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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: dzlater on October 04, 2010, 03:24:59 PM

Title: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on October 04, 2010, 03:24:59 PM
Thought some one might find this of interest
I went to the home brew shop on Saturday and found this:

East Coast Yeast
ECY10 Old Newark Ale:  Sourced from a now defunct east coast brewery, this pure strain was identified as their ale pitching yeast. Good for all styles of American and English ales.  Suggested fermentation temp: 60-68°F.   Apparent attenuation : 68-72%  

It's supposedly Ballantine yeast
I googled it and didn't find much
I will be brewing with it soon and post some results

Dan
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: blatz on October 04, 2010, 05:17:46 PM
who is the manufacturer?  Might want to PM "The Professor" as he is a huge Ballantine fan and may have some insight.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on October 04, 2010, 05:54:33 PM
I got it at Princeton Home Brew, as far as I know the manufacturer is East Coast Brewers Yeast
All I could find out about it on the internet is
http://www.aleiens.com/forum/topics/interesting-strains-from-east (http://www.aleiens.com/forum/topics/interesting-strains-from-east)
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on October 04, 2010, 06:05:09 PM
Yeah, East Coast Yeast.  That guy really needs to get a website together - even the facebook page seems to be gone  :-\
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: BrewArk on October 04, 2010, 06:34:50 PM
Yeah, East Coast Yeast.  That guy really needs to get a website together - even the facebook page seems to be gone  :-\

For sure.  Nobody from the "Brewark" is going to drive from the left coast to the least coast for it.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 04, 2010, 11:29:28 PM
"Old Newark" does seem to be the real deal Ballantine ale yeast. 

I obtained some of this a couple months ago, have brewed with it, and I tend to agree now  with the manufacturer that it is clearly NOT the same as Chico/001/1056 since  it behaves quite differently (flocs out much better), and seems identical to the pure culture I had quite a few years ago but lost in a malfunctioning fridge while I was working out of town for 2 months  (insert your favorite expletive here).   

In any case, the Pale Ale I made with it as a test came out just as I had hoped, and next week I'm putting it to work on double batches of both IPA and Burton ale.  Those will tell the tale for me. 

If you can get your hands on some,  definitely try it. 
Hopefully the manufacturer (East Coast Yeast) will gradually achieve wider distribution.  Right now, it is available from Princeton Homebrew (in Trenton, NJ)...a store you should definitely visit if you are in or passing through southern NJ. 

Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on October 04, 2010, 11:35:37 PM
is it a liquid or a dry yeast?

<edit>
And speaking of people who need to have websites set up . . . let's add Princeton Homebrew to the list :)
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 05, 2010, 12:25:02 AM
is it a liquid or a dry yeast?
...

All of the EAST COAST products are liquid yeasts.
Some time back, Joe at Princeton Homebrew sent me the descriptors of the first round of ECY products...since there is no website, I'll pass along the info here:

-------------------------------------
ECY01
BugFarm:  A large complex blend of cultures to emulate sour beers such as lambic style ales. Over time displays a citrus sourness and large barnyard profile. Contains yeast (S. cerevisiae and S. fermentati), severalBrettanomyces strains, Lactobacillus and Pediococcus. The BugFarm blend changes every year and can be added at any stage of fermentation.
 
ECY10
Old Newark Ale:  Sourced from a now defunct east coast brewery, this pure strain was identified as their ale pitching yeast. Good for all styles of American and English ales.  Suggested fermentation temp: 60-68°F.  Apparent attenuation : 68-72% 

ECY07
Scottish Heavy: Leaves a fruity profile with woody, oak esters reminiscent of malt whiskey. Well suited for90/shilling or heavier ales including old ales and barleywines due to level of attenuation (77-80%). Suggested fermentation temp: 60-68°F.   

ECY08
 Saison Brasserie blend : A combination of several Saison yeasts for both fruity and spicy characteristics accompianied with dryness.  Apparent attenuation: up to 80%. Suggested fermentation temp: 75-85° F.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: klickcue on October 05, 2010, 01:13:20 AM
Contact   joeATsolarhomebrew.com

Joe has a paypal account at the above address.

~$8 plus flat rate shipping of ~$7 for the ECY10 Old  Newark  Ale

I bought the Bug Farm IV which was 125 ml liquid but was about a 30 ml slug of yeast ;D

Al B (East Coast Ales) is over here:
http://www.babblebelt.com/newboard/thread.html?tid=1108752780&th=1281735655&pg=1&tpg=1&add=1   
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 01:43:03 AM
Thanks for the info - it would be great to get the pure strains at some point, but I'm not in any rush really.  If someone has a sample they'd like to trade I'd be cool with that.  I'll just stick it in the -80 at work for later use . . .
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: realbeerguy on October 05, 2010, 01:50:32 AM
Glad I saw this.  Getting ready to head up 95 to NJ for my daughter's wedding & planned to stop in & see Joe.   Been wanting to recreate the Ballentine XXX.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on October 05, 2010, 08:51:12 PM
I made a small 500ml starter and pitched it into 5.5 gallons of 1.045 wort
air lock bubbling within two hours. It seemed to really flocculate well, and settle out quick in the starter.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on October 07, 2010, 10:30:31 PM
Jeff, I'd be interested in your rendition of the Burton Ale. After having drank them myself and others here on the forum(Denny et al) and along with my tasting notes reflecting what Brockington reported in the 90's of the apparent "apple and pear" aroma, I personally would surmise that they actually used the Bass strain for those two batches they brewed in '34 and '46. Getting back ot, it's funny how brewing myths can seem reality, when I lived in Chico and talked to Ken Grossman about the analogy that he got his yeast from the dying Ballantine brand back in the late 70's, he immediately chuckled and told me he got a strain that was banked at Siebel in Chicago and went on the performance specs.
The Newark Yeast intrigues me and is inspiring me to brew up some more Ballantine IPA project beers now that I have a source for "organic" Brewers Gold which I believe was a favorite at Ballantines. I've subbed Cluster on recommendations but, I'm ready to rework the recipe with BG. This is awesome! Let's keep the conversation going!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 08, 2010, 02:31:12 AM
Jeff, I'd be interested in your rendition of the Burton Ale. After having drank them myself and others here on the forum(Denny et al) and along with my tasting notes reflecting what Brockington reported in the 90's of the apparent "apple and pear" aroma, I personally would surmise that they actually used the Bass strain for those two batches they brewed in '34 and '46. Getting back ot, it's funny how brewing myths can seem reality, when I lived in Chico and talked to Ken Grossman about the analogy that he got his yeast from the dying Ballantine brand back in the late 70's, he immediately chuckled and told me he got a strain that was banked at Siebel in Chicago and went on the performance specs.
The Newark Yeast intrigues me and is inspiring me to brew up some more Ballantine IPA project beers now that I have a source for "organic" Brewers Gold which I believe was a favorite at Ballantines. I've subbed Cluster on recommendations but, I'm ready to rework the recipe with BG. This is awesome! Let's keep the conversation going!


Some of this will likely repeat what I may have posted elsewhere, but since it's relevant to the discussion at hand, here goes:

From what I had been able to find out from a few former Ballantine employees a number of years ago (and I started inquiring  about it probably more than 30 years ago), their  XXX, IPA, Brown Stout,  Porter, and Burton ales ALL used the same Ballantine house ale yeast .  The strain originated in England, but nothing I was told firsthand or read elsewhere  ever led me to believe it was the Bass strain.  The Ballantine strain (whatever its UK origins) was certainly robust enough that there would have been no reason to substitute something else.

My ongoing experiments with reproducing the Bally IPA have settled in with Cluster and Bullion for the hops;  Brewers Gold was used by the brewery for a time, but is a bit more difficult to find nowadays and Bullion is a very good substitute as far as my palate can discern.  As pointed out many times, the real keys to their IPA were the long aging period (they aged it for 1 year, in wooden aging tanks) and the use of hop oil in addition to the dry hopping. 
I'm still working on the hop oil part of it, but aside from that issue, the only times I've ever come remotely close to reproducing the beer was when I could keep my mitts off of it and let it fully age for 8-12 months.

As far as the Burton beer, it's also interesting to note that (according to at least one firsthand account) other than the unbelievably long aging prior to bottling (up to 20 years), their Burton was essentially the same beer as their IPA- -perhaps ramped up a bit with a higher OG at the outset-- -- but topped up annually with select batches of the IPA once the yearly Xmas bottling was done.  That's evidently how they were able to keep up the tradition for 20+ years.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on October 09, 2010, 03:30:21 PM
Fascinating as usual Jeff. I'm wondering if the ruby color (~15 SRM) was from storage in the wooden barrels for 20 years?
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 09, 2010, 11:36:05 PM
Not sure about that...the color that pours from surviving bottles of the Burton today is pretty much the same deep amber/copper hue that the IPA had when I drank it regularly in the late 60's and early 70's.  The aging may have darkened it somewhat, but I think most of the color just came from the malts used.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on October 10, 2010, 06:55:36 PM
In my tasting notes of both bottles off the Burton I drank indicate the color as "Dorothy's Ruby Red Slippers". Anchor's Old Foghorn is pretty close to BBA
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: denny on October 10, 2010, 08:13:36 PM
Bob, I finally located my notes from the BBA tasting we did!  I WILL get them posted.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 10, 2010, 10:53:21 PM
Bob, I finally located my notes from the BBA tasting we did!  I WILL get them posted.


I'll be anxious to see that too, Denny...as I recall,  I think you mentioned once that you tasted a sample from the 1934 brewing, right?
All of my bottles are from 1946 brewing, and bottled in 1960, 62, 63, 65, and 66 (x2).

Interesting stuff, it is...sure do wish I could have tasted it when it was first bottled or within a few years of that. 
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on October 11, 2010, 02:21:49 AM
Bob, I finally located my notes from the BBA tasting we did!  I WILL get them posted.
I hate you Denny, so very very much.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on October 11, 2010, 02:40:35 PM
I've got some of the old newark yeast on the way... (along with some bug farm IV).  I've read a lot about ballantine in the past weeks, but there's a lot to go before tackling this project.  this kind of stuff is great guys!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: denny on October 11, 2010, 02:49:28 PM
Al, I think that's the correct year, but I'll have to check the bottle to be surr.

Tom...back atcha!  ;)
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on October 12, 2010, 02:34:05 PM
Check the gravity today, brewed on the 5th
It's down to 1.010, OG was 1.045
78% attenuation a bit higher then I expected
looks pretty clear
if anybody cares here is what I brewed
what do you think of this?

Batch Size: 5.500 gal
Boil Size: 7.063 gal
Boil Time: 1.500 hr
Efficiency: 80%
OG: 1.046
FG: 1.011
ABV: 4.5%
Bitterness: 19.0 IBUs (Rager)
Color: 15 SRM (Morey)

Fermentables
================================================================================
                        Name  Type    Amount Mashed Late Yield Color
        Pale Malt (2 Row) US Grain  4.750 lb    Yes   No   79%   2 L
  Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L Grain  4.000 oz    Yes   No   74%  40 L
 Caramel/Crystal Malt - 120L Grain 16.000 oz    Yes   No   72% 120 L
                 Munich Malt Grain 16.000 oz    Yes   No   80%   9 L
                 Vienna Malt Grain 16.000 oz    Yes   No   78%   4 L
            White Wheat Malt Grain  8.000 oz    Yes   No   86%   2 L
               Special Roast Grain  4.000 oz    Yes   No   72%  50 L
Total grain: 8.750 lb

Hops
================================================================================
       Name Alpha   Amount     Use       Time   Form IBU
 Willamette  4.7% 0.500 oz    Boil   1.000 hr Pellet 9.9
    Cascade  5.0% 0.500 oz    Boil 30.000 min Pellet 5.8
   Amarillo  7.2% 0.500 oz    Boil 10.000 min Pellet 3.3
   Amarillo  7.2% 0.500 oz   Aroma    0.000 s Pellet 0.0
   Amarillo  7.2% 1.000 oz Dry Hop   1.000 hr Pellet 0.0

Misc
================================================================================
              Name        Type  Use    Amount    Time
 pH 5.2 Stabilizer Water Agent Mash 2.029 tsp 0.000 s
        Irish Moss      Fining Boil 0.000 tsp 0.000 s

Yeast
================================================================================
           Name Type   Form      Amount   Stage
 Old Newark Ale  Ale Liquid 125.000 gal Primary

Mash
================================================================================
               Name     Type    Amount    Target       Time
           DOUGH IN Infusion 4.091 gal 154.000 F   1.000 hr
 Final Batch Sparge Infusion 4.109 gal 165.200 F 15.000 min

Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on October 12, 2010, 03:53:12 PM
I think the percentage of crystal is a bit too high, but that's just my taste.  I still want to try it though :)
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on October 13, 2010, 02:40:20 AM
"Bob, I finally located my notes from the BBA tasting we did!  I WILL get them posted."

Sounds good Denny! In all the moves in the past 3.5 years, I'm having a hard time finding archived notes from that and other sessions I've experienced. Thanx! But, I'll never the forget the color of the Burton beers in my Douglas Scotch Ale glasses as being ruby red. Like I said before, all of my tastings reflect the Brockington notes from the mid 90's. It'll be interesting to see the data Denny has. I left the empty for his collection and I don;t remember when the bottling was.

Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast/East Coast Yeast
Post by: ninab on October 17, 2010, 08:38:45 PM
Hey folks - this is NinaB, wife, sidekick and brewers enabler to Al B, the bugfarmer.  East Coast Yeast is a hobby-based business (read - more about passion and fun than cash) out of Central NJ.  Had no idea there was so much chatter on other homebrew boards about ECY's cultures, so since you all are interested, thought I'd let you know what we're up to:

We had our FB page up (albeit minimally useful) and ran into some trouble with the powers that be in FB.  Think I got that straightened out and the page is back up.  Webpage is still pending although we've registered the domain name. Right now we don't plan to take direct orders for individuals - as you all seem to know, the best way to get ECY cultures is through Princeton Homebrew.  This seems the most feasible way to get cultures out for now.  If you plan to drive over to Joe's for cultures, we recommend calling first.  Joe's also been shipping cross-country.  Right now we're aiming to drop off some bottles at Joe's next weekend - I'll try to get details up on Facebook.

We have some other ideas for getting cultures out (like taking large homebrew club orders for bulk delivery or ship) and Al's had some projects with The Bruery (CA), Dock Street (Philly), Goose Island (Chicago), and with Rogue (Eugene)....but like I said, this is hobby level (damn those day jobs!) so please bear with us as we figure this out!   
Happy Brewing,
NinaB
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast/East Coast Yeast
Post by: MrNate on October 18, 2010, 07:15:35 AM
Hey folks - this is NinaB, wife, sidekick and brewers enabler to Al B, the bugfarmer.  East Coast Yeast is a hobby-based business (read - more about passion and fun than cash) out of Central NJ.  Had no idea there was so much chatter on other homebrew boards about ECY's cultures, so since you all are interested, thought I'd let you know what we're up to:

We had our FB page up (albeit minimally useful) and ran into some trouble with the powers that be in FB.  Think I got that straightened out and the page is back up.  Webpage is still pending although we've registered the domain name. Right now we don't plan to take direct orders for individuals - as you all seem to know, the best way to get ECY cultures is through Princeton Homebrew.  This seems the most feasible way to get cultures out for now.  If you plan to drive over to Joe's for cultures, we recommend calling first.  Joe's also been shipping cross-country.  Right now we're aiming to drop off some bottles at Joe's next weekend - I'll try to get details up on Facebook.

We have some other ideas for getting cultures out (like taking large homebrew club orders for bulk delivery or ship) and Al's had some projects with The Bruery (CA), Dock Street (Philly), Goose Island (Chicago), and with Rogue (Eugene)....but like I said, this is hobby level (damn those day jobs!) so please bear with us as we figure this out!   
Happy Brewing,
NinaB

Nina, just out of curiositry, where in Central NJ are you guys?
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ninab on October 18, 2010, 11:38:37 PM
MrNate - we're in Hillsborough.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 19, 2010, 02:42:52 AM
In my tasting notes of both bottles off the Burton I drank indicate the color as "Dorothy's Ruby Red Slippers". Anchor's Old Foghorn is pretty close to BBA
The comparison of Old Foghorn to BBA is probably a very good one and not just for the similarity in color you perceived, since if the folklore is to be believed  Mr. Maytag was evidently very inspired by a taste of the BBA.

Strange how I never considered it before, but as a result of  the BBA sample he tasted probably being only 5 or 10 years from the original bottling date, it could very well be that Foghorn represents at least some  approximation of what the BBA was when Fritz tasted it, except that Foghorn lacks the explosive hop aroma that the BBA certainly had (and is now lost to age in existing samples).  The intense aroma of Ballantine's ales was pretty unique back then and would still be quite unique today.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: MrNate on October 19, 2010, 01:47:29 PM
MrNate - we're in Hillsborough.

Well then howdy, neighbor!  ;D
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ninab on October 22, 2010, 12:07:20 AM
For anyone interested:  East Coast Yeast delivered 40 bottles of fresh yeast to Princeton Homebrew today.  Bugfarm IV, Saison Blend, Scottish Heavy and a few Old Newark Ales.  Some may already be spoken for, so call Joe soon at PH if you're interested.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on October 22, 2010, 05:11:49 AM
Just brewed my Ballantine IPA tonight with the Old Newark yeast Joe sent me.  I made a starter with the yeast and it took right off.  Nice packaging on Al's and Joe's part!

Highly recommended.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2010, 11:32:12 AM
I'm very interested in this yeast. I hope they'll still have some by the time I order.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on October 22, 2010, 05:41:09 PM
I don't want to change the topic too much, so I'll add a shameless plug here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=4237.0
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on October 23, 2010, 02:13:15 PM
back on topic...

this yeast is nuts.  blowoff city!  huge rocky krausen.  I've had to clean up after it a few times already and I pitched the yeast late thursday evening.
Top cropper for sure.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ninab on October 24, 2010, 04:37:43 AM
Yup, top cropper indeed.  What you're experiencing is the feistiness of fresh yeast! :o 
 
Really, the 125 ml bottle can be pitched directly into a 5-6 gal carboy.  Starter is optional unless the yeast sits around (in your fridge!) a while.   Hope your final results are what you're looking for!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on October 24, 2010, 11:25:22 AM
The beer I brewed with the Old Newark came out really well.
I hadn't brewed the recipe before so I can't really compare it
too well against other yeasts. I guess I would call it "clean
I don't know if the yeast had anything to do with it but I got a really
nice hop flavor. I have a batch of brown ale I pitched with the washed
yeast from the first batch fermenting away now. I am hoping to do a third batch
reusing the yeast from that batch.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 25, 2010, 03:55:21 AM
The beer I brewed with the Old Newark came out really well.
I hadn't brewed the recipe before so I can't really compare it
too well against other yeasts. I guess I would call it "clean
I don't know if the yeast had anything to do with it but I got a really
nice hop flavor. I have a batch of brown ale I pitched with the washed
yeast from the first batch fermenting away now. I am hoping to do a third batch
reusing the yeast from that batch.

I've had similar great results.  I'm already into my fifth repitch of the yeast (in beers of various stregths and colors) and I fully expect to do at least 5 more subsequent repitches.  I haven't even washed the yeast before re-using.

This product seems to behave exactly like the pure Newark strain I had many years ago.   
I am very happy indeed with this stuff.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: hopfenundmalz on October 25, 2010, 12:16:38 PM
How do you find if different from the Chico yeast? 
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 25, 2010, 03:27:22 PM
How do you find if different from the Chico yeast? 

It seems to floc out much more thoroughly than the Chico yeast. 
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: hopfenundmalz on October 25, 2010, 04:01:15 PM
I wondered if there was a difference.  Many times it has been said that the Chico yeast is from Ballantine.  Ken Grossman has stated that he really does not know the original brewery, as it came from Siebel.  It could have Ballantine as the origin, but has adapted to the SN brewery, and the large cylindrical tanks (does not take long from what was stated in "Yeast").

Thanks for the reply.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on October 25, 2010, 06:54:27 PM
Yup, top cropper indeed.  What you're experiencing is the feistiness of fresh yeast! :o 
 
Really, the 125 ml bottle can be pitched directly into a 5-6 gal carboy.  Starter is optional unless the yeast sits around (in your fridge!) a while.   Hope your final results are what you're looking for!


Well the fermenting beer smells fantastic.  Wonderfully hoppy.  I had to keep the lid off the bucket because it kept blowing off (yes the airlock and lid blew off the top of the bucket!!).  I don't think the open fermentation will be a problem between the extreme hoppiness and huge krausen. 
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: The Professor on October 25, 2010, 07:53:46 PM
I wondered if there was a difference.  Many times it has been said that the Chico yeast is from Ballantine.  Ken Grossman has stated that he really does not know the original brewery, as it came from Siebel.  It could have Ballantine as the origin, but has adapted to the SN brewery, and the large cylindrical tanks (does not take long from what was stated in "Yeast").

Thanks for the reply.

Yeah, I'd heard for years that the yeasts sold as "Chico" were the Ballantine strain, and the flavor and fermentation profiles seem similar based on my past experience...except that having worked before with what I knew with good certainty was the original Ballantine strain, I always thought it odd that the "Chico" didn't flocculate nearly the same way.

I haven't met Al B. (East Coast Yeast's 'ranch foreman') even though he lives probably no more than 5 miles from me,  but in conversations with Joe Bair (Princeton Homebrew), apparently Al B.  is of the opinion that the Old Newark is different enough that it likely isn't even related to the Chico  (maybe ninab can corroborate that?).

I've already done a couple of batches of my take on BIPA using the yeast,  and so far the beer is tasting mighty fine, but since the authentic BIPA recipe calls for 8-12 months of aging, I'll wait for pronouncement of my final result.  I feel good enough about it though that I have already planned for several more double batches in the coming month or two to ensure there is plenty to age properly, since I expect that some of what I've already made will be consumed a bit younger.   
I can sometimes be impatient as anyone.  ;D
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ninab on October 25, 2010, 10:51:49 PM
Professor:  Confirming Old Newark is definitely not Chico.  Have brewed with both, have both in our yeast bank.

I used to live in New Brunswick....from Louis Street we're 10 miles door-to-door. 

Got word from Joe Bair there's still a few bottles left of each strain.  Next drop off won't be for more than a week.  We are trying to announce drop offs on Facebook.  
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on October 26, 2010, 06:02:41 PM
Nina,

Can you post your link to FB? I can't sem to locate you.

Thanks,

Bob
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ninab on October 29, 2010, 01:35:24 AM
Bob - hope this works for you...
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/East-Coast-Yeast/168646113149281
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on November 03, 2010, 10:54:28 PM
Thanks Nina, it works! Also, I have Ballantine Ale yeast in da house! Woo Hoo! Just mad a 2 liter starter but, I must say that the lovely container it came in was quite lively,,,real fresh! I'm going to brew tomorrow and I'm soo excited. Thank you for resurrecting the strain from what I'm guessing was a freeze dried culture from a microbiologist library of some sort!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ninab on November 04, 2010, 12:12:41 AM
What size batch are you making?  Generally the 125 ml bottles are designed to pitch directly into 5-6 gal.  Some folks doing direct pitches are reporting some mighty feisty fermentation - 'tis the magic of fresh healthy yeast!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on November 04, 2010, 06:55:07 PM
Im brewing 10 gallons of a BIPA clone Jeff Renner provided me with about 6 years ago.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: hopfenundmalz on November 04, 2010, 07:54:55 PM
Bob,

I know that Renner had posted a recipe on the old HBD, and have looked at it.  Maybe I will send an e-mail to let him know someone has the actual yeast, and to give this thread a look.

Edit: Sent Jeff a message.

Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on November 04, 2010, 08:25:59 PM
Yeah I consulted Jeff's recipe on mine, and besides a few tweaks is pretty much the same.  Going into aging this week.

And about the yeast, I made a small starter (1qt) and the yeast exploded in the fermenter.  Went nuts.  In hindsight, probably no big need to make a starter.  Just did because I was worried about it going through the mail. 
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on November 05, 2010, 01:39:12 AM
Roger that Ry! Let me know how it turns out. Are you going to age it a year on American Oak?
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: ryang on November 05, 2010, 01:15:10 PM
Roger that Ry! Let me know how it turns out. Are you going to age it a year on American Oak?
At least 8 or 9 months.  We'll see what it's doing by then.  A year is definately possible.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on November 05, 2010, 07:31:10 PM
The starter I made flocced out and is crystal clear! I'm posting my tweaked BIPA recipe in the recipe section if you want to compare notes.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: Jeff Renner on November 08, 2010, 04:32:40 PM
I did do some research on Ballantine IPA a few years ago and that can be found on HBD.  I think two brewers sent me samples that they brewed based in part on my research, Larry O'Mahoney in 1998 and Beverage Bob in 2005.  Both were very nice IPAs but lacked that pungent hop presence of the original.  Mine did, too.

The old Yeast Culture Kit Company American ale yeast was different from both WhiteLabs and Wyeast, especially in its top cropping.  It threw a big head of yeast.  I think that Dan McConnell, the owner, got the yeast from a yeast bank, and I think he said it was the original Ballantine.  I should ask him.  It was also a little more characterful than either.

Let's see if I can post a photo of yeast skimming at the old Ballantine brewery

(http://www.falstaffbrewing.com/bally_wort.jpg)

Hey, it worked!  You'll never get that from WhiteLabs or Wyeast versions, although in my experience Wyeast does throw a bit more of a yeast head than WhiteLabs.

The site  http://www.falstaffbrewing.com/ballantine_ale.htm (where this photo is) has a lot of of good history on Ballantine.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on November 10, 2010, 01:24:11 AM
Look at the little step ladder they built so you can use it to climb in and out with.... The diving board must be on the other side :D
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: skyler on November 29, 2010, 09:36:29 PM
Man, I got my ECY10 bottle a week ago and it was less than half full (despite being sealed and unopened), but my starter took off within an hour. I have never seen a starter look so creamy so quickly. (I recall my "risen from the dead" Wyeast 3864 took 48 hours on the stir-plate to get going). I know my first beer with this is going to be a ~1.040 OG bitter, but I was also considering brewing up a dry stout with it. Someone on the NB forum said that "just about any yeast" will work for a dry stout, but, since it's a style I have not brewed since my early extract days, I thought I would ask the people here who have worked with ECY10 if you thought it would be a good choice for a dry stout.

Also, a few questions:
1) What temp should I ferment ECY at for a) a bitter, b) a dry stout, c) an IPA (my guess was to keep it around 62-64F for all of them)
2) Does the attenuation of this strain seem more akin to 1056, 1272, 1028? I only ask so I can better guage where to mash/how much crystal to use.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on November 29, 2010, 10:12:29 PM
I've done three beers with it repitching twice.
First was a 1.045 og beer with 78% attenuation
second was a brown ale 1.060 og 80% attenuation
third was a pale ale 1.043 og it's at 80% attenuation after one week
I fermented them all between 64 f and 68 f.
The pale ale is still in the fermentor but the other two turned out real well.
I think it would be great for a dry stout.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: skyler on November 29, 2010, 11:25:32 PM
I've done three beers with it repitching twice.
First was a 1.045 og beer with 78% attenuation
second was a brown ale 1.060 og 80% attenuation
third was a pale ale 1.043 og it's at 80% attenuation after one week
I fermented them all between 64 f and 68 f.
The pale ale is still in the fermentor but the other two turned out real well.
I think it would be great for a dry stout.

Were you mashing those for dryness? 80% attenuation seems pretty intense if you were mashing in the 154-158 territory, but if that was at 146-150, it seems pretty on par with what I have been expecting.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on November 30, 2010, 11:54:15 AM
I mashed at 154, 153, 154. However let me say that the accuracy of my thermometers may be suspect.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: dzlater on December 03, 2010, 12:34:04 AM
I mashed at 154, 153, 154. However let me say that the accuracy of my thermometers may be suspect.
Checked my thermometers out today, they were dead on.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: gmwren on December 09, 2010, 05:31:24 PM
Anyone have experience with the other Old Newark yeast?

"ECY12 Old Newark beer: Sourced from the same defunct east coast brewery as ECY10, this pure strain was used as their “beer pitching yeast”. The strain has been identified as S. cerevisae, hence it is not a true lager strain, but should ferment at lager temperatures. Could this be the parent strain of Chico?
Suggested fermentation temp: 58-68°F, Apparent Attenuation: medium"
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on December 10, 2010, 09:28:17 AM
It's too bad there isn't any DNA mapping of these yeast strains where we'd have  definitive characteristics that could be correlated to the yeast strains that the labs are selling. I wonder if the teaser about being the daddy of WY1056 that ECY actually knows this info. Being most yeast lab companies get strains from freeze dried cultures at some sort of yeast libraries, you think they would pass along the origin of the strains they sold as fact and not some dreamy sales reference. I'm sure there's proprieties involved with some of them. Too much mystery for me! I just want facts!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on December 11, 2010, 07:54:33 AM
People are working on yeast fingerprinting for just that reason.  The problem is a lot of brewing strains are too closely related to be able to differentiate between them with the techniques they're using, but maybe they'll come up with something else.  Right now it is mostly useful for quickly identifying contaminating strains.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on December 11, 2010, 08:37:24 AM
Thanks for the info Tom!
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: Jeff Renner on December 13, 2010, 04:31:48 PM
Just an aside, Bob.  I don't think the cultures are freeze dried but rather they are kept at -80C (-112F) in a 15% glycerol solution.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: tschmidlin on December 13, 2010, 06:50:12 PM
Yes, Jeff's right, -80C in glycerol.  I know that is how Wyeast does it.  I don't know the glycerol % though, that can vary.  I use 20% for mine.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: beveragebob on December 14, 2010, 07:00:31 AM
Roger that guys, thanks for the update. I love what ECY is doing but, I'm just tired of the marketing BS.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: skyler on January 06, 2011, 11:35:58 PM
This yeast is great... but not for what I first used it for (a bitter). It is at least as clean and dry as Chico and a lot more flocculant. I expected, based on the description, that there would be some "characterful" esters, but I really get none - it is as clean as any yeast I've used - I would compare its performance to Pacman in term of attenuation, flocculance, and dryness. I expect this yeast to work great for the dry stout I am brewing this Sunday and for the DIPA I will follow that up with.
Title: Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
Post by: skyler on January 10, 2011, 08:08:51 PM
Sorry for not letting this old thread die, but I thought it worth sharing that I am successfully fermenting a dry stout with this yeast at ~57F. So, FWIW, this one will go very cold.