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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: Saccharomyces on September 23, 2020, 10:13:05 PM

Title: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on September 23, 2020, 10:13:05 PM
Has anyone used this stain?  K-87 is allegedly the same strain as Wyeast 1007, which is a true top-cropper. It would be nice to find a dry true top-cropper.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on September 23, 2020, 10:49:00 PM
Has anyone used this stain?  K-87 is allegedly the same strain as Wyeast 1007, which is a true top-cropper. It would be nice to find a dry true top-cropper.

They are worlds apart IMO. K97 isn't nearly as crisp and clean IME.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Megary on September 23, 2020, 11:19:40 PM
I got a pile of sulfur in a Cream Ale fermented at 68F the only time I ever used it.  It took forever to clear and lose the aroma.  I do think the beer had a crisp bite though. That was one pack in a 3 gal. batch.

I’d be hard pressed to use it again.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Iliff Ave on September 24, 2020, 12:05:15 AM
I didn’t like it the few times I used it. Got a strange tartness from it.
Title: K-97
Post by: tommymorris on September 24, 2020, 12:37:53 AM
I liked K-97 in an American Wheat beer except it cleared a bit faster than WY1010. Otherwise the taste was similar.

I haven’t liked K-97 in anything else.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on September 24, 2020, 12:59:50 PM
Has anyone used this stain?  K-87 is allegedly the same strain as Wyeast 1007, which is a true top-cropper. It would be nice to find a dry true top-cropper.

They are worlds apart IMO. K97 isn't nearly as crisp and clean IME.

I wouldn't go so far as to say "worlds apart".  They are very similar, though I found K-97 takes an even longer time to clear than 1007, and even after clearing still tastes a little yeasty and with the odd tartness that others agree on.  I do think 1007 is the superior product.  But they act in much the same ways, krausen that won't fall for a long time, etc.  Similar to 2565 in that respect.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Steve Ruch on September 24, 2020, 09:43:08 PM
I've used it in alt and American wheat beer. I've been happy with the results.
I'm currently drinking a batch of wild blackberry wheat beer that was fermented with it.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Descardeci on September 29, 2020, 12:15:23 PM
Has anyone used this stain?  K-87 is allegedly the same strain as Wyeast 1007, which is a true top-cropper. It would be nice to find a dry true top-cropper.
Maybe is not the same, but they have something in common, and it is a true top-cropper, for me this one is more similar to kolsch strain than the 1007, sadly, but otherwise is a beautiful yeast, only use this on my cream ale and kolschs.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on September 29, 2020, 04:33:35 PM
i did some research recently and ordered some k-97. i plan to just do the obvious and make an alt and see how it tastes before doing anything else.


from what i read and can rememeber now:

complaints:
-slight "tart" flavour
-very slow to clear (I know someone here said the opposite, but i saw quite a few people saying it remained hazy for a long time)
-it is a "true top cropper" resulting in messy carboys, and someone suggested that removing the krausen decreases a perceived astringency. others said the astringency fades with time

positives:
-can make really clean tasting beers, basically pseudo-lager
-plenty of positive reviews with no one really saying "it's just not that great" like you hear about some other yeasts (S-04 and nottingham)
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on September 29, 2020, 05:03:55 PM
Well, here ya go...it's just not that great.  Its not bad, but I don't think I'd call it anywhere near clean.  IMO your have far better luck with BRY97, even for  a psuedo lager.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on September 29, 2020, 05:08:21 PM
do you think its appropriate for an alt though?

it seems some of the kolsch/alt labeled yeasts, people say aren't really accurate
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on September 29, 2020, 05:47:54 PM
do you think its appropriate for an alt though?

it seems some of the kolsch/alt labeled yeasts, people say aren't really accurate

Nope.  Not crisp enough. BRY97 would be far better for alt if you want to stay with dry yeast.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on September 29, 2020, 06:05:01 PM
im doing k-97 in about a month or two. what do you think are appropriate styles to go with it?

it sounds more like a kind of alternative ale profile, ~highly attenuating ale, somewhere between english and belgian?
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on September 29, 2020, 06:54:40 PM
im doing k-97 in about a month or two. what do you think are appropriate styles to go with it?

it sounds more like a kind of alternative ale profile, ~highly attenuating ale, somewhere between english and belgian?

Nothing Belgian about it.  Maybe suitable for British styles.  IIRC it's kind of bready.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on September 29, 2020, 07:59:32 PM
Well, here ya go...it's just not that great.  Its not bad, but I don't think I'd call it anywhere near clean.  IMO your have far better luck with BRY97, even for  a psuedo lager.

I agree.  I've actually had less than stellar results with many dried yeasts, or at least they are all relatively hit & miss compared with liquid strains.  Just being perfectly honest.

The exceptions to this in my experience, so far, are S-189 and London ESB.  Both make a very clean beer (well S-189 actually *is* a lager after all!), better than any of the others.  Yeah yeah I know London should have esters....... except that in real life, it doesn't!

EDIT: Oh yeah, and W-34/70 is no slouch either, but I think S-189 is a little better.

Meanwhile I don't think I'll use K-97 ever again.  It just.... isn't great.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on September 29, 2020, 08:03:39 PM
im doing k-97 in about a month or two. what do you think are appropriate styles to go with it?

it sounds more like a kind of alternative ale profile, ~highly attenuating ale, somewhere between english and belgian?

K-97 would work really well in an American hefeweizen.  And... that's about it IMO.  Or well I guess maybe you could play with it in a NEIPA, but just be aware of the tartness and breadiness.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: hopfenundmalz on September 29, 2020, 08:14:09 PM
S-189 surprised me in a Rauchbier. That was a split batch, 34/70 was good, might like S-189 better.

In a pilsner it is 34/70 (or Diamond) for me, S-189 is not dry enough.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on September 29, 2020, 08:20:47 PM
appreciated, everyone. ill let you know once i brew it.


S-189 surprised me in a Rauchbier. That was a split batch, 34/70 was good, might like S-189 better.

In a pilsner it is 34/70 (or Diamond) for me, S-189 is not dry enough.

nice reference. i can get diamond lager too, but didnt consider it. is it a true lager?
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on September 29, 2020, 08:25:00 PM
nice reference. i can get diamond lager too, but didnt consider it. is it a true lager?

As far as I can tell, yes, Diamond should be a true lager yeast.  Possibly the same as W-34/70, not sure yet.  One of these years I'll try Diamond, for whatever reason I too have ignored it until recently.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: ynotbrusum on September 29, 2020, 08:45:35 PM
I've never tried K-97.  Just picked up some Diamond yeast to try in a German Pilsner.  I like S-189, but I know some folks don't think it has enough "snap" for the dry side lagers (I find it is nicely rounded and with the right water profile and hop combinations, it is plenty snappy for me).  34/70 has had some subtle lemon notes occasionally, but that could have been a genetic drift issue back when I was serially re-pitching into the teens.

Cheers!
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on September 29, 2020, 09:07:32 PM
S-189 surprised me in a Rauchbier. That was a split batch, 34/70 was good, might like S-189 better.

In a pilsner it is 34/70 (or Diamond) for me, S-189 is not dry enough.

Agreed
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on September 29, 2020, 09:08:43 PM
appreciated, everyone. ill let you know once i brew it.


S-189 surprised me in a Rauchbier. That was a split batch, 34/70 was good, might like S-189 better.

In a pilsner it is 34/70 (or Diamond) for me, S-189 is not dry enough.

nice reference. i can get diamond lager too, but didnt consider it. is it a true lager?

99% sure it's the same heritage as 34/70.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: tommymorris on September 30, 2020, 02:17:05 AM
Speaking heritage. Supposedly the origin of Wyeast 1010 is from Widmer vis Zum Uerige. Supposedly, K-97 and Wyeast 1007 are related and 1007 is from Zum Uerige.

Maybe that explains why K-97 tastes similar to Wy1010 (to me).
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: hopfenundmalz on September 30, 2020, 05:19:15 PM
They are closely related, but not the same.

http://beer.suregork.com/
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on September 30, 2020, 06:18:12 PM
They are closely related, but not the same.

http://beer.suregork.com/

man i love that tree
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 07, 2020, 04:23:56 PM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: tommymorris on October 07, 2020, 04:28:41 PM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?
Lallemand Kolsch yeast is pretty good.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on October 07, 2020, 04:40:40 PM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?

No, not great in my experience.

It sounds crazy, but I really really like Lallemand London ESB Ale.  Fermented cool, it turned out very clean for me.  Its drawback might be its attenuation, which in my experience was about 71% but others have reported it in the upper 60s.  So if you want to try it, consider mashing for a very long time, like overnight, to keep the enzymes working for a good long time, in the hopes that this will keep the beer dry like a Kolsch should be.

Dang....... now I really want to try this!  I'm making a schwarbier this week, I'll split the batch and give it a shot!  I'm pretty sure I still have some London left, will have to check.  If I do try it, I'll try to remember to report back with results, or send me a reminder.

Cheers!
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on October 07, 2020, 05:10:40 PM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?

Not IMO.  AFAIAC, WY2565 is the ultimate kolsch yeast.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 07, 2020, 11:21:23 PM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?

Not IMO.  AFAIAC, WY2565 is the ultimate kolsch yeast.

Just pitched a 4th gen 2565 (4 months old).....after 36 hours, nothing. Looking for a dry yeast for emergency back up.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on October 08, 2020, 03:00:11 PM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?

Not IMO.  AFAIAC, WY2565 is the ultimate kolsch yeast.

Just pitched a 4th gen 2565 (4 months old).....after 36 hours, nothing. Looking for a dry yeast for emergency back up.

You may be out of luck on dry in that case.  Did you make a starter with the 2565 slurry?
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on October 08, 2020, 08:07:46 PM
You may be out of luck on dry in that case.  Did you make a starter with the 2565 slurry?

I am curious as to if TXFlyGuy was serially repitching this culture like he mentioned in another thread.  Usually, a four-month-old culture is still good to go, but when one serially overpitches a culture, it loses its viability more quickly due to lack of new cell growth in each successive batch.  The culture could have been revived if he had mixed a small amount of the slurry with about 250ml of new aerated 1.040 starter wort, waited until it hit high krausen before decanting a fraction or all of the liquid portion of the starter into about 1L of fresh aerated starter wort, which would leave behind all of the old dead cells.  The resulting new culture would be mostly new cells. The old double drop system worked on this principle.  Dropping after the wort started to ferment left behind the break and dead yeast cells while adding a little O2 to a yeast culture that more than had O2 or O3-level O2 requirements.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: tommymorris on October 08, 2020, 08:29:23 PM
You may be out of luck on dry in that case.  Did you make a starter with the 2565 slurry?

I am curious as to if TXFlyGuy was serially repitching this culture like he mentioned in another thread.  Usually, a four-month-old culture is still good to go, but when one serially overpitches a culture, it loses its viability more quickly due to lack of new cell growth in each successive batch.  The culture could have been revived if he had mixed a small amount of the slurry with about 250ml of new aerated 1.040 starter wort, waited until it hit high krausen before decanting a fraction or all of the liquid portion of the starter into about 1L of fresh aerated starter wort, which would leave behind all of the old dead cells.  The resulting new culture would be mostly new cells. The old double drop system worked on this principle.  Dropping after the wort started to ferment left behind the break and dead yeast cells while adding a little O2 to a yeast culture that more than had O2 or O3-level O2 requirements.
What does this mean?

“...that more than had O2 or O3-level O2 requirements.”
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 09, 2020, 01:29:43 AM
Would K-97 work for a Kolsch? If not, what dry yeast wold you suggest?

Not IMO.  AFAIAC, WY2565 is the ultimate kolsch yeast.

Just pitched a 4th gen 2565 (4 months old).....after 36 hours, nothing. Looking for a dry yeast for emergency back up.

You may be out of luck on dry in that case.  Did you make a starter with the 2565 slurry?

Yes, made a starter using fresh sterile wort. Left the yeast until it looked ready to pitch. And now the good news, it is very actively fermenting. Just got off to a slower than usual start.
I’m used to this process starting to produce strong fermentation within a few hours.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on October 10, 2020, 01:21:30 PM
“...that more than had O2 or O3-level O2 requirements.”

Those ratings are from Brian Kirsop's paper entitled "Oxygen in Brewery Fermentation."  I kept seeing references to these values while reading culture descriptions in the NCYC.

Class O1 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is satisfied if wort is half saturated with air
Class O2 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is satisfied if wort is saturated with air
Class O3 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is satisfied by oxygen-saturated wort
Class O4 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is not satisfied by oxygen-saturated wort


NCYC 1333 is a prime example of a yeast culture with O3/O4 O2 requirements.  I had it in my bank until I took my hiatus. NCYC 1333 is a Yorkshire strain.  Most Yorkshire strains are at least O3.  That is why Yorkshire breweries use open fermentation vessels equipped with fishtails to re-aerate wort while it is actively fermenting.  The multi-strain Ringwood culture is also a Yorkshire culture, which is why the Alan Pugsley installed Peter Austin and Partners breweries all have open fermentation vessels equipped with fishtails.

Here is the basic information for NCYC 1333:


Strain Information

    Information         Flocculent. O3/O4. Head forming Yorkshire Stone Square type recommended for bottled Pale ale.
    Depositor            British Brewery
    Deposit Name      Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Month of deposit  January
    Deposit Year        1974
    Habitat                Ale production strain - Yorkshire Stone Square type recommended for bottled Pale ale.


Here is the vial in which the NCYC shipped NCYC 1333 as a slant (slope in British terms):

(https://i.imgur.com/1KoqKKS.jpg)

Here is what NCYC looks like after the brown head has been skimmed and the second head has formed:
 
(https://i.imgur.com/4CGWRrT.jpg)

When a culture is described as "head forming" in a culture collection, that is what the depositor meant.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on October 10, 2020, 01:46:21 PM
I would like to add that I am willing to bet that the most popular liquid brewing strains with amateur brewers are those that are either O1 or O2. While dry strains have made wort oxygenation less critical due to being propagated with a medium that is held under the Crabtree threshold and continuously fed O2, liquid strains are all propagated with a medium that is above the Crabtree threshold; therefore, all liquid strains require the addition of O2 at some level at time of pitching. New brewers tend to gravitate to dry yeast because they tend to have the least knowledge when it comes to aeration and yeast handling.  Due to the significantly increased quality of the dry brewers yeast that is being produced today, a lot of brewers start with dry yeast and never switch to liquid yeast. 
Title: K-97
Post by: BrewBama on October 10, 2020, 02:57:19 PM
I must be an anomaly. I started batch 1 with liquid yeast and moved to dry after being frustrated for years with the hassle of shipping with ice packs, making starters, hoping it’s alive, and stocking ‘emergency’ dry packs “just in case’’ because “dry yeast always works”. That didn’t make sense to me, so I just skipped the BS and went straight to the sure thing.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: tommymorris on October 10, 2020, 05:08:14 PM
“...that more than had O2 or O3-level O2 requirements.”

Those ratings are from Brian Kirsop's paper entitled "Oxygen in Brewery Fermentation."  I kept seeing references to these values while reading culture descriptions in the NCYC.

Class O1 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is satisfied if wort is half saturated with air
Class O2 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is satisfied if wort is saturated with air
Class O3 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is satisfied by oxygen-saturated wort
Class O4 - yeasts whose oxygen requirement is not satisfied by oxygen-saturated wort


NCYC 1333 is a prime example of a yeast culture with O3/O4 O2 requirements.  I had it in my bank until I took my hiatus. NCYC 1333 is a Yorkshire strain.  Most Yorkshire strains are at least O3.  That is why Yorkshire breweries use open fermentation vessels equipped with fishtails to re-aerate wort while it is actively fermenting.  The multi-strain Ringwood culture is also a Yorkshire culture, which is why the Alan Pugsley installed Peter Austin and Partners breweries all have open fermentation vessels equipped with fishtails.

Here is the basic information for NCYC 1333:


Strain Information

    Information         Flocculent. O3/O4. Head forming Yorkshire Stone Square type recommended for bottled Pale ale.
    Depositor            British Brewery
    Deposit Name      Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    Month of deposit  January
    Deposit Year        1974
    Habitat                Ale production strain - Yorkshire Stone Square type recommended for bottled Pale ale.


Here is the vial in which the NCYC shipped NCYC 1333 as a slant (slope in British terms):

(https://i.imgur.com/1KoqKKS.jpg)

Here is what NCYC looks like after the brown head has been skimmed and the second head has formed:
 
(https://i.imgur.com/4CGWRrT.jpg)

When a culture is described as "head forming" in a culture collection, that is what the depositor meant.
Very interesting. Thanks!
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on October 10, 2020, 06:10:36 PM
I would like to add that I am willing to bet that the most popular liquid brewing strains with amateur brewers are those that are either O1 or O2. While dry strains have made wort oxygenation less critical due to being propagated with a medium that is held under the Crabtree threshold and continuously fed O2, liquid strains are all propagated with a medium that is above the Crabtree threshold; therefore, all liquid strains require the addition of O2 at some level at time of pitching. New brewers tend to gravitate to dry yeast because they tend to have the least knowledge when it comes to aeration and yeast handling.  Due to the significantly increased quality of the dry brewers yeast that is being produced today, a lot of brewers start with dry yeast and never switch to liquid yeast.

awesome pics and super detailed info in other post

yup, its difficult to get yorkshire yeast for one, it exists but i don't see it sold at my online homebrew retailers that i use.


I must be an anomaly. I started batch 1 with liquid yeast and moved to dry after being frustrated for years with the hassle of shipping with ice packs, making starters, hoping it’s alive, and stocking ‘emergency’ dry packs “just in case’’ because “dry yeast always works”. That didn’t make sense to me, so I just skipped the BS and went straight to the sure thing.

my most embarassing homebrew truth is that i only very rarely used liquid yeast other than within the last year of homebrewing because no LHBS had liquid around here. So i was always aching to try more "authentic" yeasts. im pretty happy with the taste quality of liquid so I couldn't imagine switching back.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on October 10, 2020, 07:29:13 PM
I must be an anomaly. I started batch 1 with liquid yeast and moved to dry after being frustrated for years with the hassle of shipping with ice packs, making starters, hoping it’s alive, and stocking ‘emergency’ dry packs “just in case’’ because “dry yeast always works”. That didn’t make sense to me, so I just skipped the BS and went straight to the sure thing.

It is a testament that brewers who start with dry yeast can now achieve the results that they desire with dry yeast.  That used to not be the case.  That being said, the fact that you started with liquid yeast does make you kind of anomaly.  I know that are people who did/do, but most people get introduced to the hobby via a kit that contains dry yeast.  I also feel your pain when it comes to having limited options for liquid yeast.  The reason why I started to plate and slant my own yeast was due to the fact that Wyeast was the only game in town and they did not ship to the East Coast during the warm and hot months.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 11, 2020, 10:55:46 AM
I must be an anomaly. I started batch 1 with liquid yeast and moved to dry after being frustrated for years with the hassle of shipping with ice packs, making starters, hoping it’s alive, and stocking ‘emergency’ dry packs “just in case’’ because “dry yeast always works”. That didn’t make sense to me, so I just skipped the BS and went straight to the sure thing.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Another brewer who has broken the code.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on January 15, 2021, 03:57:29 AM
oh boy, pitched a k-97 into a ~1.045 gravity wort 22 hours ago.

finally checked the temp of the cold room, its 51 degrees. perfect for a lager yeast beer i am brewing in a few days.


can k-97 handle it or should i do something?
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on January 15, 2021, 03:59:49 AM
oh boy, pitched a k-97 into a ~1.045 gravity wort 22 hours ago.

finally checked the temp of the cold room, its 51 degrees. perfect for a lager yeast beer i am brewing in a few days.


can k-97 handle it or should i do something?

51 F might be too cold for K-97.

Even if you warm it up, get ready to wait 2-3 months before the beer clears.

Sorry for my bluntness.  I'm in one of those moods this evening.  Cheers and good luck.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on January 15, 2021, 04:02:15 AM
oh boy, pitched a k-97 into a ~1.045 gravity wort 22 hours ago.

finally checked the temp of the cold room, its 51 degrees. perfect for a lager yeast beer i am brewing in a few days.


can k-97 handle it or should i do something?

51 F might be too cold for K-97.

Even if you warm it up, get ready to wait 2-3 months before the beer clears.

Sorry for my bluntness.  I'm in one of those moods this evening.  Cheers and good luck.

don't mention it, yeah, everything i'm reading says min mid 50s. ill have to think of something.


if you're having a mood, it might be the covid, and sincerely I feel you. Let's get through this crap. Hopefully just a few months more.

This has been a really crazy time.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on January 15, 2021, 05:12:43 AM
if you're having a mood, it might be the covid, and sincerely I feel you. Let's get through this crap. Hopefully just a few months more.

This has been a really crazy time.

I think you're onto something.  I've been okay for the past 10 months.  But now just in the past couple weeks, I am *finally* starting to get really, really really bored.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on January 15, 2021, 09:14:50 PM
If K-97 is a Wyeast 1007 in dry form, it will go very low for an ale yeast.   It was the only ale yeast I could use in the unheated basement of the house where I lived when I started to brew.  The other culture I used during the cold months was CL-660, which I now believe is a W-34/70 isolate.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: denny on January 15, 2021, 09:47:28 PM
If K-97 is a Wyeast 1007 in dry form, it will go very low for an ale yeast.   It was the only ale yeast I could use in the unheated basement of the house where I lived when I started to brew.  The other culture I used during the cold months was CL-660, which I now believe is a W-34/70 isolate.

If so, it's remarkably unlike 1007.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: dmtaylor on January 15, 2021, 09:55:24 PM
Indeed they are related, but perform noticeably differently.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Hopspringseternal on January 15, 2021, 10:08:12 PM
I appreciate all the insights about the K-97.  I'm not a sophisticated brewer--just use extract kits and mostly just ales.  I got Brewer's Best Kosch kit and it included the K-97.  Even though the recipe said (twice) "do not rehydrate," I always rehydrate my dry yeast.  I have a Grainfather conical fermenter so I've kept the temp at a steady 62--which is the mid-point in the range suggested by Safale.  The OG was 1.044 and after four days the reading from my Tilt hydrometer indicates a SG of 1.010.  I'm hoping the negatives others have mentioned about this yeast won't occur, but since several entries have suggested the K-97 might be okay for a Kolsch, I'm hoping for the best.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on January 16, 2021, 03:22:36 AM
ok, it was going. i surrounded it with warm water bottles, just to try to raise the temp a little bit (it was 2am and i was needed in bed).

in the morning it was going and its been going since. i'll just let it go and see what happens. now that its fermenting that should raise its temp to an acceptable measure.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Saccharomyces on January 16, 2021, 02:08:54 PM
I'm not a sophisticated brewer--just use extract kits and mostly just ales. 

Yes, but you have better gear than I have and I have been brewing all-grain off-and-on for 28 years. :)
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on January 16, 2021, 05:08:28 PM
I'm not a sophisticated brewer--just use extract kits and mostly just ales. 

Yes, but you have better gear than I have and I have been brewing all-gain off-and-on for 28 years. :)

all-gain, no-pain brewing
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: fredthecat on January 16, 2021, 06:24:29 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/7ZwgHRH.jpg)

seems to be chugging along, here's what it looks like.
Title: Re: K-97
Post by: Hopspringseternal on January 16, 2021, 08:31:29 PM
I'm not a sophisticated brewer--just use extract kits and mostly just ales. 

Yes, but you have better gear than I have and I have been brewing all-gain off-and-on for 28 years. :)

Yeah, I'm spoiled with that conical fermenter, and the Tilt was a Christmas present this year!