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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: KRISTI on September 28, 2021, 07:17:41 pm

Title: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: KRISTI on September 28, 2021, 07:17:41 pm
Let’s Talk Books!

I’ve produced 27 books since I became publisher at Brewers Publications and many title ideas have come from our homebrewing community! As I plan for the future, I’m interested to know if there are subjects that you would like to dive into more deeply? What will help you on the next step of your brewing journey? What do you feel would help you improve your processes, techniques, or understanding? What resource are you missing in your library?

In your opinion, what are up-and-coming trends or styles? What do you want to know more about that falls into the category of fermentation? What brewers/writers would you like to learn more from?

Finally, if you have enjoyed any Brewers Publications books, I’d like to encourage you to leave a positive review on Amazon, Goodreads, Bookshop, etc. Reviews can improve our standing in search results and help our authors (and BP) be recommended more often when customers need guidance.

Please drop me a line and share your input directly with me or note your ideas below. I look forward to hearing from you and appreciate your support of Brewers Publications!

Cheers,
Kristi Switzer
Publisher, Brewers Publications
kristi@brewersassociation.org
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: erockrph on September 29, 2021, 12:58:33 am
I do all my "reading" on Audible nowadays. If BP released their books in audio format I'd snap them all up. Many of the authors are very well-spoken and would be great narrators as well.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: dmtaylor on September 29, 2021, 01:34:10 am
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH.  We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.

We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.

And give me some good German lager.

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

Thanks for the opportunity.  Cheers.
Title: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: tommymorris on September 29, 2021, 02:00:54 am
What about stories and biographies? I personally don’t want math or science. I do that at work. I also don’t want recipes. I get those for free here. But, I bet there’s a lot of stories to be told.

PS. I’ll take my stories on Audible, please ;)
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: HighVoltageMan! on September 29, 2021, 11:34:18 am
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH.  We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.

We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.

And give me some good German lager.

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

Thanks for the opportunity.  Cheers.
I agree. Most books are written for beginners or intermediate brewers. I find myself reading more white papers on studies done for the professional brewing industries on different aspects of brewing to learn more about brewing. I find more information put out by professional outlets like Master Brewers Association than from home brewing sources. Something other than the basic subjects covered in greater depth would be nice. I like the idea of historical and biographies too, but I'm looking more for advanced techniques, science and processes. German beers in depth.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: hmbrw4life on September 29, 2021, 01:00:15 pm
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH.  We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.

We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.

And give me some good German lager.

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

Thanks for the opportunity.  Cheers.
I agree. Most books are written for beginners or intermediate brewers. I find myself reading more white papers on studies done for the professional brewing industries on different aspects of brewing to learn more about brewing. I find more information put out by professional outlets like Master Brewers Association than from home brewing sources. Something other than the basic subjects covered in greater depth would be nice. I like the idea of historical and biographies too, but I'm looking more for advanced techniques, science and processes. German beers in depth.

Uhh, like beyond this?

https://www.themodernbrewhouse.com/list-of-brewing-references/
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 29, 2021, 02:36:53 pm
I do all my "reading" on Audible nowadays. If BP released their books in audio format I'd snap them all up. Many of the authors are very well-spoken and would be great narrators as well.

Dude, you would NOT want to spend hours listening to me read a book.  Not to mention that authors arent always great speakers. I produced a lot of audio books back I studio days and the author almost never read them.  A trained voiceover person would do it.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 29, 2021, 02:37:31 pm
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH.  We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.

We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.

And give me some good German lager.

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

Thanks for the opportunity.  Cheers.

I'm pretty much over that type of book.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 29, 2021, 02:37:53 pm
What about stories and biographies? I personally don’t want math or science. I do that at work. I also don’t want recipes. I get those for free here. But, I bet there’s a lot of stories to be told.

PS. I’ll take my stories on Audible, please ;)

Homebrew All Stars
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Andy Farke on September 29, 2021, 02:59:03 pm

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.


+1 to this suggestion. The statistics that were in the original DGB book were really helpful...at the very least, a book with a bunch of numerical tables would be something I would use. E.g., a "Homebrewer's Handbook." Bring all the stuff together, no fluff, just the data. Water profiles, hop profiles, yeast data, style data, etc. I have these spread across a gazillion individual books, websites, programs, and PDFs right now...
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: dmtaylor on September 29, 2021, 03:00:35 pm
You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

I'm pretty much over that type of book.

Not I.  And not others.

I think I might want to pick up a copy of that All Stars book sometime.  Seems like it would be interesting.  ;) ;)
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Wilbur on September 29, 2021, 03:06:12 pm
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH.  We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.

We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.

And give me some good German lager.

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

Thanks for the opportunity.  Cheers.

Designing Great Beers-I kind of think it'll become outdated too quickly. Too many new styles, malts, and hops coming out.

How about a homebrewer version of the Quality Management/labs book? I think there's a lot of info on yeast, cell counts, etc. but I'm sure there's a lot of simple things from the pro side that could be adapted to homebrewing. Like using sieves to quantify mill crush.

Or a book on homebrew clubs and competitions? Could dive into some of the history, etc and have sections for legal considerations, paperwork, bylaws, etc.

"Farmhouse" brewing and techniques from around the world? There's ~3 forests worth of books on lager, european beer, and IPA. I've enjoyed some of the Zymurgy articles on Tej, distilling in South American, etc.

Denny, isn't podcasting just reading a very poorly edited book?
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 29, 2021, 03:43:47 pm
You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

I'm pretty much over that type of book.

Not I.  And not others.

I think I might want to pick up a copy of that All Stars book sometime.  Seems like it would be interesting.  ;) ;)

I understand, but I'm not the only one with that viewpoint.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 29, 2021, 03:44:49 pm
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH.  We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.

We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.

And give me some good German lager.

You know what we really need?!  A new update to Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels.  If he ain't going to update it, FIND SOMEONE WHO WILL.  WE WILL BUY THAT BOOK.

Thanks for the opportunity.  Cheers.

Designing Great Beers-I kind of think it'll become outdated too quickly. Too many new styles, malts, and hops coming out.

How about a homebrewer version of the Quality Management/labs book? I think there's a lot of info on yeast, cell counts, etc. but I'm sure there's a lot of simple things from the pro side that could be adapted to homebrewing. Like using sieves to quantify mill crush.

Or a book on homebrew clubs and competitions? Could dive into some of the history, etc and have sections for legal considerations, paperwork, bylaws, etc.

"Farmhouse" brewing and techniques from around the world? There's ~3 forests worth of books on lager, european beer, and IPA. I've enjoyed some of the Zymurgy articles on Tej, distilling in South American, etc.

Denny, isn't podcasting just reading a very poorly edited book?

But much shorter.  And more humorous. Seems like a scientific audio book would be dry and boring.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: KRISTI on September 29, 2021, 09:50:03 pm
Good feedback. Keep it coming!

Thank you.
Kristi
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Big_Eight on September 29, 2021, 10:09:29 pm
I know this is about book ideas, but we need a drunk history themed show on beer history.

I do like reading about beer history though, but I assume there is enough of that around already.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Drewch on September 30, 2021, 02:08:33 am

But much shorter.  And more humorous. Seems like a scientific audio book would be dry and boring.

I agree. I have an audiobook copy of Beer by Charles Bamforth and the material just doesn't translate well for me.

At the moment, my interests lie in two areas.

First, I'm more interested in books that tell the story of brewing ... I'd like more books on historical brewing -- local & national traditions.  Martyn Cornell or Ron Pattinson or Andreas Krennmair type stuff.  Or think of the huge classic beer styles series (e.g., #11 Barleywine), but do each volume as an in depth exploration of a culture's brewing tradition rather than a system of styles that were only codified recently. Secrets of the Master Brewers does a good job of exploring history and applying it to the hobby, and I hear Beer Bible 2nd Ed. expands on this idea.

Second, I'm homebrewer: this is a hobby.  I'm not trying to be the next Sierra Nevada or even the next Straight to Ale or Monday Night. Even if I went pro, that market is crowded. Give me books about doing fun stuff with the ingredients around me.  Hyper-local brewing.  Like the Growing Beer podcast or The Wildcrafting Brewer by Baudar.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Drewch on September 30, 2021, 02:15:04 am
PS - track down Jannsen and make him turn the disjointed series of blog posts at Hors Catégorie into a cohesive exploration of turn of the (last) century Franco-Belgian brewing.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: lupulus on September 30, 2021, 10:54:24 am
My opinion only.

You don't need any book written.
Haven't bought one of your books nor opened one in ages.
Translate Narziss two volumes of Die Bierbrauerei.
Cheers!

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: TXFlyGuy on September 30, 2021, 11:46:03 am
As a brewer since 1990, many of your books have been purchased and read from cover to cover.
Today much of the info sought by the average brewer is available online. With a few simple mouse clicks. There are multiple brewing forums that can and do offer good advice.

It is doubtful that we would purchase any new book.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: goose on September 30, 2021, 02:02:21 pm
With regard to updating DGB, I too think it would outdated very quickly.  There is so much information about great beer recipes online these days that one can design a great beer by looking at the online recipes and choosing an ingredient from one person's recipe, then another, etc., to make a great recipe for their own brew.  That is what I do when trying to brew something new and have had really good luck with it.  It takes a bit of practice to get really good at tweaking the recipe to what a person will be looking for but that is the whole fun part of the hobby.

The current version of DGB gives you ideas on what can make a good recipe for a certain style and then a person can go to online recipes to pick out what they want to put in that beer.  Years ago DGB was my go to book, but now I rarely open it.

Just my 0.02.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 30, 2021, 02:20:31 pm
I second the plea to keep it homebrewer focused.  If I never see another book like Water, it would be too soon.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: lupulus on September 30, 2021, 02:47:14 pm
I second the plea to keep it homebrewer focused.  If I never see another book like Water, it would be too soon.
"The training of brewers is the same whether you are training a home-brewer or you are training a brewer for Anheuser-Busch"
Michael J. Lewis

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 30, 2021, 03:01:54 pm
I second the plea to keep it homebrewer focused.  If I never see another book like Water, it would be too soon.
"The training of brewers is the same whether you are training a home-brewer or you are training a brewer for Anheuser-Busch"
Michael J. Lewis

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

So much wrong with that statement.  For one, homebrewing is a hobby and I get to decide for myself what's important to me.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: RC on September 30, 2021, 03:46:08 pm
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH. 

The only data I know of about this is Brulosophy's, which indicate that this percentage of homebrewers is just shy of 40%.

I am a scientist, and the thought of reading a brewing book that is essentially a compendium of primary papers sounds dreadful (although to be fair I do not necessarily think that this is what you are suggesting).

IMO what homebrewers desperately need is not yet another book about brewing science, but formal sensory training. This of course does not lend itself to book format unless the book came with scratch-and-sniff stickers :P
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: ynotbrusum on September 30, 2021, 04:20:34 pm
I enjoy listening to podcasts during the brew day - some for fun and less than technical expositions (Denny and Drew usually hit this button, as does Brulosophy); some for in depth discussion on a topic involving commercial brewers (MBAA usually hits this button); and some for in-depth homebrewing issues (Palmer and Zainasheff come to mind).  These are interesting and help pass the time during mash and boil intervals.  There are many others, including the whole Brewing Network selection to watch and listen to if you would want.  Books are typically things I like to spend some time with during long winter evenings - some are easy reading, some are not and if not, I tend to let it sit until I really have little else to do and can justify working through the harder to read books.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: erockrph on September 30, 2021, 05:45:23 pm
Fact: A huge percentage of homebrewers (I'm thinking at least 50-60%??) are scientists, engineers, and IT people.  Give us SCIENCE and give us MATH. 

The only data I know of about this is Brulosophy's, which indicate that this percentage of homebrewers is just shy of 40%.

I am a scientist, and the thought of reading a brewing book that is essentially a compendium of primary papers sounds dreadful (although to be fair I do not necessarily think that this is what you are suggesting).

IMO what homebrewers desperately need is not yet another book about brewing science, but formal sensory training. This of course does not lend itself to book format unless the book came with scratch-and-sniff stickers :P

It's been a while since I read "Tasting Beer" by Randy Mosher, and I honestly don't remember whether it was before or after I started brewing, but I remember that being rather useful. It might be time for a re-read, as a matter of fact.

And I also agree that as a scientist myself, I would much rather consume whitepaper and technical journal articles in online format rather than in a book.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: lupulus on September 30, 2021, 06:10:53 pm


I second the plea to keep it homebrewer focused.  If I never see another book like Water, it would be too soon.
"The training of brewers is the same whether you are training a home-brewer or you are training a brewer for Anheuser-Busch"
Michael J. Lewis

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

So much wrong with that statement.  For one, homebrewing is a hobby and I get to decide for myself what's important to me.

Yet, he's the most respected brewing teacher in the US.

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 30, 2021, 06:39:03 pm


I second the plea to keep it homebrewer focused.  If I never see another book like Water, it would be too soon.
"The training of brewers is the same whether you are training a home-brewer or you are training a brewer for Anheuser-Busch"
Michael J. Lewis

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

So much wrong with that statement.  For one, homebrewing is a hobby and I get to decide for myself what's important to me.

Yet, he's the most respected brewing teacher in the US.

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

So what?  I know what I want from homebrewing and I don't need you or anyone else to tell me.  Nothing you or he say applies to my hobby.  Do what you want to and so will I.  It's freaking making beer at home.  It's not a big deal.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Big_Eight on September 30, 2021, 07:12:46 pm
+1 to Denny!
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: dmtaylor on September 30, 2021, 07:26:44 pm
You know, they say opinions are like a certain thing... and they all stink.  ;)
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on September 30, 2021, 07:55:25 pm
Lest anyone think I'm a total Luddite, here's the kind of stuff that interests me now....http://scottjanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/TQ-58-1-0402-01.pdf
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: BrewBama on September 30, 2021, 08:40:37 pm
…http://scottjanish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/TQ-58-1-0402-01.pdf

Good article.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Bilsch on October 01, 2021, 01:55:45 am
We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.
We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.
And give me some good German lager.

Then you definitely WANT this book:
Technology Brewing and Malting
Wolfgang Kunze

Worth every pfennig.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: dmtaylor on October 01, 2021, 04:31:39 am
We want to learn everything there is to know about mashing temperatures, mash time, hop boil times, whirlpool hop additions, experimentation, and the most accurate way to calculate IBUs.
We don't care about IPA.  Give us science.
And give me some good German lager.

Then you definitely WANT this book:
Technology Brewing and Malting
Wolfgang Kunze

Worth every pfennig.

Got it.  Been meaning to read it sometime but haven't gotten around to it quite yet.  Soon.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 01, 2021, 10:06:41 am
In the statement above..."We don't care about IPA", pretty much sums it up for us.

I like Greg Noonan's book, New Brewing Lager Beer.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: ynotbrusum on October 01, 2021, 10:12:55 am
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: dmtaylor on October 01, 2021, 11:22:21 am
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.

Mine was a gift from someone I have never met. I wouldn’t pay that much — you friggin crazy!?
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 01, 2021, 01:00:33 pm
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.

Mine was a gift from someone I have never met. I wouldn’t pay that much — you friggin crazy!?

Nor would I. That money would be better used on buying...BEER!
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: ynotbrusum on October 01, 2021, 03:03:51 pm
Yea, I never bought the book, though I have read parts of it - I am a contented shallow water swimmer, I guess.  (or a cheap brewer!)
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on October 01, 2021, 03:05:48 pm
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 01, 2021, 05:10:53 pm
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

So you are the one!  ;)
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on October 01, 2021, 05:34:22 pm
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

So you are the one!  ;)

I'm one of the ones!  It wouldn't be so ubiquitous if it wasn't so popular!
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: BrewBama on October 01, 2021, 07:45:14 pm
What’s your favorite IPA recipe Denny?



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Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on October 01, 2021, 08:21:52 pm
What’s your favorite IPA recipe Denny?



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If I want a rich, full IPA, it's still my Rye IPA.  These days I often go lighter. Mecca Grade Lamonta and 8-10 C20 or 40 to 1.064 or 68.  Usually Chinook for bittering, then additions at 20, 10, 5, 3 , flameout, and dry hop. Shooting for a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.  Hop variety chosen by looking at the survivables  booklet and what I have on hand.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: BrewBama on October 01, 2021, 08:44:25 pm


Just received my Survivables booklet and other swag from H/B school. It read 10x better in paperback than online.



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Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: jeffy on October 01, 2021, 08:47:41 pm
What’s your favorite IPA recipe Denny?



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If I want a rich, full IPA, it's still my Rye IPA.  These days I often go lighter. Mecca Grade Lamonta and 8-10 C20 or 40 to 1.064 or 68.  Usually Chinook for bittering, then additions at 20, 10, 5, 3 , flameout, and dry hop. Shooting for a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.  Hop variety chosen by looking at the survivables  booklet and what I have on hand.
Interesting that you do a BU to GU ratio.  I never gave it much thought.
I was under the impression that you did FWH on your IPAs.  No?
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Bilsch on October 01, 2021, 09:08:11 pm
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.
Mine was a gift from someone I have never met. I wouldn’t pay that much — you friggin crazy!?

What an awesome friend!

Kunze is $195 but yea still expensive. Although for what you get is very worth it.
https://www.vlb-berlin.org/en/publications/specialist-publications/kunze
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: chinaski on October 01, 2021, 10:28:55 pm
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.

Mine was a gift from someone I have never met. I wouldn’t pay that much — you friggin crazy!?

Nor would I. That money would be better used on buying...BEER!
I would buy ingredients for beer.

As far as books go, as a more experienced brewer I'm often more interested personal philosophies & guiding principles of good brewers than specific techniques or recipes.  I think that there is more room for folks doing interesting things with "local" at the homebrew scale to get into a book.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: lupulus on October 02, 2021, 01:55:40 am
Sometimes $150 is a good value and $20 is damn expensive.
You get what you pay for.

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: BrewBama on October 02, 2021, 02:06:48 am
Sometimes $150 is a good value and $20 is damn expensive.
You get what you pay for.

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: fredthecat on October 02, 2021, 03:42:59 am
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: joe_meadmaker on October 02, 2021, 04:02:06 am
At the moment, my interests lie in two areas.

First, I'm more interested in books that tell the story of brewing ... I'd like more books on historical brewing -- local & national traditions.  Martyn Cornell or Ron Pattinson or Andreas Krennmair type stuff.  Or think of the huge classic beer styles series (e.g., #11 Barleywine), but do each volume as an in depth exploration of a culture's brewing tradition rather than a system of styles that were only codified recently. Secrets of the Master Brewers does a good job of exploring history and applying it to the hobby, and I hear Beer Bible 2nd Ed. expands on this idea.

Second, I'm homebrewer: this is a hobby.  I'm not trying to be the next Sierra Nevada or even the next Straight to Ale or Monday Night. Even if I went pro, that market is crowded. Give me books about doing fun stuff with the ingredients around me.  Hyper-local brewing.  Like the Growing Beer podcast or The Wildcrafting Brewer by Baudar.

This is kind of where my mind is currently.  Especially the first point.  If I had to get rid of all my beer books and only keep one, it would be my copy of Amber Gold & Black by Cornell.  I only got it a couple years ago and it was pretty tough to track down.  Most I saw were used copies on Amazon, listed for more than $100!  Every once in a while one would drop down a bit.  I think I ordered, and was refunded, for 2 or 3 that got "lost" in the mail.  Finally snagged on on ebay for around $30 (I think).  Love that book!

There's so much information on how to brew on the Internet, and it's easy to find.  When I sit down with a book, I want to be told a story.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: TXFlyGuy on October 02, 2021, 11:17:26 am
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Being a true Hop Head in the 90's, IPA's were a big thing for me. But that was just a phase that I went through, later maturing into a Euro-Lager consumer over a number of years. As stated before, the influence of European brewers was heavy since my vocation had me in such places as Paris, London, Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, etc., and I will throw in Tokyo also, as they can and do produce lagers every bit as good, and in some cases better, than the Germans.

But I am not alone as my close friends are in the same camp. Actually, burnt out on IPA. But that is our personal problem, and we are dealing with it.

Regarding a book, one about a brewery (s) and telling the history in depth would be of interest. I have a good video from the History Channel on Breweries in America. Very good, informative, and entertaining.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: fredthecat on October 02, 2021, 01:10:42 pm
well, i also wanted to ask "what is an IPA"?


id say basically any highly hopped ale. for me high IBU (over 50) but nowadays you see "ipas" with anything down to 10 IBU for juicy DDH ones.
Title: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: BrewBama on October 02, 2021, 01:42:26 pm
well, i also wanted to ask "what is an IPA"?


id say basically any highly hopped ale. for me high IBU (over 50) but nowadays you see "ipas" with anything down to 10 IBU for juicy DDH ones.
Unofficial: …but I consider an IPA .7-1 BU/GU ratio. I’ve seen ‘session’ IPA(s) at a low OG but the hop ratio matched the OG to meet the IPA bitterness range.

It can cross over w/APA at .6-.8 BU/GU but more hop assertive IMO.

I usually shoot for ~.6 BU/GU for my hoppy beers …so APA for me.

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Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Ortizer on October 03, 2021, 04:48:40 pm
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Being a true Hop Head in the 90's, IPA's were a big thing for me. But that was just a phase that I went through, later maturing into a Euro-Lager consumer over a number of years. As stated before, the influence of European brewers was heavy since my vocation had me in such places as Paris, London, Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, etc., and I will throw in Tokyo also, as they can and do produce lagers every bit as good, and in some cases better, than the Germans.

But I am not alone as my close friends are in the same camp. Actually, burnt out on IPA. But that is our personal problem, and we are dealing with it.

Regarding a book, one about a brewery (s) and telling the history in depth would be of interest. I have a good video from the History Channel on Breweries in America. Very good, informative, and entertaining.
History of some of the iconic old breweries might be interesting, even if they're no longer around.

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Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: denny on October 03, 2021, 04:52:26 pm
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Being a true Hop Head in the 90's, IPA's were a big thing for me. But that was just a phase that I went through, later maturing into a Euro-Lager consumer over a number of years. As stated before, the influence of European brewers was heavy since my vocation had me in such places as Paris, London, Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, etc., and I will throw in Tokyo also, as they can and do produce lagers every bit as good, and in some cases better, than the Germans.

But I am not alone as my close friends are in the same camp. Actually, burnt out on IPA. But that is our personal problem, and we are dealing with it.

Regarding a book, one about a brewery (s) and telling the history in depth would be of interest. I have a good video from the History Channel on Breweries in America. Very good, informative, and entertaining.
History of some of the iconic old breweries might be interesting, even if they're no longer around.

Sent from my LM-G820 using Tapatalk

I have a book called Brewed in the Pacific Northwest that does that for PNW breweries.  Fascinating info and incredible pics.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: Big_Eight on October 04, 2021, 07:13:41 pm
What’s your favorite IPA recipe Denny?



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If I want a rich, full IPA, it's still my Rye IPA.  These days I often go lighter. Mecca Grade Lamonta and 8-10 C20 or 40 to 1.064 or 68.  Usually Chinook for bittering, then additions at 20, 10, 5, 3 , flameout, and dry hop. Shooting for a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.  Hop variety chosen by looking at the survivables  booklet and what I have on hand.
I've seen your recipe I need to brew it! I'm also an IPA fan and what's funny is I didn't used to be up until a couple of years ago. I'm not really a hazy guy more of an IPA pre the hazy craze.

I've been reading Ron Pattinson's book "The Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer" and it appears an IPA is all across the board so I would say we are talking about modern American IPA tastes in this thread lol.

Going to try a bunch of recipes from that book as it looks like they may be decent and eventually get a cask setup with a beer engine but using an aspirator with CO2 so the cask lasts longer.
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: lupulus on October 10, 2021, 07:24:14 pm
Have been thinking about this question the last few days and one thought that came to mind is how much I miss George Fix and Greg Noonan.
Authors well read in brewing science that can process the current research and summarize it without dumbing it down are hard to find.
Scott Janish is an example on the hop area of research but there's not much new on lagers, mashing, fermentation and yeast management.
A book on Modern Lager Brewing by a Weihenstephan trained brewer would cover this need.
Cheers!




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Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: KRISTI on November 04, 2021, 06:44:53 pm
Thanks, everyone! Happy to take comments any time and feel free to email if you come up with anything new. kristi (at) brewersassociation.org

Cheers,
Kristi
Title: Re: Let's Talk Books!
Post by: chumley on November 10, 2021, 12:01:17 am
One of my favorite old books was Brewing Classic European Beers at Home by Wheeler and Protz, that came out in 1999. Some sort of updated version of that, with suggested yeast strains, would get me to buy one.

I admit to a preference to brewing European style beers, as I can get multiple IPAs on tap at all the breweries and bars in town. I do brew an occasional IPA, because it is difficult to find one with the old school hops that I prefer - Chinook, Cascade, Centennial and Amarillo. Too many have those tropical fruit (which are okay) or dank (which I dislike) hops.