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General Category => Beer Recipes => Topic started by: Megary on June 11, 2019, 06:25:20 PM

Title: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on June 11, 2019, 06:25:20 PM
Looking to put together a back porch beer for the summer, even though the dog days might be here and gone by the time its ready to drink!

American Cream Ale
BIAB
Boil size of 3.25gal for 2.5gal in the fermenter.

OG around 1.050-1.055, depending on the crush!
Trying to finish around 1.010.
IBU: 17-18ish

4# 6-Row
.5# Flaked Maize
.25# Flaked Barley

Mash above for 60 @ 150-152.

.125# Corn Sugar (Boil)

.5oz Crystal @ 45min
.5oz Crystal at the end

US-05

Ferment in the coldest part of my basement (66-68) for 2 weeks.  :)

I haven't used the adjuncts before so I'm wondering if anyone sees a problem with the additions of the maize, barley or dextrose.  I'm considering leaving the sugar out.  Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Robert on June 11, 2019, 07:21:27 PM
Looks pretty solid to me.  I like corn (maize) in my beer.  I might replace the flaked barley with more maize to keep the body light and the recipe simple but that's me.  Dextrose will be fine in there.  I'll have a mug!
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on June 11, 2019, 08:30:39 PM
Thanks.  My thought on the flaked barley is to help with a little head retention but I'm not sure if a .25# will do much.  Still, if its not out of line, using it will give me a little experience with it for next time. 
And if I have to buy a full pound, I'll have some extra on hand for the fall when it gets time for a stout!
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Robert on June 11, 2019, 09:31:32 PM
One other thing.  There's really no reason to use 6 row.  It used to be (decades ago) preferred with adjuncts for its enzyme content.  But American 2 row, which used to be more like European 2 row, is equal or higher in enzymes now, and is easier to mill and gives more extract.  In fact, very little 6 row is grown and malted now, and many experts believe it will completely disappear in a few years.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on June 12, 2019, 12:32:14 AM
One other thing.  There's really no reason to use 6 row.  It used to be (decades ago) preferred with adjuncts for its enzyme content.  But American 2 row, which used to be more like European 2 row, is equal or higher in enzymes now, and is easier to mill and gives more extract.  In fact, very little 6 row is grown and malted now, and many experts believe it will completely disappear in a few years.

You are talking diastatic power, correct?  If so, that's really interesting because everywhere I look it appears that 6 row has a higher diastatic rating than 2 row.  I don't doubt you, it just makes this a bit of a guessing game. Not sure that I could tell the difference anyway.

However, if 6 row is really on the way out then I better brew with it now before it's too late. This way, in the future, I can tell all the young punks how I used to brew with 6 row back in the "old days", in the snow, up a hill, both ways...

What say you to me splitting that 4#'s in half?
2# 6-Row
2# 2-Row
Just making the recipe more of a mess I suppose.

Though I can buy the 2 row in bulk and use some in an IPA I'm dreaming up.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Robert on June 12, 2019, 12:53:27 AM
I'd just go with a good American 2 row base malt, all purpose stuff.  There's no advantage to 6 row, it's just skinnier grains with less starch to make sugar out of and more husk.  Even if you wanted it for "historical authenticity," it's not the same stuff the old timers had.  Buy the bulk 2 row and use it in everything.  As for diastatic power, 2 row and 6 row will both have at least 140 Lintner.  Your corn and barley flakes have 0.  All you really need to convert the mash is a total average of 30-40.  So you'll have more than double that.  Even a lower enzyme European malt would.  So don't worry about diastatic power.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: mabrungard on June 12, 2019, 01:03:07 AM
The flaked barley will certainly enhance the heading for that beer, but I find that it does add a grainy flavor that I don't appreciate. I prefer using flaked wheat for enhancing heading. It seems more neutral tasting to me. A 1/4 pound is more than sufficient.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: hopfenundmalz on June 12, 2019, 01:29:38 AM
i have seen some NA 2 row at 150 L almost 6 Row territory from a few years ago. Of course the malt breeders have been at it with 6 row, saw on at 180L.

That is enough to convert dirt - I am kidding.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Robert on June 12, 2019, 01:39:29 AM
i have seen some NA 2 row at 150 L almost 6 Row territory from a few years ago. Of course the malt breeders have been at it with 6 row, saw on at 180L.

That is enough to convert dirt - I am kidding.
Sounds like distillers' malt.  They need all the enzymes in maybe 10% of the mash bill.  Bet the breeders can get even that out of 2 row.  The arrangement of corns on the stalk really has nothing fundamentally to do with enzyme potential, just makes for more useless (from our point  of view) material.  The only reason 6 row ever took hold in America is that some particular landrace variety or other happened to grow well in somebody's field, centuries before breeding programs were conceived of.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: hopfenundmalz on June 12, 2019, 01:42:23 AM
i have seen some NA 2 row at 150 L almost 6 Row territory from a few years ago. Of course the malt breeders have been at it with 6 row, saw on at 180L.

That is enough to convert dirt - I am kidding.
Sounds like distillers' malt.  They need all the enzymes in maybe 10% of the mash bill.  Bet the breeders can get even that out of 2 row.  The arrangement of corns on the stalk really has nothing fundamentally to do with enzyme potential, just makes for more useless (from our point  of view) material.  The only reason 6 row ever took hold in America is that some particular landrace variety or other happened to grow well in somebody's field, centuries before breeding programs were conceived of.


There are distillers that use a lot of commercial enzymes, no malt required.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Robert on June 12, 2019, 01:48:55 AM
i have seen some NA 2 row at 150 L almost 6 Row territory from a few years ago. Of course the malt breeders have been at it with 6 row, saw on at 180L.

That is enough to convert dirt - I am kidding.
Sounds like distillers' malt.  They need all the enzymes in maybe 10% of the mash bill.  Bet the breeders can get even that out of 2 row.  The arrangement of corns on the stalk really has nothing fundamentally to do with enzyme potential, just makes for more useless (from our point  of view) material.  The only reason 6 row ever took hold in America is that some particular landrace variety or other happened to grow well in somebody's field, centuries before breeding programs were conceived of.


There are distillers that use a lot of commercial enzymes, no malt required.
Brewers have played with that that too.  But we probably wouldn't care for the results. 
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: MNWayne on June 12, 2019, 01:06:50 PM
I find 6-row to be very thin and flavorless. I'd use 2-row to maintain the flavor, and like Robert mentioned, there is plenty of enzymes to convert the corn.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on June 12, 2019, 02:05:08 PM
I'm convinced...2 row it is.  Considering this is going to be very pale in color, I'm also now considering Carapils instead of the Flaked Barley (or flaked wheat, as Martin suggested) in order to keep the haze down.  So then it would look like:

3.75# 2-Row
.75# Flaked Maize
.25# Carapils (about 5% of the bill)

.125# Corn Sugar (Boil)

.5oz Crystal @ 45min
.5oz Crystal at the end

US-05


I think I'm getting warmer.  Thanks for all the input.  Much appreciated.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: denny on June 12, 2019, 02:50:18 PM
One other thing.  There's really no reason to use 6 row.  It used to be (decades ago) preferred with adjuncts for its enzyme content.  But American 2 row, which used to be more like European 2 row, is equal or higher in enzymes now, and is easier to mill and gives more extract.  In fact, very little 6 row is grown and malted now, and many experts believe it will completely disappear in a few years.

You are talking diastatic power, correct?  If so, that's really interesting because everywhere I look it appears that 6 row has a higher diastatic rating than 2 row.  I don't doubt you, it just makes this a bit of a guessing game. Not sure that I could tell the difference anyway.

However, if 6 row is really on the way out then I better brew with it now before it's too late. This way, in the future, I can tell all the young punks how I used to brew with 6 row back in the "old days", in the snow, up a hill, both ways...

What say you to me splitting that 4#'s in half?
2# 6-Row
2# 2-Row
Just making the recipe more of a mess I suppose.

Though I can buy the 2 row in bulk and use some in an IPA I'm dreaming up.

These days 2 row has pretty much as much diastatic power as 6 row.  And there's nothi g in your recipe that would require increased diastatic power anyway.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Kevin on June 12, 2019, 03:41:10 PM
My go-to cream ale recipe is based on an interview with a guy named Curt Stock that I heard in a podcast. Off the top of my head he recommended 70 - 80% 2-row or pilsner malt. And the remaining being flaked corn... or a mix of flaked corn and flaked rice with a 2:1 ratio of corn to rice. The OG should end up around 1.050 to 1.055 with the ABV in the neighborhood of 5%

Curt says use a mild, crisp hop like Hallertauer or Saaz. I've used both of those and they work well but my favorite is Lemondrop hops and I've pretty much locked it in as the only variety I use in my cream ales. The IBU should be fairly low in the mid to upper teens but not much higher than 20 - 22 IBU. Your choice of Crystal should work well.

I forget how many batches Curt says he has made with a variety of yeasts but the one he swears by is Wyeast 1056. However the one yeast he says he has used often also is US-05 so you have chosen another winner.

Curt's recipe is 73% pilsner malt, 18% flaked corn and 9% flaked rice with Hallertauer to reach the IBU target. Usually two thirds of the hops for bittering and the remaining toward the end of the boil.

My recipe varies slightly using about 78% 2-row, 15% flaked corn and 7% flaked rice. I like the little extra body the higher percentage of base malt gives. Like you though, I have been kicking around the idea of using a touch of flaked barley for extra body. I use Lemondrop hops and target 20 IBU in each batch and I use the WYeast 1056 every time.

Cream ales are a little too thin in body for me but my wife and friends love it so I probably make more of this than anything else.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: denny on June 12, 2019, 04:16:51 PM
Cream ale tips and recipes...

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/brew-files-episode-2-crushable-cream-ale

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/recipes/i-dream-jenny-cream-ale
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on June 12, 2019, 05:55:58 PM

Curt says use a mild, crisp hop like Hallertauer or Saaz. I've used both of those and they work well but my favorite is Lemondrop hops and I've pretty much locked it in as the only variety I use in my cream ales. The IBU should be fairly low in the mid to upper teens but not much higher than 20 - 22 IBU. Your choice of Crystal should work well.


Lemondrop Hops is really interesting. Too interesting to pass up as a matter of fact.  Another adjustment to the recipe!


And Denny, thanks for the podcast.  That was required listening.  Monks in Latrobe!  The beginnings of canned beer!
But no matter how badly I'd like to try, I'm not going to use Kix cereal in the mash!  A modicum of self restraint.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: BrewBama on June 13, 2019, 01:11:41 PM
I have brewed Cream Ale with and without corn and prefer it without. There’s just something that the corn adds (sweetness?) that detracts from the beer IMO.

...but then again I exceed IBU and color guidance in my version:

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190613/a7d0665aebcc6dce08a65f5103b2be29.jpg)


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Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Iliff Ave Brewhouse on June 13, 2019, 01:25:54 PM
Bama, that looks more like a Blonde Ale to me. Nice recipe regardless...
Title: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: BrewBama on June 13, 2019, 01:42:40 PM
I don’t disagree. My styles often cross official lines.

Here’s my standard Blonde.  I use various hops but the base beer is the same.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190613/2aa5494a27d80278926fbc9ac29f5621.jpg)

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Title: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: tommymorris on June 13, 2019, 03:04:16 PM
My go-to cream ale recipe is based on an interview with a guy named Curt Stock that I heard in a podcast. Off the top of my head he recommended 70 - 80% 2-row or pilsner malt. And the remaining being flaked corn... or a mix of flaked corn and flaked rice with a 2:1 ratio of corn to rice. The OG should end up around 1.050 to 1.055 with the ABV in the neighborhood of 5%

Curt says use a mild, crisp hop like Hallertauer or Saaz. I've used both of those and they work well but my favorite is Lemondrop hops and I've pretty much locked it in as the only variety I use in my cream ales. The IBU should be fairly low in the mid to upper teens but not much higher than 20 - 22 IBU. Your choice of Crystal should work well.

I forget how many batches Curt says he has made with a variety of yeasts but the one he swears by is Wyeast 1056. However the one yeast he says he has used often also is US-05 so you have chosen another winner.

Curt's recipe is 73% pilsner malt, 18% flaked corn and 9% flaked rice with Hallertauer to reach the IBU target. Usually two thirds of the hops for bittering and the remaining toward the end of the boil.

My recipe varies slightly using about 78% 2-row, 15% flaked corn and 7% flaked rice. I like the little extra body the higher percentage of base malt gives. Like you though, I have been kicking around the idea of using a touch of flaked barley for extra body. I use Lemondrop hops and target 20 IBU in each batch and I use the WYeast 1056 every time.

Cream ales are a little too thin in body for me but my wife and friends love it so I probably make more of this than anything else.
How do you avoid the US-05 peach flavor? With such a light beer, it seems like that flavor would stand out like a sore thumb.

I like US-05 with APA’s. But after using US-05 twice in light lager type beers and getting overwhelmed by peach, I avoid US-05 in any beers that can’t hide or work with the peach.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Iliff Ave Brewhouse on June 13, 2019, 03:23:50 PM
Man sometimes I wish I got peach out of US-05. That would really compliment SOME of my beers.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: mabrungard on June 14, 2019, 12:20:12 AM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: tommymorris on June 14, 2019, 12:40:55 AM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.
I have only tasted it with fizzy yellow type beers where there is nothing to hide it.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Kevin on June 14, 2019, 02:27:40 AM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.

I was going to say the same thing. Never experienced that even in lighter body styles.
Title: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: tommymorris on June 14, 2019, 11:30:04 AM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.

I was going to say the same thing. Never experienced that even in lighter body styles.
Maybe everyone can’t rate the peach. Or maybe you guys are onto how to avoid it.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=28897.15
See post 19 in the thread above.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=16321.30
See post 30 in the thread above.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/chico-us-05-1056-and-perceived-peach-flavor-and-aroma.309272/
or this whole thread.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/getting-us-05-to-taste-clean.573681/
or this whole thread.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Homebrewing/comments/arys9b/peach_flavor_using_us05/
or this whole thread.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: denny on June 14, 2019, 01:32:41 PM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.

I've gotten it with every beer I've made with 05.  To the point that I won't use it any more.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: jeffy on June 14, 2019, 08:08:26 PM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.

I've gotten it with every beer I've made with 05.  To the point that I won't use it any more.
I find it pretty common when judging American pale ales.  Sometimes it works, other times not so much.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: richardk on June 15, 2019, 01:00:36 AM
Looking to put together a back porch beer for the summer, even though the dog days might be here and gone by the time its ready to drink!

American Cream Ale
BIAB
Boil size of 3.25gal for 2.5gal in the fermenter.

OG around 1.050-1.055, depending on the crush!
Trying to finish around 1.010.
IBU: 17-18ish

4# 6-Row
.5# Flaked Maize
.25# Flaked Barley

Mash above for 60 @ 150-152.

.125# Corn Sugar (Boil)

.5oz Crystal @ 45min
.5oz Crystal at the end

US-05

Ferment in the coldest part of my basement (66-68) for 2 weeks.  :)

I'm pretty pleased with my 5 gal cream ale recipe, even if it's ridiculously simple (never survives a cookout):

OG ~1.060, FG ~ 1.009
2 row, 8#
flaked maize, 1.5#
corn sugar, 1#
0.25 oz Cluster hops, first wort
0.75 oz Cluster hops, 15 min

1. mash at 148 °F (152 mash-in)
2. boil 90 min
3. ferment with WLP001 for 21ish days at 61 °F, slightly overpitched
4. keg on 18 PSI CO2 and lager at 33 °F for 21ish days
5. serve on 18 PSI with 14 foot 3/16 bev line at 33 °F

I haven't used the adjuncts before so I'm wondering if anyone sees a problem with the additions of the maize, barley or dextrose.  I'm considering leaving the sugar out.  Thanks in advance.

As I understand it: it's not an "American Cream Ale" without the adjuncts.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: BrewBama on June 15, 2019, 11:18:53 AM

As I understand it: it's not an "American Cream Ale" without the adjuncts.

They can be brewed with or without. Dealer’s choice.


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Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Steve Ruch on June 15, 2019, 04:53:29 PM
Peach? I’ve never experienced that in any of the beers I ferment with US-05. I would like to have that note in my beers.

I've gotten it with every beer I've made with 05.  To the point that I won't use it any more.
Would peach work in a  NEIPA?
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: BrewBama on June 17, 2019, 10:17:18 PM
I'd just go with a good American 2 row base malt, all purpose stuff.  There's no advantage to 6 row, it's just skinnier grains with less starch to make sugar out of and more husk.  Even if you wanted it for "historical authenticity," it's not the same stuff the old timers had.  Buy the bulk 2 row and use it in everything.  As for diastatic power, 2 row and 6 row will both have at least 140 Lintner.  Your corn and barley flakes have 0.  All you really need to convert the mash is a total average of 30-40.  So you'll have more than double that.  Even a lower enzyme European malt would.  So don't worry about diastatic power.

Here’s a Brülosophy article concerning 2 vs 6 row:

http://brulosophy.com/2018/04/09/grain-comparison-2-row-pale-malt-vs-6-row-pale-malt-exbeeriment-results/


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Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on July 14, 2019, 02:00:25 AM
My go-to cream ale recipe is based on an interview with a guy named Curt Stock that I heard in a podcast. Off the top of my head he recommended 70 - 80% 2-row or pilsner malt. And the remaining being flaked corn... or a mix of flaked corn and flaked rice with a 2:1 ratio of corn to rice. The OG should end up around 1.050 to 1.055 with the ABV in the neighborhood of 5%

Curt says use a mild, crisp hop like Hallertauer or Saaz. I've used both of those and they work well but my favorite is Lemondrop hops and I've pretty much locked it in as the only variety I use in my cream ales. The IBU should be fairly low in the mid to upper teens but not much higher than 20 - 22 IBU. Your choice of Crystal should work well.

I forget how many batches Curt says he has made with a variety of yeasts but the one he swears by is Wyeast 1056. However the one yeast he says he has used often also is US-05 so you have chosen another winner.

Curt's recipe is 73% pilsner malt, 18% flaked corn and 9% flaked rice with Hallertauer to reach the IBU target. Usually two thirds of the hops for bittering and the remaining toward the end of the boil.

My recipe varies slightly using about 78% 2-row, 15% flaked corn and 7% flaked rice. I like the little extra body the higher percentage of base malt gives. Like you though, I have been kicking around the idea of using a touch of flaked barley for extra body. I use Lemondrop hops and target 20 IBU in each batch and I use the WYeast 1056 every time.

So my Cream Ale went into bottles today.

2.5 gal (into fermenter)
2 gal (into 21 bottles)

77% 2-Row
14% Flaked Corn
5% CaraPils
4% Dextrose

.25 Lemondrop FWH
.5 Lemondrop - 15 minutes
.25 Lemondrop - Dry Hop

US-05 - 2 weeks in primary at 68.

OG - 1.051
FG - 1.008
ABV - 5.63% (a bit more than I was expecting)

The US-05 took off at 8 hours, peeked at about 24-36 hours, and banged away for almost 5 days before finally peetering out.  What a trooper!   Dry hops went in with 4 days left.

The color came in around 3, with Morey being the correct predictor. 

The sample taste I took was nice and clean (no peach, at least not yet) with a slight but noticeable lemon nose.  I'm really liking the suggestion of the Lemondrop hops and a little upset I didn't use more (even though it really wouldn't have been "to style").  Thank you very much.

Anticipation is high.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: denny on July 14, 2019, 02:28:27 PM
My go-to cream ale recipe is based on an interview with a guy named Curt Stock that I heard in a podcast. Off the top of my head he recommended 70 - 80% 2-row or pilsner malt. And the remaining being flaked corn... or a mix of flaked corn and flaked rice with a 2:1 ratio of corn to rice. The OG should end up around 1.050 to 1.055 with the ABV in the neighborhood of 5%

Curt says use a mild, crisp hop like Hallertauer or Saaz. I've used both of those and they work well but my favorite is Lemondrop hops and I've pretty much locked it in as the only variety I use in my cream ales. The IBU should be fairly low in the mid to upper teens but not much higher than 20 - 22 IBU. Your choice of Crystal should work well.

I forget how many batches Curt says he has made with a variety of yeasts but the one he swears by is Wyeast 1056. However the one yeast he says he has used often also is US-05 so you have chosen another winner.

Curt's recipe is 73% pilsner malt, 18% flaked corn and 9% flaked rice with Hallertauer to reach the IBU target. Usually two thirds of the hops for bittering and the remaining toward the end of the boil.

My recipe varies slightly using about 78% 2-row, 15% flaked corn and 7% flaked rice. I like the little extra body the higher percentage of base malt gives. Like you though, I have been kicking around the idea of using a touch of flaked barley for extra body. I use Lemondrop hops and target 20 IBU in each batch and I use the WYeast 1056 every time.

So my Cream Ale went into bottles today.

2.5 gal (into fermenter)
2 gal (into 21 bottles)

77% 2-Row
14% Flaked Corn
5% CaraPils
4% Dextrose

.25 Lemondrop FWH
.5 Lemondrop - 15 minutes
.25 Lemondrop - Dry Hop

US-05 - 2 weeks in primary at 68.

OG - 1.051
FG - 1.008
ABV - 5.63% (a bit more than I was expecting)

The US-05 took off at 8 hours, peeked at about 24-36 hours, and banged away for almost 5 days before finally peetering out.  What a trooper!   Dry hops went in with 4 days left.

The color came in around 3, with Morey being the correct predictor. 

The sample taste I took was nice and clean (no peach, at least not yet) with a slight but noticeable lemon nose.  I'm really liking the suggestion of the Lemondrop hops and a little upset I didn't use more (even though it really wouldn't have been "to style").  Thank you very much.

Anticipation is high.

Carapils and dextrose are kinda diametrically opposed .  Interesting choice.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on July 14, 2019, 02:46:01 PM

Carapils and dextrose are kinda diametrically opposed .  Interesting choice.

 :D
"Interesting" is an interesting choice of words.

I had already purchased a 1# bag of CaraPils based on a few recipes that I saw and instead of having it sit in my closet, I decided to give it a shot.  If it does nothing or defeats the purpose, so be it.  Live and learn.
At least now, if I just throw the rest out, I can tell myself that at least I didn't waste it all.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: denny on July 14, 2019, 02:49:22 PM

Carapils and dextrose are kinda diametrically opposed .  Interesting choice.

 :D
"Interesting" is an interesting choice of words.

I had already purchased a 1# bag of CaraPils based on a few recipes that I saw and instead of having it sit in my closet, I decided to give it a shot.  If it does nothing or defeats the purpose, so be it.  Live and learn.
At least now, if I just throw the rest out, I can tell myself that at least I didn't waste it all.

Sure.  An alternative would be to keep the grain tightly sealed in a cool, dark place and use it in another recipe.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on August 03, 2019, 12:07:54 AM
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190803/fe726c58191b1ecd0b0aab23545d0348.jpg)

Finally getting to enjoy this Cream Ale. Came out pretty good, if I do say so myself. The lemondrop hops are coming through nicely (kinda wish I added more!), white, foamy, clingy head that sticks around almost to the bottom. A bit of yeastiness coming through. This was US-05, so maybe that *is* a peachy thing. Hmm. Hard to tell with the lemondrop. Anyway, I’m slowly raising the bar.




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Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Iliff Ave Brewhouse on August 03, 2019, 02:02:05 AM
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190803/fe726c58191b1ecd0b0aab23545d0348.jpg)

Finally getting to enjoy this Cream Ale. Came out pretty good, if I do say so myself. The lemondrop hops are coming through nicely (kinda wish I added more!), white, foamy, clingy head that sticks around almost to the bottom. A bit of yeastiness coming through. This was US-05, so maybe that *is* a peachy thing. Hmm. Hard to tell with the lemondrop. Anyway, I’m slowly raising the bar.




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Awesome! Sounds delish. I just took a reading of my cream ale with rye and its about ready to package. Going to be interesting for sure but probably won’t come off as a cream ale though.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: BrewBama on August 03, 2019, 02:46:24 AM
Once it clears that yeastiness could disappear.  Cheers!


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Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Joe Sr. on August 03, 2019, 02:52:57 AM
Once it clears that yeastiness could disappear.  Cheers!


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Agree with that. No disrespect but it looks a bit cloudy. The yeast flavor should drop as the beer clears.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: Megary on August 03, 2019, 10:00:42 AM
Yeah it’s definitely a bit cloudy. I didn’t use any finings and it’s only been in the fridge for a day, so this was an early test, for scientific purposes.  ;)

Hoping the haze will settle in a week or two. If it lasts that long.
Title: Re: Simple Cream Ale
Post by: BrewBama on August 03, 2019, 11:43:07 AM
Absolutely. The data well collect is invaluable.


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