reports that Blaugies, for their Saison d'Epeautre (OG 1.048) primary ferments at 77 - 80F, and that their storage period is only five days at 41F.  I'm not sure if that "storage" immediately follows primary fermentation, but that's the way I read it.  Interesting tidbit.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: zwiller on September 14, 2017, 01:38:56 pm
https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/ (https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/)

4 weeks and that makes sense for bottle conditioning.  Back when I bottled I rarely had full carb in 2 weeks.  I would imagine if they thought extended aging was necessary that would be at least a few months. 
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: brewsumore on September 14, 2017, 04:33:27 pm
https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/ (https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/)

4 weeks and that makes sense for bottle conditioning.  Back when I bottled I rarely had full carb in 2 weeks.  I would imagine if they thought extended aging was necessary that would be at least a few months.

Cool!  I'll pull my mostly carbed kegs from the kegerator and put them in the wine cellar for at least a couple weeks.  At kegging (1.005) it was amazingly clean and tasty, and much more balanced fruity (vs. fruit bomb) and did have underlying slight earthy and peppery elements - and thankfully I noticed a tad of bubble gum that snuck in with the 3724, that I hope will stick around.  Life is grand.
Title: Re: Imperial Rustic
Post by: HoosierBrew on September 14, 2017, 04:50:24 pm
https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/ (https://farmhousebeerblog.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/yeast-brasserie-de-blaugies/)

4 weeks and that makes sense for bottle conditioning.  Back when I bottled I rarely had full carb in 2 weeks.  I would imagine if they thought extended aging was necessary that would be at least a few months.

Cool!  I'll pull my mostly carbed kegs from the kegerator and put them in the wine cellar for at least a couple weeks.  At kegging (1.005) it was amazingly clean and tasty, and much more balanced fruity (vs. fruit bomb) and did have underlying slight earthy and peppery elements - and thankfully I noticed a tad of bubble gum that snuck in with the 3724, that I hope will stick around.  Life is grand.


Sounds good!