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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: TXFlyGuy on September 15, 2020, 10:40:32 PM

Title: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 15, 2020, 10:40:32 PM
Well...here it is. And Bel Air Brewing is on their 50th gallon of this fine seasonal bier! Having just brewed 30 gallons, and yesterday another 20 gallons, we thought this was good enough to share.

A local brewer, and former brewery employee told us this was the best Oktoberfest he has ever had.

Super easy recipe:

For 10 gallons -

8 lbs pale or Pils malt
8 lbs Vienna Malt
8 lbs Munich Malt

2.5 oz Mt. Hood Hops 6.5 AA (FWH)

18 gallons filtered city tap water...no other chemical additions, please!

90 minute boil / ferment at 48 F.

Wyeast 2633

OG 1.058
ABV 4.8%

(https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/services/mediarender/THISLIFE/005342726106/media/1677939685228882/medium/1600208117/enhance)

(https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/services/mediarender/THISLIFE/005342726106/media/1677939738411641/medium/1600209316/enhance)



Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Saccharomyces on September 15, 2020, 11:28:30 PM
Mt. Hood is one of my favorite hops.  It was one of the five hops with which I brewed in the 90s.  Mt. Hood is only second to its sister Liberty.  Both of these hop cultivars are triploids (three sets of chromosomes); therefore, they are sterile and seedless.  Mt. Hood was created by taking Hallertau Mittlefruh and doubling its chromosomes via colchicine treatment to produce a tetraploid (four sets of chromosomes), which was bred back with a male diploid (two sets of chromosomes) to produce a triploid.  The same thing happened with Liberty.  However, to me, Liberty is the closest to Hallertau Mittlefruh. It is like a cross between Mt. Hood and Hallertau Mittlefruh aroma and taste-wise. I am certain that your beer is good.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: pete b on September 16, 2020, 12:10:56 AM
I find the malt bill very appealing as well.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Sanatorium on September 16, 2020, 11:50:37 AM
You don't find this overly sweet finishing at 1.021?  :o
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 16, 2020, 02:40:55 PM
You don't find this overly sweet finishing at 1.021?  :o

No, not at all. Very well balanced between the malt, the hops, and overall body.

None of us detected much if any residual sweetness. It is not dry in finish either. The actual FG was lower than 1.02X, 1.01X is what the calculator showed.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 16, 2020, 02:43:29 PM
I find the malt bill very appealing as well.

This malt bill creates the classic color for an American Fest Bier. This might be our best effort so far. The recipe was suggested by TX Brewing Inc., the store where we obtain most of our ingredients.

We use Ireks Malt exclusively now.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: denny on September 16, 2020, 02:45:17 PM
You don't find this overly sweet finishing at 1.021?  :o

High FG  does not necessarily imply sweetness
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 16, 2020, 04:52:26 PM
You don't find this overly sweet finishing at 1.021?  :o

High FG  does not necessarily imply sweetness

Keep in mind that the ABV could easily be 5.0, 5.4, or more. My numbers are a WAG, using a refractometer with alcohol present, and then using an online calculator. It’s probably closer to 5.5% based on our drinking tests.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Cliffs on September 16, 2020, 04:54:29 PM
You don't find this overly sweet finishing at 1.021?  :o

High FG  does not necessarily imply sweetness

around 1.020 is when I start perceiving beers to have an unfermented like sweetness to them.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Cliffs on September 16, 2020, 04:58:34 PM
Mt. Hood is one of my favorite hops.  It was one of the five hops with which I brewed in the 90s.  Mt. Hood is only second to its sister Liberty.  Both of these hop cultivars are triploids (three sets of chromosomes); therefore, they are sterile and seedless.  Mt. Hood was created by taking Hallertau Mittlefruh and doubling its chromosomes via colchicine treatment to produce a tetraploid (four sets of chromosomes), which was bred back with a male diploid (two sets of chromosomes) to produce a triploid.  The same thing happened with Liberty.  However, to me, Liberty is the closest to Hallertau Mittlefruh. It is like a cross between Mt. Hood and Hallertau Mittlefruh aroma and taste-wise. I am certain that your beer is good.

YES!!!
I worked at  homebrew shop in the early 2000's, and I recall the smell of fresh Mt. Hood. It really is an underappreciated hop.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Village Taphouse on September 16, 2020, 05:12:59 PM
I have made many Festbier recipes over the years and I keep simplifying it.  Some very good German brewers mentioned that it could be as simple as 50/50 pilsner/Munich 2 and one hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs.  I did a few that way and eventually went with 65/35 Pils/Munich 2 and then either Spalt or Hallertau and my yeast of choice is Omega Bayern.  The result is a beer that is simple and more pale than you might think.  I have a batch of this that has been lagering now for about 8 weeks and it will be brought out shortly.  Here's a shot of the one from 2019.

(https://i.postimg.cc/R0pbc9xD/Oktoberfestlager2018c2.jpg)

Here's one that was 50/50...

(https://i.postimg.cc/jqMCPFDJ/festbier2017a.jpg)
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: denny on September 16, 2020, 05:17:05 PM
You don't find this overly sweet finishing at 1.021?  :o

High FG  does not necessarily imply sweetness

around 1.020 is when I start perceiving beers to have an unfermented like sweetness to them.

But it it's balanced by bitterness I have no issues with an FG like that.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 16, 2020, 05:38:55 PM
I have made many Festbier recipes over the years and I keep simplifying it.  Some very good German brewers mentioned that it could be as simple as 50/50 pilsner/Munich 2 and one hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs.  I did a few that way and eventually went with 65/35 Pils/Munich 2 and then either Spalt or Hallertau and my yeast of choice is Omega Bayern.  The result is a beer that is simple and more pale than you might think.  I have a batch of this that has been lagering now for about 8 weeks and it will be brought out shortly.  Here's a shot of the one from 2019.

(https://i.postimg.cc/R0pbc9xD/Oktoberfestlager2018c2.jpg)

Here's one that was 50/50...

(https://i.postimg.cc/jqMCPFDJ/festbier2017a.jpg)

While at the Paulaner Restuarant in Frankfurt, and drinking their Fest Bier, it looked exactly like your sample from 2019. Oktoberfest biers over there are much more pale in color.

Might try that 65/35 grain bill. I like that color!
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Village Taphouse on September 16, 2020, 06:11:21 PM
There is always a bit of muddy water around the style too... Oktoberfest, Export Helles, Tent Beer.  I think there is room for all of these styles but it seems like most of the beer being consumed in the tents is a stronger version of a helles which I think is the most popular beer style in Bavaria during the rest of the year.  I used to add CaraMunich, Aromatic, etc. but at some point I realized it wasn't necessary.  German recipes are often SIMPLE even if their processes are not.  I'm looking forward to this upcoming batch and will snap a pic and post it.  Cheers.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Iliff Ave on September 16, 2020, 06:32:41 PM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 16, 2020, 10:55:33 PM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...

We did use W-34/70 for 10 gallons, with the above recipe. It turned out to be an exact clone brew of Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest. All of us preferred the version with the Wyeast 2366.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Iliff Ave on September 16, 2020, 11:27:48 PM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...

We did use W-34/70 for 10 gallons, with the above recipe. It turned out to be an exact clone brew of Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest. All of us preferred the version with the Wyeast 2366.

I can only assume that yeast is great. I’ve been experimenting with blending dry yeasts to make my lagers more interesting. I prefer dry yeast at this point due to convenience. I think I only use liquid in kolsch because I haven’t found a good dry alternative.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 17, 2020, 12:13:17 AM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...

We did use W-34/70 for 10 gallons, with the above recipe. It turned out to be an exact clone brew of Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest. All of us preferred the version with the Wyeast 2366.

I can only assume that yeast is great. I’ve been experimenting with blending dry yeasts to make my lagers more interesting. I prefer dry yeast at this point due to convenience. I think I only use liquid in kolsch because I haven’t found a good dry alternative.

First time for us to use it. And, it makes an awesome Fest Bier. We were a little skeptical at the outset, but now have come to really like the 2366.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: hopfenundmalz on September 17, 2020, 12:30:30 AM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...

The current festbiers are between an export and Heller Bock. There are some differences between breweries.

On another forum a guy said the Weihenstefaner's is all Pils malt with a decoction.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Iliff Ave on September 17, 2020, 12:34:49 AM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...

The current festbiers are between an export and Heller Bock. There are some differences between breweries.

On another forum a guy said the Weihenstefaner's is all Pils malt with a decoction.

Yeah with a estimated srm of 5.4 mine is going to get me where I want to be for what I would like. I wasn’t try to clone it my any means but I really like Sierra Nevadas example this year.

I don’t know if mine will be good at all but it seems there is still a lot of confusion between festbier and marzen for Americans.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: tommymorris on September 17, 2020, 12:56:09 AM
I have one currently in the fermenter:
74% pilsner
14% munich II
12% munich I

S-189/w3470 blend

Basically took my helles bock and brought the gravity down...

The current festbiers are between an export and Heller Bock. There are some differences between breweries.

On another forum a guy said the Weihenstefaner's is all Pils malt with a decoction.

Yeah with a estimated srm of 5.4 mine is going to get me where I want to be for what I would like. I wasn’t try to clone it my any means but I really like Sierra Nevadas example this year.

I don’t know if mine will be good at all but it seems there is still a lot of confusion between festbier and marzen for Americans.
This year’s Sierra Nevada Festbier is great.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: fredthecat on September 21, 2020, 02:11:54 PM
I have made many Festbier recipes over the years and I keep simplifying it.  Some very good German brewers mentioned that it could be as simple as 50/50 pilsner/Munich 2 and one hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs.  I did a few that way and eventually went with 65/35 Pils/Munich 2 and then either Spalt or Hallertau and my yeast of choice is Omega Bayern.  The result is a beer that is simple and more pale than you might think.  I have a batch of this that has been lagering now for about 8 weeks and it will be brought out shortly.  Here's a shot of the one from 2019.


yup, just in general i've simplified my grists so much from years past. i feel embarassed now looking at kitchen sink recipes i did with 4oz this, 4oz that and 10 different malts.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 21, 2020, 11:19:50 PM
I have made many Festbier recipes over the years and I keep simplifying it.  Some very good German brewers mentioned that it could be as simple as 50/50 pilsner/Munich 2 and one hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs.  I did a few that way and eventually went with 65/35 Pils/Munich 2 and then either Spalt or Hallertau and my yeast of choice is Omega Bayern.  The result is a beer that is simple and more pale than you might think.  I have a batch of this that has been lagering now for about 8 weeks and it will be brought out shortly.  Here's a shot of the one from 2019.


yup, just in general i've simplified my grists so much from years past. i feel embarassed now looking at kitchen sink recipes i did with 4oz this, 4oz that and 10 different malts.

We have brewed several beers, all very good, that had a single malt in the grain bill. Sometimes less really is more.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Village Taphouse on October 04, 2020, 08:59:10 PM
Festbier 2020.  65/35 Pils/Munich 2.  25 IBUs of Hallertau from the start of the boil.  Omega Bayern on the yeast.

(https://i.postimg.cc/G9wGjkgF/festbier-2020a.jpg)
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 05, 2020, 12:25:57 AM
Festbier 2020.  65/35 Pils/Munich 2.  25 IBUs of Hallertau from the start of the boil.  Omega Bayern on the yeast.

(https://i.postimg.cc/G9wGjkgF/festbier-2020a.jpg)

Looks very good! We should be kegging our second 30 gallons in about 10 to 12 days.

Might try more base malt next time, like you did with 65% Pils.

Nice mug, where did you get it?
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Village Taphouse on October 05, 2020, 12:30:40 AM
Looks very good! We should be kegging our second 30 gallons in about 10 to 12 days.

Might try more base malt next time, like you did with 65% Pils.

Nice mug, where did you get it?
That's a Hofbrau stein like this...

(https://i.postimg.cc/28gz8CVB/HB-Stein.jpg)

I may have gotten it on Amazon but I may have also gotten it at our local Hofbrauhaus... can't remember. 
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: fredthecat on October 05, 2020, 04:09:20 AM
Festbier 2020.  65/35 Pils/Munich 2.  25 IBUs of Hallertau from the start of the boil.  Omega Bayern on the yeast.

(https://i.postimg.cc/G9wGjkgF/festbier-2020a.jpg)

Looks very good! We should be kegging our second 30 gallons in about 10 to 12 days.

Might try more base malt next time, like you did with 65% Pils.

Nice mug, where did you get it?

how do you get rid of 30 gallons? very slowly or many people?
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 05, 2020, 11:43:58 PM
Festbier 2020.  65/35 Pils/Munich 2.  25 IBUs of Hallertau from the start of the boil.  Omega Bayern on the yeast.

(https://i.postimg.cc/G9wGjkgF/festbier-2020a.jpg)

Looks very good! We should be kegging our second 30 gallons in about 10 to 12 days.

Might try more base malt next time, like you did with 65% Pils.

Nice mug, where did you get it?

how do you get rid of 30 gallons? very slowly or many people?

That is shared among the 3 main brewers. Yes, we drink it fast!
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on November 17, 2020, 10:39:02 PM
I just tasted a one ounce sample of my 3 week old, still fermenting, Fest Bier.

Made with 14 lbs Pils, 4 lbs Vienna, 4 lbs Munich. This is far better than my previous efforts, with a 1/3 split for each of these.

Much cleaner, a little less malty, and the hops really shine! Might even enter this in the upcoming Blue Bonnet Festival.

Hat-Tip to The Village Taphouse for the heads up on this recipe variation.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: tommymorris on November 18, 2020, 12:50:54 AM
I just tasted a one ounce sample of my 3 week old, still fermenting, Fest Bier.

Made with 14 lbs Pils, 4 lbs Vienna, 4 lbs Munich. This is far better than my previous efforts, with a 1/3 split for each of these.

Much cleaner, a little less malty, and the hops really shine! Might even enter this in the upcoming Blue Bonnet Festival.

Hat-Tip to The Village Taphouse for the heads up on this recipe variation.
So it’s 4/4/4 lbs or 14/4/4 lbs pils, vienna, munich?
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Ellismr on November 18, 2020, 12:02:01 PM
I’ve been working on my first beer recipe and the final version is
88% pills
9% light Munich
3% victory

Hops: hallertauer & tettnang


Yeast W34/70


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on November 18, 2020, 01:16:55 PM
I just tasted a one ounce sample of my 3 week old, still fermenting, Fest Bier.

Made with 14 lbs Pils, 4 lbs Vienna, 4 lbs Munich. This is far better than my previous efforts, with a 1/3 split for each of these.

Much cleaner, a little less malty, and the hops really shine! Might even enter this in the upcoming Blue Bonnet Festival.

Hat-Tip to The Village Taphouse for the heads up on this recipe variation.
So it’s 4/4/4 lbs or 14/4/4 lbs pils, vienna, munich?

14 lbs Pils
4 lbs Vienna
4 lbs Munich

For 10 gallons.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Cliffs on November 20, 2020, 03:41:02 AM
I've heard a rumor that some maltsters vienna malt is just a blend of Pils and Munich, has anyone else heard this?
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: fredthecat on November 20, 2020, 04:01:00 AM
no, and i find it really hard to believe. the vienna ive had, had had a consistent colour. munich and pils would be visually noticeable
Title: Fest Bier
Post by: BrewBama on November 20, 2020, 04:08:13 AM
I haven’t read about Pils blends but I have read about Cara blends. I have notes from an old 2014 article by Mike Reintz that said:

“Weyermann makes CaraMunich and CaraVienna malt by creating Kilned Caramel Malts–half ends up being Crystal Malt and the other half is Munich or Vienna (depending on temperatures).

Briess doesn’t do any Kilning for their Caramel varieties. Their CaraMunich 60L, for example, is actually just a blend of Caramel 60L and regular Munich Malt. Likewise, their CaraVienne 20L is a blend of Caramel 20L and Vienna Malt.

Based on all that, if you’re looking for a Lovibond rating of CaraMunich or CaraVienne that you can’t find, just do a 50/50 blend of Caramel Malt and Munich/Vienna.

For example, CaraMunich 40L = 50% Caramel 40L + 50% Munich. CaraVienne 80L = 50% Caramel 80L + 50% Vienna.”


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Iliff Ave on November 20, 2020, 05:16:57 AM
Interesting stuff. Explains why I like caramunich so much.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: ynotbrusum on November 20, 2020, 10:59:48 AM
From the Briess website:

Q: What's the difference between Caramel and Crystal Malts?
A: Dave Kuske, our Director of Malting Operations, explains it this way.
The difference between Caramel and Crystal malts involves both terminology and chemistry and production differences.

As for terminology, the European maltsters landed on crystal malt as the descriptor of malts that go through a conversion step where starches are rapidly (typically within 45 minutes) converted to sugars and the sugars are then crystallized at high temperatures in a roaster. Somewhere in our distant past, it was decided that our crystal style malts produced in the same manner were given the name caramel Malt.

The term caramel really refers to the process of pyrolisis of sugars. When I give presentations on the process, I encourage the audience to envision a candy thermometer. There are different temperature "breaks" where different "types" of caramel are produced and each have unique and very different physical and flavor properties. Crystal style malt is in reality the end process of achieving high enough temperatures to produce a 'hard crack' type caramel inside of each malt kernel, which results in a hard glassy endosperm. This crystallization lends unique properties to the flavor and functionality of the malt. In order to achieve crystallization, the actual kernel temperature must exceed 300ºF, which requires much higher applied temperatures only achievable using a roaster, which has the burner capacity to reach in excess of 700+ºF if needed.

There are Caramel malts on the market that are produced using a kiln. The green malt is heated at minimal airflow and is held at high moisture content for an extended period of time (more like hours than minutes) on the upper kiln to "stew" the malt to allow the enzymes to break the starches into sugars.  It is a tricky step on the kiln because it is difficult to get the wet malt heated up to the enzyme optimum temperatures (60-70ºC or 140-158ºF) without drying the malt in the process, which slows the enzymatic breakdown. I liken it to trying to heat up a wet bath towel. After stewing, the malt is heated at the highest temperature possible on the kiln, which is not hot enough to actually crystallize the sugars due to maximum temperature limitations on the kiln. In most cases, 220-240ºF burner temperature is as high as one can achieve on a kiln, which falls far short of crystallization temperature of the predominant sugars. There is some caramelization that occurs at the lower temperatures, but the majority of the color and flavor development is due to the Maillard reaction (sugar + amino acid) which provides a different flavor profile and a mealy/powdery endosperm.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on November 20, 2020, 01:39:08 PM
So how does CaraBohemian fit in to this discussion?
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Village Taphouse on November 20, 2020, 03:43:58 PM
From the Briess website:

Q: What's the difference between Caramel and Crystal Malts?
A: Dave Kuske, our Director of Malting Operations, explains it this way.
The difference between Caramel and Crystal malts involves both terminology and chemistry and production differences.

As for terminology, the European maltsters landed on crystal malt as the descriptor of malts that go through a conversion step where starches are rapidly (typically within 45 minutes) converted to sugars and the sugars are then crystallized at high temperatures in a roaster. Somewhere in our distant past, it was decided that our crystal style malts produced in the same manner were given the name caramel Malt.

The term caramel really refers to the process of pyrolisis of sugars. When I give presentations on the process, I encourage the audience to envision a candy thermometer. There are different temperature "breaks" where different "types" of caramel are produced and each have unique and very different physical and flavor properties. Crystal style malt is in reality the end process of achieving high enough temperatures to produce a 'hard crack' type caramel inside of each malt kernel, which results in a hard glassy endosperm. This crystallization lends unique properties to the flavor and functionality of the malt. In order to achieve crystallization, the actual kernel temperature must exceed 300ºF, which requires much higher applied temperatures only achievable using a roaster, which has the burner capacity to reach in excess of 700+ºF if needed.

There are Caramel malts on the market that are produced using a kiln. The green malt is heated at minimal airflow and is held at high moisture content for an extended period of time (more like hours than minutes) on the upper kiln to "stew" the malt to allow the enzymes to break the starches into sugars.  It is a tricky step on the kiln because it is difficult to get the wet malt heated up to the enzyme optimum temperatures (60-70ºC or 140-158ºF) without drying the malt in the process, which slows the enzymatic breakdown. I liken it to trying to heat up a wet bath towel. After stewing, the malt is heated at the highest temperature possible on the kiln, which is not hot enough to actually crystallize the sugars due to maximum temperature limitations on the kiln. In most cases, 220-240ºF burner temperature is as high as one can achieve on a kiln, which falls far short of crystallization temperature of the predominant sugars. There is some caramelization that occurs at the lower temperatures, but the majority of the color and flavor development is due to the Maillard reaction (sugar + amino acid) which provides a different flavor profile and a mealy/powdery endosperm.
Mmm, that's good stuff.  This is an area I do not dive into very deeply... I just try to use high quality stuff.  I admit that I like my occasional use of CaraMunich I and II and also CaraVienne in certain styles.  I will also use some Special B and English Dark Crystal but in small amounts.  I will use C40 and C60 in some ales that I make.  But generally I am using LESS crystal/caramel malt in my recipes these days.  It also gets mildly disorienting because different maltsters have different names for basically the same thing.  I ordered some CaraVienne from a local place (to pick up) and when I got there she handed me the bag and it said CaraRuby on it.  I said that this wasn't my order and that I ordered CaraVienne and she shrugged and said "This is CaraVienne... just a different name and different maltster".   :o 
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: ynotbrusum on November 20, 2020, 04:36:07 PM
So how does CaraBohemian fit in to this discussion?

Just showing the process considerations for those who might be interested.  Carabohemian is merely Weyermann's 64.5-83.4 L caramel malt.  Here is the link to the Briess site for its Caramunich:

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Assets/PDFs/Briess_PISB_CaramelMunichMalt60L.pdf

Probably pretty close to Carabohemian….
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on December 24, 2020, 07:05:29 PM
So...just had a small glass of my recently kegged Fest Bier.

It is a winner! And thanks again to the Village Tap House for the heads-up on the grain bill.

I feel like I'm sitting in the outdoor courtyard of the Paulaner Restaurant in Frankfurt, DE.

This is a definite entry for the upcoming Bluebonnet.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Village Taphouse on December 24, 2020, 07:18:11 PM
So...just had a small glass of my recently kegged Fest Bier.

It is a winner! And thanks again to the Village Tap House for the heads-up on the grain bill.

I feel like I'm sitting in the outdoor courtyard of the Paulaner Restaurant in Frankfurt, DE.

This is a definite entry for the upcoming Bluebonnet.
Did you make it with the simpler grain bill?  Depending on the specific grains, anywhere from 50/50 pils/Munich 2 down to something like 65/35 pils/munich 2 can be really nice.  One hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs or so.  I need to check my notes but I think that Spalt hops that are in excellent condition might be the way to go on the hops.  I'm sure I did Magnum and also Hallertau Mitt on a couple of these but I have some really good Spalt hops right now and they're very fresh, vibrant and punchy. 
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: TXFlyGuy on December 24, 2020, 08:42:46 PM
So...just had a small glass of my recently kegged Fest Bier.

It is a winner! And thanks again to the Village Tap House for the heads-up on the grain bill.

I feel like I'm sitting in the outdoor courtyard of the Paulaner Restaurant in Frankfurt, DE.

This is a definite entry for the upcoming Bluebonnet.
Did you make it with the simpler grain bill?  Depending on the specific grains, anywhere from 50/50 pils/Munich 2 down to something like 65/35 pils/munich 2 can be really nice.  One hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs or so.  I need to check my notes but I think that Spalt hops that are in excellent condition might be the way to go on the hops.  I'm sure I did Magnum and also Hallertau Mitt on a couple of these but I have some really good Spalt hops right now and they're very fresh, vibrant and punchy.

Yes, 14 lbs Pils, 4 lbs Vienna, 4 lbs Munich. 10 gallon brew.
2.5 oz Mt. Hood FWH.
Wyeast Oktoberfest Lager Blend (3rd Gen)
OG - 1.050
FG - 1.011
ABV - 5.12%

It turned out exactly the way I hoped, especially the color. It looks and tastes very close to the Paulaner Fest Bier on draft at the brewery restaurant.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: jverduin on December 25, 2020, 03:46:21 AM
So...just had a small glass of my recently kegged Fest Bier.

It is a winner! And thanks again to the Village Tap House for the heads-up on the grain bill.

I feel like I'm sitting in the outdoor courtyard of the Paulaner Restaurant in Frankfurt, DE.

This is a definite entry for the upcoming Bluebonnet.
Did you make it with the simpler grain bill?  Depending on the specific grains, anywhere from 50/50 pils/Munich 2 down to something like 65/35 pils/munich 2 can be really nice.  One hop addition at the start of the boil for about 25 IBUs or so.  I need to check my notes but I think that Spalt hops that are in excellent condition might be the way to go on the hops.  I'm sure I did Magnum and also Hallertau Mitt on a couple of these but I have some really good Spalt hops right now and they're very fresh, vibrant and punchy.

Yes, 14 lbs Pils, 4 lbs Vienna, 4 lbs Munich. 10 gallon brew.
2.5 oz Mt. Hood FWH.
Wyeast Oktoberfest Lager Blend (3rd Gen)
OG - 1.050
FG - 1.011
ABV - 5.12%

It turned out exactly the way I hoped, especially the color. It looks and tastes very close to the Paulaner Fest Bier on draft at the brewery restaurant.
I’m a big fan of using malts in combinations like you mention. It works (in my opinion) for marzen, Vienna, bocks (Helles, bock and doppel). I adjust percentages and may sub in melanoiden, aromatic or darker Munich malts. I’ve generally been happy without crystal type malts in these German lagers.


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Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Fire Rooster on December 25, 2020, 09:39:59 AM
https://www.atlanticbrewsupply.com/Epiphany-Ursprung-Fest-Malt-3L-Epiphany-Craft-Malt_p_4075.html
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: tommymorris on December 25, 2020, 05:22:25 PM
https://www.atlanticbrewsupply.com/Epiphany-Ursprung-Fest-Malt-3L-Epiphany-Craft-Malt_p_4075.html
Did you try this malt? Sounds good.

I have a 65/35 Best Pilsner and Avangard Munich Festbier on right now. It is awesome.  I made it with Mexican Lager yeast which turned out great.
Title: Re: Fest Bier
Post by: Fire Rooster on December 25, 2020, 06:17:51 PM
https://www.atlanticbrewsupply.com/Epiphany-Ursprung-Fest-Malt-3L-Epiphany-Craft-Malt_p_4075.html
Did you try this malt? Sounds good.

I have a 65/35 Best Pilsner and Avangard Munich Festbier on right now. It is awesome.  I made it with Mexican Lager yeast which turned out great.

Only once recently in a small amount, beer was good, but mixed with flaked corn & Vienna.
Next two batches on deck are SMASHs, one with Vienna, and the other with Ursprung Fest Malt.
Or I might do 50/50 Vienna & Ursprung, undecided at this time. I don't have enough experience
with this malt to give an opinion.