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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: capozzoli on October 12, 2010, 10:14:09 PM

Title: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 12, 2010, 10:14:09 PM
Whats your dessert specialty? Anybody else bake? Winter is coming and with more time for indoor activities now is the time to do it. Nothing like staying home with the family and baking an apple pie.

Here is my famous peach cobbler. Works great when peaches have flavor but are not very juicy.

What makes my peach cobbler unique is that I use semolina flour instead of regular flour. I also use maple syrup instead of brown sugar.

This one bakes up relatively easy and it is a crowd pleaser.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/DSC08155.jpg)

Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: bluesman on October 13, 2010, 02:03:52 AM
Peach Cobbler is one of my all-time favorite desserts.  I like it best still hot out of the oven and served with vanilla ice cream.

To die for... ;)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 13, 2010, 02:54:10 AM
I served that on top of a cream reduction of about 50% flavored with a little sugar and a touch of vanilla.

I make a lot of pies around the holidays. Give them out to friends and stuff.

I start running some tests in the weeks before. Im gonna do an apple pie this week with some fresh picked winesaps. Im thinking of putting that semolina maple crumble crust pictured above on top of the apples instead of regular crust.

Another pie idea swirling in my head is an avocado custard pie. I know I can make it taste delicious because I make awesome avocado shakes. Im just affraid it will turn brown. I want it to stay green. Wonder if there is something I could add?

I made a banana custard pie;not a cream pie, ore like the texture of pumpkin. It turned black. Still tasted good though.

Another one I am gonna do which I tried and turned out great is pistachio pie. Really Really good. Make the filling as per pecan pie but trade out the nuts, leave out the spices, and use reduced caramelized  sugar instead of molasses.

One that is really good and old fashioned is the regular potato pie. I got that recipe from that old cook book I had from the 1800's. The custard filling is made with mashed potato, eggs, sweetened condensed milk and vanilla. Makes for a nice looking tasty pie and people go nuts trying to figure out what it is.

Im gonna swap out the mashed with avocado for my avocado custard pie.



Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 13, 2010, 02:56:07 AM
I scoop out ice cream, homemade. It is better that way. The wife bakes, I cook.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 13, 2010, 03:50:31 AM
I love baking, I even have a frilly apron.

Homemade ice cream? What ya using to make that? Im thinking ice kefir.

Here is lemon poppy seed cake and apple cake. 

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday020-1.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1127Thanksgivingday019.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/2008_1201Alexa-4mold016.jpg)
sweet potato

Here is the white potato pie.

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Food001.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Food002.jpg)

(http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll294/capozzoli_2008/Food005.jpg)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 13, 2010, 04:31:33 AM
Kitchen Aid attachment. Home made cream and goats milk. Kefir might work.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on October 13, 2010, 05:32:58 AM
Another pie idea swirling in my head is an avocado custard pie. I know I can make it taste delicious because I make awesome avocado shakes. Im just affraid it will turn brown. I want it to stay green. Wonder if there is something I could add?
Typically it will turn brown because it is getting oxidized.  Acid like lemon or lime juice might help, but I'm not sure it will hold up to the baking.  I don't have a lot of experience with that.

One that is really good and old fashioned is the regular potato pie. I got that recipe from that old cook book I had from the 1800's. The custard filling is made with mashed potato, eggs, sweetened condensed milk and vanilla. Makes for a nice looking tasty pie and people go nuts trying to figure out what it is.
That sounds tasty, what else goes in it?
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: euge on October 13, 2010, 06:01:48 AM
Ordinarily I don't care much for desert but I can make a mean cobbler. Prefer Bisquick dropped on the surface of the fruit and then baked.

Also a pretty darn good cheesecake. The secret is you make it like Crème anglaise and use a water bath. Then an hour rest still in the oven with the door partially open after baking.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tumarkin on October 13, 2010, 11:07:20 AM
I'm not much of a baker, but I do make a habanero pumpkin pie... usually for Thanksgiving. Almost ashamed to say it, but it starts with Libby's canned pumpkin & a frozen pie shell. However, I spice it to my taste, not the recipe on the can, and I add some finely diced habanero. The amount varies depending on whether it's for my consumption or for the TurkeyDay table.

You'd be surprised at how well this combination works. Keep it restrained and even non-pepper lovers go crazy for it. The fruity habs mix with the pumpkin flavor in a really nice earthy way. Discard the seeds & the inner membrane, use just the walls of the pepper. You'll still get plenty of heat, but more of the distinctive hab flavor (this is generally true with any hot peppers). Most folks go for the heat, but I like the pepper flavors. You can always get as much heat as desired by using another pepper.

My wife's the baker. She recently made an incredible tiramisu for my birthday. She bakes the biscuit herself, rather than using lady fingers. She uses both turkish & regular dried apricots, killer chocolate, and Zaya (my favorite rum). I'll see if I can dig up a good picture from the birthday dinner.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: theDarkSide on October 13, 2010, 12:47:05 PM
My son and I took 1st place in our Cub Scout Pack Dad and Lad Cake bake last year ( no female assistance allowed and everything has to be edible, including the decorations ).  We made a Hogwarts castle.

I guess it helps that my mom used to bake up a storm when I was a kid...I guess some of it rubbed off.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: phillamb168 on October 13, 2010, 12:47:48 PM
One of the EASIEST tricks for turning any baked good utilizing flour into something different and usually better is:

Take the flour you'll be using and dump it out onto a half sheet pan. Preheat the oven to 160 * c/ 320 * f and once it's nice and warm, put the flour in and let it brown for about 20 minutes. Think of it as cooking with torrified wheat. You'll get some lovely nutty flavors, kinda like cooking with bread crusts but in a good way.

For other desserts: my wife made me a candied-bacon-and-peanut-butter ice cream pie for my birthday one year. That was a hella good pie.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on October 13, 2010, 04:02:43 PM
My son and I took 1st place in our Cub Scout Pack Dad and Lad Cake bake last year ( no female assistance allowed and everything has to be edible, including the decorations ).  We made a Hogwarts castle.

I guess it helps that my mom used to bake up a storm when I was a kid...I guess some of it rubbed off.
I don't bake much because I don't really crave solid dessert, a nice glass of barleywine or RIS almost always sounds better.  But I admit to being fascinated by gingerbread house and other construction projects using food.  Was this an upright castle, or was it more of a flat thing and the castle was in the icing/decorating?  Got any pictures?
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: theDarkSide on October 13, 2010, 04:17:57 PM
Was this an upright castle, or was it more of a flat thing and the castle was in the icing/decorating?  Got any pictures?

Not professionals, but it sure tasted good. 
(http://i304.photobucket.com/albums/nn176/stevo155/untitled-2.jpg)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on October 13, 2010, 04:23:24 PM
Was this an upright castle, or was it more of a flat thing and the castle was in the icing/decorating?  Got any pictures?

Not professionals, but it sure tasted good. 
I love it!  Great idea for the inverted cones for towers.  :)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 15, 2010, 01:11:20 AM
Yeah that castle is great. Its funny, when the daughter and me eat those pretzels we say that we are eating windows.

Im really interested in Phil's idea of toasting the flour before making the dough.

Tom that pie has just those few ingredients. Potatoes, (Yukon Golds are great for this, dont use baking potatoes) eggs, sweetened condensed milk, vanilla, sugar., you may have to add some regular milk to adjust consistency. The original recipe if I remember properly also included nutmeg and clove. I dispensed with these after the first one I made. The potato pie fillings consistency is somewhere between a custard and cheese cake. You can fudge the consistency to your liking as I did by adding more potato and less egg for a more dense product and more egg less potato for a more custard like consistency.

This recipe is just a straight up custard pie with potato added to the mix. Ever have just a regular custard pie? They are fashioned and rare. Made with only eggs, cream (or condensed milk) vanilla, sugar and a table spoon of cornstarch. Sorta like the creme in creme brulet. When I make a vanilla custard pie I torch a sugar shell on top.

with the egg custard pies even pumpkin pie, you have to cook it only till a tooth pick stuck in the middle comes out clean. You want the eggs to only set not curdle. When making an egg custard pie you really have to keep an eye on it. To long in the oven and it turns into scrambled eggs. Takes a little practice.

Pumpkin pie, sweet potatoes pie and white potato pie are more forgiving. If they go a little long it is not that noticeable, but giveing alonger time in the oven they will be ruined.

For the potato custard pie I use a short bread style pie crust made in the food processor.

Start with two cups of flour and a stick of butter. Cut the butter up into 1/4" or so cubes and put them in the freezer to chill it. Put the two cups of flour into the food processor with a teaspoon of salt and a small pinch of baking powder. Run the food processor to sift the ingredients together. Then add the cubed butter. Pulse the machine for a while till the butter starts to break up and blend. Then run it for a few moments watching it. Stop it when the ingredients are still kinda dry and in pea size grains.

Then take a bowl of water run the food processor and sprinkle water in. Add a little at a time and be sure not to add to much. When the dough is moist enough it will form a ball. Then take it out and set it on a floured surface roll it out and put it in a pie pan. Here is one of my secrets. When I moisten my dough at the end, I use maple syrup instead of water. This is a secret so keep it under your hat.

I put another pie tin on top fiting inside of my crust and pre bake it at 400 for a little while before adding the custard.

For the potato custard (Make this before you make the dough) I mash two med. size potatoes and set them aside to cool. In the food processor I put six eggs vanilla, 1/2 a can of sweetened condensed milk Then blend for a little while. Then I add the mashed potatoes. Blend for a little while more till smooth. It will get thick on you so add some milk or cream till it smooths out. It should be about the consistency of pancake batter. Taste and adjust sweetness with sugar if needed. Pule to blend added sugar.

Pour it into the crust and bake it at about 400. When a tooth pick comes out of the center clean take it out of the oven and put it on a cooling rack so it does not continue to cook too much.

After I take it out I drizzle maple syrup over the top and it sort of gazes it. Works great for pumpkin and sweet potato pie too.

Ive been toying with some bean pie ideas to. Assalaamu 'alayakum.


 

Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on October 15, 2010, 04:37:53 AM
That sounds great cap, thanks for the explanation.  I'm going to have to try it soon.  :)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: phillamb168 on October 15, 2010, 09:42:35 AM

Im really interested in Phil's idea of toasting the flour before making the dough.


The idea was stolen from here, btw: http://chocolateandzucchini.com/archives/2010/04/squeeze_cookies_a_roasted_flour_experiment.php
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: beerocd on October 15, 2010, 11:26:29 AM
Do food forums go off on beer tangents?
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 16, 2010, 04:28:46 AM
I was thinking about starting a beer thread in a cooking forum. But all of the cooking forums are filled with a bunch of jerks that wnant to jump all over people when they think they are wrong.

Man, I hate when people are telling me I am wrong, especially when I am right.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: boulderbrewer on October 16, 2010, 04:33:21 AM
Are you sure you are correct? Just asking.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 16, 2010, 06:01:41 AM
ARGH!
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: beerocd on October 16, 2010, 01:00:26 PM
I was thinking about starting a beer thread in a cooking forum. But all of the cooking forums are filled with a bunch of jerks that wnant to jump all over people when they think they are wrong.

Man, I hate when people are telling me I am wrong, especially when I am right.

Yeah you're right ::) and they probably use more than just salt, and use non-stick and crockpots too!
Plus you get to talk like a Pirate here!  ;D
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 16, 2010, 02:14:25 PM
The Slovakian word for hello is Ahoy.

AYE!
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: ryang on October 20, 2010, 04:54:37 PM
Hey Cap,  I made your potato pie, and gotta say it's pretty darn good.  Didn't add any spices or vanilla, just potatoes (4), sweetened condensed milk (one 12oz can), a little bit of cane sugar (less than 1/4 cup), and 3 eggs.  Made the shortbread crust too.

Quite good.  Made one big regular size pie and two mini pies with the leftovers.

Drizzled honey over it for the last 10 min. 

Baked a little lower temp - 350 for about an hour 15min (it was a good 2" thick)

Quite tasty after my from-scratch chicken noodle soup for dinner.  My wife loved me lots for making all that.  ;)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: bluesman on October 20, 2010, 04:59:50 PM
I had some pumpkin roll today, made by a freind that was fantastic.

Ever had pumkin roll?  It has a sweetened cream cheese filling.  :-*
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on October 20, 2010, 11:25:47 PM
Hey Cap,  I made your potato pie, and gotta say it's pretty darn good.  Didn't add any spices or vanilla, just potatoes (4), sweetened condensed milk (one 12oz can), a little bit of cane sugar (less than 1/4 cup), and 3 eggs.  Made the shortbread crust too.

Quite good.  Made one big regular size pie and two mini pies with the leftovers.

Drizzled honey over it for the last 10 min.  

Baked a little lower temp - 350 for about an hour 15min (it was a good 2" thick)

Quite tasty after my from-scratch chicken noodle soup for dinner.  My wife loved me lots for making all that.  ;)

Glad you liked it try experimenting eith the egg to potato ratio if you like. My wife likes it more custardy.

Also try mixing just egg, cream, sugar and vanilla, the filling should come out like flan.  Then after its baked sprinkle it liberally with sugar and then brown it with a propane torch. Wow. Its fantastic.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: beerocd on October 21, 2010, 02:11:21 AM
I had some pumpkin roll today, made by a freind that was fantastic.

Ever had pumkin roll?  It has a sweetened cream cheese filling.  :-*

Never seen anyone make it except my wife...

BTW: make a ton, freeze each roll individually and you always have something to serve. Thaws fast, tastes awesome!
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: morticaixavier on November 08, 2010, 09:16:13 PM
On the avacado pie front, I don't think I wouild cook tha avacado. I find when cooked they lose all their flavor. But I have made a key lime pie raw foods/vegan style with avacado to get the color and creaminess and irish moss as a thickener. That one had a pressed macadamia nut crust but I bet you could blind bake a crust and add the 'custard' after it is chilled. It was good. to sweet for me and REALLY rich. it came from the graditude cafe cookbook and all those deserts come out to sweet for me. perhaps the raw foods vegan thing results in protien cravings as those can often be confused with sweet cravings.

I also make an avacado ice cream (More or less alton browns recipe) that is really good although it can make people nervous if you tell them what it is. And a coconut 'sorbet'. no dairy just coconut milk and agave or honey, sugar, maple, whatever. Plain vanilla is good chocolate is awesome. For apple pie though I like to make a simple vanilla ice cream but swap out the sugar for a jar of ginger preserves (When I can find them).
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on November 10, 2010, 02:51:43 AM
Yeah that makes sense.

Maybe I will try to pre bake the pie crust then make cold set type of avocado custard.

Avocado makes a great shake. Avocados in the blender with some kefir and sugar. Blend till creamy. WOW! Make it thick and it works well as a dessert that can be eaten with a spoon.

Ill have to try and make the avocado ice cream.

Ill get some pies going in this thread soon. Have run any pre thanks giving trial runs yet.  Guess I better get started though TG is coming up fast.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: redbeerman on November 10, 2010, 03:21:04 PM
One Bowl Brownies.  The recipe is on the Baker's baking chocolate box.  This recipe makes the best brownies I have ever had.  Everyone that has tasted them agrees. ;D
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: bluesman on November 10, 2010, 03:55:40 PM
One Bowl Brownies.  The recipe is on the Baker's baking chocolate box.  This recipe makes the best brownies I have ever had.  Everyone that has tasted them agrees. ;D

Sounds like a good one!

I'd like to try that recipe sometime.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: flapjack on November 10, 2010, 04:56:34 PM
Another one of my hobbies besides brewing is making chocolates. I think I'm going to do a flavorful stout ganache in a dark chocolate shell next. Here's a pic of my Madagascar vanilla bean truffles and solid 58% dark chocolate squares.
(http://cocoafusionchocolates.com/images/file1387.jpg)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on November 10, 2010, 05:01:22 PM
Another one of my hobbies besides brewing is making chocolates. I think I'm going to do a flavorful stout ganache in a dark chocolate shell next. Here's a pic of my Madagascar vanilla bean truffles and solid 58% dark chocolate squares.
SWMBO just took a chocolate making class with friends, she had fun.  She's going to get some supplies and make some of her own, I'll have to suggest beer chocolates ;D  Do you have a recipe or at least a starting point for the stout ganache?
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: flapjack on November 10, 2010, 05:18:57 PM
  Do you have a recipe or at least a starting point for the stout ganache?


A great book to check out is, Chocolates and Confections: Formula, Theory, and Technique for the Artisan Confectioner by Peter P. Greweling & The Culinary Institute of America, It helps to understand the science of chocolate making and has a good formula development section. I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency, you want as little moisture in your ganache as possible, then you would have to play with the ratios of the chocolate, cream & stout reduction + butter,invert sugar & any other flavorings if using any.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on November 10, 2010, 06:15:20 PM
I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency
Does your experience give you any idea how much of a reduction that is?  75%?  Do you think that would concentrate the bitterness too much, or will it be offset by the sugar?  Or would you start with something with low bitterness?

Thanks for the book recommendation :)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: redbeerman on November 10, 2010, 08:14:16 PM
Chocolate is the best! No, beer is!  Oh, never mind.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: flapjack on November 10, 2010, 11:54:36 PM
I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency
Does your experience give you any idea how much of a reduction that is?  75%?  Do you think that would concentrate the bitterness too much, or will it be offset by the sugar?  Or would you start with something with low bitterness?

Thanks for the book recommendation :)

Heres the ganache formulation I use, its from Grewelings book

250g Heavy Cream
70g  Glucose Syrup
60g  Liqueur or liquid flavoring (beer reduction)
30g  Butter
620g Dark Chocolate

I would start out with at least a 50% reduction and maybe as much as 75%, just a guess. I'll keep you updated when I develop my recipe, I'll have to do some trial and error. The bitterness shouldn't be a huge factor since you're not using a large amount of the beer plus it should be offset by the sweetness of the glucose and chocolate (provided its not a high% dark chocolate), If its a highly bitter beer maybe try using a milk chocolate to make the ganache to balance it out.

Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on November 10, 2010, 11:55:26 PM
Great, thanks for the tips! :)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: morticaixavier on November 10, 2010, 11:57:45 PM
I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency
Does your experience give you any idea how much of a reduction that is?  75%?  Do you think that would concentrate the bitterness too much, or will it be offset by the sugar?  Or would you start with something with low bitterness?

Thanks for the book recommendation :)

Heres the ganache formulation I use, its from Grewelings book

250g Heavy Cream
70g  Glucose Syrup
60g  Liqueur or liquid flavoring (beer reduction)
30g  Butter
620g Dark Chocolate

I would start out with at least a 50% reduction and maybe as much as 75%, just a guess. I'll keep you updated when I develop my recipe, I'll have to do some trial and error. The bitterness shouldn't be a huge factor since you're not using a large amount of the beer plus it should be offset by the sweetness of the glucose and chocolate (provided its not a high% dark chocolate), If its a highly bitter beer maybe try using a milk chocolate to make the ganache to balance it out.



Not pros or even close but last year for xmas the wife and I made some RIS truffles with straight RIS no reduction and it came out pretty good. We just swapped out the liqour for the beer. lots of stouty flavor.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on November 21, 2010, 05:16:32 PM
I have another whacky pie idea.

Im thinking of making a boiled peanut custard pie. Thinking along the lines of a bean pie or sweet potato pie. Boil the peanuts till soft then make a sweetened condensed milk and egg custard with them in the food processor.

And Flapjack those chocolates are unbelievable. True art work there? How did you get the white dots? Did you use some perf. material as a stencil?
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: nicneufeld on November 22, 2010, 01:39:02 PM
Here's a pic of my Madagascar vanilla bean truffles and solid 58% dark chocolate squares.

Those are well photographed and quite beautiful.  Almost would be a shame to eat them!  Almost being operative.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: brewmichigan on November 22, 2010, 04:33:20 PM
I made over 150 truffles for my wedding last year. Never again.

Making 20-25 truffles is not bad but working with 150 is a nightmare.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: flapjack on December 10, 2010, 01:23:05 AM
morticaixavier  you can definitely just use straight beer, I'm not a pro by any means, but what I have been taught is that water is an enemy of chocolate and the less water the longer the shelf life of the product.

capozzoli I think a peanut custard pie of some sort would be amazing! let me know if you come up with a good recipe. As for the white dots they are from a transfer sheet. Its just colored cocoa butter that's designed on as plastic sheet called a "transfer sheet" applied to warm chocolate & then once sets the cocoa butter design adheres to the chocolate giving it that amazing design, easier than it looks.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: weazletoe on December 10, 2010, 01:31:44 AM
Well, we're talking desserts now. All I can say is, BLECH!! The Weaze don't do sweets. Rarely do I touch pies, cakes, cookies, ice cream etc.....

  But, that aside, I can maked some pretty killer bourbon balls. A package of Nilla wafers gone thorugh the food processor, a bit of cocoa powder, and whiskey. Mix it all up, and roll out your balls, then chill them.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: weazletoe on December 10, 2010, 01:32:34 AM
roll out your balls, then chill them.


  In retro-spect, I'm sure there is a better way I could have phrased that.  :-\
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on December 10, 2010, 03:33:13 AM
Dude, when you make them you have to walk around with a tray full, then when you present them say, in a heavy french accent
 " put my balls into your mouth"

Almost every year for Christmas my mom makes crab balls and I always say the same thing "I didnt even know they have them"  Its been twenty years and she still doesn't get it.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on December 10, 2010, 10:57:05 PM
morticaixavier  you can definitely just use straight beer, I'm not a pro by any means, but what I have been taught is that water is an enemy of chocolate and the less water the longer the shelf life of the product.

capozzoli I think a peanut custard pie of some sort would be amazing! let me know if you come up with a good recipe. As for the white dots they are from a transfer sheet. Its just colored cocoa butter that's designed on as plastic sheet called a "transfer sheet" applied to warm chocolate & then once sets the cocoa butter design adheres to the chocolate giving it that amazing design, easier than it looks.


In theory the boiled peanut custard pie is wonderful. Havent gotten it made yet although I tried twice. The problem is the peanuts, boil them up and it is a good deal of work shelling them. They get eaten before the custard is made. ::) It is so hard not to eat them.

Im gonna give it another try this weekend. I plan on getting twice the amount of peanuts needed and then practice discipline regarding picking. . 

Tonight we are making fried banana crepes. I should take some pics.

Stand by for pics of the soon to be famous Capozzoli Boiled Peanut Custard Pie.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: jaybeerman on December 11, 2010, 12:39:48 AM
Banoffee pie, that's all I got but... it's good
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: MrNate on December 11, 2010, 02:12:24 AM
Well, we're talking desserts now. All I can say is, BLECH!! The Weaze don't do sweets. Rarely do I touch pies, cakes, cookies, ice cream etc.....

I'm with you, dude. Although I did do an experiment and made some sourdough doughnuts for my daughter's 4H party tonight.
They weren't bad, equally sweet and sour.

Before:
(http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee226/nutkeis/WP_000059.jpg)

After:
(http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee226/nutkeis/WP_000066.jpg)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: oscarvan on December 11, 2010, 02:54:54 AM
Dude, when you make them you have to walk around with a tray full, then when you present them say, in a heavy french accent
 " put my balls into your mouth"

Almost every year for Christmas my mom makes crab balls and I always say the same thing "I didnt even know they have them"  Its been twenty years and she still doesn't get it.

You Sir, owe me a keyboard. One of the cocktail hour bites at my house are my "warm nuts"..... I will leave the rest unsaid.  ;D
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on December 11, 2010, 04:54:42 AM
Have you ever had cheese balls? Its the dreaded final stages of beer nuts.
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: gordonstrong on December 11, 2010, 02:13:07 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnNYXgV7L-c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnNYXgV7L-c)
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: capozzoli on December 11, 2010, 10:51:53 PM



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXSyzeVWueI
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: tschmidlin on December 12, 2010, 08:27:00 AM
Well, we're talking desserts now. All I can say is, BLECH!! The Weaze don't do sweets. Rarely do I touch pies, cakes, cookies, ice cream etc.....

I'm with you, dude. Although I did do an experiment and made some sourdough doughnuts for my daughter's 4H party tonight.
They weren't bad, equally sweet and sour.
I'm with you guys, I'd much rather have a nice dessert beer than a piece of cake.  But I was in Dresden last year visiting a friend and we went out for pastries one morning.  They were much less sweet than pastries most other places.  He said it is left over from post-WWII sugar rationing in East Germany.  They just learned to get by with less, and now people prefer it that way.  I've got to say, I prefer it too.

Great videos by the way, I was thinking of Chef's balls before I got to your message Gordon, and cap, Pete Schweddy is classic.  Don't forget about his Schweddy weiner (http://glennrivera.multiply.com/video/item/139). ;D  "There's nothing quite like the look on a child's face the moment he gets a hold of his own Schweddy weiner."
Title: Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
Post by: weazletoe on December 14, 2010, 04:20:52 AM
Have you ever had cheese balls? Its the dreaded final stages of beer nuts.

LMAO!