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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: denny on November 14, 2009, 07:57:44 PM

Title: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: denny on November 14, 2009, 07:57:44 PM
From the Hindenburg...

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/AheadoftheCurve/beer-bottle-hindenburg-disaster-worlds-expensive/story?id=9043449
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: babalu87 on November 14, 2009, 08:07:23 PM
Its gotta be skunked, I know I know its a brown bottle but that was a pretty big flame

Some people got more money than brains.
I'd like to give it a shot that way for a while though
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: brewboy on November 15, 2009, 05:01:38 AM
Stupid is as stupid does.
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: boulderbrewer on November 15, 2009, 05:11:43 AM
I could get the same one if I used my time machine. :D
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: mrbowenz on November 15, 2009, 11:45:14 AM
It will be the most expensive beer in the world until .....

 Allsopp's Arctic Ale, the large one is from Sir Edward Belcher's 1852 expedition, the smaller one is from Dr. Elisa Kane's expedition in 1875 , both full with the orignal seal and corks

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i226/mrbowenz/P1000711.jpg)

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i226/mrbowenz/P1000654.jpg)
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: boulderbrewer on November 15, 2009, 06:34:25 PM
Yours?

Nice piece of brewing History.
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: denny on November 15, 2009, 06:59:18 PM
No kidding!  I had a Ballantine Burton ale from 1931 a few years back, but that doesn't hold a candle to those!
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on November 16, 2009, 02:48:22 AM
It was sold for ONLY $18.034.
Great steal if you ask me!
http://brookstonbeerbulletin.com/hindenburg-beer-auctioned-for-10000/
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: mrbowenz on November 16, 2009, 10:02:14 AM
No kidding!  I had a Ballantine Burton ale from 1931 a few years back, but that doesn't hold a candle to those!

Did you get to enjoy it's contents ?

Regarding the OP, I think it's remarkable that a bottle survived that shower of fire. Here' the footage in color:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSuR2IgnimA&feature=related
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: denny on November 16, 2009, 04:46:33 PM
No kidding!  I had a Ballantine Burton ale from 1931 a few years back, but that doesn't hold a candle to those!

Did you get to enjoy it's contents ?

Well, we got to sample the contents...enjoy may be a bit strong.  There were about 8 of us tasting.  We decanted it into a pitcher and spent about an hour sniffing the evolving aroma and taking notes.  It was pretty spectacular. When we finally tasted it, it tasted a lot like watered down scotch.  Interesting, but no one shouted "wotta great beer!"  One of the tasters was a microbiologist and he tried valiantly to culture the yeast, but no luck.
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: tubercle on November 16, 2009, 05:13:32 PM
 Check this out.

 http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_ODD_NEW_ZEALAND_ANTARCTIC_WHISKEY?SITE=VASTR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_ODD_NEW_ZEALAND_ANTARCTIC_WHISKEY?SITE=VASTR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT)
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: The Professor on November 18, 2009, 12:15:47 AM
No kidding!  I had a Ballantine Burton ale from 1931 a few years back, but that doesn't hold a candle to those!

Did you get to enjoy it's contents ?

Well, we got to sample the contents...enjoy may be a bit strong.  There were about 8 of us tasting.  We decanted it into a pitcher and spent about an hour sniffing the evolving aroma and taking notes.  It was pretty spectacular. When we finally tasted it, it tasted a lot like watered down scotch.  Interesting, but no one shouted "wotta great beer!"  One of the tasters was a microbiologist and he tried valiantly to culture the yeast, but no luck.

Interesting, and that jibes with others' experience with the 1930's brewing of Ballantine Burton.  If you see one of these and can get it cheap, grab it as a mantle-piece  decoration or paperweight, but not for a taste revelation.

On the other hand, well handled samples of the 1946 brewing (bottled beginning in 1954 and from what I have been able to research, ending in 1966) believe it or not still can yield a remarkable sensory and tasting experience...loads of hop character and aroma, a hefty hint of the oak it was aged in, along with the expected sherry notes.   Having acquired  six  of these for my research, I can say that the first indicator of whether the contents are remotely drinkable lie in the amount of apparent evaporation of the volume in the bottle, and whether the beer drops bright in the bottle after a few months undisturbed (all were quite turbid when I received them).
 
Being a very strong, very highly hopped beer, the Burton still has something to offer for sensory analysis;  it's brewing history, it's still alive to a degree,  and definitely worth experiencing if you are lucky enough to obtain a well handled one.
That pricey Hindenburg Lowenbrau, on the other hand,  goes into a museum case or on the aforementioned mantle.  It is more relevant to aviation history.
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: boulderbrewer on November 18, 2009, 03:10:38 AM
Any idea of the yeast viablility on the 1946 brewings?
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: The Professor on November 18, 2009, 03:46:58 AM
Any idea of the yeast viablility on the 1946 brewings?

At the moment, no.
However  the next bottle I open for evaluation will be one from was was (as far as I know) the last bottling (brewed '46 with the yearly top-ups, until bottling in '66) and I am going to be careful with handling, so I can try and see if it's possible to get some yeast going from the dregs. 
The yeast they used for the ferment was, of course, BRY96 (aka 1056, 001) though it would be interesting to see what characteristics are to be had from something cultured up from 43 year old bottle dregs !  Given the nature of these remnants, I will  enlist the help of a biologist friend who has offered to help out...she has indicated that using various media for multiple cultures may increase the chances of retrieving something. 

As they used to say on TV, "film at eleven"     ;D
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: boulderbrewer on November 18, 2009, 04:41:19 AM
Keep us updated.
Title: Re: $8000 for a Lowenbrau???
Post by: bonjour on November 18, 2009, 01:12:34 PM
Any idea of the yeast viablility on the 1946 brewings?

At the moment, no.
However  the next bottle I open for evaluation will be one from was was (as far as I know) the last bottling (brewed '46 with the yearly top-ups, until bottling in '66) and I am going to be careful with handling, so I can try and see if it's possible to get some yeast going from the dregs. 
The yeast they used for the ferment was, of course, BRY96 (aka 1056, 001) though it would be interesting to see what characteristics are to be had from something cultured up from 43 year old bottle dregs !  Given the nature of these remnants, I will  enlist the help of a biologist friend who has offered to help out...she has indicated that using various media for multiple cultures may increase the chances of retrieving something. 

As they used to say on TV, "film at eleven"     ;D
When you do these 'rare' beer tastings, please post them in a 'Rare Beer' thread that you start.

Thanks

loooking forward to your review.

Fred