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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: Wetbrews on September 08, 2017, 07:07:19 PM

Title: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: Wetbrews on September 08, 2017, 07:07:19 PM
Hi All,

Long time lurker here, and looking into trying something new. Is anyone using wet hops? If so do ya'll have any recipe suggestions and where are you getting them?

Thanks guys!
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: dmtaylor on September 08, 2017, 07:28:03 PM
They grow like weeds in our backyards.  Use them in any style, about 4-5 times as much by weight as dry hops since they are about 75-80% water.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: hopfenundmalz on September 08, 2017, 08:32:51 PM
The math goes

Dry <10% water, 90 or more plant material.

Wet/fresh 80% water, 20% plant material.

To get the same amount of plant material, 90/20=4.5 times as much by weight. Probably better to use 5 times as much.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: Wilbur on September 08, 2017, 08:53:15 PM
Here's what I posted a few weeks ago:

So, I'm trying out my theory tonight. Using the UVM hop calculator, I've determined my fresh/wet hops are 26% dry matter. The fresh weight is 1213 g, which (if dried), has an equivalent dry weight of 345.6 g. This gives a ration of 3.5:1, which is significantly lower than typical recommendations. I'm planning on brewing an IPA with a ton of late hops (single hop-Columbus). Any thoughts on this? I'll update with my impression of the beer and the bitterness. Might have to brew a pellet version for a comparison.

http://www.uvm.edu/extension/extensionapps/engineering/?Page=hopscalc.html (http://www.uvm.edu/extension/extensionapps/engineering/?Page=hopscalc.html)

The main thing was trying to determine how much dry material there is, hops are typically ~73% moisture when harvested and dried to ~8.5%. For my Columbus hops I picked, that meant a ratio of ~3.5:1. I ended up using a fairly large charge (14.1 oz. wet ~ 4 oz. dry) late at 10 and 5 minutes, as well as the same as a dry hops. I haven't carbonated it yet, but the sample I took the other day was incredible-I got some grassy, wet flavors but the hoppy/earthy/spicy character also came through tremendously in the aroma and flavor. Malt was simple, 92% pils and 8% Vienna.

Harvest time for hops is August to mid September, so it might be a stretch to find some near you. Gorst Valley hops has some, but you're probably best off trying to find a hop farm near you.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: hopfenundmalz on September 09, 2017, 03:31:22 AM
Nice calculator.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: chinaski on September 09, 2017, 11:08:38 PM
I've done several wet hop ales with my own hops.  I chose an American Amber recipe and modified it: kept the bittering addition as regular dried hops to ensure some predictable IBU component to the beer, and then added loads and loads of wet Cascades in the last 10 min. of the boil.  The beer comes out decent- though I do prefer to use my hops dry.  Frankly, the biggest upside of using a bucket of wet hops was not drying and packaging those hops.  Its worth doing, just to try it out for yourself.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: Wetbrews on September 10, 2017, 10:24:55 PM
Here's what I posted a few weeks ago:

So, I'm trying out my theory tonight. Using the UVM hop calculator, I've determined my fresh/wet hops are 26% dry matter. The fresh weight is 1213 g, which (if dried), has an equivalent dry weight of 345.6 g. This gives a ration of 3.5:1, which is significantly lower than typical recommendations. I'm planning on brewing an IPA with a ton of late hops (single hop-Columbus). Any thoughts on this? I'll update with my impression of the beer and the bitterness. Might have to brew a pellet version for a comparison.

http://www.uvm.edu/extension/extensionapps/engineering/?Page=hopscalc.html (http://www.uvm.edu/extension/extensionapps/engineering/?Page=hopscalc.html)

The main thing was trying to determine how much dry material there is, hops are typically ~73% moisture when harvested and dried to ~8.5%. For my Columbus hops I picked, that meant a ratio of ~3.5:1. I ended up using a fairly large charge (14.1 oz. wet ~ 4 oz. dry) late at 10 and 5 minutes, as well as the same as a dry hops. I haven't carbonated it yet, but the sample I took the other day was incredible-I got some grassy, wet flavors but the hoppy/earthy/spicy character also came through tremendously in the aroma and flavor. Malt was simple, 92% pils and 8% Vienna.

Harvest time for hops is August to mid September, so it might be a stretch to find some near you. Gorst Valley hops has some, but you're probably best off trying to find a hop farm near you.

Wilbur- thanks for the info. Let me know how your brew goes. I too have heard that a well done wet hop beer is a thing of beauty.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: Wetbrews on September 10, 2017, 10:27:47 PM
I've done several wet hop ales with my own hops.  I chose an American Amber recipe and modified it: kept the bittering addition as regular dried hops to ensure some predictable IBU component to the beer, and then added loads and loads of wet Cascades in the last 10 min. of the boil.  The beer comes out decent- though I do prefer to use my hops dry.  Frankly, the biggest upside of using a bucket of wet hops was not drying and packaging those hops.  Its worth doing, just to try it out for yourself.

Thanks Chinaski. I'm trying to decide between using the fresh hops on the cold side or the hot side. Have you tried dry hopping with fresh hops? Perhaps knowing the alpha content would pump up your results
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: reverseapachemaster on September 11, 2017, 03:21:28 PM
I didn't look this year but I thought over the past few years I've seen some of the homebrew shops or hop sellers pre-selling wet hops for delivery immediately after harvest. I know breweries are starting to get their wet hop harvests in right now. Maybe contact local breweries you know do wet hopped beers and see if they will have any excess or can get a little more for you.

If you are a fan of wet hopped beers then that's a pretty good reason to grow your own hops if you have the space and climate. You won't have access to the newer proprietary varieties but some of the newer public domain hops should start to become available soon.
Title: Re: Wet Hops for Homebrewers?
Post by: Wilbur on September 19, 2017, 04:18:40 PM
Here's what I posted a few weeks ago:

So, I'm trying out my theory tonight. Using the UVM hop calculator, I've determined my fresh/wet hops are 26% dry matter. The fresh weight is 1213 g, which (if dried), has an equivalent dry weight of 345.6 g. This gives a ration of 3.5:1, which is significantly lower than typical recommendations. I'm planning on brewing an IPA with a ton of late hops (single hop-Columbus). Any thoughts on this? I'll update with my impression of the beer and the bitterness. Might have to brew a pellet version for a comparison.

http://www.uvm.edu/extension/extensionapps/engineering/?Page=hopscalc.html (http://www.uvm.edu/extension/extensionapps/engineering/?Page=hopscalc.html)

The main thing was trying to determine how much dry material there is, hops are typically ~73% moisture when harvested and dried to ~8.5%. For my Columbus hops I picked, that meant a ratio of ~3.5:1. I ended up using a fairly large charge (14.1 oz. wet ~ 4 oz. dry) late at 10 and 5 minutes, as well as the same as a dry hops. I haven't carbonated it yet, but the sample I took the other day was incredible-I got some grassy, wet flavors but the hoppy/earthy/spicy character also came through tremendously in the aroma and flavor. Malt was simple, 92% pils and 8% Vienna.

Harvest time for hops is August to mid September, so it might be a stretch to find some near you. Gorst Valley hops has some, but you're probably best off trying to find a hop farm near you.

Some updates: burst carbonated this beer and tried it last night: