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General Category => Ingredients => Topic started by: HopDen on February 19, 2021, 04:03:45 PM

Title: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: HopDen on February 19, 2021, 04:03:45 PM
Let's talk water. I don't brew ales often and I'm definitely not used to using such a high sulfate addition. So here I am for my water.

AmPaleAle: 12gal RO mash water
                  89% Pale Ale
                  6% C60
                  5% Victory

To add: 8.61g CaSO4
            3.3g MgSO4
            4.15g CaCL2
            1.5g Sea Salt (I always add some sea salt to my recipes)

This should equate to Ca 73ppm
                                Mg 8ppm
                                Na 36ppm
                                SO4 143ppm
                                CL 69ppm

The Sulfate to Chloride ratio is 2.1 and the balance is bitter.

Does this seem correct for a AmPaleAle?
Criticism is welcome!
                               
                 
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: denny on February 19, 2021, 04:37:00 PM
Looks good to me
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: goose on February 19, 2021, 04:37:28 PM
The sulfate sounds about right and the SO4/Cl seems about right.
I have more sulfate in my IPA's up to 200 ppm and the beer tastes good with a nice crisp hoppiness just to give you an idea.   I designed my own water profile for IPA rather than using one from Bru'n Water.  Since I am not home I don't remember the ratio of SO4/Cl.

I hope Martin will chime in on this as well with his observations.
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: denny on February 19, 2021, 04:38:39 PM
IMO, ratios are a canard.  I adjust by numbers.
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: ynotbrusum on February 19, 2021, 05:09:32 PM
Ratios are not perfect, nor are absolute numbers, except that I have found that you can get to "alka seltzer" quickly if you get too heavy handed.  These numbers seem fine for a 5 gallon batch, but mine would be dialed back a bit for my tastes.  Maybe 6 g CaSO4 and 3 g CaCl2.  Of course many APA's are now pushing IPA hoppiness, so it just depends on what you are shooting for...  In any event, you are in the ballpark and can adjust as you desire on your next beer.
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: HopDen on February 19, 2021, 06:15:48 PM
Ratios are not perfect, nor are absolute numbers, except that I have found that you can get to "alka seltzer" quickly if you get too heavy handed.  These numbers seem fine for a 5 gallon batch, but mine would be dialed back a bit for my tastes.  Maybe 6 g CaSO4 and 3 g CaCl2.  Of course many APA's are now pushing IPA hoppiness, so it just depends on what you are shooting for...  In any event, you are in the ballpark and can adjust as you desire on your next beer.

My fault, should have said it is a 18 gallon batch size.
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: ynotbrusum on February 19, 2021, 06:36:38 PM
Well alright, then!  Now you are in the ranges I use.  I know others prefer more sulfate to make the hops pop for them, so I don't take issue with that, when suggested, but your range now is what I prefer using RO as the start.

Brew On!
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: mabrungard on February 20, 2021, 12:12:18 AM
In my experience, 100 ppm sulfate is not sufficient in a pale ale. 200 ppm is pretty good in a pale ale and not overpowering. 300 ppm is a nice level for those that like the pale ale style.

The good thing is that you can check the effect of sulfate content in your glass after brewing a beer. I’d say that the proposed 150 ppm level is a good starting point that won’t be too drying. It will allow the brewer to test the effect of higher sulfate. A thin pinch of gypsum powder mixed into a pint of the beer will add about 100 ppm sulfate. If that doctored beer is more pleasing, then you’ll know where your sulfate preferences lay. Do be aware that a beer’s bittering level might need to be reduced slightly as the sulfate content is increased.
Title: Re: Water for AmPaleAle
Post by: HopDen on February 20, 2021, 02:13:59 PM
In my experience, 100 ppm sulfate is not sufficient in a pale ale. 200 ppm is pretty good in a pale ale and not overpowering. 300 ppm is a nice level for those that like the pale ale style.

The good thing is that you can check the effect of sulfate content in your glass after brewing a beer. I’d say that the proposed 150 ppm level is a good starting point that won’t be too drying. It will allow the brewer to test the effect of higher sulfate. A thin pinch of gypsum powder mixed into a pint of the beer will add about 100 ppm sulfate. If that doctored beer is more pleasing, then you’ll know where your sulfate preferences lay. Do be aware that a beer’s bittering level might need to be reduced slightly as the sulfate content is increased.

Sounds good! I will proceed with what I have and work up if I need too.

Thanks for the input Martin.