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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: chumley on October 04, 2010, 08:29:25 PM

Title: Crock pot?
Post by: chumley on October 04, 2010, 08:29:25 PM
Hey, I'm heading to hunting camp this weekend, and am looking for a good crock pot recipe of some kind.  I like to prepare something at home, so when I get to camp (actually, camp is a farm house in the country), I can plug in the crock pot when I leave in the morning.  When we get back to camp after a day of hunting followed by drinking, dinner is ready with minimal activity.

In the years past, I have made both green and red chili, pollo con arroz, and Slovakian goulash.  I thought I would poll the master chefs at the forum here, to see if anyone has developed a killer crock pot recipe.

To start it off, here's the Slovakian goulash recipe:

4 lbs. Pork shoulder (Boston butt), cubed
- 1 tbs ground black pepper
- 2 large onions
- 1/3 cup of oil
- 1 tbs cumin
- 2 tbs sweet Hungarian paprika
- 2 tbs hot Hungarian paprika
- 1/4 cup soy sauce
 - 2 lbs sauerkraut
- 1 cup cream (sweet)
- 1 can beef broth
- 1 can vegetable broth
- 1 teaspoon of salt

Put the oil (or pork fat) into a pot and then fry the diced onions. Then add the pork (which should be cut up into cubes) to the frying onions. After 15 minutes or so, once the juices are escaping from the meat, then tansfer to the crock poyt.

Add the salt, cumin, pepper, paprika and pour in the broth. Set the crock on low.

When you get back to camp, add the saurkraut and cook for an hour. Meanwhile, boil up a pot of egg noodles.

Add the cream to the pork n kraut and let it cook for a further five minutes.

Finally add the soy sauce and cook for the remaining five minutes.

Serve over the noodles.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: euge on October 04, 2010, 08:45:58 PM
Darn I'm hungry now!

The soysauce looks a little odd but one finds it in lots of recipes these days. Looks good to me.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: nicneufeld on October 04, 2010, 08:50:28 PM
Countdown to Cappozoli's head exploding, in three, two, one....

 ;D  Sorry if that catches you confused, bit of an old forum joke about crockpots (and one user's intense phobia of them).

The last paprika I bought was serbian.  Much cheaper than hungarian...I can't tell much difference, but then I'm not comparing them side by side in similar recipes, or eating it straight.  I should probably test that! 
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: bluesman on October 04, 2010, 08:53:25 PM
Countdown to Cappozoli's head exploding, in three, two, one....

zero.....blastoff!!!!

(http://cs.astronomy.com/asycs/blogs/astronomy/Spacecraft/blog_usa193-launch.jpg)

Very nice looking recipe.

I love my crockpot...very savory recipes come from my crockpot too.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 04, 2010, 09:19:41 PM
NO MORE CROCK POTS.......EVER!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HY-03vYYAjA
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: euge on October 04, 2010, 09:39:08 PM
Beans would be another good idea. Especially a cassoulet. That would probably do well in a crock pot at a hunting camp.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: maxieboy on October 04, 2010, 09:42:56 PM
After a long day in the cold hunting or especially snowmobiling(when you're whipped), there's not much better than having a couple brews and diving into a nice hot, low fuss, filling meal from the crockpot! Can't tell ya how good it smells in the cabin or motel room when you get back from a long day on our beautiful U.P. trails!   8)
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 04, 2010, 10:16:18 PM
Chumley that Slovakian gulash is called Segedin gulash. (say ga deen)

Soy sauce is a common ingredient in Slovakian cooking

I have had this dish many times in Slovakia. I notice some inconsistencies with your recipe though (not that they are wrong just perhaps not authentic)

One is, never heard of cumin seed in there but they put in loads of caraway seeds, I would also add some marjoram, bay leaf and celery seed. Or diced celery root.

They also use sour cream not regular cream.

Then some butter flour roux so it gets a little thick.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: beerocd on October 04, 2010, 11:46:20 PM
Countdown to Cappozoli's head exploding, in three, two, one....

 ;D  Sorry if that catches you confused, bit of an old forum joke about crockpots (and one user's intense phobia of them).

The last paprika I bought was serbian.  Much cheaper than hungarian...I can't tell much difference, but then I'm not comparing them side by side in similar recipes, or eating it straight.  I should probably test that! 

Funny, I buy the Hungarian stuff. Didn't even know Serbia exported the stuff. Guess I'll need to give it a go.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: nicneufeld on October 05, 2010, 12:02:53 AM
Funny, I buy the Hungarian stuff. Didn't even know Serbia exported the stuff. Guess I'll need to give it a go.

I would have bought hungarian, since I was making paprikash and gulyas, but I have a cheap streak a mile wide and they had the ljuta and...and..."sweet" (I forget!) varieties for very cheap by comparison.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 12:29:05 AM
I get paprika from the Indian store for $1.99 per lb. Thats like 1/100th the cost of the stale stuff in a can.  :o

Oh, the Slovakian soy sauce is called sojova omacka (soy ova) (o mach ka)
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: nicneufeld on October 05, 2010, 12:47:46 AM
All paprika is is dried peppers ground up...the type of pepper (as well as any additional factors, such as smoking to dry, or roasting, etc) is going to make a huge difference.  I wonder what sort of differences an Indian pepper powder vs a Eastern European pepper powder might portend.

Peppers are fantastic...easily my favorite vegetable...chilis, capsicums/bell, love them all.  Roasted four of them and cooked them down with spices to stretch my jar of ajvar a bit further!

Oops, I'm getting carried away with a threadjack.  Crockpots are handy tools.  I use mine every now and again but I think I love the process of cooking too much to really get much benefit out of them.  Do you think on high they would get hot enough to use as a chinese "hot pot" kind of thing (ie., really hot broth, cooking thinly sliced meat and veg on skewers at the table)?  That would be a nice way to get more use out of the thing without buying a new space-consuming device just for the task.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: beerocd on October 05, 2010, 12:49:22 AM
Oh, the Slovakian soy sauce is called sojova omacka (soy ova) (o mach ka)

Everything is - OVA!
Kmart-ova , Volgreens-ova, car-ova  it's just a universal suffix to slovakificate the words.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: beerocd on October 05, 2010, 12:53:09 AM
Do you think on high they would get hot enough to use as a chinese "hot pot" kind of thing (ie., really hot broth, cooking thinly sliced meat and veg on skewers at the table)?  That would be a nice way to get more use out of the thing without buying a new space-consuming device just for the task.

I could probably pull off a fondue on mine if I kept the liquid level low(less than half). Have to make a full pot of anything, except oatmeal - that gets two hours at about half full and it's awesome.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: nicneufeld on October 05, 2010, 12:54:14 AM
Cap I forget, are you Slovakian-in-law or Slovenian-in-law?  My Balkan IQ is improving but I'm still a bit fogged on all the variations still.  I will say that I'm enjoying Serbian food.  There's something about the food of countries we've formerly been at odds with...German, Italian, Japanese, Korean...I suppose I should add Iraqi cuisine to the list of "to learns".
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 01:00:34 AM
Nic, peppers are fruit. :P

My other half is Slovakian and yes everything is ova or ovy. Its weird there that every female has ova on the end of there name. My wifes maiden name is Antolova. Her father and brothers last name is Antol.

Now her last name is Capozzoliova.  ;D I think it comes from the Latin Ovum for ovaries or something?

I wouldn't even use a crock pot for a toilet. Only Kidding, I use it at parties to keep my balls warm.

Nic soon after we evacuate Iraq they will all come here and open restaurants just like the Vietnamese. I cant wait!

Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: beerocd on October 05, 2010, 01:08:56 AM
I wouldn't even use a crock pot for a toilet. Only Kidding, I use it at parties to keep my balls warm.

So your crock is on a small cart so you can move around during the party?  :P

Serbs do the -a for females too.
jedan = one male  jedna = one female
But not the last names like that, they just take the guys last name.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 01:32:51 AM
Interesting. Do you speak Serbian? Do they have the feminine and masculine for things that make no sense at all like a table is female but a bottle is masculine? Man I hate that. I have been learning Slovakian. Its really hard. My daughter speaks mostly Slovakian cause that is what she is learning first,  little English so far.

I cant speak Slovakian that well yet but They cant speak it anymore without me knowing what they are saying.  8)

Nic, I did a lot of research and comparing of paprika. It was brought to the Hungarians from the Turks and Im pretty sure it founds its way to Turkey from India via the silk road. http://www.budapest-tourist-guide.com/hungarian-paprika.html

Compared side by side the Pride of Seged or whatever it is called against the Indian stuff you can tell they are the same but the Indian stuff has much better color aroma and flavor.

There are many different kinds of Paprika in Hungary. Fresh, Dry, powdered, Sweet,  hot,  and many others. There is a giant market in Budapest that is great. The paprika stalls have all different kinds of dried peppers hanging everywhere. Really cool and the smell is wonderful. They are all the same peppers every other country uses to make paprika by air drying and grinding to a fine powder.

In the Indian store look  for the sweet paprika or ask. They have several varieties most are VERY hot.  

The can paprika we get in this country is of a very low quality and but a mere shadow of the stuff in Hungary. On the other hand the Indian stuff compares.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 01:46:47 AM
I'm going to look for it at the Indian store. Haven't been able to find the "hot" anywhere. The flavor of paprika goes well with what I cook.

Sorry no crock pot I have a pressure-cooker. 
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 01:52:28 AM
That a boy euge.

That's the way to do it.

When you go to the Indian store look for a tiered pressure cooker.  I haven't gotten one yet but I want one. They have layered containers inside that allow you to cook more than one coarse in the same pot.

Pressure cookers are cheap at Indian stores too.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 05, 2010, 02:02:07 AM
How does the soy sauce compare to tamari? Sorry for hijacking.

Crock pot stuff a goose in there with some veggies, dinner time.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: beerocd on October 05, 2010, 02:12:07 AM
Interesting. Do you speak Serbian? Do they have the feminine and masculine for things that make no sense at all like a table is female but a bottle is masculine? Man I hate that.


Actually you got that backwards. Astall is table and flasha is the bottle. In order to get food, I had to speak Serbian - in order to play with the kids I had to speak English. So I have the proper accent for either language. I'm just really bad on the cyrilic. Basically I know about half the letters, recognize a handful of words and can piece together the wedding invite or whatever comes our way written like that. I wouldn't even try a newspaper - they write both cyrilic and latin alphabet so I can still claim fluency even though my cyrilic sucks.

So, "cheap" means aluminum? No worries there? I'm paranoid - I avoid aluminum, microwaves, and artificial sweeteners as much as possible.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 02:14:27 AM
How does the soy sauce compare to tamari? Sorry for hijacking.

Crock pot stuff a goose in there with some veggies, dinner time.

Totally relevant.  And, probably NOT: why would soysauce feature in Slovakian cuisine? Is the Slovakian sojova omacka any different than Asian?
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 02:45:12 AM
So your crock is on a small cart so you can move around during the party?  :P
Hilarious  ;D

I'm a big fan of smoked paprika, and use it in a few crock pot dishes.  It gets me smokiness in my chili without the heat from using chipotles, so the family is still able to eat it. 

One of my favorite crock pot dishes is red cooked chicken.  You mix equal parts of soy sauce, Chinese cooking wine, and water or broth.  Add some sliced ginger, green onions, and some star anise.  I like to throw in some Szechuan peppercorns too.  You can boil all of that for a few minutes and strain it, or just throw it all into the slow cooker.  Make sure it's enough to cover the chicken, then cook it on low until it's done.  Serve it with some of the sauce and some minced green onion for dipping.

Take the remaining sauce and boil it for a few minutes, then chill it and freeze it.  Use the sauce over and over again, it picks up flavor and gets more complex the more you use it.  You can freshen it now and then with more herbs/spices, and you'll have to top it up periodically with more soy/water/cooking wine.

You can also do this on the stovetop - bring the liquid to a boil, add the chicken, return to boiling.  Boil 10 minutes, then cover and remove from heat.  Let it sit in the liquid another 15 minutes and it's ready to serve.  Delicious.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 03:51:39 AM
The Indian pressure cookers are SS. Good quality too.

How the soy sauce got to Slovakia I dont know, wife does not either. But I know there are several brands that are brewed in Slovakia. They grow lots of soy beans there. The Slovakian soy sauce is a little maltier, light and less salty then the Asian soy sauce.

(http://www.vitana.sk/_dataPublic/products/452b84a7374c2b112d97a50ae00c4776/sojova-omacka-sladka.png)

http://www.vitana.sk/produkty/ochucovadla/tekute-koreni/sojova-omacka-sladka/30639/Sojova-omacka-sladka.html


Get a pressure cooker. Loose the crock pot.

Takes six hours or more to cook beans in a crock pot. and thats after you soak them over night.
Put dry un-soaked beans into a pressure cooker and they are done to perfection in 15 -20mins. Its a no brainier.


Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 05, 2010, 04:02:37 AM
Sounds alot like tamari. At least the brand we get.

Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 04:19:02 AM
Once you try this stuff you will never go with out it again. You will find yourself putting in in all kinds of stuff. And lots of chefs do the same.

(http://www.dorothyho.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/carrotcake2.jpg)

http://importfood.com/sakm2101.html
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 04:26:42 AM
Get a pressure cooker. Loose the crock pot.
Why not have both?  ;D
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 04:39:12 AM
takes up to much valuable room.

I have one collecting dust in the basement. Still thinking of trying it for this.

http://www.happymountain.net/moonshine%20still.html
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: phillamb168 on October 05, 2010, 06:01:29 AM
One  the best paprikas you can buy IMHO is Pimenton, or smoked Spanish paprika. Seconding what another guy said, it's fantastic for adding a smokey slightly spicy note without knocking the pants off your guests. I end up using it a lot here because most French (well, ile-de-France) people can't handle anything remotely spicy.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 06:24:41 AM
These are great! (http://www.bobsredmill.com/13-bean-soup-mix.html) Your supermarket probably has them or similar. Dump one or two in the CP w/water and go hunting. What the hey- throw a pack of sausage and an onion in there too.  :)

(http://www.bobsredmill.com/images/cache/BRM-5fee7ddd7a4a33907bdefd76619b63dd.jpg)
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: phillamb168 on October 05, 2010, 06:56:24 AM
Beans would be another good idea. Especially a cassoulet. That would probably do well in a crock pot at a hunting camp.

How do you cook your beans? Every time I've tried to cook beans in the crockpot they never get soft. Last time I soaked them for 24 hours and then cooked them for 12, they were still crunchy. I'd love to try it again but I'm getting pretty frustrated.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: euge on October 05, 2010, 07:23:09 AM
Well if you're asking...

Try turning up the crock-pot a bit to cook the dry beans at a harder simmer.

Otherwise.

I'm of the soak school. Rinse and soak for at least 16 hours. Even for the pressure cooker. Then everything goes in for 30 minutes for regular beans like pinto or garbanzo. For a softer bean like Navy or Great Northern then 7-10 minutes is just fine. Saute onions and garlic first if you like I don't bother any more. I find it takes at least 45 minutes in the PC if the beans are dry. However, that's pretty good compared to traditional simmer methods.
 
Chumley might want to soak his beans at home first. Then a ziplock bag for the hydrated beans. That's his preparation LOL. However, his goulash looks pretty tasty too.

Which brings to mind pork butt, sliced onion and apple topped off with a can or two of Campbell's Golden Mushroom soup can be done in a crock-pot. It's fork tender in eight hours. Salt and pepper baby. ;) On rice or potatoes... OMG!
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 07:33:55 AM
Beans would be another good idea. Especially a cassoulet. That would probably do well in a crock pot at a hunting camp.

How do you cook your beans? Every time I've tried to cook beans in the crockpot they never get soft. Last time I soaked them for 24 hours and then cooked them for 12, they were still crunchy. I'd love to try it again but I'm getting pretty frustrated.
I've found it helps to have fresh dried beans instead of old dried beans. And to soak them on the counter instead of in the fridge.  I also heard somewhere, maybe on Good Eats or it could have been ATK, that you don't want to try to cook the beans in acidic liquid, it takes a lot longer.  So cook them to get them soft, then add them to things like chili.  They may have even cooked them with some baking soda added, although whether or not that affects the cooking seems to be disputed and might depend on your water.  As always, YYMV :)
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: phillamb168 on October 05, 2010, 09:32:02 AM
This:
I've found it helps to have fresh dried beans instead of old dried beans.
Is probably why I'm having troubles. I'll go to a better market this weekend.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: chumley on October 05, 2010, 03:23:53 PM
Hey, thanks for the recipe adjustments, Cap!  I think sour cream sounds better.

I had that dish in Kosice in 2002 and the version I posted was off some website that no longer exists.

The chinese red chicken sounds pretty good. That got me thinking, maybe a filipino adobo with pork and chicken, boil up some minute rice, and viola!  Dinner.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 04:18:54 PM
Hey, thanks for the recipe adjustments, Cap!  I think sour cream sounds better.

I had that dish in Kosice in 2002 and the version I posted was off some website that no longer exists.

The chinese red chicken sounds pretty good. That got me thinking, maybe a filipino adobo with pork and chicken, boil up some minute rice, and viola!  Dinner.
Sounds great - except for the minute rice.  :)  Some brown or wild rice sounds better.  ;D
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 08:08:32 PM
Chumley, got to make CZ dumplings to go with the segadin.

 And my wife made an interesting discovery this very day that may help. She steamed Pillsbury country style biscuits from the can and got a very close imitation CZ dumpling. Just set up a little steamer and steam the biscuits for 15 mins. instead of baking them. Works really well and would be more authentic than the noodles.

I would ordinarily suggest making homemade because they are better but given the measure of your expedition this as well as the use of the crock pot are acceptable.  ;)

   
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: bluesman on October 05, 2010, 08:14:51 PM
Chumley, got to make CZ dumplings to go with the segadin.

 And my wife made an interesting discovery this very day that may help. She steamed Pillsbury country style biscuits from the can and got a very close imitation CZ dumpling. Just set up a little steamer and steam the biscuits for 15 mins. instead of baking them. Works really well and would be more authentic than the noodles.

I would ordinarily suggest making homemade because they are better but given the measure of your expedition this as well as the use of the crock pot are acceptable.  ;)

   

It's approaching that time of year to make some Hungarian Goulash with CZ dumplings.  8)

I made your recipe last year and it went over really well at the house of bluesman.  ;)

Maybe I can find that recipe and pics "on the other forum" to post here.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 08:43:02 PM
Isnt it in this thread? Its hard to search some of these threads. Past recipes get lost, like tears in the rain.  ::)

Ill find it. They are pretty easy to make, basically bread dough steamed instead of baked.

Did I do perogies in this thread? Ill get them both over here.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: tschmidlin on October 05, 2010, 09:06:17 PM
Hard to say cap, how many dumpling recipes do you have?  ::) ;D I searched dumplings on your name and came up with this one:

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=174.msg1386#msg1386

But that's the one that goes in your grandma's chicken popeye. 

I think this is the one you were talking about . . .

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=144.msg3257#msg3257

Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 09:16:58 PM
Oh yeah that is it.  Ill post my segedin gulyas recipe in a little while. Ill have to find the pics.

How many dumpling recipes do I have?  oh Ill bet its in the hundreds. Especially if you include things like perigees, pelmeni and apple dumplings. 

Ever have PA dutch apple dumpling? Tis the season.

That reminds me. Ill put that in the PA dutch thread.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: bluesman on October 05, 2010, 09:29:03 PM
Isnt it in this thread? Its hard to search some of these threads. Past recipes get lost, like tears in the rain.  ::)

Ill find it. They are pretty easy to make, basically bread dough steamed instead of baked.

Did I do perogies in this thread? Ill get them both over here.

Found it...

http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=58428&start=570

I want to make this soon.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 05, 2010, 10:05:32 PM
That is the Hungarian Gulyas one that is stove top made. Basically gulyas stew.  What was at the BBQ with Thirsty Monk was (Kotlikovy Gulyas In Slovakian, more of a soup. Gulyas leves pronounced lev-esh in Hungarian is what they call the kettle and the soup that you had. Its just flavored a little differently and thickened with a flour butter roux.

The Segedin gulyas; or Slovakian Gulyas as it is sometimes called is different. It has loads of sauerkraut (Kysla kapusta) in it and is creamed with sour cream (kysla smotana) at the end.

I cant seem to find pics. Ill have to do it again soon and take some pics.

Found lots of good ones in my albums, Ill start moving some here.

Here is my Chirken Paprikash with Hungarian style dumplings.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1101BillyKikaAlexa3mold009.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1018DuckChicken003.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1113Alexa35m056.jpg)

I am FANATICAL about freshness.  ;D

Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 02:20:37 AM


I am FANATICAL about freshness.  ;D



 :o

I see that. 

 :-X
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: EHall on October 22, 2010, 10:22:09 PM
How did you kill it? Snap its neck? I love the photo sequence... Here's my chicken on the floor, now here he is on the counter and finally he made it to the table... good chicken! really good chicken!! and thats one mighty fine job of getting all the feathers off!
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: capozzoli on October 22, 2010, 11:00:30 PM
I was just kidding around.That was my pet rooster Poppy. The chicken on the counter came from the Chinese grocery store. A lot of Chinese people would never by a chicken without the head. They need to see that the eyes are clear.

Those pics were from last year. I just saw an interesting editorial opportunity when I saw the pictures in my album.  ;D

I would never hurt Poppy. He has since gone off to that big chicken coop in the sky.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2009_0123DJAlexa026.jpg)
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: MrNate on October 23, 2010, 12:18:39 AM
I would never hurt Poppy. He has since gone off to that big chicken coop in the sky.

Is that a euphamism for "my skillet"?
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: bluesman on October 23, 2010, 03:01:29 AM
Only the Capster can post a photo sequence like that and get away with it.  ;)
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 23, 2010, 03:23:52 AM
I remember Poppy, some chickens just become pets. Raise some and you will see too!
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: MrNate on October 23, 2010, 03:45:22 AM
I remember Poppy, some chickens just become pets. Raise some and you will see too!

True, but I ate her anyway.
Title: Re: Crock pot?
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 23, 2010, 03:56:45 AM
Sure