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Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: HopDen on December 04, 2020, 12:44:49 pm

Title: Covid19
Post by: HopDen on December 04, 2020, 12:44:49 pm
Man, I caught the dreaded virus!! Last Sunday I wasn't feeling to hot and went for a covid test Tuesday to be safe. I have elderly parents and in-laws along with my co-workers to consider. Came back positive as I suspected. I have to admit that it felt like a seasonal head cold in the sense that my only symptoms were head congestion/runny nose, headache, body aches and extreme fatigue. I honestly do not get sick, ever, so when I started to experience symptoms I sort of knew what the outcome was going to be.

In my case case, I am a 58 year old male with no medical conditions except high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol. Like I said earlier I rarely if ever get sick. My covid experience was mild and I am thankful that it was not more serious and for the most part I am fully recovered except a continuation of a congested head and a lack of taste and smell.

It is the lack of taste and smell that has been the worst part. Throughout the last 5 days of illness I did not lose my appetite at all except that first full day which was Monday and which was the most severe.

I could not imagine going through life with a permanent diminished sense of taste and smell. My life seriously revolves around food and drink in so many ways from socializing with friends to a quiet evening creating a dinner at home for myself and wife. Making beer and wine is more than a hobby for me, it is a way to connect with friends, family or a new acquaintance and it is shared on a daily basis as a means of human connection. If not with friends and family who on any given day may drop in for a discussion on the days events and a glass or two of cheers then it can easily be with just myself on the back porch listening to music or reading.

This is slowly subsiding and I can almost taste the delectable and subtle flavors of a Czech Pils I am sipping on as I write this story.

I can only hope that should any one of you have the unfortunate experience of catching covid that you recovery fully and quickly as I have and that you do not lose your sense of taste and smell. I never realized how much we take for granted something as simple and yet so complex.

Cheers!

Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: kramerog on December 04, 2020, 12:51:27 pm
Yes, losing my sense of taste and smell is the scariest thing for me personally about covid as I am in reasonably good health (setting aside the possibility of infecting and hurting other people and contributing to the continuation of this awful partial shutdown). My enjoyment of life would be quite diminished.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: denny on December 04, 2020, 12:52:10 pm
Glad to hear you're recovering.  Take care of yourself
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Northern_Brewer on December 04, 2020, 02:06:36 pm
At least you got it back pretty quickly, I lost my sense of smell for a few months, and then went through a really odd spell of things not smelling right - hot chocolate smelt of toast and so on.

Aside from the pleasure of eat/drinking, you want to be aware of the dangers that you may not know about - I still can't really smell gas or burning, which is worrying.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: jeffy on December 04, 2020, 02:18:39 pm
I had all the symptoms last week, but tested negative.  I have recovered mostly but still have a partial loss of smell and some things don't smell right.  For instance I was chopping garlic last week and it smelled a little like spoiled meat.  I'm 68 and have some asthma so I am in the risk group - I really think the test was wrong, so next time I give blood I'll get the antibody test.  In the mean time, I am still coughing and wheezing a bit.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: HopDen on December 04, 2020, 02:21:30 pm
At least you got it back pretty quickly, I lost my sense of smell for a few months, and then went through a really odd spell of things not smelling right - hot chocolate smelt of toast and so on.

Aside from the pleasure of eat/drinking, you want to be aware of the dangers that you may not know about - I still can't really smell gas or burning, which is worrying.

Unfortunately I haven't.

Did you lose yours from covid?

I think I would have a difficult time if this lets a few months. From what Ive read loss of smell and taste usually subsides after 10-14 days. I certainly hope that's the case!!

Here is the strange thing at least for me, I can sense heat, sour, bitter and sweet but not the food that is transporting them.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: HopDen on December 04, 2020, 02:27:08 pm
I had all the symptoms last week, but tested negative.  I have recovered mostly but still have a partial loss of smell and some things don't smell right.  For instance I was chopping garlic last week and it smelled a little like spoiled meat.  I'm 68 and have some asthma so I am in the risk group - I really think the test was wrong, so next time I give blood I'll get the antibody test.  In the mean time, I am still coughing and wheezing a bit.


Just a curious question Jeff, did you have the rapid test performed or was it the PCR test?

The reason is that if it was the rapid test and it was negative with symptoms it is more likely that it was a false negative. At least that is what mt neighbor who is a nurse practitioner explained to us.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: jeffy on December 04, 2020, 02:31:32 pm
I had all the symptoms last week, but tested negative.  I have recovered mostly but still have a partial loss of smell and some things don't smell right.  For instance I was chopping garlic last week and it smelled a little like spoiled meat.  I'm 68 and have some asthma so I am in the risk group - I really think the test was wrong, so next time I give blood I'll get the antibody test.  In the mean time, I am still coughing and wheezing a bit.


Just a curious question Jeff, did you have the rapid test performed or was it the PCR test?

The reason is that if it was the rapid test and it was negative with symptoms it is more likely that it was a false negative. At least that is what mt neighbor who is a nurse practitioner explained to us.
Yes, it was the rapid test, self-applied drive through at the Walgreens.  I am pretty sure it was a false negative, just from all the symptoms, but glad it wasn't worse.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: dmtaylor on December 04, 2020, 02:55:18 pm
The reason is that if it was the rapid test and it was negative with symptoms it is more likely that it was a false negative. At least that is what mt neighbor who is a nurse practitioner explained to us.

That is correct.  The rapid test is known for a lot of false negatives.  If it comes back positive, it's a real positive, but if negative, well there's really no such thing.  They should actually call the result "inconclusive".  My sister is a nurse practitioner and told me this, and it makes sense based on what I've heard from other friends from work.  My brother-in-law had the rapid test, tested negative, but had all the symptoms for over a week and still suffers from fatigue months later.  My brother tested positive more than 20 days ago and all the symptoms are gone except for smell & taste, he's really bummed about that but said he is just starting to barely be able to taste some things now so it's coming back, just slowly.

I myself have not had the virus and will continue to try to avoid people as much as I can.  I've been working from home almost all year since April.
 When I go out I am super careful, sanitize everything and wash my hands the second I come home, etc.  Avoid bars, that's where we're all most likely catch it.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: HopDen on December 04, 2020, 04:12:42 pm
When I go out I am super careful, sanitize everything and wash my hands the second I come home, etc.  Avoid bars, that's where we're all most likely catch it.


Same here. We haven't been to a brewery, bar or restaurant in weeks if not months save for a couple dinners on vacation in September. At this point I really have to question the effectiveness of masks. I know a number of people who have been consistent in their approach to avoid this virus and they too have been infected. Who knows?
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: ravenwater on December 04, 2020, 04:17:20 pm
HopDen - glad to hear your case was mild, in relative terms, and with fairly rapid recovery. Yes, losing sense of smell/taste would suck a goodly portion of pleasure out of my day-to-day. Even for folks who have not had severe symptoms the potential for lingering neurologic and possibly other consequences is very real, and disconcerting to me. And very much there is such a thing as a false negative COVID test. This is worrisome in terms of the potential for spread of the virus the small portion of folks who have tested negative and dismiss symptoms as attributable to other causes but may be contagious for a time (this can include health care workers). Thus reinforcing the importance for us all to be diligent with precautions including mask wearing and frequent thorough hand washing. I feel fairly convinced I had COVID last March although I tested negative. Masks do notably reduce the chances of catching and spreading the virus - are they 100% effective? No. And I see many folks don't wear them appropriately, thereby negating their value.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on December 04, 2020, 06:52:01 pm
I was told by a first responder the rapid test is 65% accurate. Mostly not detected being the incorrect result. My wife's test was not detected. Fairly certain she had some virus, not 100% it was C-19. It caused problems with her blood pressure and we finally have that cleared up 8 weeks later. I hurt my arm while she was at her worst several weeks ago and kept it to myself due to her condition. Anyway, I go for an MRI tomorrow on the elbow and have a complete distal bicep tendon tear. Probably surgery next week. 2020 does indeed suck.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Northern_Brewer on December 05, 2020, 07:11:49 am
At least you got it back pretty quickly, I lost my sense of smell for a few months, and then went through a really odd spell of things not smelling right - hot chocolate smelt of toast and so on.

Aside from the pleasure of eat/drinking, you want to be aware of the dangers that you may not know about - I still can't really smell gas or burning, which is worrying.

Did you lose yours from covid?

I can sense heat, sour, bitter and sweet but not the food that is transporting them.

I've not had a test yet - I've got an antibody test on order which will decide how sociable I am at Christmas - but I had the equivalent of a medium flu with quite a bit of coughing and diarrhoea but not much of a fever, followed by loss of smell (anosmia) followed by weird mismatched smell (parosmia). Which all seems to tick the boxes - the loss of smell thing is quite unusual, so is probably the single best symptom for diagnosing Covid with.

The return to normal was weird though, having had no smell for quite a long time, I had what seemed to be just a normal cold, and it was like it pushed the Covid out of my nose, so I got the parosmia for a few days and now it's generally much better (but I don't think complete).

Still kinda annoying though, I was planning to do some WSET wine courses and I'm now not completely confident about my senses which is uncomfortable.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Slowbrew on December 05, 2020, 07:58:57 am
I'm no expert and everything that follows is anecdotal, so take it for what it's worth (not much, in other words).   ;)

I have a strong feeling a lot more people have had COVID than anyone can know.  And I think COVID has been here longer than the experts can find evidence of.

What I've seen:
My mother passed away last December which means a very large extended family was together more than once before and following the holidays.  My family consists of four sisters, four brothers, eight spouse and  22 grand-kids.  Add in more spouses and great-grand-kids and you have a crowd even before the hometown gets involved at the wake, the funeral, the funeral dinner...  In addition, we live all over the country and some of of us had made trips abroad.

One of my sisters, a nurse, had "something" in September thru November that antibiotics/steroids/etc could not kick.  Her doctor couldn't identify what it was at the time.  Looking back she can check all the boxes for COVID. 
Throughout December and January we all had colds and flu that were worse than we normally have. 
My wife lost here senses of taste and smell in December. 
I didn't lose taste or smell but felt run down and had lingering cold symptoms for 2 or 3 months. 
The same with the rest of my clan.  Each branch had their own version of "something" and it all looks, at some level like COVID.

It's interesting that blood serum studies are coming out showing that COVID was in Iowa in December last year already.  It supports my theory a little, at least.

Since this started my family has had the opinion that the most interesting numbers would be how many people already had the antibodies prior to this being declared a pandemic.  I think a fairly large portion my extended family does.
For the record: I'm not one of the people claiming natural herd immunity will stop this thing but we already may be closer than anyone will ever know.

All that said: My household wear our masks, wash our hands, use hand sanitizer, stay home and do all the stuff we have told to do to stop this thing.  And we will get vaccinated as soon as we possible can, when it's our turn. The teachers (2), engineers (1 working and 1 in college), our resident chemist and myself will all be in different phases of the rollout.   I suggest you all do the same.

As I started this...
This is all just observation and conjecture.  There is still a lot to learn about this little buggard.

Stay safe everyone.

Paul
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: HopDen on December 05, 2020, 08:56:02 am
As far as taking a vaccine when they are available, I will be opting out. I am not in a high risk group and even if I were I would still opt out. After some time I may reconsider taking the vaccine but as it stands now there isn't any reason for me to do so. Consider, as it currently stands, covid has a 99.5% recovery rate in my age/health category so I don't see the benefit of taking a vaccine that has a 94% efficiency factor but that is just my opinion. I personally feel that there hasn't been enough time to ferret out the side effects that are certain to rise once the vaccine is distributed on a larger and larger population.

Getting the vaccine isn't a cure just as getting the virus doesn't make one immune from future infections. This is here to stay like all SARS-CoV strains.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: beersk on December 07, 2020, 12:46:43 pm
As far as taking a vaccine when they are available, I will be opting out. I am not in a high risk group and even if I were I would still opt out. After some time I may reconsider taking the vaccine but as it stands now there isn't any reason for me to do so. Consider, as it currently stands, covid has a 99.5% recovery rate in my age/health category so I don't see the benefit of taking a vaccine that has a 94% efficiency factor but that is just my opinion. I personally feel that there hasn't been enough time to ferret out the side effects that are certain to rise once the vaccine is distributed on a larger and larger population.

Getting the vaccine isn't a cure just as getting the virus doesn't make one immune from future infections. This is here to stay like all SARS-CoV strains.
The reasoning would be so you have a lower risk of spreading it to those that are in the higher risk category.

I'm no expert and everything that follows is anecdotal, so take it for what it's worth (not much, in other words).   ;)

I have a strong feeling a lot more people have had COVID than anyone can know.  And I think COVID has been here longer than the experts can find evidence of.

What I've seen:
My mother passed away last December which means a very large extended family was together more than once before and following the holidays.  My family consists of four sisters, four brothers, eight spouse and  22 grand-kids.  Add in more spouses and great-grand-kids and you have a crowd even before the hometown gets involved at the wake, the funeral, the funeral dinner...  In addition, we live all over the country and some of of us had made trips abroad.

One of my sisters, a nurse, had "something" in September thru November that antibiotics/steroids/etc could not kick.  Her doctor couldn't identify what it was at the time.  Looking back she can check all the boxes for COVID. 
Throughout December and January we all had colds and flu that were worse than we normally have. 
My wife lost here senses of taste and smell in December. 
I didn't lose taste or smell but felt run down and had lingering cold symptoms for 2 or 3 months. 
The same with the rest of my clan.  Each branch had their own version of "something" and it all looks, at some level like COVID.

It's interesting that blood serum studies are coming out showing that COVID was in Iowa in December last year already.  It supports my theory a little, at least.

Since this started my family has had the opinion that the most interesting numbers would be how many people already had the antibodies prior to this being declared a pandemic.  I think a fairly large portion my extended family does.
For the record: I'm not one of the people claiming natural herd immunity will stop this thing but we already may be closer than anyone will ever know.

All that said: My household wear our masks, wash our hands, use hand sanitizer, stay home and do all the stuff we have told to do to stop this thing.  And we will get vaccinated as soon as we possible can, when it's our turn. The teachers (2), engineers (1 working and 1 in college), our resident chemist and myself will all be in different phases of the rollout.   I suggest you all do the same.

As I started this...
This is all just observation and conjecture.  There is still a lot to learn about this little buggard.

Stay safe everyone.

Paul

Paul, I agree. I live in Iowa City and a lot of us probably already had this. Unfortunately, like the cold or flu, you can be re-infected. And from what I understand, you can also be a carrier if you've already had it and not know it. But I think we still know so little about it yet that that cannot really be 100% accurate. I wish it were more like the chicken pox or something where you really only get it once...
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Northern_Brewer on December 07, 2020, 04:47:56 pm
I'm no expert and everything that follows is anecdotal, so take it for what it's worth (not much, in other words).   ;)

I have a strong feeling a lot more people have had COVID than anyone can know.  And I think COVID has been here longer than the experts can find evidence of.

The DNA "clock" evidence is pretty persuasive, that COVID in its current form originates some time around early-mind November 2019. It's possible that interpretation is wrong, but we're getting towards "extraordinary claims need extraordinary evidence" territory - it's going to take more than a bit of anecdote to refute it.

One of my sisters, a nurse, had "something" in September thru November that antibiotics/steroids/etc could not kick.  Her doctor couldn't identify what it was at the time.  Looking back she can check all the boxes for COVID. 

There's lots of things that can give similar symptoms - the loss of smell is just about the only thing that's unusual about Covid and even that's not unique. There are literally hundreds of viruses out there that can give a similar spectrum of symptoms, but it's easy to get so focussed on one of them that the hundreds of others get forgotten about. Seriously - if we're getting to "extraordinary claims" territory, then the only box that could be checked that would be convincing would be a PCR positive from a sample taken pre-November, or a Covid antibody positive shortly afterwards.

One of my relatives had something a bit similar - couldn't shake it for weeks. But that was 5 years ago - I think we can safely say it wasn't Covid, it was another of these hundreds of poorly characterised respiratory viruses that just "got" to her in some way. And to be honest, the respiratory bit of Covid doesn't linger, it just gets on with putting you in intensive care, the "long Covid" symptoms are somewhat different.
Title: Covid19
Post by: tommymorris on December 07, 2020, 05:00:51 pm
I'm no expert and everything that follows is anecdotal, so take it for what it's worth (not much, in other words).   ;)

I have a strong feeling a lot more people have had COVID than anyone can know.  And I think COVID has been here longer than the experts can find evidence of.

The DNA "clock" evidence is pretty persuasive, that COVID in its current form originates some time around early-mind November 2019. It's possible that interpretation is wrong, but we're getting towards "extraordinary claims need extraordinary evidence" territory - it's going to take more than a bit of anecdote to refute it.

One of my sisters, a nurse, had "something" in September thru November that antibiotics/steroids/etc could not kick.  Her doctor couldn't identify what it was at the time.  Looking back she can check all the boxes for COVID. 

There's lots of things that can give similar symptoms - the loss of smell is just about the only thing that's unusual about Covid and even that's not unique. There are literally hundreds of viruses out there that can give a similar spectrum of symptoms, but it's easy to get so focussed on one of them that the hundreds of others get forgotten about. Seriously - if we're getting to "extraordinary claims" territory, then the only box that could be checked that would be convincing would be a PCR positive from a sample taken pre-November, or a Covid antibody positive shortly afterwards.

One of my relatives had something a bit similar - couldn't shake it for weeks. But that was 5 years ago - I think we can safely say it wasn't Covid, it was another of these hundreds of poorly characterised respiratory viruses that just "got" to her in some way. And to be honest, the respiratory bit of Covid doesn't linger, it just gets on with putting you in intensive care, the "long Covid" symptoms are somewhat different.
I saw a few articles lately that speak to this. I am sorry I can’t cite them. I believe both were in the NYTimes.

1. There is evidence that Covid got to the US much sooner than previously thought as in November December of 2019.

2. CDC antibody surveys around the US suggest about 100 million people have had Covid already. It is approaching 1/3 of the population. Unfortunately, that is not enough for herd immunity.

My take away from number 2 was there is sort of a race for natural herd immunity versus vaccine herd immunity in the US. Obviously, vaccine based herd immunity is much safer for the community, but the virus isn’t letting up.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Wilbur on December 07, 2020, 06:40:50 pm
The benefits of getting a vaccine are more than just dying or not dying. It may limit your spread or prevent you from getting seriously ill. Given that a lot of people have reported feeling awful for months, losing their sense of smell, and/or heart or lung damage (even among elite athletes), I can't imagine not getting vaccinated. The only downside I've heard is that some people have had a headache for a day or two.

I know Sweden has looked at where they're at in terms of herd immunity and determined that they're not even close. A few members of my homebrew club are in the hospital system here, and they've been seeing: staff on mandatory overtime for months, rising admissions, and staff only allowed to call in sick if they have a positive test and are symptomatic. I think deaths are going to rise over the next few weeks unfortunately.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: dmtaylor on December 07, 2020, 09:15:58 pm
"When this baby hits 88 mph, you're gonna see some serious sh**."

That's where we are now.  Almost up to 88 mph.  No mistake about it, the next 3-4 months will be 3 times worse than the last 9 months, and might continue to get even worse into a few months beyond, depending on how many can begin to get vaccinated around that time.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: ravenwater on December 08, 2020, 09:31:23 am
The benefits of getting a vaccine are more than just dying or not dying. It may limit your spread or prevent you from getting seriously ill. Given that a lot of people have reported feeling awful for months, losing their sense of smell, and/or heart or lung damage (even among elite athletes), I can't imagine not getting vaccinated. The only downside I've heard is that some people have had a headache for a day or two.

I know Sweden has looked at where they're at in terms of herd immunity and determined that they're not even close. A few members of my homebrew club are in the hospital system here, and they've been seeing: staff on mandatory overtime for months, rising admissions, and staff only allowed to call in sick if they have a positive test and are symptomatic. I think deaths are going to rise over the next few weeks unfortunately.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

I can tell you that here in Albuquerque our hospitals have maxed out their ICU beds for COVID patient care and physicians are prepared to execute protocols for determining COVID patent care (or not) - meaning they are at the point of having to think about who gets a ventilator or more extreme life-saving measures and who gets ranked as less likely to respond to immediate intervention and therefore left without treatment that could be critical. Not a situation we want to be in. Whatever can be done to help start to get a better handle on this thing and bring our infection numbers down is worth considering, in my opinion. This is not just info I'm getting from the news, etc. - my wife is a nurse educator at the largest local healthcare system and so is getting this info passed on directly from those on the front lines.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: hopfenundmalz on December 08, 2020, 11:55:33 am
As far as taking a vaccine when they are available, I will be opting out. I am not in a high risk group and even if I were I would still opt out. After some time I may reconsider taking the vaccine but as it stands now there isn't any reason for me to do so. Consider, as it currently stands, covid has a 99.5% recovery rate in my age/health category so I don't see the benefit of taking a vaccine that has a 94% efficiency factor but that is just my opinion. I personally feel that there hasn't been enough time to ferret out the side effects that are certain to rise once the vaccine is distributed on a larger and larger population.

Getting the vaccine isn't a cure just as getting the virus doesn't make one immune from future infections. This is here to stay like all SARS-CoV strains.
The reasoning would be so you have a lower risk of spreading it to those that are in the higher risk category.

I'm no expert and everything that follows is anecdotal, so take it for what it's worth (not much, in other words).   ;)

I have a strong feeling a lot more people have had COVID than anyone can know.  And I think COVID has been here longer than the experts can find evidence of.

What I've seen:
My mother passed away last December which means a very large extended family was together more than once before and following the holidays.  My family consists of four sisters, four brothers, eight spouse and  22 grand-kids.  Add in more spouses and great-grand-kids and you have a crowd even before the hometown gets involved at the wake, the funeral, the funeral dinner...  In addition, we live all over the country and some of of us had made trips abroad.

One of my sisters, a nurse, had "something" in September thru November that antibiotics/steroids/etc could not kick.  Her doctor couldn't identify what it was at the time.  Looking back she can check all the boxes for COVID. 
Throughout December and January we all had colds and flu that were worse than we normally have. 
My wife lost here senses of taste and smell in December. 
I didn't lose taste or smell but felt run down and had lingering cold symptoms for 2 or 3 months. 
The same with the rest of my clan.  Each branch had their own version of "something" and it all looks, at some level like COVID.

It's interesting that blood serum studies are coming out showing that COVID was in Iowa in December last year already.  It supports my theory a little, at least.

Since this started my family has had the opinion that the most interesting numbers would be how many people already had the antibodies prior to this being declared a pandemic.  I think a fairly large portion my extended family does.
For the record: I'm not one of the people claiming natural herd immunity will stop this thing but we already may be closer than anyone will ever know.

All that said: My household wear our masks, wash our hands, use hand sanitizer, stay home and do all the stuff we have told to do to stop this thing.  And we will get vaccinated as soon as we possible can, when it's our turn. The teachers (2), engineers (1 working and 1 in college), our resident chemist and myself will all be in different phases of the rollout.   I suggest you all do the same.

As I started this...
This is all just observation and conjecture.  There is still a lot to learn about this little buggard.

Stay safe everyone.

Paul

Paul, I agree. I live in Iowa City and a lot of us probably already had this. Unfortunately, like the cold or flu, you can be re-infected. And from what I understand, you can also be a carrier if you've already had it and not know it. But I think we still know so little about it yet that that cannot really be 100% accurate. I wish it were more like the chicken pox or something where you really only get it once...
Chicken Pox can then manifest as the Shingles later in life. I got my first Shingrix vaccination, will get the second late January.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: beersk on December 08, 2020, 12:28:33 pm

Chicken Pox can then manifest as the Shingles later in life. I got my first Shingrix vaccination, will get the second late January.
Yeah, I'm aware of that, my dad had shingles, said it really sucked. Hope I don't get it!
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on December 08, 2020, 07:34:40 pm
Chicken Pox sucked as a kid. Had one on my eye. Found some old old video my father happened to take back in the early 70's and I appear dead as I was lying in bed with CP.
Shingles sucked as an adult and I had a mild case which we caught early. You can get shingles multiple times as well. We are getting the first shingles vaccine in early January if all works out and the second in late March. Hopefully that will work out well to get the C-19 vaccine by summer.

If all goes well the distal bicep tendon repair is Friday.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Slowbrew on December 09, 2020, 05:25:07 am
Chicken Pox sucked as a kid. Had one on my eye. Found some old old video my father happened to take back in the early 70's and I appear dead as I was lying in bed with CP.
Shingles sucked as an adult and I had a mild case which we caught early. You can get shingles multiple times as well. We are getting the first shingles vaccine in early January if all works out and the second in late March. Hopefully that will work out well to get the C-19 vaccine by summer.

If all goes well the distal bicep tendon repair is Friday.

Good luck on the surgery!

I've had shingles twice and my bout with Chicken Pox as a kid was horrible.  My doctor has mentioned the vaccine a couple of times but never actually given it to me.  The same with a tetanus booster, took 10 years to to be given the shot (they last 35+ years, right?).  He just retired, we'll see what the new kid decides to do.

Just to clarify my earlier comments: I didn't intend to play down the virus but I see it could easily be read that way.  I was hoping to point out how much more prevalent it is in our world than a surprisingly large population of folks seem to believe.  I'll leave it at that.

Take care of yourselves and each other!

Paul
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on December 09, 2020, 07:55:13 am
Thanks! Looking forward to it actually.

Quick note about the tetanus shot. I had received boosters as needed since childhood. Had a cut on a foot which got infected and they asked about tetanus, but I could not recall the last booster. Got the shot and had an adverse reaction which is extremely rare. Every joint in my body ached and I had a very high fever. Took about 4 days for the fever to drop and a couple of weeks to get back to normal. Made the flu seems like a cakewalk and I had the flu in 2019 for the first time in 24 years and it was truly horrible.

As far as the bicep tear, it's rare too. 1.2 out of 100,000. Lucky me!
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Northern_Brewer on December 09, 2020, 11:31:43 am
I saw a few articles lately that speak to this. I am sorry I can%u2019t cite them. I believe both were in the NYTimes.

1. There is evidence that Covid got to the US much sooner than previously thought as in November December of 2019.

The earliest hard evidence is deaths in northern California on 6 and 17 February (https://www.sccgov.org/sites/covid19/Pages/press-release-04-21-20-early.aspx), confirmed by retrospective tests which found "SARS2 virus" - presumably genetic material. On average it's about 27 days from infection to death so that suggests infection around the 10 and 21 January give or take a week or so. Since by February they were testing people who had travelled to Wuhan, that suggests we can be pretty sure there was community transmission in Northern California by early January.

Previously the earliest US death had been thought to be one in Seattle on 26 February (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-52385558) (ie infected around 30 January) and the first confirmed test was on 19 January. There may well have been the odd one missed in February but given that there are direct flights from Wuhan to San Francisco you'd expect the Bay Area to be one of the first places it would show up. We can assume that the kind of people making 12 hour flights across the Pacific are younger and not typically in high-risk groups, but on the other hand Christmas is a perfect time for super-spreader events - lots of people crowding indoors, lots of hugging and singing, lots of interaction between younger people and the elderly etc.

Even with that in mind, from what we now know about death rates you'd be surprised if none of the first 100 infectees died, so if the first death really was 6 February then that suggests there were <100 infectees in the US as of ~10 January - and potentially as few as 10 or so if they were all old. So we're talking well within the scope of a single superspreader event - or perhaps more likely some circulation for a couple of weeks - but not months - before 10 January. So you can explain the observed death rates with just one infectee coming from Wuhan to San Francisco just before Christmas last year, maybe a US businessman coming back from a business trip, or someone coming from Wuhan to see family over Christmas.

So one doesn't need infections long before Christmas to explain the observed deaths - whereas if you are claiming a lot of infection well before Christmas then you need to demonstrate increased deaths which we don't see. Yes the odd one might be missed, but not the results of a widespread infection. And I suspect there's been quite a lot of testing of old samples to try and find virus in them - it's not easy to do always, but given the huge kudos of reporting something that rewrites the story then the fact that there's been no reports of virus in pre-Christmas samples suggests that it certainly wasn't common before Christmas.

Which brings us to the report I think you're talking about, Basavaraju et al (https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciaa1785/6012472) - the "antibodies in December" paper. The first thing to say is that any antibody evidence is indirect so you can never say anything definite with them - and cross-reactions are a real problem.

The second thing to say is that the authors themselves will only allow themselves the conclusion that their testing "suggests that the virus was present in the United States earlier than previously recognized" - they're not commiting to anything definite, just a "suggestion", and not a date, just "earlier". As they themselves say "These data might indicate that there is no clear delineation between potentially cross reactive specimens, and those that were obviously from SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals....The S1 subunit has been reported to be a more specific antigen for SARS-CoV-2 serologic diagnosis than the whole S protein"

So everyone got excited about the headline finding that 106 out of 7,389 samples had some kind of reaction with SARS2, but once you look into the detail it looks like ~56% of those were definitely cross-reactions, and just one had a reaction with SARS2 S1 subunit. So they think something's going on, but there's only one they feel really confident about :

"Collectively, these data suggest that at least some of the reactive blood donor sera could be due to prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. One serum, collected on January 10, 2020 in Connecticut, demonstrated a neutralization titer of 320, 6.75 signal to threshold ratio, and 70% inhibition activity by surrogate neutralization activity, but was Ortho S1 non-reactive. These data indicate that this donation was likely from an individual with a past or active SARS-CoV-2 infection."

No doubt in time we'll get a better feel for which patterns of antibodies come from SARS2 and which from infection with other coronaviruses. The one that was S1 positive is interesting - a sample from a 16-29yo man from Northern California, collected 13-16 December. Which far from disproving anything, is exactly consistent with the kind of conclusion we'd drawn from the pattern of deaths - and once it gets on a direct flight from Wuhan to SFO it can readily spread through the US.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: tommymorris on December 09, 2020, 12:00:00 pm
That seems like what I saw. I just misremembered the details.  I am not in healthcare. I think it is awesome they can do this type of investigative work.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Northern_Brewer on December 09, 2020, 11:41:45 pm
2. CDC antibody surveys around the US suggest about 100 million people have had Covid already. It is approaching 1/3 of the population. Unfortunately, that is not enough for herd immunity.

Another cheerful bit of data - Manaus in Brazil is pretty much the poster child for what happens if you do nothing about Covid, it didn't start slowing down there until 76% had had it. The one thing in their favour is a much younger population than is typical in the West, so a smaller percentage die, but I hate to think what their long Covid stats are like.

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/12/07/science.abe9728
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Cliffs on December 18, 2020, 09:51:25 am
The benefits of getting a vaccine are more than just dying or not dying. It may limit your spread or prevent you from getting seriously ill. Given that a lot of people have reported feeling awful for months, losing their sense of smell, and/or heart or lung damage (even among elite athletes), I can't imagine not getting vaccinated. The only downside I've heard is that some people have had a headache for a day or two.

I know Sweden has looked at where they're at in terms of herd immunity and determined that they're not even close. A few members of my homebrew club are in the hospital system here, and they've been seeing: staff on mandatory overtime for months, rising admissions, and staff only allowed to call in sick if they have a positive test and are symptomatic. I think deaths are going to rise over the next few weeks unfortunately.

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I can tell you that here in Albuquerque our hospitals have maxed out their ICU beds for COVID patient care and physicians are prepared to execute protocols for determining COVID patent care (or not) - meaning they are at the point of having to think about who gets a ventilator or more extreme life-saving measures and who gets ranked as less likely to respond to immediate intervention and therefore left without treatment that could be critical. Not a situation we want to be in. Whatever can be done to help start to get a better handle on this thing and bring our infection numbers down is worth considering, in my opinion. This is not just info I'm getting from the news, etc. - my wife is a nurse educator at the largest local healthcare system and so is getting this info passed on directly from those on the front lines.

My wifes grandfather is in the hospital with Covid, he contracted it at his nursing home. Due to icu capacity they have told us he will not be getting a ventilator or any extraordinary measures. He might die unnecessarily. To say I am angered and disappointed by my countries response to this pandemic is an understatement.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: ravenwater on December 18, 2020, 10:15:42 am
My wifes grandfather is in the hospital with Covid, he contracted it at his nursing home. Due to icu capacity they have told us he will not be getting a ventilator or any extraordinary measures. He might die unnecessarily. To say I am angered and disappointed by my countries response to this pandemic is an understatement.

So very sorry to hear this. There are many heartbreaking stories to be told regarding COVID infection and deaths. In my estimation you have every reason to be angry and distressed.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Steve Ruch on December 18, 2020, 03:22:09 pm
The benefits of getting a vaccine are more than just dying or not dying. It may limit your spread or prevent you from getting seriously ill. Given that a lot of people have reported feeling awful for months, losing their sense of smell, and/or heart or lung damage (even among elite athletes), I can't imagine not getting vaccinated. The only downside I've heard is that some people have had a headache for a day or two.

I know Sweden has looked at where they're at in terms of herd immunity and determined that they're not even close. A few members of my homebrew club are in the hospital system here, and they've been seeing: staff on mandatory overtime for months, rising admissions, and staff only allowed to call in sick if they have a positive test and are symptomatic. I think deaths are going to rise over the next few weeks unfortunately.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

I can tell you that here in Albuquerque our hospitals have maxed out their ICU beds for COVID patient care and physicians are prepared to execute protocols for determining COVID patent care (or not) - meaning they are at the point of having to think about who gets a ventilator or more extreme life-saving measures and who gets ranked as less likely to respond to immediate intervention and therefore left without treatment that could be critical. Not a situation we want to be in. Whatever can be done to help start to get a better handle on this thing and bring our infection numbers down is worth considering, in my opinion. This is not just info I'm getting from the news, etc. - my wife is a nurse educator at the largest local healthcare system and so is getting this info passed on directly from those on the front lines.

My wifes grandfather is in the hospital with Covid, he contracted it at his nursing home. Due to icu capacity they have told us he will not be getting a ventilator or any extraordinary measures. He might die unnecessarily. To say I am angered and disappointed by my countries response to this pandemic is an understatement.
[Edit] You're not alone.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: denny on December 18, 2020, 04:08:29 pm
Please keep this non political
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Steve Ruch on December 18, 2020, 08:21:27 pm
Please keep this non political
Fixed it.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: boulderbrewer on December 19, 2020, 10:10:43 am
 :o :o :o
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on January 05, 2021, 12:49:52 pm
My sister (57) received the Pfizer vaccine on 12/31. She works at a hospital. Second vaccine is scheduled 1/21. No issues other than a sore arm.

My mother and father both received the Moderna vaccine today after receiving a call from the county health department telling them they were eligible. They are 80 and 83. Their second vaccine is scheduled for 2/1. No issues to report thus far.

Looking forward to getting the vaccine as an essential worker. By my calculations in NC that will be at least May.

I still see people who are not taking the virus seriously because it hasn't affected them...yet. My aunt had it as did her elderly parents. Luckily all recovered. A HS classmate's mother and father contracted the virus. The mother is still recovering and the father died last week. I went to a rather small HS and two people who attended while I was there died in December from Covid. Three EMS I spoke with had Covid and two had to be hospitalized, luckily all recovered.

Stay safe all!
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: dmtaylor on January 05, 2021, 12:55:12 pm
My young cousin, a healthy young man of about age 18, recovered fine from COVID, but then a few weeks later developed significant long term chest pains / heart problems he never had before, had to be hospitalized for that for over a week -- not hospitalized due to the flu symptoms themselves, but due to after-effects from it.  He says it feels like a truck is parked on his chest, constant pain.  His doctors are saying it is COVID related.  They say he should be close to a full recovery within about 6 months or so, hope this is true.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Slowbrew on January 05, 2021, 02:00:41 pm
My young cousin, a healthy young man of about age 18, recovered fine from COVID, but then a few weeks later developed significant long term chest pains / heart problems he never had before, had to be hospitalized for that for over a week -- not hospitalized due to the flu symptoms themselves, but due to after-effects from it.  He says it feels like a truck is parked on his chest, constant pain.  His doctors are saying it is COVID related.  They say he should be close to a full recovery within about 6 months or so, hope this is true.

There is quite a bit of information being learned about the long term effects of COVID.  Cardiac damage is one of the big ones right now. 
Sorry to hear about his problems but happy the prognosis isn't too serious.  High performance athletes are seeing the same type of things.

Paul

Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: dmtaylor on January 05, 2021, 02:13:10 pm
My young cousin, a healthy young man of about age 18, recovered fine from COVID, but then a few weeks later developed significant long term chest pains / heart problems he never had before, had to be hospitalized for that for over a week -- not hospitalized due to the flu symptoms themselves, but due to after-effects from it.  He says it feels like a truck is parked on his chest, constant pain.  His doctors are saying it is COVID related.  They say he should be close to a full recovery within about 6 months or so, hope this is true.

There is quite a bit of information being learned about the long term effects of COVID.  Cardiac damage is one of the big ones right now. 
Sorry to hear about his problems but happy the prognosis isn't too serious.  High performance athletes are seeing the same type of things.

My cousin grew up and worked on the family farm his whole life.  He is very physically fit.  I wonder if there is some link.  Fortunately for me, if I catch the virus (which I don't intend to), I am very un-fit so maybe this won't happen to me!
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on January 05, 2021, 02:41:17 pm
A friend who has Covid posted this last night. I'm going to guess she is 58.

Quote
Friends - this virus is not fun!  Symptoms change daily!  Yesterday, I was queasy!  Today, I’ve coughed most of the day!  Eating food with no sense of taste or smell is really strange!  I’ve never paid so much attention to the consistency of food.  The fatigue is unreal and the day usually ends with a headache!
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Wilbur on January 05, 2021, 03:00:02 pm
Hope your cousin recovers, from the studies I've read it sounds like most recover after 12 weeks. Good news, but thats still a long time. Talked to a club member last night who still hasn't really fully recovered his sense of smell. He lost it sometime in November.

Glad to hear folks are having a good time with the vaccine, according to the estimator I've read there's only about 10.5 million in line ahead of me in my state!
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 06, 2021, 04:15:16 am
 ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: pikalika on January 06, 2021, 05:24:14 am
Man, I don't understand why it's taking so long to vaccinate people. Maybe we should homebrew our own vaccines?  ;D
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: BrewBama on January 06, 2021, 06:55:26 am
300 million people in US / 1 million doses per day (hopefully, maybe, someday) = 300 days. That’s ~ mid/late Oct if there are no hiccups and they reach that level of distribution.

I’ve been in many meetings with Gen Gus Perna when he was the AMC Commander here in Huntsville. He’s a smart guy and will hone in on bottlenecks and snafus, plug the holes, and move out. He has a [forceful] way of getting what he wants quickly.

Of course, they can’t give what they don’t have. Daily production has to exceed 1 million doses per day to keep up and I don’t think they’re producing to that volume yet.


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Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Slowbrew on January 06, 2021, 08:32:59 am
Man, I don't understand why it's taking so long to vaccinate people. Maybe we should homebrew our own vaccines?  ;D

I know you're kidding about this but keep in mind the companies are about 9 years ahead of the "normal" schedule for creating/approval/production of a vaccine.  The supply chain issues alone are probably daunting, much less the physical plants to actually do the production.  Moderna sold it's only production facility a couple of years ago due to financing issues.

It's a big job.  I hope the companies are up to it but this will still take a while.

Paul
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: pete b on January 06, 2021, 09:38:53 am
The speed of the development of the vaccine and apparently its effectiveness has been amazing. It seems that the implementation has suffered from a lack of central management. The feds have told states its your deal and the states have told municipalities its your deal. Lots of unused doses so far. I do think the states will work hard to figure this out and the rate of getting these into people will improve greatly in the coming weeks.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Wilbur on January 06, 2021, 09:57:49 am
This American Life has a interview with one of the scientists behind it. It's a pretty engaging listen. It's in the second half of the recording below.

https://www.thisamericanlife.org/727/boulder-v-hill (https://www.thisamericanlife.org/727/boulder-v-hill)
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 07, 2021, 04:55:16 am
My young cousin, a healthy young man of about age 18, recovered fine from COVID, but then a few weeks later developed significant long term chest pains / heart problems he never had before, had to be hospitalized for that for over a week -- not hospitalized due to the flu symptoms themselves, but due to after-effects from it.  He says it feels like a truck is parked on his chest, constant pain.  His doctors are saying it is COVID related.  They say he should be close to a full recovery within about 6 months or so, hope this is true.

What are his comorbidities? Overweight, eats processed food, drinks alcohol etc. What are they?
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Saccharomyces on January 09, 2021, 10:36:33 am
We need to remember that the virus does not kill you.  It causes an extreme immune response known as a "cytokine storm" that kills you.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: HopDen on January 09, 2021, 02:38:11 pm
We need to remember that the virus does not kill you.  It causes an extreme immune response known as a "cytokine storm" that kills you.

Can you expound on this? I looked up what a cytokine storm is and my take is that it is an excess inflammatory reaction. My co-worker who contracted C-19 at the same time as I did was hospitalized and part of his therapy was steroidal. Obviously there were other therapies used in conjunction with the steroids. Im just curious as to what extent of knowledge you have with this and if possible to explain more in depth in layman's terms for the less informed including myself.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: Wilbur on January 09, 2021, 04:01:52 pm
We need to remember that the virus does not kill you.  It causes an extreme immune response known as a "cytokine storm" that kills you.

Can you expound on this? I looked up what a cytokine storm is and my take is that it is an excess inflammatory reaction. My co-worker who contracted C-19 at the same time as I did was hospitalized and part of his therapy was steroidal. Obviously there were other therapies used in conjunction with the steroids. Im just curious as to what extent of knowledge you have with this and if possible to explain more in depth in layman's terms for the less informed including myself.
I'm not even remotely qualified to explain, but my understanding is that a small percent of those who die from covid-19 have cytokine storm. A cytokine storm is an autoimmune reaction where the body begins to attack itself. My understanding is blood clots or respiratory issues/pneumonia occurs. Steroids are sometimes used to minimize inflammation of the lungs and mitigate respiratory issues.

https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/study-respiratory-failure-in-covid-19-patients-usually-not-driven-by-cytokine-storm/

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Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on March 23, 2021, 06:40:57 am
Had my first dose of Moderna on Saturday and haven't grown a horn yet. Slightly disappointed as I was looking forward to using a dremel to carve designs it as it grew. Had I not had just a hint of arm soreness at the injection site I would have thought I hadn't had the injection at all. The band aid left marks on my skin, but not even a drop of blood where she put the shot.

I was worried about the potential for an allergic reaction so I signed up at our county health department office which is directly beside a hospital. Figured it was only a slight chance at best. The nurse admitting people into the room said they had seen 2 mild reactions out of the over 500 shots they have given at that location.

At the first check in the lady said I was getting the Madonna. While we laughed quite a bit at the statement together. In the back of my mind I kept thinking about what Guy Ritchie said. It was "like cuddling up to a piece of gristle." I was hoping I'd get Material Girl Madonna as opposed to 4 Minutes.  ;D
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: dmtaylor on March 23, 2021, 06:44:54 am
My first Moderna shot is scheduled for tomorrow.  Will be so happy when this is all over for me and for so many of us within about another 6 weeks (wait 4 weeks for next shot, then 2 weeks for full effectiveness).

Except in California and Illinois.   ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: BrewBama on March 23, 2021, 08:29:10 am
I am on three different lists.


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Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: dmtaylor on March 23, 2021, 08:38:20 am
I am on three different lists.

I was on four lists for a couple of weeks, but finally found the vaccine at a fifth place.  Don't give up, keep on looking.  I don't know when any of those others will call me if ever.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: denny on March 23, 2021, 08:41:23 am
Had my first Pfizer abkkut a week and a half ago.  Sore arm and kinda tired for about half a day the next day, but no big deal.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on March 23, 2021, 09:21:17 am
I am on three different lists.

My area is heavily populated so I had my doubts about getting an appointment. Tried Walgreens and that was a bust. Never was able to complete an appointment. Supposedly CVS just opened up. I tried a couple of hospitals and could not find anything open. Finally I decided to register with the County after seeing people report they had an appointment scheduled within 48 hours of registering. Sure enough within 48 hours I was able to set an appointment. Signed up with them on Tuesday night and my appointment was Saturday. I registered my wife a minute after I completed my registration and she was contacted about 72 hours later. Her shot is scheduled for later today.

I was looking at other options. Major clinics, other counties, etc. In our state the location you get the first shot dictates where and when you will receive the second. I didn't want to be more than 30 minutes from the house and also wanted to be in close proximity of a hospital.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: jeffy on March 23, 2021, 09:40:18 am
We got our second Pfizer shots three weeks ago.  A little sore arm for me, but my wife was sick for three days.
Now that it's done I'm getting calls a couple times a week to schedule.  It's not the most organized effort, but it is slowly happening. 
I wish everybody would get the shot so we can return to somewhat normal.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: tommymorris on March 23, 2021, 11:29:01 am
I am on three different lists.


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I have been able to find my wife and son spots at cvs.com.  As of just a few minutes ago they have spots in 3 cities
in Alabama. They only schedule 4 days in advance so when you see one it won’t be long to wait.

I was able to get my wife a spot in Huntsville and my son in Decatur. I got vaccinated through Huntsville Hospital a while back due teaching in person.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: pete b on March 23, 2021, 11:58:15 am
I don’t think I am eligible until April 19. I am not in a huge hurry as I am able to stay safe at home and at work and I have had some allergic reactions that have been a bit exciting for my taste. I am hoping that in a couple of months that I will be able to get the shot of my choice at the doctor’s office.
Title: Covid19
Post by: BrewBama on March 24, 2021, 07:49:21 am
I am on three different lists.


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I have been able to find my wife and son spots at cvs.com.  As of just a few minutes ago they have spots in 3 cities
in Alabama. They only schedule 4 days in advance so when you see one it won’t be long to wait.

I was able to get my wife a spot in Huntsville and my son in Decatur. I got vaccinated through Huntsville Hospital a while back due teaching in person.
I read an article on the local news site which said N AL citizens are flocking to S TN for the shot. In the article an official from the TN Health Dept said the vaccine is a Federal program so no residency restrictions are placed on patients.

So, I looked at the two TN counties just N of us (Lincoln and Franklin). Lincoln is only offering 2nd doses but Franklin is offering 1st doses. They had plenty of appointments.

So, I signed us up for Tuesday. We’ll drive ~45 minutes but that’s OK.


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Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: tommymorris on March 24, 2021, 08:09:32 am
I am on three different lists.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I have been able to find my wife and son spots at cvs.com.  As of just a few minutes ago they have spots in 3 cities
in Alabama. They only schedule 4 days in advance so when you see one it won’t be long to wait.

I was able to get my wife a spot in Huntsville and my son in Decatur. I got vaccinated through Huntsville Hospital a while back due teaching in person.
I read an article on the local news site which said N AL citizens are flocking to S TN for the shot. In the article an official from the TN Health Dept said the vaccine is a Federal program so no residency restrictions are placed on patients.

So, I looked at the two TN counties just N of us (Lincoln and Franklin). Lincoln is only offering 2nd doses but Franklin is offering 1st doses. They had plenty of appointments.

So, I signed us up for Tuesday. We’ll drive ~45 minutes but that’s OK.


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Awesome! Good find.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: MDixon on March 24, 2021, 09:32:45 am

So, I signed us up for Tuesday. We’ll drive ~45 minutes but that’s OK.


Excellent! Sometimes you have to think outside the box. We only had to go 13 miles, but it takes 30 minutes to get there.

I got Moderna on Saturday and my next appointment is April 17. My wife got Pfizer yesterday and her next appointment is April 13. As a data point I barely knew I received a shot. Her arm is tender today and hurt when she slept on that side last night.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 24, 2021, 10:19:09 am
I was offered to have a clinic at the brewery. I told them to f##k off.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: denny on March 24, 2021, 11:07:56 am
I was offered to have a clinic at the brewery. I told them to f##k off.

Why not do a community service that would ultimately benefit you?
Title: Covid19
Post by: BrewBama on March 24, 2021, 11:48:48 am
+1

While a community service would be a plus, it could be an investment in future earnings with the advertising as well: Opening the doors to a clinic could attract people that might not otherwise visit. Once they see its a nice place with regular folks working there, they see the drink and food selection or entertainment lineup (menu and calendar handout along with the vaccine information), a portion may be inclined to come back as customers.

Call the local news and offer a press release and have them come down and film a story in the brewery while they’re giving shots. ...and when they interview the owner don’t forget to mention the Easter Egg hunt the afternoon of 4 Apr or Independence Day celebration Jul 4th, or trivia night, or the book club......


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Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 24, 2021, 11:59:49 am
I refuse to have vaccinations in my life, having lost a couple family members because of vaccinations with minimal recourse.  I'm not going to be responsible when they all start dropping dead, no way.

I would hold healthy eating and living classes. Funny nobody is talking about that, but that is another topic for another day and probably not here either.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: BrewBama on March 24, 2021, 12:07:21 pm
... Funny nobody is talking about that, but that is another topic for another day and probably not here either.

If you wanna talk about it start a thread. I know several of the regulars here practice a healthy lifestyle. Y’all might teach the rest of us something.


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Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: denny on March 24, 2021, 12:19:11 pm
I refuse to have vaccinations in my life, having lost a couple family members because of vaccinations with minimal recourse.  I'm not going to be responsible when they all start dropping dead, no way.

I would hold healthy eating and living classes. Funny nobody is talking about that, but that is another topic for another day and probably not here either.

OTOH, I've had many vaccines, including COVID, and I'm still alive....likely because of them.  I prefer science.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: boulderbrewer on March 24, 2021, 12:30:23 pm
Great for you! It makes you and all other vaccine takers a better person than me. I can live with that.
Title: Re: Covid19
Post by: denny on March 24, 2021, 12:37:57 pm
Great for you! It makes you and all other vaccine takers a better person than me. I can live with that.

No it doesn't.  And I think it's time to close this thread.