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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: Saccharomyces on July 26, 2020, 05:07:22 pm

Title: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on July 26, 2020, 05:07:22 pm
Hey guys,

After over a four-year hiatus from brewing, my life has settled down enough to consider brewing again on a limited scale.  For those who have yet to learn, I suffered a heart attack and had to undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in 2016. Having one's chest cracked open is not something that I would recommend to anyone. I also separated from my now ex-wife the same year. I did not just vanish from the face of the earth.  Those who know me more closely on this forum knew what was up. Coming back from open-heart surgery and divorce in the second half of one's fifties takes a toll on a human being.  I also had to give up my old user name in 2016, which is why many of you who have read my old posts due not recognize my user name. 

I have been watching people quote my old posts from afar during the last four years.  I remember the amount of push-back I received when I first posted my quick-and-easy (Shaken, not Stirred) method for making and pitching a starter.  To see it become a mainstream yeast propagation technique within the amateur brewing community has been both rewarding and humbling.  Hopefully, I can once again add value to the community, but it may be slow in coming because I gave away or sold everything over the last four years thinking that I would not return to brewing.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: dannyjed on July 26, 2020, 05:20:26 pm
Glad you’re back! I learned a lot from your posts about yeast over the years and I still swear by the shaken not stirred method. I hope you find some enjoyment with brewing again.


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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: jeffy on July 26, 2020, 05:41:42 pm
Welcome back.  I enjoyed learning about yeast origins from you.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: BrewBama on July 26, 2020, 05:49:46 pm
Glad to see you’ve recovered/are recovering.

One thing that has burst upon the scene during your absence is the yeast genome studies and the related relationship tree. I’ve often wondered what your thoughts are on the resulting linking/delinking of some beliefs of yeast origin.

http://beer.suregork.com/


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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on July 26, 2020, 05:52:44 pm
Hey guys,

After over a four-year hiatus from brewing, my life has settled down enough to consider brewing again on a limited scale.  For those who have yet to learn, I suffered a heart attack and had to undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in 2016. Having one's chest cracked open is not something that I would recommend to anyone. I also separated from my now ex-wife the same year. I did not just vanish from the face of the earth.  Those who know me more closely on this forum knew what was up. Coming back from open-heart surgery and divorce in the second half of one's fifties takes a toll on a human being.  I also had to give up my old user name in 2016, which is why many of you who have read my old posts due not recognize my user name. 

I have been watching people quote my old posts from afar during the last four years.  I remember the amount of push-back I received when I first posted my quick-and-easy (Shaken, not Stirred) method for making and pitching a starter.  To see it become a mainstream yeast propagation technique within the amateur brewing community has been both rewarding and humbling.  Hopefully, I can once again add value to the community, but it may be slow in coming because I gave away or sold everything over the last four years thinking that I would not return to brewing.

Glad to see you back, Mark.  You made a huge contribution to our book.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: ynotbrusum on July 26, 2020, 06:03:29 pm
Glad to see you are back at it, Mark.  Your insights are always worthy of the praise they receive.  Best wishes on your health.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: hopfenundmalz on July 26, 2020, 06:32:05 pm
Glad you're back.

Those yeast genome studies really changed some of my understanding. I would love to hear your take on what has been found.

This was worth the time. Kristoffer Krogerus blogs as Suregork. See Brewbama's post above with the link.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Bob357 on July 26, 2020, 06:54:11 pm
Welcome back! Hope you continue to recover and enjoy the hobby we know you missed.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: erockrph on July 26, 2020, 06:58:26 pm
Glad to have you back, Mark. I am just getting back into it myself after a few years of minimal brewing. Life gets in the way, and you have to focus on the important stuff. It is good to see you contribute here again. I wish you much health and happiness!
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on July 26, 2020, 08:19:33 pm
One thing that has burst upon the scene during your absence is the yeast genome studies and the related relationship tree. I’ve often wondered what your thoughts are on the resulting linking/delinking of some beliefs of yeast origin.

http://beer.suregork.com/

That data is not all that new. I had been working with earlier genomic work that covered a wider scope of yeast strains than are covered on that page before I took my hiatus, but it does appear that further research on brewing-specific yeast strains has been performed.  Does anyone recall that I stated that Wyeast 1056 (BRY-96) was a diploid yeast strain, which is unique when it comes to brewing? That information was published in several earlier studies.  There is also data out there that reveals that strains that have been used for lager brewing are taxonomically Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), not Saccharomyces pastorianus (S. pastorianus) and vice versa.  We are learning a lot about brewing yeast genetics, especially with respect to origin. The interesting thing to think about is that Pacman and BRY96 are in the same family.  Is that due to mitosis-based mutation or is it due to meiosis-based hybridization due to the fact that BRY96 is a diploid; therefore, it can under meoisis (sexual reproduction)?

As an aside, one thing that I have noticed since taking up sourdough baking is that there are lot of wild yeast strains that will ferment at 40F.  I hope to eventually plate out and test a few of the yeast strains in my sourdough culture.  There is a potpourri of yeast strains in the average sourdough culture, not all of which belong to the S. cerevisiae genus.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: riceral on July 26, 2020, 08:28:03 pm
Good to see you back Mark.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: 69franx on July 28, 2020, 11:56:42 pm
Great to see you back sir! Good luck with the new brewhouse.

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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on July 29, 2020, 02:44:42 am
Glad to see you back, Mark.  You made a huge contribution to our book.

I appreciate being included in your book. It was humbling. Brewing is like the song “Hotel California” in that one can check out, but one can never really leave. It is amazing to see what has transpired in the hobby over the last 27+ years. Home-brewing was a cottage industry when I first started to brew. It was a quirky monk squad-like activity where all-grain brewers had to have DIY skills because there was no commercially available all-grain equipment. I got into yeast culturing because Wyeast was the main liquid yeast producer and their catalog was quite small. Plus, it was difficult to get Wyeast cultures on the East Coast when the weather started to get warmer. No one who was serious about brewing used dry yeast because the quality of dry yeast was so poor. BrewTek mini slants were a life saver. I shared a Ringwood culture that I copped and plated from a hydrometer sample at the Alan Pugsley-built Wild Goose Brewery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and shared it with Jeff and Maribeth. I am fairly certain that that slanted culture is in at least one of the major yeast propagaters’ bank.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: tommymorris on July 29, 2020, 03:24:12 am
Welcome back! Glad you’re healthy enough to be back to brewing!
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: goose on July 29, 2020, 01:21:04 pm
So glad to see you back, Mark!  You are a wealth of knowledge and I have learned much from your posts.
Title: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: BrewBama on July 29, 2020, 01:45:16 pm
.... Brewing is like the song “Hotel California” in that one can check out, but one can never really leave. ...

+1. I took a hiatus when assigned to Europe back in the ‘90(s). Picked it back up once settled.

... No one who was serious about brewing used dry yeast because the quality of dry yeast was so poor. ...

How do you feel about today’s dry yeast?

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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: jeffy on July 29, 2020, 05:59:24 pm
Glad to see you back, Mark.  You made a huge contribution to our book.

I appreciate being included in your book. It was humbling.
Don't let it be too humbling.  He'll put just about anybody in his book. ;)
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on July 29, 2020, 06:31:11 pm
Glad to see you back, Mark.  You made a huge contribution to our book.

I appreciate being included in your book. It was humbling.
Don't let it be too humbling.  He'll put just about anybody in his book. ;)

Yeah, but you paid us!  😁
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: jeffy on July 29, 2020, 06:34:58 pm
Glad to see you back, Mark.  You made a huge contribution to our book.

I appreciate being included in your book. It was humbling.
Don't let it be too humbling.  He'll put just about anybody in his book. ;)

Yeah, but you paid us!  😁
I don't even remember buying you a homebrew, much less paying you.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on July 29, 2020, 07:53:31 pm
Glad to see you back, Mark.  You made a huge contribution to our book.

I appreciate being included in your book. It was humbling.
Don't let it be too humbling.  He'll put just about anybody in his book. ;)

Yeah, but you paid us!  😁
I don't even remember buying you a homebrew, much less paying you.


😁
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: mchrispen on July 30, 2020, 07:20:18 pm
Glad you are back! We missed ya!
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 02, 2020, 02:58:51 pm
Glad you are back! We missed ya!

I missed the camaraderie displayed on this forum.  It is a very "chill" forum compared to other brewing forums.  The other forum to which I used to post, Jim's Beer Kit, is kind of like a British equivalent of the AHA forum in that respect. 

What I like about the AHA forum and Jim's Beer Kit that everyone appears to be open to new ideas. I will may take a little persuasion, but most people will give a new idea a shot. Not having to feel defensive all the time when posting allows one to take in new ideas and knowledge.  The last four years were not my first multi-year hiatus from the hobby.  I took an eight-year hiatus while raising my children.  I did not think that I would come back to brewing, so I dispensed with the brewhouse and labware I had at the time (which was significantly less than the gear and labware that I let go during the last four years); however, as I mentioned, brewing is like the song "Hotel California," one can check out, but one can never truly leave.  I remember a sales person asking a new homebrewer if he planned to batch or fly sparge the first time I re-entered a homebrewing supplier that I have been using since early 1993 after my first hiatus.  Batch sparging, what the heck is that?  At first, I was certain that it would not work as well as continuous sparging, but I was wrong.  To my chagrin, Denny returned the favor.  SNS was not a slam dunk with him, but he gave it a shot and realized that he was working harder than he needed to work.  That is one thing that I truly admire about Denny.  He is constantly in search of brewing the best beer while using the simplest process.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: ynotbrusum on August 02, 2020, 08:01:43 pm
Learning from others is arguably the best use of one’s time.   Confirming with your own experience could be the second best use of one’s time.  Humility and open-mindedness are wonderful human traits, as well...I find those here a lot.  Cheers, homebrewers!
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: smkranz on August 03, 2020, 12:38:35 am
Well dang, Mark, it's great to see your return.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: BrewBama on August 03, 2020, 02:25:17 am

I missed the camaraderie displayed on this forum.  It is a very "chill" forum compared to other brewing forums.
...


+1   Though we’ve had our moments (I’m looking in the mirror), I often go to other forums and forget where I am. It doesn’t take long be be snapped back to reality.  ...and not just brewing forums.  You might not be surprised but there are some real jack wagons out there. I heard on the news some lady in a knitting circle committed suicide because of hell she caught in a forum for having the ‘wrong’ position on a topic. Crazy stuff.

You figure a forum of like minded folks congregate to ask and answer questions, and carry on thought experiments would be a friendly environment, but some are down right nasty to a newcomer asking a question. ...and not shy about berating a newb for ‘not doing your homework’ or ‘research’ before asking, either. They eat there young. I laugh because without the new blood consistently regenerating from the bottom the top will simply die off and the forum will collapse.


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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 03, 2020, 04:04:03 am
My first experience with online brewing conversations was on rec.crafts.brewing, which was a USENET group.  That was when I first started to brew.  I am almost absolutely certain that James Liddil was almost single-handedly responsible for introducing the magnetic stir plate to the homebrewing community, but he was dealing with difficult to culture microflora. Jim was the first person I know of who attempted to rescue wild yeast and bugs from bottles of Lambic.  Brewers today have no idea as to how primitive things were during the first big growth spurt of the hobby.

To answer BrewBama's question as to how I feel about dry yeast, all I can say is that the dry yeast that is being produced today is light years better than what was available when I entered the hobby in early 1993.  However, I rarely used dry yeast before I took my latest hiatus because yeast culturing was always a big part of the hobby for me.  What started out as a necessity due to the fact Wyeast smack packs were difficult to get on the East Cost turned into a companion hobby.  We have to remember that White labs did not exist in 1993.  I started by culturing BRY-96 from a bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. I started the dregs from a bottle in a small amount of 1.020 wort.  I then plated the starter after it started for "singles." The healthiest well-isolated colonies were transferred to slant.  I was able to successfully culture a few other brewery yeast strains before I encountered a BrewTek advertisement in Brewing Techniques.  BrewTek was a fantastic resource for the yeast culturing brewer. What a lot of people do not know is that Wyeast 1450 was originally a BrewTek culture known as CL-50 California Pub Brewery Ale.  Denny managed to keep the culture alive until Wyeast picked it up.  That is why the yeast culture is known as "Denny's Favorite 50."  The "50" is for CL-50.  I maintained a handful BrewTek cultures for a decade before I took my first hiatus from brewing. What I am led to believe is that the early BrewTek cultures came from the Maltose Falcon's yeast bank.  Maribeth Raines, the scientist behind BrewTek, was a Falcon.  The source of CL-50 has never been disclosed, but my bet is on it being North Coast's house strain, which Mark Ruedrich acquired from UC Davis.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: BrewBama on August 04, 2020, 01:29:34 pm
Interesting history.


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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on August 04, 2020, 01:43:17 pm
My first experience with online brewing conversations was on rec.crafts.brewing, which was USENET group.  That was when I first started to brew.  I am almost absolutely certain that James Liddil was almost single-handedly responsible for introducing the magnetic stir plate to the homebrewing community, but he was dealing with difficult to culture microflora. Jim was the first person I know of who attempted to rescue wild yeast and bugs from bottles of Lambic.  Brewers today have no idea as to how primitive things were during the first big growth spurt of the hobby.

To answer BrewBama's question as to how I feel about dry yeast, all I can say is that the dry yeast that is being produced today is light years better than what was available when I entered the hobby in early 1993.  However, I rarely used dry yeast before I took my latest hiatus because yeast culturing was always a big part of the hobby for me.  What started out as a necessity due to the fact Wyeast smack packs were difficult to get on the East Cost turned into a companion hobby.  We have to remember that White labs did not exist in 1993.  I started by culturing BRY-96 from a bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. I started the dregs from a bottle in a small amount of 1.020 wort.  I then plated the starter after it started for "singles." The healthiest well-isolated colonies were transferred to slant.  I was able to successfully culture a few other brewery yeast strains before I encountered a BrewTek advertisement in Brewing Techniques.  BrewTek was a fantastic resource for the yeast culturing brewer. What a lot of people do not know is that Wyeast 1450 was originally a BrewTek culture known as CL-50 California Pub Brewery Ale.  Denny managed to keep the culture alive until Wyeast picked it up.  That is why the yeast culture is known as "Denny's Favorite 50."  The "50" is for CL-50.  I maintained a handful BrewTek cultures for a decade before I took my first hiatus from brewing. What I am led to believe is that the early BrewTek cultures came from the Maltose Falcon's yeast bank.  Maribeth Raines, the scientist behind BrewTek, was a Falcon.  The source of CL-50 has never been disclosed, but my bet is on it being North Coast's house strain, which Mark Ruedrich acquired from UC Davis.

Was and still is.  We have some yeast storage info from her coming up on the next podcast.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Slowbrew on August 04, 2020, 01:57:06 pm
I remember rec.crafts.brewing.  It was a very important resource to me way back when I started this.  Forums are so much easier to use than USENET was. 

I have no interest in today's "social media" environment (I really struggled with that adjective  ;) ).  Too many years in software security work to ever consider those sites safe in any way.  It's also a bit of "git off my lawn" mentality, I'm sure.

Glad to see you back on the forum and looking forward to more insights and learning from your experience!

Paul
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 05, 2020, 01:29:58 am
Was and still is.  We have some yeast storage info from her coming up on the next podcast.

I will have to check that one out.  It is amazing how much impact Maribeth and the Falcons made on amateur brewing. She taught an entire generation of brewers how to collect and manage yeast cultures. The number of yeast cultures available to the amateur brewing community exploded after she put together her yeast culturing book and kit. I learned how to pour almost condensation-free plates from Maribeth.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on August 05, 2020, 02:21:40 pm
Was and still is.  We have some yeast storage info from her coming up on the next podcast.

I will have to check that one out.  It is amazing how much impact Maribeth and the Falcons made on amateur brewing. She taught an entire generation of brewers how to collect and manage yeast cultures. The number of yeast cultures available to the amateur brewing community exploded after she put together her yeast culturing book and kit. I learned how to pour almost condensation-free plates from Maribeth.

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-120-answer-brewing-wind
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: hopfenundmalz on August 05, 2020, 05:43:33 pm
Was and still is.  We have some yeast storage info from her coming up on the next podcast.

I will have to check that one out.  It is amazing how much impact Maribeth and the Falcons made on amateur brewing. She taught an entire generation of brewers how to collect and manage yeast cultures. The number of yeast cultures available to the amateur brewing community exploded after she put together her yeast culturing book and kit. I learned how to pour almost condensation-free plates from Maribeth.

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-120-answer-brewing-wind

Listened. When I hit your link, a picture of a Drewry beer add came up. My dad used to drink that brand for a while.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 06, 2020, 03:33:28 am
https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-120-answer-brewing-wind

I used to keep master and working slants, but I found that I was not using the working slants before it was time to subculture the master, so I started to subculture a new master followed by inoculating 40ml of autoclaved 1.020 wort as the first step in making a starter. I usually step at a rate of 25-to-1, 40ml to 1L, but my 40ml first level starter is inoculated using ascetic technique with absolutely sterile wort.

By the way, my 40ml starter is also an SNS starter.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 07, 2020, 07:30:38 pm
I have my own amusing batch gone bad story to add Denny's and Drew's from the podcast.  It was my third batch.  I made it using a Bruce's Dogbolter Kit.  I am fairly certain that that kit beer was made by EDME.  I did the partial boil followed by topping off with boiled and cooled water thing before pitching EDME dry yeast.  To say that EDME dry yeast was dreadful is being kind. That beer ended up having a potato chip-like aftertaste and was affectionately known in local circles as the potato chip beer.  That fermentation gone bad was the straw that broke the camel's back. I brewed my fourth beer using yeast I cultured from the bottom of a bottle of SNPA.  The first sip of my fourth beer was a lightbulb moment.  My experiences with dry yeast in the bad old days is why I still cringe at the thought of pitching dry yeast even though I know that dry yeast has come a long way.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: BrewBama on August 07, 2020, 08:45:45 pm
... affectionately known in local circles as the potato chip beer.  ...

In today’s market, that might be a huge hit.


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Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on August 07, 2020, 08:48:53 pm
I have my own amusing batch gone bad story to add Denny's and Drew's from the podcast.  It was my third batch.  I made it using a Bruce's Dogbolter Kit.  I am fairly certain that that kit beer was made by EDME.  I did the partial boil followed by topping off with boiled and cooled water thing before pitching EDME dry yeast.  To say that EDME dry yeast was dreadful is being kind. That beer ended up having a potato chip-like aftertaste and was affectionately known in local circles as the potato chip beer.  That fermentation gone bad was the straw that broke the camel's back. I brewed my fourth beer using yeast I cultured from the bottom of a bottle of SNPA.  The first sip of my fourth beer was a lightbulb moment.  My experiences with dry yeast in the bad old days is why I still cringe at the thought of pitching dry yeast even though I know that dry yeast has come a long way.

I brewed that kit in my first year of brewing.  I was so new I didn't realize how bad it was until I'd brewed a few more batches and could compare
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: jeffy on August 07, 2020, 09:07:25 pm
I have my own amusing batch gone bad story to add Denny's and Drew's from the podcast.  It was my third batch.  I made it using a Bruce's Dogbolter Kit.  I am fairly certain that that kit beer was made by EDME.  I did the partial boil followed by topping off with boiled and cooled water thing before pitching EDME dry yeast.  To say that EDME dry yeast was dreadful is being kind. That beer ended up having a potato chip-like aftertaste and was affectionately known in local circles as the potato chip beer.  That fermentation gone bad was the straw that broke the camel's back. I brewed my fourth beer using yeast I cultured from the bottom of a bottle of SNPA.  The first sip of my fourth beer was a lightbulb moment.  My experiences with dry yeast in the bad old days is why I still cringe at the thought of pitching dry yeast even though I know that dry yeast has come a long way.

I brewed that kit in my first year of brewing.  I was so new I didn't realize how bad it was until I'd brewed a few more batches and could compare
Dogbolter Bitter was my first or second batch, back in 1990.  About 10 years ago, I had a taste of that kit at a homebrew store and was surprised at how strikingly similar I remembered the flavor.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 07, 2020, 10:29:48 pm
In today’s market, that might be a huge hit.


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I was thinking about you as I was composing that post because your house yeast is Lallemand BRY-97.  That is about the only dry yeast strain that I really like.  It is a nice strain once it starts fermenting.  It clears beautifully.  Another strain that I love has apparently been available dry for quite some time; namely, 34/70.  At this point, I am almost certain that that strain was sold as BrewTek CL-660 N. German Lager (maybe, I can get it re-labled  as "Mark's Favorite 660" :).  If I am correct, 34/70 is the most forgiving lager strain I have ever used.  It was my house strain in my first brew house. I used to primary it in the low 60s high 50s in my basement without artificial attemperation.  At that temperature, it produced beautiful lagers that tasted like lagers.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: denny on August 07, 2020, 10:59:08 pm
In today’s market, that might be a huge hit.


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I was thinking about you as I was composing that post because your house yeast is Lallemand BRY-97.  That is about the only dry yeast strain that I really like.  It is a nice strain once it starts fermenting.  It clears beautifully.  Another strain that I love has apparently been available dry for quite some time; namely, 34/70.  At this point, I am almost certain that that strain was sold as BrewTek CL-660 N. German Lager (maybe, I can get it re-labled  as "Mark's Favorite 660" :).  If I am correct, 34/70 is the most forgiving lager strain I have ever used.  It was my house strain in my first brew house. I used to primary it in the low 60s high 50s in my basement without artificial attemperation.  At that temperature, it produced beautiful lagers that tasted like lagers.

Yeah, I've used 34/70 for both ales and lagers and they all came out well.  BTW, I was against calling it Denny's Favorite, but I didn't get a say in the matter.  I was pushing for Noti Pub Ale, in keeping with the original name.
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Saccharomyces on August 09, 2020, 10:51:25 pm
It does not matter what Wyeast labeled the strain. You did a service to the community by keeping the culture alive. What I would not give for an hour with Maribeth to discuss the origins of the BrewTek strains. She will probably take that information to her grave.  :)
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Cliffs on August 12, 2020, 03:43:19 am
It does not matter what Wyeast labeled the strain. You did a service to the community by keeping the culture alive. What I would not give for an hour with Maribeth to discuss the origins of the BrewTek strains. She will probably take that information to her grave.  :)
Do you happen to know anything about the brew-tek scottish ale yeast strain and if it is similar/teh same as white labs edinburgh ale yeast?
Title: Re: Hoping to slowly return to brewing and yeast culturing
Post by: Big Monk on August 14, 2020, 08:40:37 pm
Hey guys,

After over a four-year hiatus from brewing, my life has settled down enough to consider brewing again on a limited scale.  For those who have yet to learn, I suffered a heart attack and had to undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in 2016. Having one's chest cracked open is not something that I would recommend to anyone. I also separated from my now ex-wife the same year. I did not just vanish from the face of the earth.  Those who know me more closely on this forum knew what was up. Coming back from open-heart surgery and divorce in the second half of one's fifties takes a toll on a human being.  I also had to give up my old user name in 2016, which is why many of you who have read my old posts due not recognize my user name. 

I have been watching people quote my old posts from afar during the last four years.  I remember the amount of push-back I received when I first posted my quick-and-easy (Shaken, not Stirred) method for making and pitching a starter.  To see it become a mainstream yeast propagation technique within the amateur brewing community has been both rewarding and humbling.  Hopefully, I can once again add value to the community, but it may be slow in coming because I gave away or sold everything over the last four years thinking that I would not return to brewing.

Count me as someone glad to see you back Mark. Very much a welcome addition to any forum.