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Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: weithman5 on August 24, 2010, 07:04:02 pm

Title: scotch
Post by: weithman5 on August 24, 2010, 07:04:02 pm
I rarely drink anything but beer.  So I need a little help.  I just received a bottle of Glenrothes Single speyside malt scotch whiskey.  This was distilled in 1982 and bottled in 1997. the package even has a hand written description of the character from the original taster in 1982 and the approval in 1996 prior to bottling. The question do I continue to save it or do I try it?  either way i am pretty stoked :D
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: akr71 on August 24, 2010, 07:10:42 pm
Sounds like you've got something special there!

http://www.whisky.com/brands/glenrothes_brand.html
"Such is the quality of The Glenrothes, we believe this is a Malt to be savoured in special company."

However, it didn't get made just to sit on a shelf and gather dust - it was made to be enjoyed.  Also, once its bottled, the character of a whisky doesn't change much, so saving it isn't going to improve it any.

I'm very jealous...
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: nicneufeld on August 24, 2010, 07:48:04 pm
It's not like vintage port or wine, once in glass, its done and ready, and virtually stable...it will taste essentially the same today as in 1997, at least, if it changes at all it will unlikely be much improvement.  15 year old and vintage marked, that should be a nice whisky!  If you have friends that appreciate Scotch, particularly single malt, it would be a great thing to invite one or two over to open it with you.  Enjoy!

Title: Re: scotch
Post by: weithman5 on August 24, 2010, 07:48:59 pm
wow, thanks for the link.  the man who gave it to me said to drink it neat after dinner.  put a few drops of water in the glass just to help lift the aroma. well, i have a son graduating ohio state next year. good a time as any...
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: gordonstrong on August 24, 2010, 07:57:43 pm
Definitely drink it. Distilled spirits are often discussed as being so-and-so years old, but that refers to the aging at the distillery. Once it's in the bottle, it's not going to change but it could evaporate if not capped tightly.

Wine will age in the bottle, as will beer. Not spirits.

Sounds tasty.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: Slowbrew on August 24, 2010, 09:09:20 pm
I wouldn't even hesitate, open it and have a glass.  Share it with good friends.  Scotch is made to be savored but not stored forever.

Paul
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: weithman5 on August 24, 2010, 10:40:22 pm
drink it i will.  maybe this weekend.  sometime within next year.  i do have a few nice montecristos stashed among the 100 or so smokes that seem to not get smoked.  thanks guys
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: chezteth on August 24, 2010, 11:06:59 pm
Definitely drink it.  Make sure you have a good cigar to go with it.  Where do you live so I can come over and help you enjoy it.  ;)

Enjoy,
Brandon
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: MrNate on August 25, 2010, 12:37:13 am
Well, it's no Cutty Sark, but I'd drink it.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tygo on August 25, 2010, 12:57:41 am
Well, it's no Cutty Sark, but I'd drink it.

I just shuddered and gagged a little.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: weithman5 on August 25, 2010, 04:33:04 pm
[Ohhh ya!!!  I love Montecristos!!!  They're like an all day Slo Poke we used to enjoy when we were kids. Just never seems to end.... Cheers!!!

I prefer them too.  I keep getting Cohibas as gifts because everyone seems to think that is the smoke, but when it comes to cubans i do prefer the montecristos and even the partagas.  just harder to come by.  actually time to enjoy them is hard to come by.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: euge on October 24, 2010, 03:00:19 am
Just got a bottle of scotch after 15 years. The last was Johnny Walker Red label. This'uns  a 10 year single malt called Speyburn (http://www.scotchwhisky.net/distilleries/speyburn.htm#hist).

I like it. A lot.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: weazletoe on October 24, 2010, 03:10:52 am
Also, once you open it, drink it up. When the cap is off, and you pour it, it will oxidize, just like beer. Don't pour a couple glasses, and then shelf it for a couple more years. down the hatch ,with it!!
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: Tim McManus on October 24, 2010, 03:57:39 am
drink it i will.  maybe this weekend.  sometime within next year.  i do have a few nice montecristos stashed among the 100 or so smokes that seem to not get smoked.  thanks guys

It'll go well with Havana Montecristos.  :)
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: euge on October 24, 2010, 04:05:53 am
Also, once you open it, drink it up. When the cap is off, and you pour it, it will oxidize, just like beer. Don't pour a couple glasses, and then shelf it for a couple more years. down the hatch ,with it!!

OK I will take your advice! :D

Title: Re: scotch
Post by: Mikey on October 24, 2010, 04:44:23 am
Layer some CO2 or other inert gas (Argon is also good) on top and it shouldn't oxidize.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: MrNate on October 24, 2010, 05:46:14 am
I like Weaze's suggestion better.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tschmidlin on October 24, 2010, 05:59:27 am
Also, once you open it, drink it up. When the cap is off, and you pour it, it will oxidize, just like beer. Don't pour a couple glasses, and then shelf it for a couple more years. down the hatch ,with it!!
I don't think you need to worry about oxidation with whisky.  Some liqueurs have that problem, but most liquors don't.  In the case of that bottle, it's been sitting in a barrel for at least 10 years getting oxidized - how much more will it change in a closed bottle in your cabinet for several more years?  My bet is not that much, if at all - anything that was going to be oxidized probably already is.

but by all means euge, drink it as fast as you like :)
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on October 24, 2010, 12:32:51 pm
Also, once you open it, drink it up. When the cap is off, and you pour it, it will oxidize, just like beer. Don't pour a couple glasses, and then shelf it for a couple more years. down the hatch ,with it!!
I don't think you need to worry about oxidation with whisky.  Some liqueurs have that problem, but most liquors don't.  In the case of that bottle, it's been sitting in a barrel for at least 10 years getting oxidized - how much more will it change in a closed bottle in your cabinet for several more years?  My bet is not that much, if at all - anything that was going to be oxidized probably already is.

but by all means euge, drink it as fast as you like :)

+1,  while there there are some dissenting opinions on this... the consensus seems to be that whisky won't oxidize or lose quality in the bottle. at least as long as it is well sealed. most whisky is corked. if the cork starts to look bad, just replace it with another that fits well.

used to be I'd only have one or two whiskies at a time and I'd drink them up in reasonably short order. over the years, as I've gotten to like whisky more, my bar has grown. I'm a drinker not a collector though, so I don't have any that last more than a few years. I've not seen any noticeable effects from sitting in the bottle.

here is a link to a discussion among whisky bloggers on this question.....
http://www.whisky-emporium.com/Blogs/2010-10-Oct/WhiskyRT.htm

here's a link to a group of "the best whisky blogs" ....
http://www.connosr.com/blog/features/top-whisky-blog-awards/
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tubercle on October 24, 2010, 12:41:23 pm
Whiskey bottle lids are made to keep dust out between pours.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: weazletoe on October 24, 2010, 03:50:56 pm
I have no expierence with the problem, as mine always seems to diappear. I was just stating what I had head on the history channel, referred to in "that other thread".  The whiskey expert on there did say he was not concerned till maybe half the bottle was gone. With half a bottle left, he said he would call his buddies over, and kill the rest, so it was no wasted. (insert your own wasted joke here)
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: kerneldustjacket on October 25, 2010, 09:27:26 pm
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: euge on October 25, 2010, 09:51:36 pm
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: euge on November 07, 2010, 07:18:20 am
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.

Did I just double-quote myself?   ;D

I'm finding it's a waste of time to pour one finger of scotch. Scaled it up and using two cubes of ice now. I'm getting the fruity roastyness of it all. It has a long finish. Maybe I'll add a bit more and see...
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: theoman on November 07, 2010, 10:05:06 am
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.

Have you tried it neat with just a splash of water? Go pick your favorite barley wine and chill it until it's ice cold, then drink it up quickly. What's the point, right? All the complexity is dead. Same deal with scotch.

I love how even the smokiest scotch will leave behind more and more fruity/sweet/butterscotch aromas as you drink it. Sometimes I'll leave my glass unrinsed overnight just so I can smell it in the morning.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on November 07, 2010, 12:52:24 pm
+1 on splashing in a little water to bring out its bouquet...just make sure its a good quality water...something on the soft side (low mineral).


I've been adding a single cube of RO ice to about a finger of scotch (or bourbon) and I'm liking it.

Have you tried it neat with just a splash of water? Go pick your favorite barley wine and chill it until it's ice cold, then drink it up quickly. What's the point, right? All the complexity is dead. Same deal with scotch.

I love how even the smokiest scotch will leave behind more and more fruity/sweet/butterscotch aromas as you drink it. Sometimes I'll leave my glass unrinsed overnight just so I can smell it in the morning.

+1  Just a very small splash of water will open up the whisky, but too much will drown it, water down the mouthfeel & flavor. The only time I use more than a few drops is in a cask strength whisky. but that said.... it's all personal taste. but do try it with just a splash... you can add more if you like, but you can't take it back out. well, I guess you could just add more whisky  :D

and +1 on leaving the glass till the next morning. I'm used to hand washing my beer glasses, and I usually do it right away. I bought some nice glaincairn whisky glasses a number of years back, and so I hand wash those too. Everything else goes in the dishwasher. Well, one night I just left the whisky glass on the kitchen counter after a late-night dram of Springbank. When I came into the kitchen the next morning I could smell the malty richness across the room. What a pleasant surprise.

That's a testament to how a whisky opens up and changes. Drink it slow, linger over it and appreciate it. The Water of Life is truly a gift and a blessing.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: jaybeerman on November 07, 2010, 07:29:24 pm
Sometimes I'll leave my glass unrinsed overnight just so I can smell it in the morning.

+1.  Though it sounds kinda dirty when you say it like that. :D

I have changed my method recently.  I now go with one to two fingers with a single filtered water ice cube.  I prefer the character of the completely warm scotch but I've found that I like the transition too.  A few sips are taken along the way but most of the consumption comes after the coolness is fading away.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on November 07, 2010, 08:34:21 pm
if you like your scotch cool (maybe on a hot day) but don't want it watered down, there is another alternative. I forget where I saw it, but one of the distilleries (iirc i might have been one of the Isla distilleries) was selling 'Scotch Rocks.' You'd put the authentic scotch rocks in your freezer, then put in your glass. no dilution. I'd bet a red white & blue american river rock would also do the trick.

It's interesting that bourbon is almost always taken on the rocks, but scotch is usually taken neat. Difference between climates?
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tmbkr9 on November 07, 2010, 08:58:05 pm
Consider trying a shot or so  with an ounce or two of the first runnings of a brown ale.  This is excellent with a more peaty scotch but it should work well with a speyside as well.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: euge on November 08, 2010, 08:09:09 am
Nice two finger splash of the Speyburn @71F. Then added 10ml of pure water. Taste. Add 5ml more. It's what I'm drinking now. It coats your tongue. Really opens it up. There's a dry lingering finish. And I do mean dry... A lot going on there. Woody oaky tones. Smoky. Sweet. Some sour citrusy caramel notes. Will I be tasting this in the morning?

Water's nice. With ice a totally different drink. Hands down. My conclusion. Both good. Boeuf.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: redbeerman on November 10, 2010, 03:24:26 pm
Not much of a scotch drinker, but a 15 year old single malt sound pretty good to me.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: thirsty on November 18, 2010, 06:59:27 pm
Guys, my only advice is that someday you should try something called Laphroaig

http://www.laphroaig.com/

If I'm not drinking beer or bourbon I drink this straight. Kinda pricey, but good for special occasions.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: jaybeerman on November 18, 2010, 07:03:26 pm
Guys, my only advice is that someday you should try something called Laphroaig

http://www.laphroaig.com/

If I'm not drinking beer or bourbon I drink this straight. Kinda pricey, but good for special occasions.

I finished a bottle of Laphroaig, wow, and have moved to a bottle of Ardbeg. Now I wish I had them side by side. They're both fantastic!
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tschmidlin on November 18, 2010, 07:05:28 pm
Friend of Laphroaig #449737, someday I hope to get there and have a dram on my square foot of Islay.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: theoman on November 18, 2010, 07:15:23 pm
Friend of Laphroaig #449737, someday I hope to get there and have a dram on my square foot of Islay.

Hey neighbor! I'm over at #296166.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on November 18, 2010, 07:36:52 pm
Guys, my only advice is that someday you should try something called Laphroaig

http://www.laphroaig.com/

If I'm not drinking beer or bourbon I drink this straight. Kinda pricey, but good for special occasions.

I don't think there's a bad Isla whisky, just some are better than others. Laphroaig is up with the best. Has anyone had their Triple Wood? I've heard really good things about it but haven't had the chance to try it yet. Am also curious about the new Kilchomen releases, haven't been able to try them either.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: bluesman on November 18, 2010, 07:41:37 pm
This thread has me ready to break out my bottle Glenfiddich single malt that has been collecting dust as of lately.

(http://www.1-877-spirits.com/store/images/large/Glenfiddich-12YO-lg.jpg.jpg)
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: phillamb168 on November 19, 2010, 07:52:08 am
Guys, my only advice is that someday you should try something called Laphroaig

http://www.laphroaig.com/

If I'm not drinking beer or bourbon I drink this straight. Kinda pricey, but good for special occasions.

I don't think there's a bad Isla whisky, just some are better than others. Laphroaig is up with the best. Has anyone had their Triple Wood? I've heard really good things about it but haven't had the chance to try it yet. Am also curious about the new Kilchomen releases, haven't been able to try them either.

If you like the heavy peating of Laphroaig, try this sometime: http://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/P-12867.aspx Japanese whisky has really been gangbusters lately, especially Suntory. Highly recommended.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: gordonstrong on November 19, 2010, 09:30:15 pm
Guys, my only advice is that someday you should try something called Laphroaig

http://www.laphroaig.com/

If I'm not drinking beer or bourbon I drink this straight. Kinda pricey, but good for special occasions.

It's my favorite.  Even better when you can get someone to pull out the Laphroaig 30.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: nicneufeld on November 19, 2010, 10:28:34 pm
I remember liking the 15 year a lot. 

I have a bottle of the cheap (lol! less extremely expensive, perhaps) Bowmore, Legend I believe its called.  If you were going to have a bad Islay whisky I'd think this would be a competitor because of its lower price, but really, its quite good I think.  I can't think of a "bad" malt whisky I've tried...I imagine they exist but probably aren't marketed too widely.  I have had a bad blended scotch or two though!  Ack!
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: kerneldustjacket on November 19, 2010, 11:05:57 pm
+1 on Laphroaig.

I also really enjoy Lagavulin...similar in character to Laphroaig, which should be no surprise as they are a mere 2 kilometers from each other...and Ardbeg another 1 kilometer beyond.

Somewhere packed away in a moving box I have a copy of "Michael Jackson's Complete Guide to Single Malt Scotch."
This book makes me wonder which he knew more about: beer or whiskey (or whisky)
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: nicneufeld on November 19, 2010, 11:35:22 pm
Somewhere packed away in a moving box I have a copy of "Michael Jackson's Complete Guide to Single Malt Scotch."
This book makes me wonder which me knew more about: beer or whiskey (or whisky)

Great book.  Sometimes I have to catch myself and ask..."is this opinion really my own from tasting, or am I just remembering something Michael Jackson wrote about the distiller?"
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: jaybeerman on November 29, 2010, 05:45:29 am
Ok folks, seems like a lot of us enjoy the Laphroaig (i.e. peaty) but is there anyone out there that's familiar with some of the other styles?  I'd like to try a few that showcase just malt, brewing water and oak.  If anyone has tasting notes on any malts from the following list of distilleries or has a suggestion of a similar malt, I'd love to hear about them.  Thanks

Aberlour
Cragganmore (I've had a glass at a bar but haven't purchased a bottle, I recall that it was pretty good)
Glen Elgin
Glenmorangie
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on November 29, 2010, 12:15:56 pm
Abelour is a nice scotch, but it is malty whisky with a strong sherried profile. It's a great example of sherry barrel finish. This has become increasingly popular with many of the distilleries, including many of the Isla whiskys. I've not had Cragganmore, but Glen Elgin or the standard Glenmorangie are more what you describe. Though be sure you get the standard Glenmorangie... many of their expressions are finished in sherry, sauterne, or other finishing casks.

If you're looking for a great example of a malt whisky (without peat, sherry, etc) you might try Springbank. It's a Campbeltown whisky and one of the greats. If I recall, it's one of the few distilleries that still does their own floor malting.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: jeffy on November 29, 2010, 12:29:13 pm
When  I was traveling in Scotland several years ago, I found that Glenmorangie was the "bar malt" that you got if you weren't brand specific when ordering.  I find that it's a nice, malty single malt, a good deal for the price.  Another two that emphasize malt over peat are Highland Park and the MacAllan.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on November 29, 2010, 12:35:06 pm
A thought re scotch availability...... are the four whiskys you mentioned were available to you locally? If you live in a large city, you've probably got access to a wide variety of smw. If you live in a smaller city (as I do), you may not be so lucky. For example, Springbank isn't usually available here in Gainesville (I bought my current bottle on my last trip to Chicago - love Binny's).

However, it pays to develop a relationship with your favorite liquor store. My guy will now give me a better price than marked on the shelf, and he'll also special order bottles if they are something he doesn't regularly carry but are available from his distributors. He can't give me as good a discount as product that he carries normally, since the price he pays for a single bottle is higher that he gets for buying a case. But he has ordered things specially for me.

Of course, you can order by mail and often get a better price than locally even when you include shipping (especially true for multi-bottle orders), but as with brew supplies.... it's better to buy locally when you can.

re Highland Park & the Macallan, both of these are wonderful whiskys (among the very best) but both have strong sherry finishes - especially the Macallan. Interestingly, both of these top selling whiskys are owned by the same company. What a portfolio!
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: jaybeerman on November 29, 2010, 08:20:29 pm
Abelour is a nice scotch with a strong sherried profile. Glen Elgin or the standard Glenmorangie are more what you describe. Though be sure you get the standard Glenmorangie

If you're looking for a great example of a malt whisky (without peat, sherry, etc) you might try Springbank. It's a Campbeltown whisky and one of the greats. If I recall, it's one of the few distilleries that still does their own floor malting.

Ok Abelour is out.  I'm definately looking for straight oak.  Did you have an opinion as to which was better between the elgin or morangie? (I've had the morangie)  I will read up on Sringbank, not familiar with them.

Highland Park and the MacAllan.

Macallan is good though it's been quite a while since I've had any.

A thought re scotch availability...... are the four whiskys you mentioned were available to you locally? If you live in a large city, you've probably got access to a wide variety of smw. If you live in a smaller city (as I do), you may not be so lucky. For example, Springbank isn't usually available here in Gainesville (I bought my current bottle on my last trip to Chicago - love Binny's).

However, it pays to develop a relationship with your favorite liquor store. My guy will now give me a better price than marked on the shelf, and he'll also special order bottles if they are something he doesn't regularly carry but are available from his distributors. He can't give me as good a discount as product that he carries normally, since the price he pays for a single bottle is higher that he gets for buying a case. But he has ordered things specially for me.

Of course, you can order by mail and often get a better price than locally even when you include shipping (especially true for multi-bottle orders), but as with brew supplies.... it's better to buy locally when you can.

re Highland Park & the Macallan, both of these are wonderful whiskys (among the very best) but both have strong sherry finishes - especially the Macallan. Interestingly, both of these top selling whiskys are owned by the same company. What a portfolio!

I buy all of my wine, bourbon and scotch from one bottle shop.  Although we live in a small town he does carry a nice selection and definately is helpful with finding new stuff at discounted prices.  If I have to I will order by mail.  Basically I'm trying to build a list of 4 or 5 options before I go and talk to the local shop. 

Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on November 29, 2010, 09:07:02 pm
both the Elgin & Morangie whiskys are considered to be good, quality brands. I've got friends that like them both very much, but that said, neither is one of my favorites in their standard lower priced expressions. the Glen Morangies that I find more interesting are some of their finished expressions like Nectar d'Or (sauterne finish) or Quinta Rueben (port cask). They are also doing some very interesting sounding stuff that I haven't had the chance to try. Aster is finished in new, select american oak casks & is getting very good reviews, but the one that intriques me is Signet - a portion of the mash is chocolate malt - which is very unusual for a whisky malt. This one has intriqued me as a brewer. I'm very curious about the effects of malt & yeast on the whisky. Of these two distilleries, I'd suggest you try the Glen Elgin. Another option that occurs to me is Balvenie, a very good, malty whisky that is neither sherried nor peated.

You might want to look for a book called Whisky Classified by David Wishart. It's on my 'wish' list. A friend has a copy that I borrowed for a bit. Wishart says that the typical regional approach to whisky doesn't really work anymore (if it ever did). With the proliferation of wood finishes, the lessening number of distilleries doing their own malting, and better understanding of the science/impact of distillation, aging, wood finishing, many of the previous style distinctions between the regions are blurring. There are peated Highland whiskys (the peated Balvenie) and sherried Isla whiskys (sherried Laphroaig), etc. His approach is to look at whisky by flavor groups. Heavy sherry and heavy peat are on the outlying ends of the scale, with a number of steps in between based on 12 flavors present or not in each whisky. So it makes it easier to say I like xyz whisky, wxy is in the same flavor group so I'd probably like that. I'd given it back to him, or I'd use it to see what other malty whisky might be good options.

Let us know what you decide to get.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: jaybeerman on December 11, 2010, 12:53:41 am
Let us know what you decide to get.

Ok so to make my life easier and save terry the liquor shop owner some trouble I went with Springbank 10 year, it was the only one on my list that he had in stock.  I've only had time to take a few sips and haven't dedicated any time to savoring it.  I can tell already that it's pretty good and I imagine that I will thoroughly enjoy swapping this for a glass of Laphroaig every now and then.  Thanks again for the suggestions,
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: bluesman on December 11, 2010, 03:47:17 am
I went to my local liquor store to pick up some belgians today and was looking at Laphroaig 10 year old Original Cask Strength Islay Single Malt Whisky 750ml. It was $58 a bottle. Does this sound about right for a ten year old bottle of Laphroaig?
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tygo on December 11, 2010, 04:31:42 am
Yeah, probably.  The Islays tend to be on the more expensive side.  Especially for a cask strength version.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: theoman on December 11, 2010, 08:06:01 am
I went to my local liquor store to pick up some belgians today and was looking at Laphroaig 10 year old Original Cask Strength Islay Single Malt Whisky 750ml. It was $58 a bottle. Does this sound about right for a ten year old bottle of Laphroaig?

For the cask strength, that's probably right. BUT, that's not the standard Laphroig and unless you're an experienced and very dedicated scotch drinker, it might put you off whisky for good. Basically, it's straight from the cask and not diluted. That might sound nice, but to me it's pretty harsh.

If you're new to the Islays, give Lagavulin 16 year a try. That's probably my favorite. It's still plenty peaty, but a bit smoother with more fruit/butterscotch notes than Laphroaig.

And since I'm dishing out advice: Use your legs when picking up Belgians.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on December 11, 2010, 02:12:48 pm
Good advice, Theoman.

Bluesman, are you new to Isla whisky? If so, a cask strength Lappy could be a tough place to start. Though not necessarily, some people fall in love with them the first time out. They are very complex with peaty, smokey, medicinal, tarry, seaweed flavors in addition to the malt sweetness, vanilla from the cask. I'd venture that if you like big RIS, you're more likely to not be put off by the flavors.

Once you get hooked on them, you'll keep coming back for more. The first one's not free.... good whisky can be expensive but very rewarding. If that's the Quarter Cask Laphroaig, that's a very decent price. I just ordered a bottle of Ardbeg Uigedail, which is also a big, cask strength peat monster, but finished in sherry cask. A lovely dram.

For surfers worldwide, the North Shore is da place. For Isla whisky, it's the South Shore. You've got Ardbeg, Laphroaig & Lagavulin very close to each other (in addition to Port Ellen... which is closed down, but some wonderful bottles are still available, but very expensive.

If you're new to the island whiskies, Talisker is a good place to start. It's not an Isla whisky (it's made in Skye) but has some of the maritime flavors in a more approachable whisky. It's truly one of the great whiskies, and a starting place for these flavors.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tschmidlin on December 12, 2010, 09:29:48 am
If you're new to the island whiskies, Talisker is a good place to start. It's not an Isla whisky (it's made in Skye) but has some of the maritime flavors in a more approachable whisky. It's truly one of the great whiskies, and a starting place for these flavors.
Talisker is delicious.  Great stuff.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: tumarkin on December 12, 2010, 11:27:52 pm
my darling wife came up with the suggestion that we should each pick out and wrap our own gift this year. I think she's got her eye on a piece of jewelry. It'll probably be more expensive than the gift I'll be getting myself, but hey she's worth it... and keeping her happy pays huge dividends for me. SWMBC ... she who must be cherished. This way there's no question we'll both be happy, certainly no returns.

Anyway, I picked out and ordered my gift ...... a bottle of Glenmorangie Signet. Got a killer price on it, but still the most expensive whisky I've ever bought at $150 (price is typically about $189). Also ordered a bottle of Ardbeg Uigedail, good price there as well at $66. Taking some time off to spend at the beach from Xmas to New Years. Won't mind if the weather's inclement, bringing my heat with me.
Title: Re: scotch
Post by: kerneldustjacket on December 22, 2010, 11:18:47 pm
Back when this discussion was active, I googled "Islay Scotch."

So tonight while looking at Facebook, here pops up this ad for a movie about the Islay distilleries. (Gee, how'd they know I had an interest?)

Looks interesting...sells for 29.99 Euros...no idea if they ship here.

http://www.whiskyseries.com/ (http://www.whiskyseries.com/)