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General Category => Equipment and Software => Topic started by: Chaps on June 01, 2020, 09:54:02 am

Title: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: Chaps on June 01, 2020, 09:54:02 am
Hey all,

I'm sure this has been asked before on this forum,,but I moved into a new place and have a sweet spot in the basement to create a home brewery from scratch...I have been brewing for over 20+ years using my Gott cooler and ceramic pots and turkey burner....now thinking of a new brewery with new equipment...with so many different choices, how can you choose a decent, reliable system?  I am open to ideas that are reasonable in price and will make my brew day easy and fun...thinking about a 10 gal RIMS system...

Thanks in advance!!!
Curt - Batavia IL
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: Richard on June 01, 2020, 10:05:49 am
Go electric!
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: ynotbrusum on June 01, 2020, 04:08:00 pm
Electric for sure.

Frankly, if you are going with 10 gallon batches, I would consider a 240 volt all in one system, like the bigger Grainfather, the Brewzilla or one of the new component built systems like SS Brewtech or Spike Brewing or similar.  Add a game hoist for pulling up the grain basket and you are pretty well set.

I have the Anvil Foundry for 5 gallon batches and really like it on 240V...my larger set up is a 9 gallon HERMS liquor tank with immersion coil (3500W element), 20 gallon InfuSSion Mash Tun, with an 18 gallon Stout Tank (all in one using only the main kettle anymore).  I use 400 micron Brew Bags for all of my brewing to eliminate grain pushing through on recirculation.

Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: Visor on June 02, 2020, 09:32:22 am
   I've never been a fan of heating anything with electricity, but in a basement, short of doling out the cash for a hood and exhaust system the turkey fryer thing isn't a good plan, electric's probably the easiest way to go.
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: BrewBama on June 02, 2020, 11:24:29 am
I am another vote for electric. I used to use propane but now that I can control the exact wattage for the boil and the RIMS tube I can more precisely predict results.


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Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: MattyAHA on June 02, 2020, 12:40:07 pm
if i was you i'd go electric if you have the ability, i'm friggn lucky cause my stove is powerful enough to boil 7.5-8 gallon boils no problem if your stove can handle use that and save a few G's
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: ynotbrusum on June 03, 2020, 11:35:06 am
Also, I forgot to mention that I would consider the use of the steam condensers now being used by many homebrewers - a great way to minimize steam issues indoors.  I haven't gone that route yet, but I am looking into it.
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: chinaski on June 03, 2020, 12:56:30 pm
Also, I forgot to mention that I would consider the use of the steam condensers now being used by many homebrewers - a great way to minimize steam issues indoors.  I haven't gone that route yet, but I am looking into it.
I built and use a steam condenser and heat with a 240V commercial induction burner- was able to move my brewing indoors during a renovation of my own.  These two pieces are all I changed to my set-up; I'd rather spend my funds on ingredients than on equipment.
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: denny on March 16, 2022, 10:02:23 am
Opening your own brewery will cost a lot more than you expect, and you'll run into unforeseen costs quite early.

Then it's a good thing that's not what he intends to do.
Title: Re: New Home, New Brewery - Advice on transition from Old to New
Post by: ttash on March 17, 2022, 09:10:26 am
Opening your own brewery will cost a lot more than you expect, and you'll run into unforeseen costs quite early.

Then it's a good thing that's not what he intends to do.

😂