Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: Michael Thompson on October 15, 2010, 06:26:54 PM

Title: Beer in the Bible
Post by: Michael Thompson on October 15, 2010, 06:26:54 PM
When I was growing up, it was considered sinful for Christians to drink beer, and so, when I dedicated my life to the Lord, I became a teetotaller. However, I noted that the Bible does not condemn drinking per se, but drunkenness and out-of-control intoxication. Solomon in the Proverbs warns against the dangers of mixed drinks and strong liquor. Paul writes to the Ephesians to avoid being drunk with wine, which he describes as "dissipation."

On the other hand, we have a clear example of Jesus turning water into very good wine at a wedding feast, and the same Paul advises Timothy to drink a bit of wine now and then for health reasons. It does not appear that alcohol was considered sinful by the Biblical writers in the same way as my peers in a small Colorado farming community. But beer seems to gain no mention at all.

At least that's what I would have thought before I read a fascinating article in Biblical Archaeology Review for September/October 2010 (Did the Ancient Israelites Drink Beer? by Michael M. Homan). It would appear that the lack of prominent mentions of beer in the Bible are due far more to the inadequacies of translation than lack of mention by the Bible itself.

In the article, Mr. Homan cites several mentions of beer, brewing and a popular beer culture in ancient times, which are reflected in the Biblical record. He even gives a recipe for ancient beer as brewed in Bible times. Apparently, they made barley into cakes, which were soaked in water and fermented. The similarities to bread-making have obscured the references to beer in most modern translations.

I found especially fascinating his take on the popular quote from Ecclesiastes, “Cast thy bread upon the waters: for thou shalt find it after many days. Give a portion to seven, and also to eight; for thou knowest not what evil shall be upon the earth.” Ecclesiastes 11:1, 2, KJV.

Mr. Homan's take on this passage is:

Quote
Throw your bread upon the face of the water, because in many days you will acquire it. Give a serving to seven and also eight, because you do not know what evil will be upon the land.
(Ecclesiastes 11:1–2)

I believe this is a reference to the cakes of bread used in ancient beer production, as noted earlier. Cast your bread upon the water and it will return as beer. Much like the phrase carpe diem, the author advises making beer and drinking it with friends, because you don’t know what evil might be coming.

I realize not all of the members of this forum are Christians or usually interested in the Bible, but this article is still interesting for its historical value and its commentary on contemporary religion, especially prohibitions against the use of alcohol in any form. Check it out at: http://tinyurl.com/34rtncc (http://tinyurl.com/34rtncc)

BTW, I've long since made peace with the responsible enjoyment of alcohol and I enjoy brewing and imbibing a large variety of beer, and the occasional whiskey without a worry that it is inconsistent with my Christian testimony. If any of you run across friends or acquaintances who feel as I used to, you might refer them to this article.

Sláinte,

Michael
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: BrewArk on October 15, 2010, 06:32:26 PM
If Jesus had been a German instead of a Jew, would he have passed a cup of beer at the last supper?
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: MDixon on October 15, 2010, 06:49:41 PM
I've always questioned how exact the translation of the Bible really is. I did a search regarding the KJV not too long ago. Start reading at 1535 and progress forward, also note how 14 books disappeared over time. http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/

So, my thinking is if people can cut and paste and choose what to include and exclude over time, they can certainly change verbiage or it could be that some things just don't translate well.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tumarkin on October 15, 2010, 07:16:53 PM
So, if you were to 'cast your bread upon the waters' with the intent of making beer...... how would you go about it? Recipe? Techniques? Yeast or Spontaneous?
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: weithman5 on October 15, 2010, 07:37:41 PM
thank you michael :)
and what kind of water would you cast your bread on to, jordan riverish water, med sea water?
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: Hokerer on October 15, 2010, 07:44:40 PM
and what kind of water would you cast your bread on to, jordan riverish water, med sea water?

Well, just send a sample of each off to Ward Labs
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: denny on October 15, 2010, 08:20:26 PM
I want to pint out that we've received some comments about the subject matter of this thread.  The general feeling of the mods and the AHA is that there is interesting info presented here and we're gonna let it go for now.  But please, everyone be careful to keep it on the topic of beer and not religion.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dcbc on October 15, 2010, 09:10:41 PM
I want to pint out ....

Delightful slip there, Denny.  I want to pint out, too, but can't do so for another hour or so!  :D
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dbeechum on October 15, 2010, 09:20:50 PM
A good portion of my day job is dealing with linguistics and understanding how to use and develop rules of language to deal with our company's challenges. To that end, I spend a fair amount of time working with an actual full blooded and degreed up individual with knowledge of how this actually works.

When talking about the hobby, she pointed out something very interesting. There's a whole branch of linguistics that studies the evolution of language and how things have transformed over time. One of the techniques they use to trace language relationships is key words that pretty much appear everywhere and change relatively slowly. Beer is one of those words. Think of it this way.. beer = bier = bierre = biru = pivo, etc.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: denny on October 15, 2010, 09:23:09 PM
I want to pint out ....

Delightful slip there, Denny.  I want to pint out, too, but can't do so for another hour or so!  :D

I could say it's just because I'm a bad typist, but I like your way better!
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: phillamb168 on October 15, 2010, 09:28:38 PM
A good portion of my day job is dealing with linguistics and understanding how to use and develop rules of language to deal with our company's challenges. To that end, I spend a fair amount of time working with an actual full blooded and degreed up individual with knowledge of how this actually works.

When talking about the hobby, she pointed out something very interesting. There's a whole branch of linguistics that studies the evolution of language and how things have transformed over time. One of the techniques they use to trace language relationships is key words that pretty much appear everywhere and change relatively slowly. Beer is one of those words. Think of it this way.. beer = bier = bierre = biru = pivo, etc.

Hey, my wife has a Masters in Linguistics! And I've got a doctor in linguini, but that's another story, wokka wokka.

---

Alton Brown or someone equally intelligent said something along the lines of: civilization started because people started cultivating crops, and supposedly those crops were being cultivated specifically for beer-making. I would not be surprised if it turned up somewhere in the Bible.

The casting bread upon the waters thing (and the grain cake thing) is really cool! My wife and I are reading the entire Bible in one year, I'll keep a lookout for further references. Maybe I can even eek out a recipe!

Michael, do you have an Internets link to that article?
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: phillamb168 on October 15, 2010, 09:49:41 PM
The wife just mentioned that the ancient Egyptians were known to have brewed beer, and the Israelites, having been their slaves, would probably have made their own version according to a similar recipe. Anybody know any Egyptian beer recipes?
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dmtaylor on October 15, 2010, 09:51:23 PM
Not entirely beer-related, but Mary freaked out when they ran out of wine at a wedding, and so Jesus' first miracle was making wine out of water.  He's so cool like that -- He's all, "Woman, what do you expect me to do about it?" then He goes and brews 100 gallons of the finest wine in a split second.  My Hero.  Seriously.

Oh, and yeah, I made the Sumerian beer recipe a few years ago, which was in the September 2007 issue of BYO.  It was okay.  Did great in competition.  Can you say, sour fruity bacon?  Cuz that's exactly how it tasted.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: jaybeerman on October 15, 2010, 09:59:08 PM
1. Thanks for keeping the thread
2. Language, translation(s), beer - all interesting topics
3. The original post is proof that there are people who can reason their way through a complicated matter, Awesome!
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dbeechum on October 15, 2010, 10:07:32 PM
The wife just mentioned that the ancient Egyptians were known to have brewed beer, and the Israelites, having been their slaves, would probably have made their own version according to a similar recipe. Anybody know any Egyptian beer recipes?

The Egyptians weren't just known to brew beer, they were fanatical about it. You know how people were paid in Egypt? Loaves of bread and buckets of beer. Seriously, that's what your salary was. They were really just behind the Sumerians and Babylonians in terms of devotion to brew.

As for recipes, my library is all packed up at the moment, but I did have notes from a series of New Kingdom and Old Kingdom beer recipes that Kirin made a few years back as a piece of research. I'll see what I can do when I unpack.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: euge on October 15, 2010, 11:04:23 PM
I certainly wouldn't be surprised that beer preceded mass cultivation. Grain left in jars gets wet. When the people recover the grain it's gone "funny" and they eat it any way. It becomes a wonder in their world. The rest is history. And some part of that would be in the bible.

Perhaps the original intent was to pass down detailed brewing knowledge now mostly lost over time and has become:
Quote
Throw your bread upon the face of the water, because in many days you will acquire it. Give a serving to seven and also eight, because you do not know what evil will be upon the land.
(Ecclesiastes 11:1–2)
So what makes it into the bible is this particularly cryptic phrase with additional advice not to be stingy or someone will take it anyway. :o



Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tubercle on October 16, 2010, 12:04:51 AM
 Every known culture has had some form of fermented beverage from grain or fruit since time immemorial. Yes, the Israelites had "beer". The second thing Noah did after getting off the Ark was plant a vineyard and make wine.

  The Europeans have been accused of introducing "alcoholic beverages" to the native north and south Americans. They didn't have to because the native americans already had all they could brew. The Europeans just introduced the distilled versions.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: Hokerer on October 16, 2010, 01:02:28 AM
Beer is one of those words. Think of it this way.. beer = bier = bierre = biru = pivo, etc.

beer = beir = bierre = cerveza, oh wait  :-\
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: richardt on October 16, 2010, 03:02:37 AM
I made a "Bible Beer" not too long ago.  My Mom likes Food for Life's 'Ezekiel 4:9,' a sprouted 100% whole grain bread.
I read the packaging which quotes Ezekiel 4:9:  "Take also unto thee WHEAT, and BARLEY, and BEANS, and LENTILS, and MILLET, and SPELT, and put them into one vessel, and make bread of it..."

My "Bible Beer" recipe used 80% Barley and 4% each of Wheat, Beans, Lentils, Millet, and Spelt (total 20%). 
And water.
And yeast.

I recommend soaking all the beans and puree them first, then do the cereal mash (thin mash with constant stirring and low heat to avoid scorching).
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: rabid_dingo on October 16, 2010, 05:38:34 AM
Beer is one of those words. Think of it this way.. beer = bier = bierre = biru = pivo, etc.

beer = beir = bierre = cerveza, oh wait  :-\

No, you are on the right track...Think Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Just try and say "Mecero! Dos Cerevisiae por favor!" and see the reaction. ;)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 16, 2010, 05:43:31 AM
You might find the first two entries here interesting . . . I do. :)

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=beer
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dbeechum on October 16, 2010, 06:42:44 AM
beer = beir = bierre = cerveza, oh wait  :-\

Yeah, it changes very little, but there are still variants based on different root languages. They both run in branches of Indo-European, but the whole beer line comes out of the Germanic branch and then was picked up into French, etc, but not Spanish which retains the Italic cervesiae construct.

My ultimate dream job other than owning my own place would be owning my own place and having time to pick up degrees on a perpetual student basis. I really do miss school some days.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 16, 2010, 07:12:39 AM
My ultimate dream job other than owning my own place would be owning my own place and having time to pick up degrees on a perpetual student basis. I really do miss school some days.
Careful what you wish for Drew - it's not all it's cracked up to be.  The occasional class is awesomely fun, all the little check boxes you have to satisfy to get a degree . . . not so much.   :-\
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: beerocd on October 16, 2010, 12:07:07 PM
I really do miss school some days.

You "miss" school - it wouldn't be the same going back though. The way it was and the way it is are very likely two incredibly different things. Plus all the incredibly hot chicks at school are now born in a different decade than you. Just saying, if you've romanticized college life - you can't go back. I love learning; I especially enjoy those days when I'm immersed in a new subject and there's so much to comprehend that I have a headache at the end of the day and it feels like my head is going to pop.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: euge on October 16, 2010, 03:49:32 PM
If one wants knowledge being an autodidact is the way to go. As homebrewers it looks like we have a bit of that bent in our personalities.  ;)

That being said I enjoy the discipline of having to attend class and study. The extraneous stuff doesn't matter except for the hot chicks.  ;D

What that has to do with beer in the bible I don't know except I went to Mass 6 days a week for 4 years in high-school and it never kept me from touching alcohol. Not once.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: beerocd on October 16, 2010, 03:52:10 PM
Oh NO! The topic strayed  :o !!!!
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: euge on October 16, 2010, 04:09:23 PM
Oh NO! The topic strayed  :o !!!!


And my efforts to drag it back on course probably didn't help either. ;)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 16, 2010, 04:10:37 PM
Oh NO! The topic strayed  :o !!!!


And my efforts to drag it back on course probably didn't help either. ;)

Is that what you called that euge?  ;D
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: euge on October 16, 2010, 04:39:42 PM
Well it was more of an acknowledgement that we had strayed from the path... ;)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tumarkin on October 16, 2010, 04:45:30 PM
Well it was more of an acknowledgement that we had strayed from the path... ;)

straying from the path...... and on a biblical thread. am I reading too much into that? yep, I think so  :D
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: gordonstrong on October 17, 2010, 03:31:16 AM
Quote
Plus all the incredibly hot chicks at school are now born in a different decade than you

You must not know where Drew went to school...
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 17, 2010, 04:39:28 AM
Well it was more of an acknowledgement that we had strayed from the path... ;)

Quote
Proverbs 21:16
A man who strays from the path of understanding comes to rest in the company of the dead.
;D

Give me a random saying, I can find a biblical quote that seems to cover it :)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 17, 2010, 04:44:12 AM
Quote
Plus all the incredibly hot chicks at school are now born in a different decade than you

You must not know where Drew went to school...

Quote
John 7:15
The Jews were amazed and asked, "How did this man get such learning without having studied?"

See what I mean?   ;D
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dbeechum on October 17, 2010, 05:55:16 AM
You must not know where Drew went to school...

Pot... meet kettle... :)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: alikocho on October 17, 2010, 09:50:11 AM
Think of it this way.. beer = bier = bierre = biru = pivo, etc.

Except, that there is much discussion as to whether pivo is a deriviation of beer or of the same root of the word pit' in Russian, meaning to drink. Pivo is thought by some to mean 'that which is drunk', which may indicate the consumption of beer in the past in preference to water.

The bread + water aspect of brewing does work in Russia, though. Despite more modern methods of producing kvas along the same lines as beer (Randy mosher gives an AG recipe for Kvas in Radical Brewing), it was traditionally made by soaking stale rye bread in water and then allowing it to ferment. The word kvas relates to the process of fermentation, rather than any word for beer.

I'm going to have to get out a Russian Orthodox Bible and look for beer references now, aren't I.....?

Oh, and as a College Professor who spent way too long in school, you don't want to go back Drew.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: bluesman on October 17, 2010, 02:54:57 PM
The Egyptians often used beer in religious ceremonies and as the meal-time beverage. Because of the prevalence of beer in the Egyptian life, many Egyptologists have studied beer residue from Egyptian vessels. For a very long time it was thought that the Egyptians made a crude beer by crumbling lightly baked, well-leavened bread into water. They then strained it out with a sieve into a vat and the water was allowed to ferment because of the yeast from the bread. It has been thought that the Egyptians flavored the beer with date juice or honey, because the straining method would not give much flavor.

Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: dbeechum on October 18, 2010, 06:44:42 PM
Except, that there is much discussion as to whether pivo is a deriviation of beer or of the same root of the word pit' in Russian, meaning to drink.

That's one of the things I love.. it's all still up for debate.

Also, I don't think it was posted earlier, but here's the article the OP was referencing.

http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/article.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=36&Issue=05&ArticleID=04&Page=0&UserID=0&
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: majorvices on October 18, 2010, 07:23:39 PM
My favorite quote out of the Bible is:

"But Beer was lonely. So God created Pretzels. And it was good."

Guinessess 5:20
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tumarkin on October 18, 2010, 07:29:34 PM
My favorite quote out of the Bible is:

"But Beer was lonely. So God created Pretzels. And it was good."

Guinessess 5:20

couldn't find that in mine, what version do you have, the Saint Gambrinus version?
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: Slowbrew on October 18, 2010, 08:10:44 PM
The wife just mentioned that the ancient Egyptians were known to have brewed beer, and the Israelites, having been their slaves, would probably have made their own version according to a similar recipe. Anybody know any Egyptian beer recipes?

Sorry, no recipes, but I have read that many of the workmen on the pyramids were paid in beer.

(I'll avoid the parts of the articles about the Jews not really being salves for the majority of the time they worked in Egypt because I don't have information to back up or disprove those claims.)

Paul

Edit:  I should have read further, Drew already covered this.  Move along, nothing to see here.  8)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: capozzoli on October 19, 2010, 03:40:42 AM
Well it was more of an acknowledgement that we had strayed from the path... ;)

Quote
Proverbs 21:16
A man who strays from the path of understanding comes to rest in the company of the dead.
;D

Give me a random saying, I can find a biblical quote that seems to cover it :)

Try this one: "There are those who could not find their own ass with both hands and a mirror"..
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 03:52:32 AM
Try this one: "There are those who could not find their own ass with both hands and a mirror"..
Matthew 7:7
"Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you."

Sounds like they just need to ask for help.   ;D

But that really has nothing to do with throwing bread into water and making beer.  I might have to try that some time, I like to bake bread.  The problem is it usually gets eaten too quickly, there's no such thing as stale homemade bread in our house. :)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: Mikey on October 19, 2010, 04:03:08 AM
Try this one: "There are those who could not find their own ass with both hands and a mirror"..
Matthew 7:7
"Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you."

Sounds like they just need to ask for help.   ;D

But that really has nothing to do with throwing bread into water and making beer.  I might have to try that some time, I like to bake bread.  The problem is it usually gets eaten too quickly, there's no such thing as stale homemade bread in our house. :)


Well I can tell you from far past experience that I once asked for a free beer and didn't get it. I then looked for one laying around the house and couldn't find it. As a last resort I went to a neighbor's house, knocked on the door and they wouldn't open it. Life is like that sometimes. :D
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: lostralph on October 19, 2010, 04:04:14 AM
The wife just mentioned that the ancient Egyptians were known to have brewed beer, and the Israelites, having been their slaves, would probably have made their own version according to a similar recipe. Anybody know any Egyptian beer recipes?

Actually in the newest issue of BYO (November 2010, just picked up my copy) they have an article about a beer recreated from Ancient Egypt "Tutankhamun Ale"  and it does have a recipe.  I'd provide a link but it looks like their server is currently offline.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: capozzoli on October 19, 2010, 05:32:55 AM
Beer with bread and water, isnt that just Kvass? Or did someone say that already.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 07:34:26 AM
Someone mentioned it.  Kvass is rye bread though, IIRC.  Low alcohol too.  I suppose it would violate the spirit of things to mash the bread with a little 6-row, but it seems like the best way to convert the starch without using bugs.  I had a rye beer with caraway in it once, that was interesting and pretty good.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: alikocho on October 19, 2010, 06:07:50 PM
Kvas is generally made with stale rye bread, although more modern and 'monastery' versions now say that they use malt in the recipe. Sugars can be added, including honey. I have at least 20 different recipes in my Russian cooking and brewing manuals, which I'll happily translate if people want them.

It is generally low alcohol. I have no idea what the alcohol content is of the average commercial kvas, but Russians regard it as a soft drink.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 19, 2010, 06:45:36 PM
I've read that Russians regard anything less than 1.2% alcohol as non-alcoholic, while the level in the US is 0.5% or lower.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: a10t2 on October 19, 2010, 06:56:45 PM
It is generally low alcohol. I have no idea what the alcohol content is of the average commercial kvas, but Russians regard it as a soft drink.

The stuff I had in Moscow was 1.5%. I don't know how representative that is.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: alikocho on October 19, 2010, 07:17:58 PM
I've read that Russians regard anything less than 1.2% alcohol as non-alcoholic, while the level in the US is 0.5% or lower.

I know some Russians who regard below 5% as non-alcoholic ;)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: beerocd on October 20, 2010, 01:06:29 AM
Kvas is generally made with stale rye bread, although more modern and 'monastery' versions now say that they use malt in the recipe. Sugars can be added, including honey. I have at least 20 different recipes in my Russian cooking and brewing manuals, which I'll happily translate if people want them.

It is generally low alcohol. I have no idea what the alcohol content is of the average commercial kvas, but Russians regard it as a soft drink.

Classic rye bread is probably different than the "wonderbread" variety we get at the stores these days.
Is there a "classic" kvas? 20 recipes is a bit much but maybe something like what the street vendors are serving would be cool.
And, thanks in advance.

Russian family background or just fascinated by Russian culture?  (I ask because I saw you are in the UK)
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: brewmonk on October 20, 2010, 11:47:18 AM
Yeah, I know they aren't quite what we're looking for ::) but ... in the RSV translation you have:

Numbers  21:16
And from there they continued to Beer; that is the well of which the LORD said to Moses, "Gather the people together, and I will give them water."

and

Judges 9:21
And Jotham ran away and fled, and went to Beer and dwelt there, for fear of Abim'elech his brother.

Sorry, couldn't resist.  ;D

So, I'm assuming all these ancient beers would have been rather sweet, or was there some type of bittering agent used other than hops?  I've never studied ancient beer recipes.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: jeffy on October 20, 2010, 02:42:29 PM
Here's an interesting read about biblical translations concerning beer and snobbery:
http://www.bib-arch.org/press-god-drank-beer.asp
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: jeffy on October 20, 2010, 02:48:47 PM
I've read that Russians regard anything less than 1.2% alcohol as non-alcoholic, while the level in the US is 0.5% or lower.

I know some Russians who regard below 5% as non-alcoholic ;)
In Maureen Ogle's book, Ambitious Brew, she describes a NYC courthouse scene during the lead up to prohibition where they brought in an expert witness to refute the notion that beer was alcoholic.  He testified that he had already consumed several beers that day with no ill effect.  The anti-saloon side lost the argument.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: tschmidlin on October 20, 2010, 03:56:04 PM
In Maureen Ogle's book, Ambitious Brew, she describes a NYC courthouse scene during the lead up to prohibition where they brought in an expert witness to refute the notion that beer was alcoholic.  He testified that he had already consumed several beers that day with no ill effect.  The anti-saloon side lost the argument.
I remember that Jeff, wasn't there some insane number of beers the guy claimed to drink every day, like 30+?  I have a copy of that book somewhere . . .
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: Slowbrew on October 20, 2010, 06:39:17 PM
I've checked every bible in the house and I haven't found any beer in any of them.   >:(

I have been known to take beer to church in order to bribe people to work the late shift in the concession stand at certain functions though.   ;D  (Never for sale or distribution, only to keep people around long enough to get the dishes done and the gym floor cleaned, and the decorations taken down and... well you get the idea.)

Paul
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: alikocho on October 20, 2010, 06:51:42 PM
Kvas is generally made with stale rye bread, although more modern and 'monastery' versions now say that they use malt in the recipe. Sugars can be added, including honey. I have at least 20 different recipes in my Russian cooking and brewing manuals, which I'll happily translate if people want them.

It is generally low alcohol. I have no idea what the alcohol content is of the average commercial kvas, but Russians regard it as a soft drink.

Classic rye bread is probably different than the "wonderbread" variety we get at the stores these days.
Is there a "classic" kvas? 20 recipes is a bit much but maybe something like what the street vendors are serving would be cool.
And, thanks in advance.

Russian family background or just fascinated by Russian culture?  (I ask because I saw you are in the UK)

I'll translate a recipe or two, and put them in a new thread. here http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=4215.0 (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=4215.0)

I'm a University Professor in 20th Century Russian History in the UK, so I guess its fascination with the culture. I've lived in Moscow, and my wife is half Russian, so there's a bit of family in it as well.
Title: Re: Beer in the Bible
Post by: kgs on October 21, 2010, 03:04:44 AM
Let us not forget, "Cast your bread on the surface of the waters, for you will find it after many days." This obviously refers to both fermentation and the likelihood that some of your best beer will resurface when you're cleaning a closet.