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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: violaleebrews on September 09, 2010, 01:55:42 AM

Title: brewing application etiquette
Post by: violaleebrews on September 09, 2010, 01:55:42 AM
I'm strongly considering applying to a few local commercial breweries and am wondering if there is an etiquette regarding passing along a couple examples of what I'm capable of.  I LOVE sharing my beer with friends and family, but in a professional setting I don't want to be too overbearing.  My wife suggested I bring them and keep them in the car just in case you get to a point where they might be useful.

Any thoughts? 
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: tschmidlin on September 09, 2010, 02:58:40 AM
I don't work for a brewery or anything, but I think bringing them beers is the right thing to do.  You can be unobtrusive about it and keep them in a backpack/shoulder bag or whatever, but if someone came to me looking for a brewing job and brewed at home I would expect to get a sample, and I'd want to talk to you about it while we shared it.  I can't imagine any similar interviewer wouldn't want to have a taste.

Unless of course your beer is crap, then leave it at home. :)
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 11:54:26 AM
I would handle it totally differently. Rather than bring them some of your beer to show what you can do, go volunteer to clean out the mash tun, mop floors, clean kegs. Ask for a part time job helping the brewers (don't expect much money). Compliment the head brewer on his/her beers. Ask a few questions on what they do during the process to get their beer right. You might mention you are a homebrewer, but don't make a show of trying to get them you beer at first. Then, after you have gotten to know the group a bit ask if they would mind sampling your beer.

Remember that there's already a head brewer there that will be pretty proud (hopefully) of his or her beers, as will most other folks around him. So you don't want to come off "cocky" like you think you are going to walk in and blow them away with your beer. Get to know the people, and especially the brewer(s), and then they will be much more likely to give you both honest feedback and, perhaps, a chance to showcase your skills.

Now, that said, if the brewery is totally or mostly incompetent you might handle it a different way. But you might also be getting in way over your head. While the brewing process is essentially the same the tools pro-brewers use, the sanitation methods and the volumes they handle are quite different. If they have problems with their beer there is a good chance they are just going to turn around and brew your recipe with the same flaws in tact.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: Mikey on September 09, 2010, 12:12:50 PM
I agree with your wife. Leave some cold beers in the car and if the opportunity presents itself, bring them in.

As for doing manual work to get a job, that’s up to you, but I wouldn’t do it. If I was applying for a management position in my field of expertise, I certainly wouldn’t offer to clean the restrooms, in hopes of getting hired.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: dhacker on September 09, 2010, 12:21:52 PM
I agree with Keith on the methodology. Even if your skills DO eclipse those of the people working at the brewery, you have zero chance of employment if you make a point to prove that. .even in an amiable way.

What most people are looking for these days is a reliable, conscientious, butt busting worker who they can count on for whatever they might need. The higher rungs on the ladder will come in time.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 12:22:00 PM
I agree with your wife. Leave some cold beers in the car and if the opportunity presents itself, bring them in.

As for doing manual work to get a job, that’s up to you, but I wouldn’t do it. If I was applying for a management position in my field of expertise, I certainly wouldn’t offer to clean the restrooms, in hopes of getting hired.

Field of expertise eh?  :D Seriously - we are talking HOMEBREWING here. No offense meant to anyone here but we may be experts at HOMEBREWING - but few people here know much, if anything, about professional brewing. And if you think you are going to walk in and start designing recipes and manning the control panel while the head brewer goes off to clean kegs (or the restroom) you are seriously fooling yourself.

You have to start somewhere. And, like it or not, cleaning MTs and kegs - and even restrooms - is all part of what a brewer does. You CLEAN! EVERYDAY!
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 12:23:26 PM

What most people are looking for these days is a reliable, conscientious, butt busting worker who they can count on for whatever they might need. The higher rungs on the ladder will come in time.

Absolutely! And that goes for any field. The problem with kids these days coming into the work force is they think they deserve to start with a corner office job.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: theDarkSide on September 09, 2010, 12:25:22 PM

And if you think you are going to walk in and start designing recipes and manning the control panel while the head brewer goes off to clean kegs you are seriously fooling yourself.

You have to start somewhere. And, like it or not, cleaning MTs and kegs - and even restrooms - is all part of what a brewer does. You CLEAN! EVERYDAY!

Thanks for shattering my dream...next thing you're going to tell me is that brewers don't get paid insane amounts of money  ;)
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 12:28:39 PM
Luckily the women come easy though.  :P
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: Mikey on September 09, 2010, 12:37:27 PM
Quote
No offense meant to anyone here but we may be experts at HOMEBREWING - but few people here know much, if anything, about professional brewing.

True, but there's a big difference in brewing, on any level, and doing grunt work. Just because you know how to clean a mashtun, that doesn't mean you know how to brew. There is such a thing as selling yourself short.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 12:41:24 PM
Quote
No offense meant to anyone here but we may be experts at HOMEBREWING - but few people here know much, if anything, about professional brewing.

True, but there's a big difference in brewing, on any level, and doing grunt work.

Mikey - brewing is grunt work. You obviously have never been in a professional brewery before. The head brewer is running around cleaning kegs, cleaning restrooms, mopping floors, cleaning more kegs, cleaning out the mash tun, cleaning more kegs, cleaning fittings, cleaning fermenters, cleaning more kegs.

Its not all glamour and escort girls and dom perignon.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: dak0415 on September 09, 2010, 12:48:26 PM
Quote
No offense meant to anyone here but we may be experts at HOMEBREWING - but few people here know much, if anything, about professional brewing.

True, but there's a big difference in brewing, on any level, and doing grunt work. Just because you know how to clean a mashtun, that doesn't mean you know how to brew. There is such a thing as selling yourself short.

Aw c'mon' mikey, 90%+ of brewing is grunt work on ANY level.  That's why we have 4 fermenters and 8 kegs sitting waiting to be cleaned and sanitized.  Or is that just me?

Keith, just wondering, all this starting a new brewery and all, you still have time to post?  Or is there a cash prize for outposting Denny?
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 12:51:49 PM
Dave - I haven't been posting much lately but I hurt my back yesterday unloading 4000 lbs of grain and am waiting for the advil to kick in before I go into work. Wish I had some grunt to have helped me unload that.  :P
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: Mikey on September 09, 2010, 12:52:29 PM
I’ve been to plenty of professional breweries and spent a lot of time talking to the head brewer of one. Yes, I’ve seen him with a hose in his and brooms, etc. However, if I was hiring someone, I could be fairly certain that he/she could learn to clean. What I want to know is if that person knows something about sanitation, the handling of yeast, etc. Having them present  me with a nice home brew would prove to me that they know something about brewing, other than cleaning mash tuns.

Should he expect to walk into a head brewers position, no and I think don’t any of us would expect that. However, I still think his wife’s advice was spot on. Take some homebrew with you. Even if you don’t get the job or have a chance to give it to them, you have something to drink in the parking lot while you reflect on your interview.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 12:54:54 PM
Well, as part-owner of a small brewery, and the head brewer, I will tell you that I am not interested in brewing your recipe. I'm also not really interested in tasting your beer until I see you clean out the MT a few times.  ;)
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: Mikey on September 09, 2010, 01:18:15 PM
Well, as part-owner of a small brewery, and the head brewer, I will tell you that I am not interested in brewing your recipe. I'm also not really interested in tasting your beer until I see you clean out the MT a few times.  ;)

Well, that’d work out well, because I would have desire to work for anyone that is only interested in my cleaning skills.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 01:25:28 PM
Well, as part-owner of a small brewery, and the head brewer, I will tell you that I am not interested in brewing your recipe. I'm also not really interested in tasting your beer until I see you clean out the MT a few times.  ;)

Well, that’d work out well, because I would have desire to work for anyone that is only interested in my cleaning skills.

I'm just not sure why you don't get it. Cleaning skills are what most pro-brewers are interested in. And if you are going to work at a brewery your are going to start at the bottom - unless you start the business yourself. Its simply not that complex. You clean. Why would a head brewer hire someone who brings him their homebrew, no matter how great it is, for the assistant brewer position, when there are probably 2 or 3 other guys that have been scrubbing floors for several months and who probably know how the place is run?

Regardless, I'm glad you don't want the job because the guy who literally helped me for at least 60 hours or more of free work during construction is the first guy in line for the job - and he knows nothing about brewing. But he has earned the job. Plus, I'm not sure I like your attitude.  :P ;)

I'll excuse myself from the discussion now because I have 40 kegs to clean.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: theDarkSide on September 09, 2010, 01:29:44 PM
Dave - I haven't been posting much lately but I hurt my back yesterday unloading 4000 lbs of grain and am waiting for the advil to kick in before I go into work. Wish I had some grunt to have helped me unload that.  :P

You know you can unload them 1 sack at a time.. ;)  Hope the back gets better.  No go find yourself a grunt.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: Mikey on September 09, 2010, 01:34:05 PM
Sorry, I was just expressing my views just as you have. Didn’t realize that I had an “attitude”.  Also, I never even mentioned recipes or about asking anyone to brew them.  That  would certainly be very arrogant in an interview.

Now that I know you are a head brewer, I can see why you might feel strange about hiring anyone with actual brewing knowledge. You obviously want your recipes and skills to shine above all others.  That’s not my management type, but I’ve known many managers like that. FWIW I have no desire to have anything to do with professional brewing. I’m merely basing my views on my management experience in far different areas.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 01:38:45 PM


Now that I know you are a head brewer, I can see why you might feel strange about hiring anyone with actual brewing knowledge. You obviously want your recipes and skills to shine above all others

You really, really just don't get it. Or you simply refuse to.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: Mikey on September 09, 2010, 01:40:02 PM
I guess not, because I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about. However, I do know something about hiring professionals.

However, this is going no where, so I bid farewell.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: phillamb168 on September 09, 2010, 02:01:57 PM
I'm not sure if there's 100% parallel between the two, but I'd think the standard way of getting an 'in' in restaurants would work for brewing, too: become a stagiere. Basically you work for free, bust your ass doing whatever they'll let you do, and let them understand that you want to learn as much as you can. Once they get to know you, I'd say go ahead and talk up your homebrewing skills. If you don't get a job out of the deal, you'll at least have gained enough hands-on experience that you can open your own brewery.

Re bringing beer to the interview, I'd recommend against it. It's like a first date - keep something in reserve for the next time so they WANT to see you again. In this case, if they seem interested in general, say "I'd like to stop by sometime to get your opinion of my homebrews, if you don't mind." Now you've got a second chance to convince them of your awesomeness, and the guys will appreciate that you value their opinion. If they're not interested, at least you haven't let a 6-pack go skanky.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: denny on September 09, 2010, 03:52:03 PM
I agree with your wife. Leave some cold beers in the car and if the opportunity presents itself, bring them in.

As for doing manual work to get a job, that’s up to you, but I wouldn’t do it. If I was applying for a management position in my field of expertise, I certainly wouldn’t offer to clean the restrooms, in hopes of getting hired.

If you've known anyone who's gotten a job in a brewery, starting at the bottom is usually the way it's done.  99% of the people I know who work in the industry started that way.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: bluesman on September 09, 2010, 04:07:12 PM
Unfortunately it's like the school of hard knocks.  You start out at the bottom and work your way up.  It's the way of the world.

This is a memorable movie quote...that I find to be alot like the real world.

"Kung Fu" Pilot (1972)

Master Po: Do you hear the grasshopper that is at your feet?
Young Caine: [looking down and seeing the insect] Old man, how is it that you hear these things?
Master Po: Young man, how is it that you do not?

Master Po: What do you hear?
Caine: I hear the grasshopper.

Master Kan: Quickly as you can, snatch the pebble from my hand.
[Young Caine tries to do so and fails]
Master Kan: When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

 8)
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: svejk on September 09, 2010, 04:10:08 PM
While I don't work in the industry, I have had a lot of interactions with commercial brewers over the years (including brewing with one as part of the GABF Pro-Am competition).  I have found that there is a high level of interest in homebrewing among commercial brewers because a good number of them started out homebrewing themselves.  I wouldn't go in with any expectations that a brewer is going to want to brew your recipe, but I think your wife's advice is solid.  Leave a few beers in a cooler in the car, and if the opportunity presents itself, offer to share some homebrew.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: tschmidlin on September 09, 2010, 04:14:57 PM
I guess people just have different images of the type of job they're applying for.  When one of the local brewpubs lost the brewer a few years back (he moved) they put out a call for applications, no professional brewing experience necessary, they would hire homebrewers.  I would certainly expect those applicants with no history to bring samples.

If I was the head brewer and a homebrewer was applying for the assistant brewer position (which is the bottom rung at most of the breweries in my area, if the head brewer is fortunate enough to even have an assistant) I would want to sample their beer and talk to them about their process, see if they could critically evaluate their own beer.  You can tell if someone has at least some clue about sanitization if you taste their beer - if they bring you a sample that is clearly infected you know first, that they screwed up the process somewhere along the way, and second that they don't have a half decent palette if they are sharing this with anyone except as an example of what not to do or asking what went wrong.

Brewing can be taught, so can cleaning so I wouldn't require an applicant be a homebrewer or have experience brewing.  You obviously want a hard worker and someone who takes pride in their work and wants to do the best they can.  It also helps if they like beer and are interested in the process, and those types of people will probably have at least tried to brew at home.  I think there are good reasons for bringing a sample, and if there are a slew of applicants it is something that can set one apart.

And Keith, just because I bring you a sample doesn't mean I expect you to brew it.  Who says I'd even give you the recipe? ;)  It also doesn't mean that I think my beer is better than yours, and if someone came in with that attitude then don't hire them (unless they're right, then maybe you should think about it).  To me it's just about sharing a beer and a love of beer, and if a homebrewer doesn't want to share their beer then it seems to me it probably isn't very good and they're not interested in making it better.

But that's just me.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: maxieboy on September 09, 2010, 04:32:00 PM
  Leave a few beers in a cooler in the car, and if the opportunity presents itself, offer to share some homebrew.

This.

 I worked in a LHBS(that is part of a microbrewery) and was always giving samples of my homebrew to the production manager. When the brewers position was going to open up, he wanted me for the position.. Ultimately, I didn't go for it(changed careers), but those samples absolutely paved the way. My brews showed him that I had a solid grasp on sanitation and the brewing process.
Bring the beers...
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: glitterbug on September 09, 2010, 04:37:34 PM
Its not all glamour and escort girls and dom perignon.

Is it glamour and escort girls and dom perignon beer? ;D
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: maxieboy on September 09, 2010, 04:52:12 PM
Its not all glamour and escort girls and dom perignon.

Is it glamour and escort girls and dom perignon beer? ;D

It's glamour and escort girls and dom perignon beer and hard work.  :)
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: euge on September 09, 2010, 06:00:55 PM
Sure bring the beer. But as previously stated it doesn't hurt to state that you have personal brewing experience, but emphasize your excellent work ethic, eagerness to learn and supreme desire to help brew HIS/HER product the way he/she wants it done. Unlikely you'll be teaching them anything new so the home experience aspect is a good, but not a ticket in.

If the opportunity arises share your brew- more as an example that you understand the process. Don't divulge that it was a Cooper's kit... ;)

Most importantly, bring some humility along to back up that bravado. In my field of expertise a somewhat experienced egotistical colleague with just barely a year in got herself sidelined by being too cocky with the management. Recently, when she desperately needed a transfer- she ultimately didn't get the job; her position was filled by a new hire and she now works about 7 hours filling in a hole here or there. I think they expected her to quit...

What does that have to do with getting an entry level job in a brewery? I think many would prefer to train and mold their new hires, whereas "experience" can sometimes bring discord to the workplace depending on personality. So come to the interview ready to work immediately.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 08:21:28 PM
Quote from: euge
link=topic=3667.msg41726#msg41726 date=1284055255

Most importantly, bring some humility along to back up that bravado.

This is really all I was saying. That, and brewing small scale doesn't necessarily compare to brewing larger scale. Don't expect to walk in there and run the place because you brew kick ass homebrew. Start at the bottom. Because no matter how good a brewer you are you probably don't know jack about running a professional brewery. I'm just starting up as a pro-brewer, and I am amazed at how much I still have to learn.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 09, 2010, 08:44:40 PM
I guess people just have different images of the type of job they're applying for.  When one of the local brewpubs lost the brewer a few years back (he moved) they put out a call for applications, no professional brewing experience necessary, they would hire homebrewers.  I would certainly expect those applicants with no history to bring samples.

If I was the head brewer and a homebrewer was applying for the assistant brewer position (which is the bottom rung at most of the breweries in my area, if the head brewer is fortunate enough to even have an assistant) I would want to sample their beer and talk to them about their process, see if they could critically evaluate their own beer.  You can tell if someone has at least some clue about sanitization if you taste their beer - if they bring you a sample that is clearly infected you know first, that they screwed up the process somewhere along the way, and second that they don't have a half decent palette if they are sharing this with anyone except as an example of what not to do or asking what went wrong.

Brewing can be taught, so can cleaning so I wouldn't require an applicant be a homebrewer or have experience brewing.  You obviously want a hard worker and someone who takes pride in their work and wants to do the best they can.  It also helps if they like beer and are interested in the process, and those types of people will probably have at least tried to brew at home.  I think there are good reasons for bringing a sample, and if there are a slew of applicants it is something that can set one apart.

And Keith, just because I bring you a sample doesn't mean I expect you to brew it.  Who says I'd even give you the recipe? ;)  It also doesn't mean that I think my beer is better than yours, and if someone came in with that attitude then don't hire them (unless they're right, then maybe you should think about it).  To me it's just about sharing a beer and a love of beer, and if a homebrewer doesn't want to share their beer then it seems to me it probably isn't very good and they're not interested in making it better.

But that's just me.

Tom. I agree with you - if the brewer has a call for applicants - absolutely bring beer! I took it to mean a "cold call" on the brewery owner from the OP. In that case, no, I probably would not bring beer to the first meeting but would do as I mentioned above. You work for the place a week or two, help huff a few kegs in and out of the cold room, and people will be dying to try your beer.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: tschmidlin on September 09, 2010, 10:28:18 PM
Tom. I agree with you - if the brewer has a call for applicants - absolutely bring beer! I took it to mean a "cold call" on the brewery owner from the OP. In that case, no, I probably would not bring beer to the first meeting but would do as I mentioned above. You work for the place a week or two, help huff a few kegs in and out of the cold room, and people will be dying to try your beer.
I figured we'd agree when we talked in enough detail to know we were talking about the same thing.  Because if it's a cold call like you're picturing then bringing beer and expecting them to drool is probably going to be the wrong attitude for most people.  If you're showing up at the door uninvited and unknown then your work ethic should be front and foremost, not your beer, IMO.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: wfaris on September 09, 2010, 10:31:05 PM
A few years ago out in Boulder, Colorado I met one of the assistant brewers of one of the smaller breweries there.  In the process of sampling a few beers with him I found out that they would be looking for another assistant brewer soon.  As I was somewhat interested in applying I asked if I could get a tour of the place, not telling him that I was thinking of applying.  When I showed up at the brewery the next day he apologized and said he really didn't have time to do a tour since they had an unexpected deadline to get a bunch of beer packaged.  He then asked if I wanted to help on the bottling line and we could talk while working.

That couple of hours of volunteer work was quite informative.  I found out the usual stuff, history, types of beers they make, general process, etc.  In addition, and more important, the approach the head brewer had to brewing, water treatment, yeast handling, recipe development and such.  Also I learned from the other brewers what it was like to work for the guy.  

Basically, I interviewed the brewery and determined that I did not want to work for them even though the other brewers encouraged me to apply for the job.  Doing this type of research on the workplace can be just as important as how you handle yourself when they interview you.  There is an old saying, "Be careful of what you wish for..."

Wayne
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: tschmidlin on September 09, 2010, 10:33:44 PM
Basically, I interviewed the brewery and determined that I did not want to work for them even though the other brewers encouraged me to apply for the job.  Doing this type of research on the workplace can be just as important as how you handle yourself when they interview you.  There is an old saying, "Be careful of what you wish for..."
I totally agree Wayne, no matter what type of job you are applying for.  When you go for an interview, remember to interview them as well to find out if it is the type of place you'd like to work.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: MrNate on September 09, 2010, 11:38:12 PM
3 pages and nobody mentioned how critical it is to not wear pants? What is this forum coming to?
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: violaleebrews on September 10, 2010, 01:55:02 AM
awesome!  you guys just made my aha membership worthwhile!  thanks to all those who replied with regards to my question.

for the record, i wasn't expecting any headbrewer to give a damn about my recipies, i just want to be able to show them that i know what i'm doing on my own.  also, i wouldn't apply to a brewery and expect to be above any of the crew who has been breaking their backs for months or years before me.  any large or small brewery with any credibility has a head brewer who know his stuff and isn't looking to me for answers.  i'm only looking to be a part of the process.  I LOVE BREWING!  right now i'm a part of the process of making dental cabinetry!  woohoo!  yeah... not very exciting.  being some part, as integral as it may be, of the brewing process is more appealing to me than what i'm doing right now.  i know to come in to the interview with humility and it's always good to be reminded.  i have already taken some vacation days from my current job to work for free with one of the local brewers just to learn because i love brewing and everything about it, even the cleaning and more cleaning... and more cleaning.

so, it sounds like my wife had some good advice by bringing some brews just in case there is an outside chance that they might come into play. 

i'd rather have them and not need them than need them and not have them.

thanks again, and keep on brewing!

cheers

JT
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: rabid_dingo on September 10, 2010, 03:24:49 AM
3 pages and nobody mentioned how critical it is to not wear pants? What is this forum coming to?

Aaaaaah LOL...How did we miss this?!?!
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: tschmidlin on September 10, 2010, 03:25:40 AM
3 pages and nobody mentioned how critical it is to not wear pants? What is this forum coming to?

Aaaaaah LOL...How did we miss this?!?!
I think it was just a given . . .
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 10, 2010, 12:05:41 PM

so, it sounds like my wife had some good advice by bringing some brews just in case there is an outside chance that they might come into play. 

i'd rather have them and not need them than need them and not have them.



I totally agree and guess I just misunderstood your intention from the beginning. If you are actually going to an interview bring some beers along, and leave them in the car in case it comes up. Which it very well might.
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: violaleebrews on September 11, 2010, 01:14:28 PM
my wife is full of wisdom.  she's like Buddha.  still not sure why she married me.    ;) 

she'll also make sure that i'm wearing pants!
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: majorvices on September 11, 2010, 01:16:28 PM
What a catch!  ;) Good luck with your endeavor!
Title: Re: brewing application etiquette
Post by: chriskennedy on September 13, 2010, 04:08:18 PM
Don't bring beer if it sucks.  If your beer rocks, I can't imagine that EVER hurting you, and I can definitely imagine it helping you.  If a brewery doesn't hire you because you brought them good homebrew, you definitely do not want to work for them anyway.

I got my first brewing gig based on a liquid resume. 

But seriously, be pretty sure that your beer is good before you bring it to a brewer hoping to get a job.