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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: Robert on October 06, 2010, 06:18:03 AM

Title: Sausage
Post by: Robert on October 06, 2010, 06:18:03 AM
We've had the stuffed meat thread and BBQ Style started discussing fresh sausage so I figured I'd start a new thread.

I really want to get into making sausage at home, but have no idea where to start. Any of you out there stuff your own? What are some good places to start? Any recommended stuffers/grinders? 
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 06:32:42 AM
Anything and everything you want to know about making sausage is right here.

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/

Here's a favorite.

Louisiana Sausage

5 lbs. medium ground pork butt
1 1/2 tsp. cayenne
1 1/2 tsp. chilli pepper
5 tsp. salt
1 large minced onion
2 tsp. black pepper
4 cloves pressed garlic
1/2 tsp. allspice
1-cup cold-water
2 tsp. thyme
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 06:42:27 AM
I like this thread.  :)

Here's another one.  Brings out the German in me.  ;)

Bratwurst by Bill the Grill guy

Thread
http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=3484&highlight=wittdog


5 pounds lean ground pork, unseasoned
4 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 tablespoon sage
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2teaspoons dried rosemary
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon nutmeg
5 teaspoons salt
Hog casings (I used about 10')

Made 15 6" brats.

Mix all spices together and work into meat. Stuff meat mixture into hog casings and form links. Makes
about 20 brats.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Robert on October 06, 2010, 07:05:14 AM
Any stateside suppliers? That forum seems to be primarily based in the UK.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: hopfenundmalz on October 06, 2010, 07:13:44 AM
Here is a book that covers it, and more.  Chef Brian was on a No Reservations show segment recently, if you watch Anthony Bordain.  He is an instructor at Schoolcraft College (well known for the culinary school), and owns a restuarant in my small town.

http://www.amazon.com/Charcuterie-Craft-Salting-Smoking-Curing/dp/0393058298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1286374195&sr=1-1
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: nicneufeld on October 06, 2010, 07:53:45 AM
Would highly recommend that book as well, an excellent guide to a generally obscure culinary art.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: gordonstrong on October 06, 2010, 08:17:07 AM
+1 on Ruhlman's Charcuterie book.

It's cheating, but Penzey's bratwurst spice blend is actually pretty good.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on October 06, 2010, 09:04:08 AM
I've been making various types of sausages at home for a number of years, having learned sausage making from the old men in the church I lived next door to.  They would convene once a month on a Saturday to drink a case beer, make a  hundred lbs of Hungarian kolbász,  and sell it to the congregation (and interested neighbors) as a fundraiser.  I always liked kolbász, so when they knocked on my door because they were short of help, I was more than happy to oblige.  When I walked into the kitchen, they immediately handed me a beer, and when I saw that the preferred beverage there was the green can of ale with the three rings,   I knew it was some kind of divine intervention that brought me there.  ;D   I wound up helping for the next five years.

I've been making various sausages at home ever since.  It's not difficult at all, and a KitchenAid stand mixer with a grinder and stuffer attachment makes it downright easy and quick.  If you cook and/or bake, a KitchenAid is a must have anyway, and well worth the investment.

Here's the recipe for Hungarian "házi kolbász", a very simple and tasty fresh 'farmer' style sausage that was my introduction to tubed meat:

Ingredients:
5lbs pork butt, untrimmed -you want anywhere from 20% to 30% fat content  (lean sausage=fail)
2 1/2 Tblsp Kosher salt or Sea salt
1 Tblsp freshly ground black pepper (more if you like it to have a sharper kick)
2 Tblsp Hungarian sweet paprika  (there is no substitute for this...spanish paprika isn't the same)
5 cloves of garlic, pureed with a bit of ice water
1/4 to 1/2 cup ice water or very cold beer... as needed
Procedure:
Grind the meat coarsely (a 1/4" grinder plate is ideal); add the spices and mix well, keeping the mixture very cold.
Work enough of the ice water (or cold beer) into to the mix to make stuffing manageable, and stuff into hog casings (or if you want hot dog sized links, stuff into sheep casings). 

If you are cooking the kolbász without smoking,  it can be cooked immediately--although I think it's much better after being left uncovered in the fridge overnight;  if you plan to smoke the kolbász,  you really should add about 1/8 tsp of pink curing salt to play it safe.  I know people that don't use a cure when smoking sausage, but are taking what I feel is an unnecessary risk.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 06, 2010, 09:09:15 AM
I suppose I should have read this thread before posting the green chorizo recipe in the BBQ thread . . . I'll move it here.

There's lots of fresh sausage recipes . . . I never bother packing them into casings, I just use it as loose sausage.  I got this one from a TV show with the Mexican cooking guy.  Rick Bayless?  I leave out the spinach powder because I don't have any, although I might make my own for the next batch.

Chorizo Verde
Makes about 1 1/2 pounds (3 generous cups)

1 large poblano chile
1-2 serrano chiles, stemmed and roughly chopped
1 bunch of cilantro, tough lower stems cut off, the leafy part roughly chopped
1 1/2 pounds ground pork
3 Tbs spinach powder
2 tsp salt

1.   Roast the poblano chile until blistered and blackened all over.  When cool remove the blackened skin.  Remove the stem and seeds.  Quickly rinse to remove any seeds or bits of skin. Roughly chop and scoop into a food processor, along with the serrano and cilantro.  Pulse until uniformly chopped, then run the machine until you have a coarse puree.
 
2.   In a large bowl, combine the pork with the green seasonings, spinach powder, and the salt—your hand is the most efficient utensil for working the seasonings thoroughly into the meat.  Cover and refrigerate for several hours before frying.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on October 06, 2010, 10:11:26 AM
This is a thread I can really sink my teeth into.  I've made homemade breakfast sausage before and it turned out pretty good.  I'm really interested in bratwurst recipes because I'm German, I love sausage (and of course beer), and would love to put some together at home.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 06, 2010, 11:09:27 AM
Here is a book that covers it, and more.  Chef Brian was on a No Reservations show segment recently, if you watch Anthony Bordain.  He is an instructor at Schoolcraft College (well known for the culinary school), and owns a restuarant in my small town.

http://www.amazon.com/Charcuterie-Craft-Salting-Smoking-Curing/dp/0393058298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1286374195&sr=1-1

Damn there goes my plans for a "Charcuterie" thread- inspired by that very same No Reservations episode. Been looking at sausage stuffers... maybe the KitchenAide has an attachment for that too.

And all the talk about scrapple has me thinking of terrines and galantines.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: hopfenundmalz on October 06, 2010, 11:24:03 AM
Here is a book that covers it, and more.  Chef Brian was on a No Reservations show segment recently, if you watch Anthony Bordain.  He is an instructor at Schoolcraft College (well known for the culinary school), and owns a restuarant in my small town.
http://www.amazon.com/Charcuterie-Craft-Salting-Smoking-Curing/dp/0393058298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1286374195&sr=1-1
Damn there goes my plans for a "Charcuterie" thread- inspired by that very same No Reservations episode. Been looking at sausage stuffers... maybe the KitchenAide has an attachment for that too.
And all the talk about scrapple has me thinking of terrines and galantines.
The last time I saw Polcyn in town he mentioned that he was working on another book.  Don't know what the subject is.
Charcuterie plates were always an experience at FIve Lakes Grill.  That place had to retool do to the Michan economy, and is now Cinco Lagos.
Polcyn used to tell a story about a server saying to her table "Chef is very proud of his sausage."!   ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: gordonstrong on October 06, 2010, 12:35:55 PM
Quote
Polcyn used to tell a story about a server saying to her table "Chef is very proud of his sausage."!   

Reminds me of the movie Bachelor Party.  Q: "Is that the foot long?"  A: "And then some"

Euge, KitchenAid mixers have a sausage stuffer attachment.  IIRC, it's a hard plastic tube that you attach to the grinder attachment.  After the meat is all ground and mixed, you run it through again with the stuffer attachment in place.  You put the casing on the attachment and feed it out as the sausage is filled.  I've used it before, but it's been awhile.  I seem to remember the KitchenAid working better as a grinder than as a stuffer.  Manual gives you more control.  Go slow.

You might also check out Bruce Aidell's Complete Sausage Book.  It's a bit old, but the dude knows his sausage.  The Charcuterie book is nice because it also covers a wider range of topics, but not everyone wants to make duck prosciutto.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 06, 2010, 12:41:19 PM
I want to get into this too. I have a kitchen aid mixer and you can get a sausage attachment. Anyone ever try it with that?

This thread is going to turn into a real sausage fest.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on October 06, 2010, 12:45:30 PM
We make about 100 pounds of sausage every year for our Oktoberfest and usually only cook about 60 so we have brats all year long.  My wife loves the weisse brats in Bavaria but has some misguided aversion to eating veal so we make it with pork and chicken breast instead.  We normally make about 25 pounds of the weisse brats, 75 of the standard brats.  We also make about 5 pounds of the standard into breakfast sized patties and freeze them.
My standard recipe calls for 60% lean, 40% fat, and we use about a 50/50 mix of pork and beef.    Packer trimmed briskets are my favorite beef cut to use because it does have plenty of fat on it.  Another trick I've learned is to grind the fat separately with the fine disk and the lean with the coarse disk for better texture.
Here's my setup for sausage making:
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_36989_36989
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200004374_200004374
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200333527_200333527
These were Christmas presents from my wife and kids, gotta love 'em
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 06, 2010, 12:59:15 PM
 :o

Sweet setup corky, I'm totally jealous.  And I think I need to make sausage tonight.  I'm so easily influenced.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 06, 2010, 12:59:55 PM
Those are pretty sweet.

I have been dabbling in the art of charcuterie. Recently started curing meats and what not. Did some pork and a couple of corned beef. Havent made my own sausage yet but I have cured and cold smoked some fresh wild bore sausage. Pictured below. It was fantastic. Also pictured is wild boar roast. These pictures are from last winter too. I cant hit the temps for cold smoking till it is bellow freezing.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/HAM003.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009012.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009016.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009007.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Gulash2009005.jpg)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: EHall on October 06, 2010, 01:17:42 PM
I've wondered for a long time when someone would make it official that there was a sausage fest going on around here...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on October 06, 2010, 01:24:49 PM
My wife was raised on a farm in France and we visit her family every other year.  I dearly love the charcutrie over there.  One BIL was a butcher and his specialty was charcutrie, especially cured hams(prosciutto style) and blood sausage.  French farmers in the post WWII era learned how to make damn near anything taste great.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on October 06, 2010, 01:28:10 PM
I've wondered for a long time when someone would make it official that there was a sausage fest going on around here...

Suffice it to say that you can set your inklings aside and let the festivities begin my freind.

The AHA sausage and beer fest has officially begun.  ;)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: EHall on October 06, 2010, 01:36:49 PM
GO MEAT!!!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 06, 2010, 04:08:38 PM
Alright, I posted pics of my sausage.

 How embarrassing if no one else does.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 06, 2010, 04:45:29 PM
I'd show mine too but I haven't made any yet. :D

Cap do you hang those with beneficial organisms?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 06, 2010, 06:08:07 PM
Just cured it with Morton's Tender Quick; that name is confusing cause it has nothing to do with tenderizing meat. It is a simple cure formula. of mostly salt with a  small amount of sodium nitrate and nitrite  I made a brine solution of the curing salt, sugar and spices  The wild boar sausage that was already made was brine cured. Not cured while ground before stuffing like klobasa is.

That is what I would like to learn to do.

Beneficial organisms, Is that what they call the stuff for the fermented meats like salami and pork roll?

Do you guys have pork roll or is that a local thing for me? MMM a Taylor pork roll sandwich from their restaurant on the Wildwood boardwalk....Nice.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tygo on October 06, 2010, 06:47:29 PM
I have a kitchen aid as well and have been thinking about getting the grinding and stuffing attachment.  I've made homemade sausage but just made patties so far.  My dad has one of these:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v226/wyogoob/SausagePress_a_sm-1.jpg)

He inherited it from his father along with the recipe.  I got him to give me the recipe but I'm still tweeking the amounts of spices.  The recipe he has measures them in "hands per inch of meat".

For 5 lbs of pork sausage:

5 tsp salt
1.25 tsp pepper
5 tsp brown sugar
1.25 tsp coriandar
0.25 tsp thyme
1/2 + 1/8 tsp allspice
0.25 tsp dried sage
1/2 + 1/8 tsp paprika

The last time I made some it came out very close to what he makes.  My notes say up the spices a bit.  Also, you need a good bit of fat in the pork.  Since I can only ever find very lean ground pork around here I had the butcher grind up a couple pounds of beef fat for me and mixed it in.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on October 06, 2010, 06:58:52 PM
That stuffer is beautiful, especially with the family connection.  Looking at the gears you can tell it was made to last, not like stuff made today.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 06, 2010, 09:26:12 PM
Do you guys have pork roll or is that a local thing for me? MMM a Taylor pork roll sandwich from their restaurant on the Wildwood boardwalk....Nice.
I miss pork roll!  I grew up with it and had gotten over it, but got together with family 6 months ago and it brought all of the memories back.  But I got a recipe from someone on this board (who will remain nameless unless they choose to identify themselves, since it was through PM).  I gave it to a butcher willing to give it a try, and pick up the results this Saturday!  Very excited!  Taylor ham, fried egg, cheese, on an English muffin . . .yum!

Have I mentioned I'm very excited?!   ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on October 07, 2010, 03:35:52 AM

Have I mentioned I'm very excited?!   ;D

Yes you did.  ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 07, 2010, 08:44:41 AM
Do you guys have pork roll or is that a local thing for me? MMM a Taylor pork roll sandwich from their restaurant on the Wildwood boardwalk....Nice.
I miss pork roll!  I grew up with it and had gotten over it, but got together with family 6 months ago and it brought all of the memories back.  But I got a recipe from someone on this board (who will remain nameless unless they choose to identify themselves, since it was through PM).  I gave it to a butcher willing to give it a try, and pick up the results this Saturday!  Very excited!  Taylor ham, fried egg, cheese, on an English muffin . . .yum!

Have I mentioned I'm very excited?!   ;D

Wow. I would love to see that. Is there some sort of fermenting step that sours the meat? There is one they use for salami, I think they even use it for proccuttio and soprasatta.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 07, 2010, 08:50:54 AM
Wow. I would love to see that. Is there some sort of fermenting step that sours the meat? There is one they use for salami, I think they even use it for proccuttio and soprasatta.
Yes, it's a 12-24 hour fermentation with LHP, which I understand is a couple of different strains of pediococcus.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: nicneufeld on October 07, 2010, 10:07:26 AM
http://www.georgesbrandmeats.com/

Their slogan is catchy:  "OUR MEAT CAN'T BE BEAT"  I leave the doubtlessly pending jokes to the imagination.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on October 07, 2010, 10:14:12 AM
GO MEAT!!!

That's what I'm talkin' about! :o
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: beerocd on October 07, 2010, 05:33:43 PM
http://www.georgesbrandmeats.com/

Their slogan is catchy:  "OUR MEAT CAN'T BE BEAT"  I leave the doubtlessly pending jokes to the imagination.

You sure have become a fan of Serbian "stuff". I dare not call it cuisine...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 10, 2010, 12:02:49 AM
Do you guys have pork roll or is that a local thing for me? MMM a Taylor pork roll sandwich from their restaurant on the Wildwood boardwalk....Nice.
I picked up 10 lbs of "pork roll" from the butcher today.  There's less than 9 lbs left.  ;D

The flavor is pretty close to Taylor Ham IIRC, but the texture is all wrong.  The butcher has some ideas to improve the overall recipe, so I'm going to try his version next time.  I'm also going to get him a sample of the real thing and let him try to duplicate it after that, so we'll revisit this recipe.  The main thing I think, is going to be to grind it finer to begin with.  He also wraps it in plastic instead of the cloth that Taylor uses, which has a downside - when you cook it some of the fat renders out.  The plastic traps it, so after I opened each package I scraped off the congealed fat and an aspic like substance.   :-\

Then I sliced it up and pan fried it - served on an English muffin with cheddar and a fried egg - yum!   ;D  So good.

The butcher was kind enough to cut it into chunks, shrink wrap, and freeze it for me since the original handoff didn't happen.  Unopened packages, in this pic, you can see a blob of the congealed rendered fat on the left . . .
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLFj1MmLQcI/AAAAAAAAAEg/j2CMEv3GtC4/IMG00142-20101009-1751.jpg)

After slicing and pan-frying . . .
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_j-Iuc3I_JMk/TLFj1eotMaI/AAAAAAAAAEk/PxNh2hUCWpk/IMG00145-20101009-1918.jpg)

For a first try I'm super excited. This is a good enough substitute as is, but if we can get closer that will be awesome!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 11, 2010, 01:52:14 PM
Who is this mystery pork roll recipe holder?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 11, 2010, 01:55:53 PM
I ordered the piece for my kitchen aid.

Sausage really seems like something I could get my hands around?

Anyone else gonna play with some sausage?

 I want to see more pics of sausage and compare.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 11, 2010, 02:52:18 PM
I'm waiting to get a KA mixer but want the one where the bowl is cradled in the two arms not resting on its base.

I plan to do the real stuff. Dried and fermented.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: beerocd on October 11, 2010, 03:38:29 PM
FERMENTED?  :o

You sure about that?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 11, 2010, 04:29:02 PM
FERMENTED?  :o

You sure about that?

Sure. An aspect of charcuterie.  Supposedly 40-60C for several days is the ideal range.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: beerocd on October 11, 2010, 04:35:09 PM
Ah, went to look it up - and yes I've had the white-ish sausages before.
I guess "fermented meat"  just sounded funny to me.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 11, 2010, 05:31:22 PM
Salami is fermented too. So is sopresatta.

Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: rabid_dingo on October 11, 2010, 08:01:21 PM
My family's Chorizo is fermented a bit in vinegar...Pickled i guess is a better word...I have wanted to get into
stuffing some sausage...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 11, 2010, 11:41:42 PM
Who is this mystery pork roll recipe holder?
I am now  ;D

Yesterday I made 3 kinds of sausage - andouille, Italian, and that green chorizo recipe I posted here the other day.  We had green chorizo tonight, friend up with some onions, beans, a little cumin and Mexican oregano, and served over rice.  Delicious.  No pics though, sorry.

I fried up some patties of the andouille and Italian to taste the seasonings, they turned out nice.  They're emeril recipes, although I made some substitutions where I felt like it.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-mild-italian-sausage-recipe/index.html
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-andouille-sausage-recipe/index.html
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on October 12, 2010, 03:33:43 AM
Who is this mystery pork roll recipe holder?
They're emeril recipes, although I made some substitutions where I felt like it.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-mild-italian-sausage-recipe/index.html
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-andouille-sausage-recipe/index.html

Love Emiril's sausage recipes. I need to try my hand at some Andouille.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on October 12, 2010, 07:13:46 AM
Who is this mystery pork roll recipe holder?
They're emeril recipes, although I made some substitutions where I felt like it.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-mild-italian-sausage-recipe/index.html
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-andouille-sausage-recipe/index.html

Love Emiril's sausage recipes. I need to try my hand at some Andouille.

Sounds good to me as well.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 15, 2010, 11:50:22 AM
I found this site. Very informative and instructional.

http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/ (http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 15, 2010, 12:02:07 PM
Lots of recipes on there, thanks for the link euge.  :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 15, 2010, 12:03:51 PM
Dang, now I want to make sausage.

I hate you guys. First it's beer. Then cider. Then wine. Then bread, cheese, smoked meats, pepper sauce, sauerkraut, scrapple, soap, and now sausage? Sheesh, it's like I'm turning into my own little country store over here.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on October 15, 2010, 10:25:06 PM
Dang, now I want to make sausage.

I hate you guys. First it's beer. Then cider. Then wine. Then bread, cheese, smoked meats, pepper sauce, sauerkraut, scrapple, soap, and now sausage? Sheesh, it's like I'm turning into my own little country store over here.

LOL!  I feel the same way sometimes.   Love it though...at least I know what's going into it!!!
But really, making sausage is one of the easiest things in the world to make.  And like homebrew, once you get the hang of it it's far better than pretty much anything you can buy.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 16, 2010, 08:10:34 AM
Yeah, that's really the problem. Once you've done it once or twice, you see stuff in the store and think to yourself, "I'll just make some. No big deal." Then next thing you know you're churning butter on the weekends.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 16, 2010, 08:36:15 AM


We churn our own butter. Its easy with a mixer.

First time was an accident. We were aiming for whip cream.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 16, 2010, 08:51:01 AM


We churn our own butter. Its easy with a mixer.

First time was an accident. We were aiming for whip cream.

Discovered that as a bartender. Nice fresh sweet-cream butter.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 16, 2010, 09:07:34 AM
Yeah, my wife made butter trying to make whipped cream. She didn't realize it, and I didn't have the heart to tell her.

I forget what we had it on, but it was good!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on October 16, 2010, 09:25:12 AM
I've made my own butter, it turned out really nice - but I decided the effort wasn't worth it on a regular basis.  Unless you can get the cream cheap, you spend more money making it yourself than if you just bought a good quality butter to begin with.  Now I only make it for special occasions. :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on October 16, 2010, 09:31:38 AM
That was pretty much my conclusion.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 16, 2010, 09:52:18 AM
We make it when we get cream at the Hallo Farm Dairy. Its half there what it is at  the grocery store. I then usually plan making Ethiopian food around that cause I make niter kebbeh with the fresh butter.

Also works wonderfully for making homemade Gee.Try it in Chicken Kiev. 
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 16, 2010, 01:11:40 PM
One of the many reasons I wish I lived 30 miles west of here. You can't buy unpastuerized dairy here, and it's hard to find a dairy farm that'll sell direct. Hell, the biggest dairy farm in the area just sold off the herd and closed up shop last year.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 16, 2010, 07:43:46 PM
It is illegal to sell raw milk products in NJ an PA. you have to know someone in the dairy business to get it from the back door. I used to know a guy that would hook me up. He would scoop it out of the mixing vat that kept the cream from rising. The vat sat just before the homogenizing and pasteurizing processes.

Really good stuff for cooking. A really thick cream would rise to the top. Very good.

mrnate, if you are ever near Trenton stop in at the Halo Farm store. They have really good farm fresh milk and stuff. Great prices too. Its pasteurized but very fresh and right from the farm. Kids love going there too cause they can watch the packaging line in operation from the store
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on October 16, 2010, 09:26:37 PM
A big +1 on Halo Farm, and in nearby Lawrenceville check out Cherry Grove Farm.  They have great meat products (including grass fed beef, whey fed pork, and free true free range eggs)  as well as some great raw milk cheeses (they fall within the aging guidelines to keep them legal). 

While you're in the neighborhood, also check out Terhune Orchards for some great produce and right now, great apples in many varieties.

The Garden State still has some really great gardens, if you seek them out!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 16, 2010, 09:38:33 PM
A big +1 on Halo Farm, and in nearby Lawrenceville check out Cherry Grove Farm.  They have great meat products (including grass fed beef, whey fed pork, and free true free range eggs)  as well as some great raw milk cheeses (they fall within the aging guidelines to keep them legal). 

While you're in the neighborhood, also check out Terhune Orchards for some great produce and right now, great apples in many varieties.

The Garden State still has some really great gardens, if you seek them out!


Terhune cider makes the absolute best hard cider, hands down. I make some just about every yer (not this year, though).
Raw milk is legal in PA if you have a "raw milk permit". There was a guy who got busted not too long ago for selling at a farmer's market without said permit..
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 17, 2010, 04:55:05 AM
A big +1 on Halo Farm, and in nearby Lawrenceville check out Cherry Grove Farm.  They have great meat products (including grass fed beef, whey fed pork, and free true free range eggs)  as well as some great raw milk cheeses (they fall within the aging guidelines to keep them legal). 

While you're in the neighborhood, also check out Terhune Orchards for some great produce and right now, great apples in many varieties.

The Garden State still has some really great gardens, if you seek them out!


Terhune farm is fun. Good cider and pies. Very expensive tough.  Plus I am not into their apple cider doughnuts. Snipes farm makes the best cider doughnuts around here.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 17, 2010, 10:00:47 AM
How are the prices at Cherry Grove Farm? I have never been there but it is on my list now.

Mrnate, thanks for pointing out that raw dairy is legal in PA. Do you know somewhere to get it? The Amish?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 17, 2010, 09:59:15 PM
How are the prices at Cherry Grove Farm? I have never been there but it is on my list now.

Mrnate, thanks for pointing out that raw dairy is legal in PA. Do you know somewhere to get it? The Amish?

I don't know any specifics, but the Amish and assorted bretheren would be a good bet. I really need to find a place since I'm out that way regular enough. There's a couple on this list in Bucks, Lancaster, Lehigh, etc. that I'd like to check out: http://www.realmilk.com/where4.html#pa
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 18, 2010, 05:56:53 PM
Very cool and that one farm drops off right around the corner from my house. Sweet. Im putting in an order as I write.

Weird how the Sausage thread turned into a dairy thread.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: beerocd on October 18, 2010, 06:16:51 PM
Very cool and that one farm drops off right around the corner from my house. Sweet. Im putting in an order as I write.

Weird how the Sausage thread turned into a dairy thread.

Yeah amazing it went off track.  ::) :P ::)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on October 18, 2010, 06:38:17 PM
Very cool and that one farm drops off right around the corner from my house. Sweet. Im putting in an order as I write.

Weird how the Sausage thread turned into a dairy thread.

Yeah amazing it went off track.  ::) :P ::)

Are we having fun with this thread yet.  :-\  ;)  ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on October 18, 2010, 06:48:46 PM
Lets go talk sausage in the cheese thread.

Kefir has alcohol? I wonder what would happen if that were distilled? Milky moonshine?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: beerocd on October 18, 2010, 07:11:55 PM
Lets go talk sausage in the cheese thread.

Kefir has alcohol? I wonder what would happen if that were distilled? Milky moonshine?

1% per gallon, so 1.2 ounces per gallon, milk is anywhere from $4-$9 a gallon, so a pint of white(ha ha) lightning is $60-$100?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MrNate on October 18, 2010, 09:27:03 PM
Lets go talk sausage in the cheese thread.

Capital idea, Sir. Capital.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on October 19, 2010, 10:59:51 AM
I just ordered a grinder/stuffer to start making sausage again.  Used to do it lots as a kid with my germanic russian family.  Got to get the family recipe from my 92 year old grandfather.

Another sausage we used to make, and I still do make every 1-2 years with my dad is what we call "mushy sausage."  I've only ever come across a similar commercial sausage once, and it was called "rice sausage, " although we use barley instead.  The key components are liver, barley and allspice.  Anyways, this is a loose sausage, I'm guessing the "mushy" term was just a poor translation.

Mushy Sausage
1 pork shoulder
1.5 lbs beef/pork liver
1 bag pearl barley cooked
3 onions
salt
pepper
allspice (lots)
garlic (lots)

Grind the meat, mince the onion and garlic, season, and mix.  Bag and seal it up in 1lb packages.  Pan fry.

The liver and allspice give it a very unique flavour.  Even people that hate liver can't pick it out.  Absolutely delicious with eggs and toast.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on October 19, 2010, 11:48:13 AM
I just ordered a grinder/stuffer to start making sausage again.  Used to do it lots as a kid with my germanic russian family.  Got to get the family recipe from my 92 year old grandfather.

Another sausage we used to make, and I still do make every 1-2 years with my dad is what we call "mushy sausage."  I've only ever come across a similar commercial sausage once, and it was called "rice sausage, " although we use barley instead.  The key components are liver, barley and allspice.  Anyways, this is a loose sausage, I'm guessing the "mushy" term was just a poor translation.

Mushy Sausage
1 pork shoulder
1.5 lbs beef/pork liver
1 bag pearl barley cooked
3 onions
salt
pepper
allspice (lots)
garlic (lots)

Grind the meat, mince the onion and garlic, season, and mix.  Bag and seal it up in 1lb packages.  Pan fry.

The liver and allspice give it a very unique flavour.  Even people that hate liver can't pick it out.  Absolutely delicious with eggs and toast.

Sound a lot like the "Hurka" my Hungarian grandmother made.  Rather like Polish "Kiska" sausage, actually.  Rice, a bit of meat, and the offals that are classic to some of these eastern European tubed meat masterpieces;  the classic Hungarian way is to add a good amount of marjoram.  Hers used only rice, no barley,, and in addition to the liver also included the lungs (which became illegal to sell in the US).  I've made it a few times leaving the lungs out (only because I couldn't  get them and don't raise pigs myself) and it came out great.  You're absolutely right about the liver...it adds an interesting, different, and not overpowering  dimension to the sausage  and even self proclaimed non-offal fans I've fed it to have found it very tasty.

I like the idea of the pearled barley in there...I may just have to try your recipe soon...thanks for posting it.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on October 19, 2010, 12:11:14 PM
I like the idea of the pearled barley in there...I may just have to try your recipe soon...thanks for posting it.

I forgot to mention that the somewhat "mushy" texture comes from the addition of liquid.  You can gently boil the organ meat prior to grinding, skim off any scum, and use that for liquid, or just plain water.  Again, no specific amounts, just go by texture and feel.  Always fry up a test portion to see how it turns out.

I did some quick googling and found similar recipes that also call for tongue and other such interesting parts.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: EHall on January 06, 2011, 11:18:38 AM
So I picked up a copy of Charcuterie, pretty good book. Do any of you here make your own cured sausage? Sopprasatta and/or salami would be fun to make. I was thinking I could use the fermenter for it since I can control the temp but I'm not sure about the humidity. Is there a way to get the reading w/o a fancy/expensive gauge? I was also thinking I couldn't have any fermentations going on due to the CO2 would be floating all around the sausage. But anyone do this successfully?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on January 06, 2011, 02:32:45 PM
I don't know how accurate the humidity had to be, but I have a cheap cordless thermometer that measures temp and humidity. 
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: capozzoli on January 06, 2011, 07:22:37 PM
Ive never fermented sausage but but I dried cured, smoked sausage in front of a fan. Works great. Last time I did it I made kabanosy. smoked and dried real easy cause it is much thinner than regular klobasa.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on January 10, 2011, 03:28:50 PM
The mushy sausage sounds a lot like the Louisiana boudin my BIL gave me at Christmas.  made with rice, pork ans just a hint of liver it's really good stuff.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on January 10, 2011, 08:01:33 PM
The mushy sausage sounds a lot like the Louisiana boudin my BIL gave me at Christmas.  made with rice, pork ans just a hint of liver it's really good stuff.

Yeah, I need to make more, I've been craving some.  But I just got my new electric grinder/stuffer so I'm gonna give that a test run next weekend with some fairly basic pork sausages and turkey brats.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluedog on January 21, 2011, 08:31:59 PM
I have been making sausage for about fifteen years and I can offer a little advice. Check out Rytek Kutas' book on Sausage Making - it is the real deal. I would also recommend Bruce Aidell's book and even Emeril has a section in his Real and Rustic book on Charcuterie. Also check out The Sausage Maker Catalog. From experience I can tell you the Kitchen Aid attachment will work if you want to make a pound of brats. But if you want to make more than a pound at a time invest in a sausage press. I bought one after fighting the Kitchen aid and it is money well spent. Think Corona mill vs any of the higher end malt mills. I also recommend mixing any dry spices with ice water before adding them to the meat mixture for a more even distribution of spice.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on January 24, 2011, 06:45:26 PM
I also recommend mixing any dry spices with ice water before adding them to the meat mixture for a more even distribution of spice.

I did this on the weekend, worked great.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: rabid_dingo on February 11, 2011, 12:38:43 AM
Does anyone have a good breakfast sausage recipe?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: rabid_dingo on February 11, 2011, 12:50:14 AM
Made some home made chorizo, I have to ask my mom if it is ok to share the recipe, it was Grandma's...But enjoy the view.

(http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh233/Rabid_Dingo/ChorizoSpices.jpg)
The mix of garlic, spices and herbs.

(http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh233/Rabid_Dingo/ChorizoChiles.jpg)
Ancho and Rojo(Colorado) Chiles. In a steam basket in a pot. Easier than soaking in water. Too much gets
wicked away in water. Steam does enough to soften the dried chiles and makes them easy to work with.

(http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh233/Rabid_Dingo/Chorizo.jpg)
The final product. It has to sit and marinate overnight or for at least 12 hours. Garage is cold enough
I sat it on the floor covered overnight.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on February 11, 2011, 12:52:38 AM
Does anyone have a good breakfast sausage recipe?

Sage.

Add this to (as desired) salt and pepper, powdered garlic along with crushed red chile or jalapeño. I ground up chilled pork-butt roasts. No binder. It's the sage that makes the difference. Pretty much star of the show. BTW go easy with the garlic.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: rabid_dingo on February 11, 2011, 11:42:24 AM
Cool. Thanks.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on February 11, 2011, 12:22:21 PM
Made some home made chorizo, I have to ask my mom if it is ok to share the recipe, it was Grandma's...But enjoy the view.

One of my favorite sausages. Looks great!

I'd love to see your family recipe.

Thanks for sharing.  :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: miguelpanderland on February 24, 2011, 07:06:16 PM
Anyone have a great bratwurst recipe?  Going to use my new sausage stuffer for the first time on Saturday.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tygo on March 27, 2011, 12:30:18 PM
UPS delivered my meat grinder attachment for the kitchen aid on Friday and I just ordered up some sausage casings.  Going to make up 10 lbs one of these upcoming weekends.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on August 26, 2011, 01:10:13 PM
It's time we started talking about home made sausage again . . .

Someone who really likes me gave me a kitchenaid mixer.  I've ordered the meat grinder attachment and plan to make some sausage next week, but I haven't decided what kind yet.  I'll be reading the sausage section of Charcuterie this weekend and picking something out.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tygo on August 26, 2011, 01:29:27 PM
I still haven't made any yet.  One of these weekends I need to get on that.  I did break in the meatgrinder attachment though to make burgers the other weekend.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: EHall on August 26, 2011, 02:45:45 PM
Tom,
Tip for the kitchenaid... freeze your meatgrinder and pull it out right before you ready to use... that info is usually in all the books but I found out the hard way that the kitchenaid heats up pretty quickly.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on August 26, 2011, 03:03:23 PM
Good to know, thanks for the tip!  It will be my first grinding so I'm not sure what to expect.  Lots of reading to do. :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on August 26, 2011, 03:12:17 PM
Tom,
Tip for the kitchenaid... freeze your meatgrinder and pull it out right before you ready to use... that info is usually in all the books but I found out the hard way that the kitchenaid heats up pretty quickly.

a definite +1 on that tip.   
Between freezing the grinder unit for a while and half-freezing the meat, you will get a perfect grind every time. 
My KitchenAid is going on its 25th year and still going strong.  I recently purchase two more third party manufactured grinding plates for mine...  12.5mm and a 10mm plates for extra coarse grind...a must when making Hungarian Kolbasz,  Polish Keilbasa, Andouille, and a few other types that call for the coarser grind.
For some sausages, I have also used a food processor to make true chopped meat  (which I prefer for burgers and meat based pasta sauces).
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: robertpreed on December 12, 2011, 04:04:30 PM
I have been making sausage for about fifteen years and I can offer a little advice....  From experience I can tell you the Kitchen Aid attachment will work if you want to make a pound of brats. But if you want to make more than a pound at a time invest in a sausage press. I bought one after fighting the Kitchen aid and it is money well spent.....

Okay, this thread has gotten me very hungry..........and interested in making sausage.

I have a Kitchen Aid and an unused grinding attachment, so probably time to put it to use.   The online reviews of the KA sausage stuffer have been mixed to say the least and the sausage press sounds like a good ($140 or so) idea. 

I'll probably do a batch or two not in casing to ensure that this is the hobby for me.    I bet the sausage would taste good with a homebrew.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on December 12, 2011, 04:07:11 PM
I think you are right!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on December 12, 2011, 04:20:31 PM
I've only done loose sausage so far and haven't used the stuffer attachment (haven't gotten one yet either), but I think I'll try the cheap one before springing for an expensive sausage press.  From the sounds of some of the reviews, the reason it doesn't work for some people is that they're doing it wrong.  I'm hoping if I read the instructions I'll have better luck.

Has anyone here used the KA sausage stuffer attachment?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on December 12, 2011, 06:36:50 PM
The KA meat grinder attachment is next on the list of kitchen gadgets to buy. I was hoping to have it by now but other things (purchases) got in the way Hopefully...sooner than later. You may want to consider some fresh Kielbasa...it tastes fantastic smoked.  ;)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on December 12, 2011, 06:42:47 PM
Here's a high profile place to learn more about the art and craft of sausage making.  :)

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: robertpreed on December 12, 2011, 07:06:23 PM
Thanks for the forum link.....info overload!

Rusk?   Do people actually add that to their sausage?   Is that just crushed rusk crackers?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on December 12, 2011, 07:25:37 PM
Or here's a good looking Italian Sausage recipe...

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=8010

scroll down a bit...

(http://i768.photobucket.com/albums/xx324/Vindiii/P11502241024x768.jpg)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bo on December 12, 2011, 07:36:42 PM
I can't remember the last time I used Italian sausage in link form. I almost always cut it out of the casings for spaghetti sauce, pizza, etc. I might give that recipe a try and just keep it in premeasured chunks in the freezer.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: robertpreed on December 12, 2011, 07:46:46 PM
Yeah, that recipe looks like a cross between sweet and hot.    That's probably a winner!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on December 12, 2011, 08:45:33 PM
Amazing. But 15 pounds? That's a lot of sausage- hopefully a lot of people are eating it!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on December 12, 2011, 08:57:00 PM
Amazing. But 15 pounds? That's a lot of sausage- hopefully a lot of people are eating it!
Because of the mess and the amount of cleaning involved 15 pounds is a minimum for me.  We did about 60 pounds of sausage one night in September for our Oktoberfest.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bo on December 12, 2011, 09:05:12 PM
Amazing. But 15 pounds? That's a lot of sausage- hopefully a lot of people are eating it!

I was looking at the 1 pound recipe toward the end of the page. I can scale that up a little.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MDixon on December 13, 2011, 06:16:52 AM
Has anyone here used the KA sausage stuffer attachment?

The KA attachment is kinda a PITA to use, you have to hold the casing in one hand and apply pressure with the other. 10lbs of sausage is a bit of a chore that way.

Skip the KA attachment and get a Grizzly http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6252

I think I got mine off ebay for a few bucks less and still directly from Grizzly.

It's the difference between taking hour(s) to fill casings as opposed to minutes.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on December 13, 2011, 08:50:42 AM
Has anyone here used the KA sausage stuffer attachment?

The KA attachment is kinda a PITA to use, you have to hold the casing in one hand and apply pressure with the other. 10lbs of sausage is a bit of a chore that way.
Skip the KA attachment and get a Grizzly http://www.grizzly.com/products/H6252
I think I got mine off ebay for a few bucks less and still directly from Grizzly.
It's the difference between taking hour(s) to fill casings as opposed to minutes.


I won't disagree that the Grizzly (or similar) vertical stuffer is easy to use, and wicked fast once you get the process down...but I can't begin to imagine why stuffing 10 lbs of sausage using the KA mixer attachment should take "hours" .   
I make sausage on a fairly regular basis  primarily using a KA setup, and once all the other preps are done and the casing is threaded onto the tube, 10 lbs usually takes no more than 10 or 15 minutes to go through (I never actually timed it, but it's probably closer to 10 min.). 

I would only tag the KA attachment with one caveat:  if you routinely want to make sausages that use extremely finely ground or nearly emusified meat (such as hot dogs, knockwurst, and the like) the KA is not an ideal tool for that (it can be done, but not with the speed and ease of making kolbasz/kielbasa or Italian type sausages.

If one already has a KA mixer, the sausage kit can be had on eBay for dirt cheap and it's a great way to try out sausage making.  For 5 or 10 lb batches (typically what I make), it's a pretty much hassle free and easy cleanup operation (aside from the exception noted above).
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on December 13, 2011, 09:46:11 AM
Because of the mess and the amount of cleaning involved 15 pounds is a minimum for me.  We did about 60 pounds of sausage one night in September for our Oktoberfest.

Yeah, if you are going to go through the effort, might as well make at least 15-20lbs.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bluesman on December 13, 2011, 10:21:57 AM
Because of the mess and the amount of cleaning involved 15 pounds is a minimum for me.  We did about 60 pounds of sausage one night in September for our Oktoberfest.

Yeah, if you are going to go through the effort, might as well make at least 15-20lbs.

+1

If you're not serving right away then vacuum seal and freeze the excess.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MDixon on December 13, 2011, 03:12:13 PM
We made about 80 lbs (maybe more) of sausage on the Grizzly in less than an hour including all cleanup in between 4 different batches. 80 lbs on the KA would take me pretty much all day, of course The Professor says he could do it in 80 min.  ::)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: robertpreed on December 14, 2011, 02:22:06 PM
Speaking of the KitchenAid........

My KitchenAid meat grinder attachement came with two plates, a coarse (which is 1/4 inch) and a fine (which is 3/16 inch).

I see many recipes that call for using the "medium" blade and I assume that is for stand alone meat grinders only.

What would be the KitchenAid equivalent, running it through the coarse twice?

I think the only time I would be using the fine plate would be for some brats.

Thank you all.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on December 18, 2011, 07:14:05 PM
We made about 80 lbs (maybe more) of sausage on the Grizzly in less than an hour including all cleanup in between 4 different batches. 80 lbs on the KA would take me pretty much all day, of course The Professor says he could do it in 80 min.  ::)

You're not far off.   Seriously... it wouldn't take much more than that.   The most I've ever made in one shot was about 30 lbs...but the math works out.

BUT...again...it depends on the type of sausage.  A coarse ground sausage (Polsh kielbasa, Hungarian Kolbasz, Italian sausage)  would present no problem.
 
I agree that the  Grizzly would indeed be quicker with sausages requiring a finer grind of meat.  (I've not used a Grizzly, but HAVE used an old stuffer of the same type)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MDixon on December 19, 2011, 08:22:42 AM
You're better than I. To grind 80lb in the KA would take me an hour or two (not what we are discussing) and to stuff would probably take me 3 hours or more. On the Grizzly I can stuff by myself at 20-25 rpm and it would only take minutes to empty.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: bo on December 19, 2011, 08:38:21 AM
The KitchenAid mixer is just that, a good mixer. The attachments are Mickey Mouse in my opinion.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on December 19, 2011, 10:01:45 AM
The KitchenAid mixer is just that, a good mixer. The attachments are Mickey Mouse in my opinion.

LOL.  That's probably a fair description if you're comparing it to a dedicated grinder/stuffer unit.  No argument there.
The KA gets the job done, certainly, but if someone is making lots of sausage on a regular basis  then I would agree that it would be better to invest in something purpose made.   But for doing medium sized batches of tubed meat every few months,  it's perfect. 
The KA worked out great for me since I already had the mixer (I couldn't imagine not having one in my kitchen).   The grinder/stuffer attachments were not at all expensive, and the only things  I had to add to the kit were a few custom made grinder plates to allow a coarser grind for some sausages.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on December 19, 2011, 12:24:16 PM
Anyone using rusk? I didn't know about it and assumed my sausage would be 100% filler free. Now I dunno. The rusk sounds like it's needed.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on December 19, 2011, 01:54:44 PM
Anyone using rusk? I didn't know about it and assumed my sausage would be 100% filler free. Now I dunno. The rusk sounds like it's needed.

I do use rusk when making British or Irish style 'bangers'. 
For those little beasts I think you definitely need the filler in there  for the authentic texture (breadcrumbs, cracker meal, or matzo meal all work equally well).  A decent amount of fat is also important.

I don't use it in any other sausage types I make, though.   
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MDixon on December 20, 2011, 05:53:26 AM
Euge - get the Rytek Kutas book, his recipes will let you know what you need for almost any type of sausage...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tygo on January 15, 2012, 04:57:25 PM
Made up 16 lbs of sausage today.  Got a whole pork shoulder, broke it down, and ground it up with the kitchen-aid and stuffed it with the 11 lb stuffer.  Worked like a charm.

(http://i.imgur.com/XYF7q.jpg)

Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on January 15, 2012, 05:26:35 PM
Made up 16 lbs of sausage today.  Got a whole pork shoulder, broke it down, and ground it up with the kitchen-aid and stuffed it with the 11 lb stuffer.  Worked like a charm.

Looks great...what kind of sausage did you make?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tygo on January 15, 2012, 07:48:49 PM
I guess you'd describe it as kind of a breakfast sausage.  It's a family recipe.  My dad has the recipe which was handwritten out by my grandfather.  I thought it was the only kind of sausage there was until I was about 12.

All of the spices on the recipe were measured in "hands per inch" of pork.  I estimated how much salt I thought would be right for the volume and then scaled the rest of the spices based on that.  I've made the mix before for patties but I've never stuffed it until today.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 04, 2012, 10:26:49 AM
Here's a pic of the 6# of sausage I made last night with Ruhlman's & Polcyn's master sausage recipe:

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-WRrECFaWYlo/T8zq9vPxo5I/AAAAAAAAAdE/UaQGgnQHceA/s649/2012-06-04+11.53.50.jpg)

It was pretty easy handling and stuffing the casing. Thought it would be more slippery and out of control. It wasn't!

Here's the recipe:

Fresh Garlic Sausage:
2.25kg boneless fatty pork shoulder
40g kosher salt
10g fresh cracked pepper
54g minced garlic
250ml good red wine- chilled
3 meters hog casings

My pork was over 6# so I compensated the salt amounts by a couple grams. As it is the sausage is very flavorful and the wine really makes a difference in the overall flavor. I was quite surprised. Next time I will scale back the salt a bit per my tastes since I think it could do with less and still be plenty salty.

Certainly can see using port or brandy as part of the liquid component. I have some that needs using.

And I bought a pound of the casings for $7.99. Looks to be a lifetime supply. ;) They are well wrapped and resting in the freezer.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Delo on June 04, 2012, 12:41:14 PM

It was pretty easy handling and stuffing the casing. Thought it would be more slippery and out of control. It wasn't!

They look great.  Was this your first time making them? I just made sausage the first time about a few weeks ago and I felt the same way.  It was a lot smoother than I thought it would be. I made about 6lbs, half breakfast sausages and half Irish Bangers. Did you use a stuffer?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 04, 2012, 03:24:41 PM
It's too much work using the grinder with the stuffer attachment. I'll get a proper stuffer this week. I see now that it isn't essential but would make things a hell of a lot easier.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 04, 2012, 11:14:57 PM
looks awesome euge, nicely done!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on June 05, 2012, 04:59:49 AM
I've heard that the red wine makes a huge difference in flavor.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Delo on June 05, 2012, 07:45:36 AM
It's too much work using the grinder with the stuffer attachment. I'll get a proper stuffer this week. I see now that it isn't essential but would make things a hell of a lot easier.
A stuffer would be a nice but we have had a number of our appliances we use everyday die recently so that wont be happening anytime soon.  The sausage attachment for my meat grinder works pretty well.  Here are some picks of the bangers I made.  I browned them and then cooked them with onions and Guinness.  Reduced the Guinness to make a sauce and ate it with cheddar mash.  Mmmmm.
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8009/7341591848_5d3ddd20f3.jpg)(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8153/7156389113_16aa1bb599.jpg)(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8167/7156389257_34c28f1acf_m.jpg)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 05, 2012, 07:02:25 PM
I found a "Butcher supply" a couple blocks from work. They have cure#1 for $3/lb and cure#2 for $7.80/lb. Bought some plus two large casing to make summer sausage.

They had a wide selection of grinders, mixers and stuffers from household variety to the commercial size. Mainly it was those three types of equipment and knives etc...

But I got the last 5# stuffer they had and for a good price! They quoted me $129 on the phone and only charged me $119 when I got there. The rest of the home models were badass and well-made with metal gears but for a hefty $300. Can skip that price for now. 

Excited.  ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 05, 2012, 10:30:57 PM
I found a "Butcher supply" a couple blocks from work. They have cure#1 for $3/lb and cure#2 for $7.80/lb. Bought some plus two large casing to make summer sausage.
Wow!  I paid $5 for four ounces of cure (Heller's Modern Cure #47688).  I need to look for a butcher supply instead of a butcher shop.

I know I could have gotten it online for less, but I was impatient and wanted to try it out :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 05, 2012, 10:56:25 PM
Sausagemaker.com  (http://www.sausagemaker.com/curesandcultures.aspx) has them for more but the break is 5# I think.

I think you'll do better locally. I still have to shmooze up some butchers for the good cuts and fat at a good price.



Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 05, 2012, 10:59:11 PM
I found a local place that has modern cure for $1.50 per pound.  I don't get down that way much, but I'll be going by Monday at the latest so I may have to swing by.  Not that I need that much really.

What kind of casings did you get?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 05, 2012, 11:21:24 PM
The second type were those big brown synthetic summer beef sausage casings. I got two that are 20" long by 3" wide. Probably hold about 5#.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 05, 2012, 11:27:54 PM
Which were the "lifetime supply for $7.99" ones? :)

I'll probably get something small to try it out, but I kind of like loose sausage too.  What are the relative merits of the different types of casings?  I probably asked that already . . .
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 05, 2012, 11:49:47 PM
Which were the "lifetime supply for $7.99" ones? :)

I'll probably get something small to try it out, but I kind of like loose sausage too.  What are the relative merits of the different types of casings?  I probably asked that already . . .

Well I bought a pound of natural hog-casings that are salted down like cod but on these hollow plastic strips. One of these strips will probably do 15-20 pounds of sausage. There are maybe 15 strips to the pound or even more. The plastic strips have a weight so if you can get casings without them it might better. However, they sure were easy to slip over the stuffing tube.

I think natural casings are preferable due to the crunch/snap and digestibility. They also take on smoke more readily than synthetic. When fermenting I think ultimately natural is the way to go. But for an intro basic unfermented summer sausage a synthetic casing probably will do for now. Mine will have cheddar and jalapeño...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 06, 2012, 12:20:02 AM
Thanks for the info euge, good to know.  I might do natural and see what I get.  I don't plan to ferment sausages yet, maybe after NHC :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 06, 2012, 02:06:11 AM
I've got a hygrometer taking readings the basement now, and have already placed a bid on a used industrial meat slicer. Gonna be doing fermented sausage ASAP, that's for sure.

How do you guys stuff your sausage? Meaning, how do you get the right amount in there (I tend to overstuff, for example) and how to you get a good rhythm going . I find that I have problems in stuffing and keeping the casings going at the same time.

I just bought a 5 L vertical stuffer WITH A RELEASE VALVE. I think it's super important, they look like the release valves on corny kegs, use it to make sure you're not pushing air into the casings. Cost me ~200 eur, I have no idea how much sausage fits in 5 liters, I'm guessing around 5 kg/10 pounds?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: MDixon on June 06, 2012, 04:35:55 AM
I just let the casing slide more off the tube it appears I am overstuffing. 200 euro is a buttload, is it motorized?

I stuff the entire casing and then twist afterwards. I've seen some do it on the fly and I've never been able to pull that off.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 06, 2012, 05:13:04 AM
I just let the casing slide more off the tube it appears I am overstuffing. 200 euro is a buttload, is it motorized?

I stuff the entire casing and then twist afterwards. I've seen some do it on the fly and I've never been able to pull that off.

Nope, not motorized. Just no market for them (not much jerky making going on around here either, for example). They don't exist in versions cheaper than 500 eur in France, so I had to go with a UK supplier.

I too have tried to twist during production, it's more trouble than it's worth.

For tying, check this out:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHa9vTxOsJE
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Delo on June 06, 2012, 06:48:26 AM
Well I bought a pound of natural hog-casings that are salted down like cod but on these hollow plastic strips. One of these strips will probably do 15-20 pounds of sausage.

I think natural casings are preferable due to the crunch/snap and digestibility. They also take on smoke more readily than synthetic. When fermenting I think ultimately natural is the way to go. But for an intro basic unfermented summer sausage a synthetic casing probably will do for now. Mine will have cheddar and jalapeño...
Do the plastic strips go all the way down the inside of the casing? For the first time sausage making that I just did, I bought natural hog casings.  I got them from a farmers market by me and were similar to the these but without the plastic strips.  They were all balled up together and I had to untangle them.  I rinsed them with water and ran water through them and they slid pretty easily on the attachement.

From my extremely limited knowledge on the subject, hog casings are easier to work with than other natural casings. For me, who tends to be more destructive than not, they worked well. As far as stuffing goes, I was worried that it would come out too fast and I wouldnt be able to keep up. The grinder I have moves the meat out slowly and I have to push it out to move it faster.  I would slide the casing off the tube as I needed more.  It worked well for me since I was doing it by myself.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on June 06, 2012, 07:03:04 AM
Any ideas/recipes for an all-beef sausage similar to what they serve in central Texas?  Loved the smoked sausage at Smittys and Louis Mueller, would like to attempt something similar at home.  Thought it was amongst the best I have ever tasted.

I'm guessing they are fairly simple - ground brisket? , salt, pepper, and ???
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 06, 2012, 08:19:52 AM
Try 85% chuck/15% pork shoulder. black & white 'rub' for the seasoning: salt, pepper and a bit of cayenne, I use Salt Lick rub because it's easier. Smoke at 235 to 160 internal, I use a mix of applewood and oak. I suppose hickory would work as well. Eat fresh out of the smoker!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 06, 2012, 12:02:02 PM
I was wondering if chuck or brisket point would make good beef sausage!

Delo- the casings are completely on the plastic strips. I got them from the butcher at Whole Foods- he said they use them to make their own sausages. I can only imagine that their purpose is to aid slipping onto the stuffer tube without having to disentangle the hog-gut.

So far the "professionals" have been pleased and thrilled that I'm undertaking this. Much like we are eager to welcome new brewers!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: The Professor on June 06, 2012, 02:51:31 PM
I was wondering if chuck or brisket point would make good beef sausage!


Definitely should be part of the mix for beef sausage (the rest can be assorted trimmings from other cuts, especially chuck).

I also always use some brisket point in my hot dogs (mostly pork, like any superior quality hot dog should be, but I do add in about 15-20% brisket)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: markaberrant on June 06, 2012, 06:01:47 PM
I also always use some brisket point in my hot dogs (mostly pork, like any superior quality hot dog should be, but I do add in about 15-20% brisket)

Mind sharing that recipe?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Delo on June 07, 2012, 10:56:09 AM
Euge- Thanks for the info. The plastic stips seem like they would be helpful and its good to know whole foods has the casings too.

I went back and read through most of this thread. There is a lot of great info. I may have missed it but can anyone tell me what is the best way to store the links in the freezer? I did a pretty poor job with the freezer paper and zip lock bags. A lot of mine stuck together.  Also has anyone made sausages with cheese in them? Are there any special techniques? I would imagine you would have to use "higher temperature" cheese. I plan on making chicken chipotle w/ cheddar or jack cheese sausage.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 07, 2012, 11:17:19 AM
I made a kilo of sausage last night and used the "stuffer". I let the grinder do it's job and chilled every part in the freezer for at least an hour. Cleaned out the grinder about halfway through and chilled it again. Went real smooth.

Now that I've used it- the "stuffer" has made itself indispensable with one stuffing session. If you are going to make sausage in casing in any real quantity you have to have one of these. Crank the crank and the meat comes out nice and easy and freely.

I'm going to add cheese too. I think dicing it and then freezing the cheeze and adding it to the mixing phase right before going into the stuffer would work best.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 08, 2012, 05:42:23 AM
Last night I did 7 kg of sausage, 3.5 kg of basil/tomato/chicken and 3.5 kg of mango/chile/cilantro/chicken. Basil tomato was just too salty. Gonna try it one more time with 1/3 less salt, but mango chicken is one of our favorites.

OH and I only busted ONE casing out of 35! Overstuffing will hopefully be a thing of the past from now on. Trick is to just let the meat do the work for you with pulling the casing.

Also Euge my stuffer will hopefully be here shortly, I finished up last night just before midnight. My meat grinder is great (although ----extremely---- loud) but it's a lousy stuffer. I'm liking the idea of being able to just turn the crank instead of turn on/push with plunger/add meat/turn off/repeat.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Delo on June 08, 2012, 07:27:20 AM
I'm going to add cheese too. I think dicing it and then freezing the cheeze and adding it to the mixing phase right before going into the stuffer would work best.
I didnt think about freezing the cheese.

Last night I did 7 kg of sausage, 3.5 kg of basil/tomato/chicken and 3.5 kg of mango/chile/cilantro/chicken. Basil tomato was just too salty. Gonna try it one more time with 1/3 less salt, but mango chicken is one of our favorites.
These both sound good. Did you add fat? I'm planning on making chicken sausage for the first time tomorrow morning with 4 or 5lbs of breast from Costco that I have.  From what I have heard, I was wondering it will be too dry and I should add fat...or dark meat....or skin...or something. 
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 08, 2012, 07:39:18 AM
I'm going to add cheese too. I think dicing it and then freezing the cheeze and adding it to the mixing phase right before going into the stuffer would work best.
I didnt think about freezing the cheese.

Last night I did 7 kg of sausage, 3.5 kg of basil/tomato/chicken and 3.5 kg of mango/chile/cilantro/chicken. Basil tomato was just too salty. Gonna try it one more time with 1/3 less salt, but mango chicken is one of our favorites.
These both sound good. Did you add fat? I'm planning on making chicken sausage for the first time tomorrow morning with 4 or 5lbs of breast from Costco that I have.  From what I have heard, I was wondering it will be too dry and I should add fat...or dark meat....or skin...or something.

Nope. I used 100% boneless (NOT skinless) thighs and legs. Plenty of fat, no need to add any. Good flavor. Have to special order them every time, and the butcher does it by hand. I feel a little bad for her, but then I remember that I'm paying her to do it and the sausages are tasty.
Title: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 10, 2012, 12:13:23 PM
Stuffer should be here tomorrow!!!!! I've got a shoulder ready, gonna try to make a new recipe. Base is Wisconsin-style brats, but I'm adding dried pears and armagnac.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 10, 2012, 12:31:39 PM
Are you doing an emulsified sausage? You'll love the stuffer.

I'm doing a spicy one today: got two habeneros for a kg of pork shoulder. And some dried bird's eye chile as backup if the habenero doesn't do the trick.

I have cure 1&2 so plan on adding a bit to this recipe, hot smoking and vac-packing for storage in the fridge. Ought to last for months if I don't gobble it all up.

Also, Ive been studying "Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages" by S. Marianski & A. Marianski. Dense and chock full of precise information.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 11, 2012, 09:24:22 AM
It seems that for dry curing sausage, you need to include a starter culture. I'm wondering if it wouldn't work to just scrape off the white mold from some sausage I have and use that? It's awfully expensive to buy those little packets...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 11, 2012, 09:47:15 AM
It seems that for dry curing sausage, you need to include a starter culture. I'm wondering if it wouldn't work to just scrape off the white mold from some sausage I have and use that? It's awfully expensive to buy those little packets...

There's usually an initial lactic culture and the white mold is a secondary application after the lactic is done.
Title: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 11, 2012, 11:15:29 AM
I see now why my stuffer was so expensive.

(http://img.tapatalk.com/25aff913-3582-ea65.jpg)

That's a 750 ml bottle next to it for size comparison.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: gmac on June 11, 2012, 12:03:16 PM
I didn't realize Ron Jeremy made a sausage stuffer   :)
I assume you're getting your cholesterol and liver function tests done on a fairly frequent basis?
Title: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 11, 2012, 12:26:48 PM
I didn't realize Ron Jeremy made a sausage stuffer   :)
I assume you're getting your cholesterol and liver function tests done on a fairly frequent basis?

Sorry I didn't hear ya, was in the middle of anudder hyart ettack. I ordered da poooolish sahhhsadge.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 11, 2012, 02:42:21 PM
Ah I see you got the two speed model. Is that a 5 kilo stuffer?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: maxieboy on June 11, 2012, 05:25:00 PM
Sausage stuffer now on the to buy list. You guys are killin' me...  ;)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: thebigbaker on June 11, 2012, 06:03:04 PM
I've been doing a lot of home made items recently to control my sodium intake and this thread has given me some major incentive to make my own low sodium sausages.  After all, I think I can convince my wife to let me get some new shiny toys if it's for health reasons!
Title: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 11, 2012, 10:05:37 PM
Ah I see you got the two speed model. Is that a 5 kilo stuffer?

5 liters actually. For water volume I know 5 l is 5 kg, I have a 2.5 kg shoulder I'll throw in there tonight to see how far it comes up. Best part is the cylinder pops out like a champ for cleaning/freezing.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 11, 2012, 10:32:32 PM
Looks amazing Phil!

I happened to be in the south end of Seattle today, stopped by the sausage making supply place . . . got some modern cure, enough for 500 lbs of meat for $1.89.  THAT will last a while :)

Same amount costs $25 at the butcher shop where I got my first packet. ::)
Title: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 12, 2012, 02:16:49 PM
Just used it for the first time tonight. Talk about a game changer - my previous worm drive type stuffer would do 2 kg in about 10 minutes, with LOUD noise. This makes no noise and I had stuffed 4 meters of Apfelbratwurst* in, no kidding, 2 minutes. With time to stop and change some things around.

* = bratwurst with diced dried apples and a cup of cold calvados for liquid.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 12, 2012, 02:50:07 PM
Just used it for the first time tonight. Talk about a game changer - my previous worm drive type stuffer would do 2 kg in about 10 minutes, with LOUD noise. This makes no noise and I had stuffed 4 meters of Apfelbratwurst* in, no kidding, 2 minutes. With time to stop and change some things around.

* = bratwurst with diced dried apples and a cup of cold calvados for liquid.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

Now you see what a cruel joke it is to try and stuff through a grinder.

Sunday I stuffed habenero-cheese with cumin and garlic. Used #1 cure and have let them rest in the fridge on a rack to dry and condition a bit. Tonight I will hot- smoke to 150f and then a cold water bath to cool. Or I could do a couple hours at a lower temp and then poach them to finish. Then once cooled I will vac-seal and enjoy the sausages over the weeks to come.

Not sure how long the cure will keep them but a month or two in the fridge crisper ought to work.

BTW it is interesting to see the sausages turn that deeper red as the cure works its magic on the meat.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 13, 2012, 06:00:17 AM
Somewhat unrelated. I dun goofed. I think the bacon I've been eating lately was cured with #2 and not #1. This was weeks/months ago, so the risk of imminent death is passed. But how bad is it really?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 13, 2012, 10:50:41 AM
Somewhat unrelated. I dun goofed. I think the bacon I've been eating lately was cured with #2 and not #1. This was weeks/months ago, so the risk of imminent death is passed. But how bad is it really?

You made your own bacon with #2? It should be ok with the time-frame you've described. You had already wiped/rinsed the meat off most likely... I'd say you're fine.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: maxieboy on June 13, 2012, 04:15:51 PM
Somewhat unrelated. I dun goofed. I think the bacon I've been eating lately was cured with #2 and not #1. This was weeks/months ago, so the risk of imminent death is passed. But how bad is it really?

You're terminal. IM incoming with my shipping address for your sausage stuffer...  ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 14, 2012, 01:05:32 AM
Somewhat unrelated. I dun goofed. I think the bacon I've been eating lately was cured with #2 and not #1. This was weeks/months ago, so the risk of imminent death is passed. But how bad is it really?

You're terminal. IM incoming with my shipping address for your sausage stuffer...  ;D

When you see the shipping costs for a 20-pound 3-foot-high stuffer, you'll be terminal too.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 14, 2012, 07:28:04 AM
Probably ran you $300 (at least) but you'll be giving that stuffer to your grandkids. 
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: Delo on June 14, 2012, 09:01:59 AM
Just used it for the first time tonight. Talk about a game changer - my previous worm drive type stuffer would do 2 kg in about 10 minutes, with LOUD noise. This makes no noise and I had stuffed 4 meters of Apfelbratwurst* in, no kidding, 2 minutes. With time to stop and change some things around.
After stuffing only my third batch of sausages with my meat grinder, I may be looking into getting a stuffer.  I also realized that most people have more patience than I do.
Title: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 14, 2012, 01:29:02 PM
Probably ran you $300 (at least) but you'll be giving that stuffer to your grandkids.

I didn't have it shipped from the US - came from the UK, shipping was £10. :-D

And yes my grand kids will get it, but not until I've stuffed my last sausage.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 26, 2012, 05:45:46 PM
A lowly tomato-sausage fresh off the grill:
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-j1uvOyBt1jc/T-pWKupfWCI/AAAAAAAAAeg/JOWSBExmdCQ/s649/2012-06-26+18.55.28.jpg)

And some green-chile boudin:
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-dGr8Dk4kTzQ/T-pWWkSaLRI/AAAAAAAAAeo/QH4nQ5keZu0/s649/2012-06-26+19.05.06.jpg)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on June 26, 2012, 10:29:00 PM
A lowly tomato-sausage fresh off the grill:
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-j1uvOyBt1jc/T-pWKupfWCI/AAAAAAAAAeg/JOWSBExmdCQ/s649/2012-06-26+18.55.28.jpg)

I don't know about lowly, but it sure looks lonely. :)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on June 27, 2012, 01:11:38 AM
That looks really, really, really good Euge.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on June 27, 2012, 05:14:51 AM
Indeed it does!  What beer did you pair it with?
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on June 27, 2012, 07:57:08 AM
Euge, how do you tie the sausage off.(No matter how I phrased this question it still sounds nasty)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on June 27, 2012, 09:10:59 AM
Thanks guys!

I paired the sausage with a special bitter made with chinook and cascade. Went will with the 100+ temps...

And Corky all I had to do was not overstuff the casings and then twist every other link the same direction at least 5 times. Then you let the sausage dry/rest for a couple hours before separating the links. Each end of the chain get a half-surgeons' knot. I have taught myself how to use toothpicks to do this as well. 
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on July 06, 2012, 10:33:39 PM
[I don't know about lowly, but it sure looks lonely. :)
Looks like one of those $100 plates at hells kitchen  ;D (jk nice job euge thanks for sharing)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 06, 2012, 11:46:39 PM
I really, really wish you guys would stop this crap.

 In the past 3 weeks The Tubercle has bought a 350 watt meat grinder, a bunch of casings, hog rings, pliers, etc. Made bratwurst and it was delicious. Just got through stuffing 5 lbs of summer sausage which is curing in the fridge. First thing in the morning I have to get up and start smoking them. I had to make a bunch of modifications to my smoker to hang the sausages.

Please stop. I don't have time to make beer now.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on July 07, 2012, 07:06:35 AM
LMAO....livin large tubercle..... :P
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 07, 2012, 09:29:26 AM
I can see right now the next purchase will be a dedicated stuffer. 8) Trying to stuff 2-1/2" casings with the grinder is aggravating. :o
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on July 07, 2012, 10:40:53 AM
Muahahaha...! ;D

I'm switching to bottles for a while so I can use my kegerator as a meat/sausage curing/fermentation chamber. Hello salami and summer sausage!

Don't be afraid to keep the smoker at a lower temp (around 140) for a couple hours just to put a nice smoke on the sausages with cure in them. You can then poach to an internal temp of 150 and cool in a cold water bath. Vacuum sealed they should keep around six months in the fridge.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on July 07, 2012, 11:13:22 AM
I can see right now the next purchase will be a dedicated stuffer. 8) Trying to stuff 2-1/2" casings with the grinder is aggravating. :o

These guys are reliable....fwiw
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/NTESearch?storeId=6970&Ntt=stuffer  (http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/NTESearch?storeId=6970&Ntt=stuffer)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 07, 2012, 11:35:48 AM
There is a NT about 20 miles from here. I have bought a lot of things there including a 8 x 12 trailer. They have good stuff for the price. I will be visiting to investigate the stuffer. Thanks.....
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 15, 2012, 01:26:24 PM
Well, well, well.

 Tubercle was reading the paper this morning and what gift did the sausage gods bring? A $20 off cupon from Northern Tool.

 The Tubercle is now the proud owner of of a 5lb verticle stuffer. ;D

Also ran by Academy Sports and picked up some natural hog casings. Made my last batch of bratwurst with the collegen ones but didn't care for them too much. >:(

Its on now....
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on July 15, 2012, 02:30:31 PM
Its on now....
I've been making about one batch a week since I started posting about it and see no reason to stop. What it boils down to is that sausage is the perfect meat delivery system. :D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: maxieboy on July 15, 2012, 03:27:43 PM
Well, well, well.

 Tubercle was reading the paper this morning and what gift did the sausage gods bring? A $20 off cupon from Northern Tool.

 The Tubercle is now the proud owner of of a 5lb verticle stuffer. ;D

Also ran by Academy Sports and picked up some natural hog casings. Made my last batch of bratwurst with the collegen ones but didn't care for them too much. >:(

Its on now....

Nice. As soon as I can get this BRD under control  8), a vertical stuffer is next...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on July 15, 2012, 03:51:16 PM
Well, well, well.
  5lb verticle stuffer.
Its on now....
You ain't stuffin me with 5 lbs of anything!!!   ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 15, 2012, 05:05:57 PM
Well, well, well.
  5lb verticle stuffer.
Its on now....
You ain't stuffin me with 5 lbs of anything!!!   ;D

5lb verticle stuffer does sound like something that could cause leg cramps after a few minutes ;D ;D ;D

Maybe we should start calling them meat injectors casing stuffers something else to keep our minds on track so the thread doesn't get locked ::)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on July 16, 2012, 12:34:33 AM
Mechanized piston-based protein portability enabler
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 17, 2012, 06:25:54 PM
Made bratwurst with my new Mechanized piston-based protein portability enabler (MPBPPE) and natural casings.

 Oh! Yes.

 Anyone that has any idea that they may make sausage one day go ahead and get a MPBPPE.

 Yes, you can stuff sausage with out it. You can also crush barley with a rock....js.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on July 17, 2012, 09:32:31 PM
Made bratwurst with my new Mechanized piston-based non horizontally oriented  protein portability enabler (MPBPPE)MPBPNHOPPE and natural casings.

 Oh! Yes.

 Anyone that has any idea that they may make sausage one day go ahead and get a MPBPNHOPPE.

 Yes, you can stuff sausage with out it. You can also crush barley with a rock....js.
There fixed it fer ya
I would like to think that ah had sumthin to do with that.  ::)  :o
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 17, 2012, 10:18:35 PM
Made bratwurst with my new Mechanized piston-based non horizontally oriented  protein portability enabler (MPBPPE)MPBPNHOPPE and natural casings.

 Oh! Yes.

 Anyone that has any idea that they may make sausage one day go ahead and get a MPBPNHOPPE.

 Yes, you can stuff sausage with out it. You can also crush barley with a rock....js.
There fixed it fer ya
I would like to think that ah had sumthin to do with that.  ::)  :o

Thanks 1v :D I can always count on you. BTW...here is the spice mix I used for the brats. Could used a little more heat next time and maybe some bay leaf.


5 lb batch
1-tbsp ground coriander
1-tbsp ground sage
1-tsp paprika
1-tsp cayenne pepper
2-tsp dried rosemary
1-tbsp dry mustard
1-tsp pepper
1-tsp nutmeg
4-tsp salt
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on July 17, 2012, 10:44:30 PM
I have not made brats yet even though they are a favorite. Did you make an emulsified forcemeat? A little intimidating to do...
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on July 17, 2012, 10:50:38 PM
I have not made brats yet even though they are a favorite. Did you make an emulsified forcemeat? A little intimidating to do...
now yer gonna get this thread locked
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on July 17, 2012, 10:52:48 PM
I have not made brats yet even though they are a favorite. Did you make an emulsified forcemeat? A little intimidating to do...
now yer gonna get this thread locked

If cap ain't gonna post someone's got to do it. ;)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on July 18, 2012, 02:50:25 AM
My brat recipe:
http://www.thepauperedchef.com/2009/06/homemade-wisconsin-style-bratwurst.html
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on July 18, 2012, 05:24:46 PM
I have not made brats yet even though they are a favorite. Did you make an emulsified forcemeat? A little intimidating to do...

I don't think I did the emulsified forcemeat thing. I ground through the medimum plate , made a slurry of the spices and water, and mixed by hand for about 5 minutes. I ended up adding about a cup and a half of water during the mixing until it "looked right".

 Blanched for about 10 minutes before frying in olive oil.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on July 18, 2012, 11:57:10 PM
I did some Kielbasa this evening. Tastes great pre-cure. Now resting in the fridge and I will smoke it probably in a couple days. This would be considered "country-style"

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-IgYhy4hAP6Y/UAeTVfZZSoI/AAAAAAAAAfA/OoKpnZ8S1jE/s669/2012-07-18+23.53.43.jpg)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on July 19, 2012, 04:40:02 AM
Looks as good as the fresh kielbasa from the Polish butchers in Jersey!  And that's sayin' somethin'! Good job, Euge!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on August 14, 2012, 07:10:02 PM
Made 3 batches of summer sausage so far.

 Soy protien is a must!!! All the difference in the world.

Fixing to dry cure a deboned boston butt to make some buckboard bacon. Got my cold smoker device perfected. I'll post pictures when I smoke the butt after curing.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on August 24, 2012, 06:29:02 PM
Dry cured boston butt on the smoker right now.

 First I de-boned and cut the butt in half longways.

 I used 1 cup kosher salt, 1/2 cup brown sugar and 1 tsp #1 cure for the rub. Put each piece seperate in a gallon zip lock in the fridge for 4 days, turning daily, rinsed and dried and then 2 days on a rack in the fridge. Smoking for 6 hours w/hickory @ 150f then in the fridge overnight before slicing. I rubbed with coarse ground pepper before smoking (I found a use for the old coffee grinder).

Buckboard bacon for breakfast....
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: realbeerguy on August 24, 2012, 08:03:58 PM
I did some Kielbasa this evening. Tastes great pre-cure. Now resting in the fridge and I will smoke it probably in a couple days. This would be considered "country-style"

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-IgYhy4hAP6Y/UAeTVfZZSoI/AAAAAAAAAfA/OoKpnZ8S1jE/s669/2012-07-18+23.53.43.jpg)

Send realbeerguy some Kiebasa so he doesn't have to make an emergency trip to Sayreville.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on August 24, 2012, 09:07:07 PM
Buckboard bacon off the smoker.

Had to fry some up...extremely salty! More like what we call around here as country ham. Very god taste but too much salt. I'll slice and put in the freezer for beans.

 Yesterday I ordered a pork belly from a butcher in the next town over. Going to use much less salt, maybe a few tablespoons and a whole lot more brown sugar. Instead of the zip lock bags I will cure on a rack. I will remove the kegs from the kegarator and use it as a curing fridge.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on August 24, 2012, 09:48:09 PM
you summed it up didn't ya...
I really, really wish you guys would stop this crap.

 In the past 3 weeks The Tubercle has bought a 350 watt meat grinder, a bunch of casings, hog rings, pliers, etc. Made bratwurst and it was delicious. Just got through stuffing 5 lbs of summer sausage which is curing in the fridge. First thing in the morning I have to get up and start smoking them. I had to make a bunch of modifications to my smoker to hang the sausages.

Please stop. I don't have time to make beer now.

Now he has "refurbished" the kegerator too..... ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on August 25, 2012, 06:48:06 AM
Buckboard bacon off the smoker.

Had to fry some up...extremely salty! More like what we call around here as country ham. Very god taste but too much salt. I'll slice and put in the freezer for beans.

 Yesterday I ordered a pork belly from a butcher in the next town over. Going to use much less salt, maybe a few tablespoons and a whole lot more brown sugar. Instead of the zip lock bags I will cure on a rack. I will remove the kegs from the kegarator and use it as a curing fridge.

Oh they should be cured in ziplocs first and overhauled at least once a day for 7 days until firm to the touch. The bag is to keep them exposed to the liquid that comes out and then reabsorbs. Then they can go on a rack and dry; you'll end up with something like pancetta.

I did some buckboard bacon too but overcured it! The color was almost like pastrami. Still good but less cure/time would have been better.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tubercle on August 25, 2012, 08:20:52 AM
you summed it up didn't ya...
I really, really wish you guys would stop this crap.

 In the past 3 weeks The Tubercle has bought a 350 watt meat grinder, a bunch of casings, hog rings, pliers, etc. Made bratwurst and it was delicious. Just got through stuffing 5 lbs of summer sausage which is curing in the fridge. First thing in the morning I have to get up and start smoking them. I had to make a bunch of modifications to my smoker to hang the sausages.

Please stop. I don't have time to make beer now.

Now he has "refurbished" the kegerator too..... ;D ;D ;D ;D
 

Glad I kept all those bottles ;D ;D ;D ;D


Oh they should be cured in ziplocs first and overhauled at least once a day for 7 days until firm to the touch. The bag is to keep them exposed to the liquid that comes out and then reabsorbs. Then they can go on a rack and dry; you'll end up with something like pancetta.

I did some buckboard bacon too but overcured it! The color was almost like pastrami. Still good but less cure/time would have been better.



OK...I'll use the bags. This came out very firm and good color. Just too much salt. Judging by the color from the cure I think the timing was right for the thickness. It was pink throughout.

 After sitting in the fridge overnight I sliced it very thin on the food slicer and tried some more. It was OK...taste was very good and not quite as salty cut thin. I vac sealed in 1 lb pouches and put in the freezer. It won't go to waste.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on August 25, 2012, 10:33:14 AM
There's something to be said about an ice-cold bottle of beer right after some sweaty yard-work. Ahhhhhh...!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on March 04, 2013, 05:54:34 PM
Four kilos of Polish "funeral-sausage"... Actually it's a spin on Polish wedding sausage by way of Ukraine. Pork butt and brisket fat trimmings. Garlic, salt, cure #1, fresh garlic, fresh cracked pepper, marjoram, bay leaf, allspice, nutmeg, chile de arbol and red wine. Totally old-world and old-school.

Coarse-ground and spicy. Made in honor of my Dear Uncle and my Mother who we will lay to rest next week up in Arkansas in the family plot. Enjoy.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-zu9m7N43yLw/UTVADyws9UI/AAAAAAAAAuI/ADKwqFubG5c/s814/20130304_184440.jpg)

Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: tschmidlin on March 04, 2013, 11:33:35 PM
looks awesome euge.  awesome
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: redbeerman on March 05, 2013, 05:43:04 AM
looks awesome euge.  awesome

+100 LDL ;)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on March 19, 2013, 05:29:21 AM
Last night I made up a batch of Ruhlman's Peperone. The line for the freshly ground beef at the meat counter was way too long (end of school vacation here so everybody's back with nothing in their fridges), so the wife got pre-ground beef, 'packaged under a protective atmosphere.' I figure the sausage you buy in the grocery store is made with worse, so no biggie.

This is my first time doing 'real' cured sausage, i.e., no cooking at all, leaving it downstairs for 2 weeks, load it up with 6 grams of Prague #2, so nitrite and nitrate. Spices were paprika, cayenne, allspice, and supposedly fennel. I say supposedly because we don't have fennel in the supermarkets here, so I had to use a 'breastfeeding mother' tea, composed of fennugreek, fennel, and a few other herbs. That'll be interesting.

First time using lactic culture, too. Apparently I was supposed to keep the packet in the fridge... Ooops. It was downstairs in the cellar, which is about 55 degrees, so somewhat 'cold.' We'll see. If all goes well I'll post some pics in two weeks.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on March 19, 2013, 05:56:34 AM
I haven't done a fermented sausage either. Supposedly, you'll need to keep the sausage in a warm place for a couple days to get the culture "going". An unlit oven has been suggested by some... Your cellar sounds perfect for hanging the sausage to finish curing and dry.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: phillamb168 on March 19, 2013, 06:07:49 AM
I haven't done a fermented sausage either. Supposedly, you'll need to keep the sausage in a warm place for a couple days to get the culture "going". An unlit oven has been suggested by some... Your cellar sounds perfect for hanging the sausage to finish curing and dry.

Ruhlman sez to keep it someplace ~ 80 deg F for 12 hours, so I put it in our oven with the oven light on. It felt somewhat warm to the touch when I took it out this morning. Talk about being counter-intuitive. Raw meat left overnight in a warm place.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: corkybstewart on September 14, 2013, 07:14:35 AM
We're getting ready for Oktoberfest so me and my sausage team made 50 pounds of sausage last night:
22 pounds of pork sirloin
18 pounds brisket(fat from brisket ground very fine)
10 pounds pork fat ground very fine
In 2 bottles of Guinness ad seasonings:
12 tablespoons coarse Kosher salt
3 tablespoons fresh ground pepper
3 teaspoons nutmeg
2 tablespoons onion powder

Stuff into hog casings
The first sausage batch is always a fun party for me and the crew, lots of food, beer, wine, and laughter.
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: gmac on September 14, 2013, 07:45:56 AM
We're getting ready for Oktoberfest so me and my sausage team made 50 pounds of sausage last night:
22 pounds of pork sirloin
18 pounds brisket(fat from brisket ground very fine)
10 pounds pork fat ground very fine
In 2 bottles of Guinness ad seasonings:
12 tablespoons coarse Kosher salt
3 tablespoons fresh ground pepper
3 teaspoons nutmeg
2 tablespoons onion powder

Stuff into hog casings
The first sausage batch is always a fun party for me and the crew, lots of food, beer, wine, and laughter.

Very VERY jealous Corkybstewart!!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: HoosierBrew on September 14, 2013, 08:26:21 AM
No kidding. That's a hell of an operation you ran there.  Sounds amazing !
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on January 29, 2014, 11:23:57 AM
Just finished stuffing my garlic kielbassa and now it's curing in the cold garage. Temps won't get over 45 today and I doubt the garage will change much. Goes for a cold smoke after work tonight. Been searching for a cheap and easy way to hang wet sausage without it unraveling, Guess I found it!

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-KWrKf3B8qsA/UulEA4epALI/AAAAAAAAA0s/Vro6b6cP1kE/w326-h579-no/20140129_120804.jpg)
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: 1vertical on January 29, 2014, 11:35:55 AM
I was reviewing my Botulinum information and these processes leave me so uneasy.....
Not easily skeert, but ^^ is so inciduous!
Title: Re: Sausage
Post by: euge on January 29, 2014, 12:02:16 PM
Well it is freshly made but not "fresh" since I included sodium nitrite in the recipe. This helps preserve the inside. A good smoking will preserve the outside. And then I could vacseal them as is and freeze or poach them post-smoke to 150*. This can be done pre or post vacseal and the cured sausage will keep for months in the fridge.

If I was really ballsy I'd use sodium nitrate and hang them post-smoke all winter in the garage.