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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: KCguy on July 02, 2019, 01:22:05 PM

Title: aeration ideas
Post by: KCguy on July 02, 2019, 01:22:05 PM
Having always simply poured my 65F wort into the fermenter from a few feet high, and turning out decent beers, I began to think I might need more oxygen when making belgian styles....tried a simple aquarium pump and it seemed to work fine, but I could never get over the "dont let the stone get wet" thing but knowing it still needed to be sanitized.  I guess I could put the thing in the oven, then pull it out 15 mins before and connect to santized hoses and the pump - but that is too much of a Faff, as the english say. 

Then I realized Ive got a few stirring tools for the end of a cordless drill, which Ive used to de-gas my wine batches.  I wonder if that would work just as well as the pump?  Besides, Ive read somewhere (so it must be correct :) ) that the aquarium pump method only injects about 8ppm, which is same as pouring in, like Ive always done.  I dont want to go get a tank of oxygen and then still worry about santizing the stone and tubing. 

Any other clever ideas for aeration?  Or downsides to the wine stirring sticks? 
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2019, 01:39:19 PM
Don't let the stone get wet?  Wha...?
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: KCguy on July 02, 2019, 01:44:35 PM
Don't let the stone get wet?  Wha...?

Oh the documentation that came with the pump and stone, says not to let it get wet.  I know, I know.  It just made me realize they took a tool for something else, and re-sold it to learning brewers.   
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: kramerog on July 02, 2019, 01:49:25 PM
A few points:
-stainless steel stones can be baked, boiled and dropped in sanitizer solution
- 8 ppm is about the max dissolved oxygen (DO) you can get in wort from air depending on your gravity; higher DO is possible in water
- You can "shake" a fermenter to create a big vortex for 40 seconds and get to 8 ppm (presumably from 4 ppm). 
- no reason a mix stir wouldn't work
- pouring wort into a fermenter can get you to about 4 ppm DO.  I haven't seen claims before that you can get to 8 ppm with pouring alone.

I used to know the sources for the above information, but I no longer do.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2019, 02:34:15 PM
I use a stainless stone and just put it in iodophor to sanitize.   I recommend a 2 micron stone, not 0.5 micron.  The 2 micron ones are much easier to clean and sanitize because flow through them is easier.  I just flush the whole assembly with water after use (I put a little barb on a hose adapter on my sink faucet) and run air or CO2 through to mostly dry it out. 

I've used air, and now use the red Bernzomatic oxygen cylinders. The air coming out of my aquarium pump stank from the rubber diaphragm, and I don't want my beer to taste like rubber, so I rigged a carbon filter as well as a sterile filter in line so I'd just get nice, pure air into the wort. 

The one handling instruction I know of (never heard of something intended to go in liquid that couldn't get wet) is not to directly touch it, as the oils in your skin will clog the pores  -- handle it like a halogen headlight bulb.

I haven't ever tried it, but the idea of using a stirrer on a drill ought to be a lot easier than pouring back and forth or shaking, and a pretty clever, simple idea.  Easy to clean and sanitize too.

As kramerog indicates, the maximum dissolved oxygen level at saturation with air is around 8ppm, which is just about enough in most cases.  1-2 minutes of gentle bubbling with pure O2 should get 10ppm easily, which is supposed to be ideal.  Also note it is possible to go too far.  10-12ppm is really the most you want.  The Yeast book by White and Zainasheff has some tables with results of O2 levels they got using various methods.  One more point on using a stone.  Ideally, you have a flow rate such that fine bubbles are just reaching the surface, not churning up a boiling head of foam -- gas that's breaking the surface and shooting into the air is obviously not dissolving into the wort.

Very strong beers may need more, but rather that try to get more O2 in upfront, the advice I've always seen is to aerate a second time several hours (up to 12) after pitching, while of course any oxygenation after fermentation starts is usually a big no-no.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: denny on July 02, 2019, 02:49:19 PM
I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: EnkAMania on July 02, 2019, 02:59:34 PM
I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Bob357 on July 02, 2019, 03:06:29 PM
It's the sterile filter you don't want to get wet.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2019, 03:07:06 PM
I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2019, 03:07:34 PM
It's the sterile filter you don't want to get wet.
Ok, that makes sense!
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: denny on July 02, 2019, 03:48:54 PM
I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2019, 03:57:46 PM


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: ynotbrusum on July 02, 2019, 05:41:53 PM


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I have gone from aerating with a stone and O2 to just what Denny does.  It seems that sufficient oxygenation occurs with a healthy yeast pitch and a modest froth from transferring.  I rack onto yeast (dry liquid or re-pitched portion of cake, so I always assume that oxidation concerns are pretty much avoided due to the nearly immediate yeast uptake and use of the O2 that is present in the foamy surface of the fermenter at wort transfer (and O2 in the head space of the fermenter, if necessary).  I practice most of the low O2 processes up to the point of transfer from the boil kettle to the fermenter and have had pretty good success with lagers with that approach.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: goose on July 02, 2019, 05:51:55 PM

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)
[/quote]

I still use this method!  It is about 6" of 3/8"copper pipe that has about 20 holes drilled in it at an angle around its circumference so that it sucks in air while the wort is passing through it (I pump my wort from the kettle through the chiller and and aerator into the top of my conical).  It works great, is cheap, and I seem to get enough O2 in the beer from this method so that I never have really long lag times.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 02, 2019, 06:13:44 PM
^^^^
Ah, so your method sucks air into the wort stream rather than spraying the wort, Goose!  That reminds me of another trick I've heard that's similar but even simpler, if you use a siphon:  put a pinhole in the top side of the racking hose just past where it attaches to the racking cane.  This will suck in a lot of air as the wort flows too.  (I accidentally saw this effect in action once due to a bad connection between hose and cane.)
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: 4swan on July 02, 2019, 07:40:16 PM
I have been using a siphon spray wort aerator for the last few years and have been happy with that.  It is a little piece of plastic that sticks in the end of your hose.  It looks like the current price is about $4.  I have not done any experiments to see if it is any better than anything else.  It does no worse than the aquarium pump I retired years ago.
Title: aeration ideas
Post by: coolman26 on July 02, 2019, 07:42:32 PM
TMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: The Beerery on July 02, 2019, 07:45:00 PM
LMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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I don't know about that... I thought it was more like 3-4, with just splashing vigorously. After a 1hr rest in the kettle in the perfect world you would get 2ppm though surface diffusion, however I see considerably less than that on my setup (100ppb). I would not ditch that stone...
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: coolman26 on July 02, 2019, 08:08:15 PM
LMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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I don't know about that... I thought it was more like 3-4, with just splashing vigorously. After a 1hr rest in the kettle in the perfect world you would get 2ppm though surface diffusion, however I see considerably less than that on my setup (100ppb). I would not ditch that stone...
From the source, thanks for the correction. I’m not sure where the 6 came from. I hope I’m getting around 6.


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Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: denny on July 02, 2019, 08:33:04 PM


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: coolman26 on July 02, 2019, 09:36:58 PM


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
I’ve never used one myself actually. I remember Leos used a Venturi for in-line aeration when he started his brewery. The idea has always stuck with me since then.


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Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: coolman26 on July 02, 2019, 09:57:16 PM
LMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



I don't know about that... I thought it was more like 3-4, with just splashing vigorously. After a 1hr rest in the kettle in the perfect world you would get 2ppm though surface diffusion, however I see considerably less than that on my setup (100ppb). I would not ditch that stone...
10/4, the stone will be back for 90sec @ 12.5g. I went back through my notebook. That was my SOP before not using it. I didn’t see anything negative happen fortunately.


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Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on July 02, 2019, 09:59:09 PM


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
I’ve never used one myself actually. I remember Leos used a Venturi for in-line aeration when he started his brewery. The idea has always stuck with me since then.


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Thank you for mentioning me.

I still do use Venturi tube. Issue is that you need to have adequate flow to create the vacuum (to suck the air into the liquid stream).

I am not sure if there are so small Venturi tubes that would be adequate for home brewing.

Nowadays I use 1” tube( that would be a NPT Thread size). I can ferment 9 % beer without a problem. My transfer takes about 60 minutes and last time I bought new yeast pitch was 2.5 years ago. This puts me to 63-th repitching (some people call it generation).

As Denny mentioned if you use dry yeast, you do not have to worry about wort airration.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: KCguy on July 03, 2019, 02:32:39 PM
I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going.

Would most here agree that using Imperial yeast is active yeast already?  Or are you saying starters only? 
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: coolman26 on July 03, 2019, 06:50:12 PM
I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going.

Would most here agree that using Imperial yeast is active yeast already?  Or are you saying starters only?
I'm saying pitching a starter that is at high krausen. 
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: AzBruin on July 13, 2019, 05:45:25 PM
I use 2 different methods, depending on OG. On lower gravity beers, I pour back and forth between 2 buckets, but through a fine screen colander. This has the advantage of removing some of the hops and hot break.
For anything with higher grav, (about 1.060 or so) I use a stone and bernzomatic oxy tank. To clean the stone after use, keep the oxy flowing while dipping it into some sanitizer.

I guess to be totally honest, I use the stone and tank almost all the time because I rarely brew anything less than 1.080.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: smkranz on July 17, 2019, 12:49:54 AM
Fermentis conducted a yeast class a couple months ago at my local HBS.  It was an extensive presentation on their research, and dispelled some of the things I've come to supposedly know over the years about brewing and yeast.  One of them is, there's no reason to rehydrate with their dry yeasts.  That issue has been beaten to death here.  Secondly, Fermentis says there is no reason to oxygenate wort with their yeasts, because their dried yeast has the nutrients that it needs.  I don't have a copy of the presentation, but from their web site:

Effect of oxygen
WHEN USING ADY THERE IS NO SPECIFIC REQUIREMENT OF AIR OR OXYGEN DURING THE WORT COOLING AND TRANSFER TO THE FERMENTER. Indeed, the ADY is rich enough in sterols (lipids) and minerals for its own multiplication process.

To put this to the test, we brewed a second batch of the Tank 7 clone recipe from the AHA database. We direct pitched dry Belle Saison yeast (not even a Fermentis yeast, but Lallemand says the exact same thing about their yeast...no oxygenation necessary), with no oxygenation. Our OG was 1.076.  FG was 1.003.  Flavor is great.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: Robert on July 17, 2019, 01:18:41 AM

Fermentis conducted a yeast class a couple months ago at my local HBS.  It was an extensive presentation on their research, and dispelled some of the things I've come to supposedly know over the years about brewing and yeast.  One of them is, there's no reason to rehydrate with their dry yeasts.  That issue has been beaten to death here.  Secondly, Fermentis says there is no reason to oxygenate wort with their yeasts, because their dried yeast has the nutrients that it needs.  I don't have a copy of the presentation, but from their web site:

Effect of oxygen
WHEN USING ADY THERE IS NO SPECIFIC REQUIREMENT OF AIR OR OXYGEN DURING THE WORT COOLING AND TRANSFER TO THE FERMENTER. Indeed, the ADY is rich enough in sterols (lipids) and minerals for its own multiplication process.

To put this to the test, we brewed a second batch of the Tank 7 clone recipe from the AHA database. We direct pitched dry Belle Saison yeast (not even a Fermentis yeast, but Lallemand says the exact same thing about their yeast...no oxygenation necessary), with no oxygenation. Our OG was 1.076.  FG was 1.003.  Flavor is great.

A while back I had an exchange with one of their technical reps on a tangentially related topic.  He sent a couple of papers from the studies they did.  The data are rock solid.  It is in fact preferable to direct pitch without rehydration and skip oxygenation on the first pitch.  For repitching harvested yeast, proceed exactly as you would if the original pitch was liquid.  Dry yeast is no less suitable for repitching than liquid, the data show.  What is not well publicized is that, AFAICT, there is actually NO DIFFERENCE between Fermentis' and other manufacturers' yeasts.  These studies were all done in the 90s, a couple of decades before Fermentis started implying in their advertising that some kind of "new" process made this possible.  It doesn't look like there's a new type of yeast, just the belated dissemination of information dispelling old misconceptions.  Don't overcomplicate your brew day, that defeats the advantage of dry yeast, whoever sells it.  (Full disclosure, I'm a liquid yeast guy.  Never quite resolved that other issue, but it's probably irrelevant to most.)

EDIT typo
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: denny on July 17, 2019, 02:29:00 PM
I'll add that it's not just Fermentis.....that applies to all dry yeast.  Lallemand says the same thing.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: soymateofeo on July 20, 2019, 01:24:09 PM
I don't think you will come across anybody who has had problems with oxygen unless brewing big beers.  I have done the following.
1. Shake my carboy  (only broke one)
2. Wine degasser  (i also used it to create a postboil whirlpool)
3. Air pump with hepa filter and stainless stone
4. Plastic tip that splashes wort all over the place.
5.benzo oxygen with airstone
6.  Can't think of anything else but I am sure i have tried it.

They all worked.  I never had off flavors that I could tell as long as my temp was good.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: kgs on July 20, 2019, 04:19:44 PM
I have an aquarium pump and a stone, but have gone back to whisking 5 minutes with a 24" stainless steel whisk. I suspect this is unnecessary (since sometimes I just pour, and all is well) but it is excellent upper arm exercise. The whisk makes three appearances in my brew day: stirring the mash (where it does a great job of breaking up potential dough balls), whirlpooling the wort during cooling (also great for this task), and aerating. This whisk gets a lot of use elsewhere in my kitchen.
Title: Re: aeration ideas
Post by: purduekenn on July 23, 2019, 06:38:19 PM
I used to used to use a oxygen stone but within the last year I quit that practice. And started to use a simple  Siphon Spray Wort Aerator that attached to the end of the transfer hose out of the brew kettle. The beers have turned out fine and it is simpler than using a O2 tank and a stone.