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General Category => Zymurgy => Topic started by: jill on August 16, 2010, 05:04:23 PM

Title: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: jill on August 16, 2010, 05:04:23 PM
Hi all,

I'm currently in the planning process for 2011 issues of Zymurgy. Is there anything in particular you'd like to see in the way of themes or articles? Particular beer styles? Brewing techniques? Equipment? Brewing ingredients? Please post your ideas here.

Thanks!
Jill Redding
Editor-in-Chief, Zymurgy
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on August 16, 2010, 05:10:52 PM
I'd like to see more side by side comparisons of brewing techniques and the effects they have on the beer.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: dbeechum on August 16, 2010, 05:21:00 PM
I'd like to see more articles by that guy who writes about all the crazy recipes he can think of. :)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: wingnut on August 16, 2010, 05:38:42 PM
One topic I would like to see covered is recipe formulation with respect to Malt.  

Not just the standard, "use Munich to get bread crust flavor, pilsner to get the continental malt flavor, English two row for more biscuit flavor..." etc.  What the malts are supposed to provide is widely available already just by reading maltser's data sheets.

Instead, what I am looking for is information more to do with getting malt (and even hops) to show up in the beginning, middle, and finish of a beer.  A lot of beers I have formulated have a good parts, but could use some tweaking to enhance the "entire drinking journey".  For instance, my Vienna has great malt nose, beginning and finish have lots of beady malt notes, but it is "flat" in the middle. What techniques would change this?  If I want an American Brown with an up front hop presence, but a more restrained hop finish with substantial nutty/chocolaty malt flavors, how do I keep the malt to the end and mute the hop finish?  

There appear to be multiple variables associated with the topic, including water formulation, malt variety/maltster and mashing temperatures/schedules.  

While there has been a lot of attention given to hops in the past 5 years, and there is a lot of information available on Hops, there has not been the same attention given to Malt. With the huge variety of malts now available to homebrewers that were not in past years, I think there is a largely untapped opportunity to cover malts more in-depth and have a better understanding of where/how they can be used to manipulate the flavor experience.





Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on August 16, 2010, 05:40:43 PM
I'd like to see more articles by that guy who writes about all the crazy recipes he can think of. :)

I've had enough of that guy...... ;)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bluesman on August 16, 2010, 06:36:24 PM
I'd like to see some articles on crafting big beers like American Barleywine and other Strong Ales.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bonjour on August 16, 2010, 07:33:24 PM
hmmmmm,

nothing under 1.100 right?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: marty on August 16, 2010, 10:47:14 PM
I really liked that article on the special Hefe mashing technique, so anything like that would be interesting (doing this in the mash, does this to the wort, and that affects the yeast like this)



the NHC winner's recipes issue is my favorite every year
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: babalu87 on August 17, 2010, 12:05:23 AM
An article showing proof that wort production has more of an effect on attenuation than the yeast used.

Maybe if I'm not so lazy I'll write it up.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bluesman on August 17, 2010, 01:53:31 AM
hmmmmm,

nothing under 1.100 right?

Right on the mark Fred!  ;)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bonjour on August 17, 2010, 01:58:45 AM
I was thinking of a NHC presentation with several samples towards that end,

No "session" beers, right ;)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: mindphlux on August 17, 2010, 03:06:20 AM
I liked some of the technical articles, like the one on sanitizing. I think anything about improving process is good, like batch vs fly sparge, maybe different types of mash tun construction, etc. cool rigs and bringing professional class brewing to an affordable/attainable home level is good stuff too. like, I am (like every other starry eyed homebrewer) plotting and planning to build an electric RIMS system, so hearing about difficulties and success stories might be neat for example?

 I also love to see commercial recipes, the pliny the elder one was awesome. homebrew recipies I can find on the internet, but recipes from commercial brewers - that's something I can't just google.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: piszkiewiczp on August 17, 2010, 03:54:46 AM
Water, water, every where,
And all the boards did shrink;
Water, water, every where,
Nor any drop to drink.

Water chemistry and adjustments to city water supplies for brewing.

Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: robbievonb on August 17, 2010, 06:50:31 PM
I agree with Denny.  Maybe make multiple batches of the same basic recipe but change mash temp, fermentation temp, water profile, batch size, forced carbonation vs, bottle conditioning etc...
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: boyle_brew on August 17, 2010, 09:13:05 PM
I'd like to see an article comparing the different types of base malts (Maris Otter, American 2-row, Pale ale, Belgian Pilsner, German Pilsner, Vienna, Munich, etc.)  I'm interested in the type of flavor that each base malt adds to a beer. 
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: jptheelder on August 17, 2010, 09:29:44 PM
I read in another mag about brewing with bacon, so I dont think that ever needs to be done again :D I like the ideas about base malts. is it time for a new hop guide, now that several kinds are available that were not beafor. I also seem to love to read about the cool new ideas and gadgets home brewers are comming up with.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: narvin on August 18, 2010, 02:51:06 AM
I really like information about how different commercial breweries approach a style.  Homebrew recipes are nice, but reading about the Trappists in Belgium or Vinny Cilurzo make a beer that defines the style is fascinating.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: BrewArk on August 18, 2010, 03:25:12 AM
I always liked history.  You could have a feature every month, ancient history, early European, early American,  life before/during prohibition, the early AHA days & brewing w/Pabst malt, Fritz Maytag & Anchor ...
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: 1vertical on August 18, 2010, 05:30:27 AM
how about something like "How to take your homebrew club/org from inception to BJCP competition?"
Use these paths to organize your club.
Use these paths to fund your competition
What to do for accomodations
etc etc
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bluesman on August 18, 2010, 10:04:46 AM
I really like information about how different commercial breweries approach a style.  Homebrew recipes are nice, but reading about the Trappists in Belgium or Vinny Cilurzo make a beer that defines the style is fascinating.

I'll second this suggestion. 

I'm also very interested in learning about tips, techniques and recipes from commercial breweries.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: Me on August 18, 2010, 04:01:01 PM
I'd like them to do a piece about equipment upgrades that homebrewers can make. Maybe something that gives you an idea of what equipment/modifications will give you the most bang for your buck.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on August 18, 2010, 07:56:20 PM
An article showing proof that wort production has more of an effect on attenuation than the yeast used.

Maybe if I'm not so lazy I'll write it up.

+1 on this one... aside from Kai's work, I haven't really seen any good numbers on estimating attenuation changes with mash temp changes.

I'd also like to see more on: sour/wild brewing (maybe tips from pros), blending styles, and using wine/mead ingredients in beer(which grapes/honey with which style, when to add grape juice in the process, any additional fermentation considerations, hopping levels, etc.)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on August 18, 2010, 07:58:30 PM
P.S.

Will you post a list of popular topics from the forum and the AHA staff that may need authors?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: BrewArk on August 19, 2010, 10:56:01 AM
The swimsuit edition should not have Denny Conn in a speedo on the cover. ;D
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: hopfenundmalz on August 19, 2010, 01:35:43 PM
Lagers and lager production would be my choice.  Especially how to make a really good N. German Pilsner.

Techniques that can enhance the brewing procedure are always good.  Gadgets too.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: babalu87 on August 19, 2010, 02:01:12 PM
An article showing proof that wort production has more of an effect on attenuation than the yeast used.

Maybe if I'm not so lazy I'll write it up.

+1 on this one... aside from Kai's work, I haven't really seen any good numbers on estimating attenuation changes with mash temp changes.


What I have done and plan to do with some future batches is split the wort into two fermenters and use different yeasts.

I've already done this with Wyeast 1968 and US-05
In a 1.050 Porter they both finished at the same FG
Next is up is probably a Pale Ale, one with 1762 and the other using either US-05 or maybe even 1968 again
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: jeffy on August 19, 2010, 02:37:11 PM
It may be interesting to have an article describing doctoring beers for off-flavor demos.  I know it's on the bjcp site, but a whole lot of non-judges out there would probably like to learn where inappropriate flavors come from.

Pairing beer with food is also popular.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: richardt on August 19, 2010, 04:53:36 PM
I've mentioned it elsewhere on the forum, but Cap's food posts (and pics) are awesome.  The number of pages associated with topics like "ethnic and regional cooking" lead me to believe that a regular food column in Zymurgy with a beer pairing suggested by experts would be a huge hit. 

Perhaps even a "gourmet couples" monthly beer dinner recipe section where every month is a different theme and would include 4-6 different recipes (appetizers, main courses, side dishes, desserts).  That way, for those who wanted to do this, the recipes could be divided up between 4-6 couples and the dinner party would rotate each month to another couple's home.  Equally important would be commercial beer pairings and recommended homebrew pairings.  If space were a premium in the magazine, just offer a teaser column with website link for the actual recipes for those who are interested.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: EHall on August 19, 2010, 11:00:07 PM
I second the history suggestion. Going back in time and researching old recipes/styles could really spark some ideas for bringing them back. I know personally I'm looking to do a Ballentine clone at some point. I would also like to see less repeated subjects. There seems to be something about repeating subjects far to often...

Also maybe a series on ideas/suggestions/what it takes to open a brewpub/microbrew?

I'm a long time subscriber and love the mag but it needs some 'freshness' added to it.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: Dave King on August 20, 2010, 01:55:59 AM
I'd like to see some back to basics articles.  I have trouble talking new members into joining AHA.  They often borrow old copies, and say "no thanks."  I think we've become too technical and obscure, probably because so many of our older members have become very good, experienced brewers. 

If there was an occasional "how to.... ," maybe they'd be more interested.  JMHO
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: kylekohlmorgen on August 21, 2010, 11:14:47 PM
  They often borrow old copies, and say "no thanks."  more interested.  JMHO

I always loan out Charlie's "Complete Joy of Homebrewing"... much more enjoyable for someone who doesn't know anything about brewing!

For my beer-geek (and technically-minded) friends, I'll give them that one and "How to Brew".
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: svejk on August 22, 2010, 06:36:06 AM

I'd also like to see more on: sour/wild brewing (maybe tips from pros)

I would also like to see this.  Including some tips on establishing "bug colonies" that homebrewers can develop by harvesting the dregs from commercial beers. 
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: capozzoli on August 22, 2010, 01:04:05 PM
Oh man, I love the idea of a a cooking and recipe and pairing, section. That would be great.

Also a permanent equipment and do it yourself section would be awesome. 
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: witsok on August 22, 2010, 02:09:46 PM
Definately yes to a cooking and beer food pairing column.

I too would like to see a series of article on lagers.  Except for the Helles, the Classic Beer Style Series is very dated on lagers (especially the pilsner book).

Effects of fermentation temperature.  In my opinion this is one of the most important parts of the process.  How about an article which the same wort is split and fermented with the same yeast, but at different temperatures.

Doing you own spontaneous fermentation.

Best of specialty beers - celebrating creative homebrews / homebrewers.

Equipment / ingredient reviews by readers.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: tschmidlin on August 23, 2010, 05:34:08 AM
Actually, I'm totally against a cooking or food/beer pairing section.  I love cooking with beer and pairing, but I want Zymurgy to stay focused on making beer, not what we do with it after that.

Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on August 23, 2010, 03:04:19 PM
The swimsuit edition should not have Denny Conn in a speedo on the cover. ;D

SO this!  ^^^^^^
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: markaberrant on August 24, 2010, 08:30:59 PM
More Canadian content!
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: dbeechum on August 24, 2010, 09:08:13 PM
More Canadian content!

Ha I'm in Canadia right now.. what would be Canadian content to you?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: Hokerer on August 25, 2010, 12:19:19 AM
More Canadian content!

Ha I'm in Canadia right now.. what would be Canadian content to you?

An article on Elsinore Brewery?  You Hoser  ;)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: chaz on August 25, 2010, 12:31:00 AM
More Canadian content!

Ha I'm in Canadia right now.. what would be Canadian content to you?

I lived in Canada for a few years and it brings this to mind. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_content)
:D
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on August 25, 2010, 04:03:38 PM
More Canadian content!

Ha I'm in Canadia right now.. what would be Canadian content to you?

Brewing with round bacon??
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: markaberrant on August 25, 2010, 06:33:42 PM
what would be Canadian content to you?

More pictures of my handsome smiling face.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: brushvalleybrewer on August 25, 2010, 08:51:36 PM
Water chemistry and adjustments to city water supplies for brewing.

I'd also like to see a water chemistry and adjustments.

Perhaps John Palmer could be convinced to do a follow-up to the RA topic and pitch the upcoming water book?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: treaves on August 26, 2010, 02:05:20 AM
The history info would be great; the people, places, and even the politics of brewing's foundations.

How about some comparative analysis?  There are so many grain choices, with more showing up all the time (including a lot of organic malt).  The same for yeasts.  So why not a recipe per month where two grains and two yeasts are compared? They could be two 10 gallon batches so that the four combinations could be tried.  I know it'd be a hardship to find volunteers to help rate and dispose of all that beer, but perhaps you could manage!

Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: thcipriani on August 27, 2010, 03:08:21 AM
I'd like to see one super geeky issue.
Normally the magazine is full of interesting geeky bits here and there but I'd like to see a complete "Beer by the numbers" issue.

It'd starting with malt analysis sheets and water lab info, moving on to the mash pH and mash gravity tests, then to wort stability tests and propagating yeast and end with fast ferment tests and fermenter geometry.

That's probably my dream issue of zymurgy.

Also, like to see Gordon Strong's recipes - he choose many ingredients that I wouldn't have thought of for a particular style - it offers a lot of insight, I think.

my $0.02
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on August 27, 2010, 03:44:47 PM
Also, like to see Gordon Strong's recipes - he choose many ingredients that I wouldn't have thought of for a particular style - it offers a lot of insight, I think.

my $0.02

Maybe the "Gordon Strong Swimsuit Issue"?   :o
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: dak0415 on August 27, 2010, 03:47:14 PM
Maybe the "Gordon Strong Swimsuit Issue"?   :o

Ok, that conjures up a disturbing picture!
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: Hokerer on August 27, 2010, 06:23:22 PM
Maybe the "Gordon Strong Swimsuit Issue"?   :o

Ok, that conjures up a disturbing picture!

More or less disturbing than the "Denny in a Speedo" that was mentioned on page 2 of this thread  ???
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: thcipriani on September 10, 2010, 05:40:51 AM
I would like to think that we could all agree that a "Ubiquitous AHA Forum Members in Banana Hammocks" issue would likely be what we'd NOT like to see in 2011.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on September 10, 2010, 04:14:35 PM
I would like to think that we could all agree that a "Ubiquitous AHA Forum Members in Banana Hammocks" issue would likely be what we'd NOT like to see in 2011.

I agree!  :)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: hopshead on September 12, 2010, 06:10:53 PM
How about taking a piece of geeky brewing research and dumb it down to a Joe 6 pack level?  I want to know what people are experimenting with and what the results are but I can get through these technical research papers.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on September 13, 2010, 04:22:54 PM
How about taking a piece of geeky brewing research and dumb it down to a Joe 6 pack level?  I want to know what people are experimenting with and what the results are but I can get through these technical research papers.

That's a great idea.  Take a very technical topic and put it in average homebrewer terms and explain how it relates to what we do.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: tschmidlin on September 13, 2010, 05:45:45 PM
How about taking a piece of geeky brewing research and dumb it down to a Joe 6 pack level?  I want to know what people are experimenting with and what the results are but I can get through these technical research papers.

That's a great idea.  Take a very technical topic and put it in average homebrewer terms and explain how it relates to what we do.
I like the idea too, and I'd love to write some of the yeast ones! :)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on September 13, 2010, 06:37:55 PM
Find a paper you want to "demystify" and contact Jill!
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: tschmidlin on September 13, 2010, 06:43:58 PM
I've got a long list :)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on September 13, 2010, 07:27:46 PM
I've got a long list :)

In that case, I'll look forward to your article!
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: roguejim on October 03, 2010, 03:06:00 AM
I haven't read every post here, so forgive me if I reiterate something already said.

The owner of my LHBS and I were talking about Zymurgy, and that other magazine.  He remarked that he can't understand why he hangs on to his stack of magazines over the years.  I remarked that homebrew mags were a lot like fishing mags, i.e., everything just seems to be recycled over time to where you end up reading the same stuff, over and over again.  Now, I realize that new developments may arise in homebrewing to which articles will be devoted, but these will be far and few between, no?  So, I guess what I'm saying is that I would interested in topics that are "new", topics that will actually impart knowledge that hasn't been imparted umpteen times before.  A tall order perhaps, but, you asked.   
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on October 03, 2010, 04:04:35 PM
I'd be willing to bet that in every issue of each mag, there's something that's "new" to someone.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bluesman on October 03, 2010, 05:11:16 PM
How about a home brewery issue.  The top ten home breweries with photos of course.  Homebrewers can send their photos with a short story behind the home brewery.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on October 03, 2010, 06:53:17 PM
How do you decide on the top 10?  Fanciest, most expensive equipment?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: bluesman on October 03, 2010, 07:10:51 PM
How do you decide on the top 10?  Fanciest, most expensive equipment?

Break them down into categories.

1. fully automated
2. most organized
3. simplicity
4. most creative
5. worst brewery setup
6. etc...
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: pweis909 on October 20, 2010, 10:29:29 AM
I'd like to see history-oriented articles, perhaps focused around different, possibly obscure, styles.  Some of the styles here, for example:  http://www.germanbeerinstitute.com/styles.html. 

I also think the brewing science articles demystified idea could be interesting, especially if those articles have take home messages for the homebrewer (as opposed to the commercial brewer).
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: alikocho on October 20, 2010, 06:59:46 PM
Having just read the latest Zymurgy article on cider, I'd really like to see an article on English Cider, its substyles, and its production (say next fall).

I'd even be happy to write it, and can talk to plenty of traditional cidermakers in the West Country, where I live, and talk about making it on a homebrew scale.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: gimmeales on October 20, 2010, 08:17:34 PM
I too, would like to see articles on various accepted 'rules' of brewing - either prove or disprove various 'rules' in homebrewing, like: do you REALLY need to mash for 60 mins?  How about a side-by-side comparo of single infusion mashes carried out for 30, 45, 60, and 90 minutes with some numbers to show how the wort is affected (AND are the differences in numbers perceived in the finished beer).

Also, some side-by-side experiments altering a single ingredient or process-step to see how they truly carry over in to the finished beer.  

Or what about side-by-side equipment comparisons like immersion vs. plate vs. counterflow vs. whirlpool-immersion chillers.

I very much like Bluesman's suggestions on homebrew system comparisons too from cheapest to most expensive, to 'best' and 'worst'.  That would be fun.

edit:  oh yeah - history articles are always great - loved the brewing with spices article that Mosher did awhile back.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: maxieboy on October 20, 2010, 08:37:53 PM
How do you decide on the top 10?  Fanciest, most expensive equipment?

Uh huh. Everyone knows that you can't make good beer with simple, cheap equipment! Sheesh.  ;)  :-*
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: BrewArk on October 21, 2010, 06:26:45 AM
Having just read the latest Zymurgy article on cider, I'd really like to see an article on English Cider, its substyles, and its production (say next fall).

I'd even be happy to write it, and can talk to plenty of traditional cidermakers in the West Country, where I live, and talk about making it on a homebrew scale.

Wouldn't that be out of the AHA's domain like...Distilling?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: alikocho on October 21, 2010, 06:44:59 AM
Having just read the latest Zymurgy article on cider, I'd really like to see an article on English Cider, its substyles, and its production (say next fall).

I'd even be happy to write it, and can talk to plenty of traditional cidermakers in the West Country, where I live, and talk about making it on a homebrew scale.

Wouldn't that be out of the AHA's domain like...Distilling?

Possibly, but as AHA/BJCP sanctioned competitions include entries in 27B - English Cider, and the BJCP style guide lists several US commercial examples, it might not be outside of the AHA's domain. And who know's, maybe Europe has some stuff to teach American homebrewers (and craft brewers) about cider, just like it did on a whole host of beer styles.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: BrewArk on October 21, 2010, 06:48:11 AM
Maybe both are worth talking about.  I love cider.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: evandy on October 30, 2010, 01:44:11 PM
I'd love to see a thorough discussion of electric brewing.  e.g. high-density elements vs low-density, RIMS vs HERMS, building electric tuns and kettles, etc.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: kgs on November 07, 2010, 03:13:21 PM
Definitely a cooking/pairing section, especially with beer recipes (brew this beer, pair it with these suggested menus). Dungeness crab season is coming soon here and I'm realizing I wish my last brew had been a stout or a dubbel.

Time-saving tricks to keep brewing despite work/family life. Mashing ahead, software/tools/techniques that enable brewing multitasking, brew days with kids and family, etc.

Experiments proving/disproving homebrewing myths and WOMs. I like the Basic Brewing/BYO collaborations. They aren't that rigorous but they are better than folklore.

Brewing abroad. Homebrewers who are stationed overseas, expats, etc. and how they cope with their brewing challenges.

I'm still a fan of someone doing an article on "easing the physical process." Reading between the lines in many Forum posts, I see people taking steps to do this for themselves (through smaller-batch brewing, pumps, transfer systems, and brew systems/methods that avoid lifting/bending), yet a lot of get-into-brewing guidance assumes that anyone can (and wants to) manipulate and move around a 10-gallon kettle filled with up to 7 gallons of liquid and then transfer it into a large glass vessel which then needs to be carried to a location, etc.  It would be interesting to find homebrewers who are physically challenged (anywhere from having bad backs to using wheelchairs--or like me, just short, old, and female) and interview them about their methods.

Drill-your-own kettle... a recurring theme on the Forum. :-)
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: BrewArk on November 08, 2010, 05:24:26 PM
<snip>

Dungeness crab season is coming soon here and I'm realizing I wish my last brew had been a stout or a dubbel.


Nothing better than crab for Thanksgiving!   It's one of the best things about living in the bay area.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: denny on November 08, 2010, 05:25:27 PM
The brewer at our Rogue local just brewed a Dungeness porter...really!  
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: gsandel on February 15, 2011, 04:28:27 AM
I have given this a lot of thought...and maybe it is too late and you are onto 2012, but here is my list of things I would like to see.

1. More articles more voices from more members....it seems like Zymurgy has its 5 favorite authors (and all the other beer magazines have theirs and three or more are in common between them).  This makes beer publications the world according to...(fill in the blank).  Or this particular style, according to (blank).  Some of us can write quite well, and are willing, but sometimes don't necessarily have the right ideas (or fail to believe that we have a shot of being heard).  Seek them out.
2. More trends further ahead of the curve....I liked the issue on session beers in the age of the bigger badder is better.  I don't necessarily want to know what is going on or what is new....I want to think about what is next what the future might be, what kinds of ingredients are coming, what kinds of beers are finding regional niches....oh, and how can I brew them.  I want to be inspired to brew, inspired to teach, and inspired to experience beer and brewing.
3. I would love to see an article focusing on why it isn't a good idea to open a commercial brewery....I have been looking at this...and perhaps more than a few of us shouldn't ruin a good hobby.
4. More ideas.  Brewing isn't all about the art and science of pushing the envelope or winning competitions...and in fact, most members don't enter them, and most who do, don't win (and some even do it for the feedback)....some excellent beers in their own right....this goes along with more voices.  I do respect guys who win competitions regularly and the grand master poobah leveled judge, but it has just gotten too competitive and to put them further on a pedestal just makes it worse.  It separates us into the experts and everyone else.
5. How about a 1 beer comp?  Put on a beer comp where you can only enter one beer...your best. 
6. More voices on beer judging more widely available beers.  I like the 3 guys and Beth's Commercial Calibration, but only when I have had the beer before, and I would like to hear other reviewers....perhaps the four plus one guest reviewer....maybe even a non-judge but thoughtful reviewer (someone who has a more average palate).
7. More on how to formulate recipes to make them taste the way you want (crafting for personal taste)....I need more on what all the new varieties of hops do.
8. More historical perspectives on styles, regions, methods.
9. More on emerging styles and regional taste differences....I love to travel, just to see the state of craft beer and what's selling in other parts of the country, continent, and world.
10. Purchasing equipment.  There are a lot of companies making pro-level equipment....Blichmann, Morebeer, Sturdy?, Stout Tanks, Sabco, Monstermill, Schmidling....a whole industry serving us, but nary a review of high end equipment and suppliers.  The opposite of the gadgets issue, I guess....and the whole world of equipment and suppliers we can't get from the pro world....again to be inspired to try to fabricate methods or equipment that pros use.
11. Blogs and interesting websites from members: I have one but admit it is not for everyone (some parts are good, some are funny, some sucks), but I would like to hear about decent ones from other members.  I like new ideas and this is where new ideas are.

And here is a few things I would eliminate or avoid.

I don't think beer goes with food....I love beer, and food, but I like to keep them separate... beer/food pairings sparingly, please.  Food keeps me from fully tasting my beer.

I guess I only had one thing....that is okay, I would like to focus on the positives rather than the negatives.







Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: hoser on February 18, 2011, 04:32:15 AM
water and mash pH
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: tonyp on February 21, 2011, 02:53:21 AM
One topic that would intrigue me would be popular beer style recipes by century (or half century), such as what was the most popular style in the late 1700's and why, what were the most popular ingredients during this time, differences by region, etc etc.

Something of this scope could very well be a monthly feature or long-term research project.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: dannyjed on February 21, 2011, 04:05:03 AM
I agree with tony, I would like to read more historical info about brewing. Like when did people realize they were drinking infected beer or not?
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: punatic on February 26, 2011, 02:42:56 AM
Stories by homebrewers gone pro.  Was turning a hobby into a job/business the right thing to do?  There are some awesome pro brewers out there that started as amateurs.

How about reprinting some of the best threads from this forum?  There's some great stuff in here.  It may lead to more participation in the forum.
Title: Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
Post by: tygo on February 26, 2011, 04:25:11 AM
Stories by homebrewers gone pro.  Was turning a hobby into a job/business the right thing to do?  There are some awesome pro brewers out there that started as amateurs.

How about reprinting some of the best threads from this forum?  There's some great stuff in here.  It may lead to more participation in the forum.

Those are both great ideas.  We've got two folks right now that could contribute to topic #1.  You up for an article majorvices and thirsty monk?   :D

The second one would take some thought from an editing perspective and it would have to be identified by someone who participates regularly in the forum.  Hmm, I'm thinking Bluesman for that one.

I love volunteering other people for stuff  :-*