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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: dano14041 on October 22, 2010, 02:08:08 AM

Title: Overshooting FG
Post by: dano14041 on October 22, 2010, 02:08:08 AM
I just took a gravity reading on the ESB I brewed a couple weeks ago. It was 1.011, but was estimated to be 1.018. Other than the higher alcohol content, is there any thing to worry about in over shooting the FG?

My OG was 1.059 and FG is 1.011 for and ABV of 6.26%.

Thanks,
Dano
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: tschmidlin on October 22, 2010, 02:12:43 AM
I just took a gravity reading on the ESB I brewed a couple weeks ago. It was 1.011, but was estimated to be 1.018. Other than the higher alcohol content, is there any thing to worry about in over shooting the FG?

My OG was 1.059 and FG is 1.011 for and ABV of 6.26%.

Thanks,
Dano
Besides the higher alcohol, you can expect a thinner body.  You may also find a higher than expected perceived bitterness, and decreased malty flavors among other things.  It will probably still be good though, so RDWHAHB.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: dano14041 on October 22, 2010, 02:18:58 AM
Besides the higher alcohol, you can expect a thinner body.  You may also find a higher than expected perceived bitterness, and decreased malty flavors among other things.  It will probably still be good though, so RDWHAHB.

Thank you! I will really relax when I start drinking this.  ;)

I turned the temp control down to 35F hopefully that will stop any further fermentation.

Thanks!
Dano
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: a10t2 on October 22, 2010, 02:30:24 AM
Just throwing this out there: are you kegging? It's extremely dangerous to stop fermentation in a beer that's going to be bottled.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: euge on October 22, 2010, 09:50:53 AM
A couple of weeks ago? Don't worry about too much more attenuation. That's done.

Overshooting the FG can be a RDWHAHB situation. Really, what more can one do? However, It can seriously throw your beer out of balance. Alcohol too prominent. Too bitter. A bad combination and can be harsh. A hard lesson especially if you brew in quantity.

All Grain recipe?
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: bluesman on October 22, 2010, 11:46:58 AM
That's over 80% attenuation which is fairly high for an ESB.  Assuming you were brewing all-grain, the mash temp can have an affect on attenuation. The beer is more than likely fully attenuated but it's always better to verify that by taking a couple of gravity readings on cosecutive days. If the gravity reading stays consistent two or three days in a row it is ready for racking and or bottling.

I wouldn't worry about it your beer will be okay.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: dano14041 on October 22, 2010, 03:48:28 PM
A couple of weeks ago? Don't worry about too much more attenuation. That's done.

Overshooting the FG can be a RDWHAHB situation. Really, what more can one do? However, It can seriously throw your beer out of balance. Alcohol too prominent. Too bitter. A bad combination and can be harsh. A hard lesson especially if you brew in quantity.

All Grain recipe?

It was an all grain batch, my first. I tasted the test sample and it did seem thin and the alcohol was more than I expected. I am hoping that carbonation will help a bit with the body.

I am pretty sure the fermentation is finished, there hasn't been any activity in the airlock in a few days. I will know for sure when I take the next two gravity readings tonight and Sat. If the gravity doesn't change, I am planning on bottling Sat evening.

I usually have trouble getting the FG low enough, it was kind of a surprise when it turned out that much lower than estimated.

Thank you All for your help!
Dano
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: denny on October 22, 2010, 04:01:25 PM
It was an all grain batch, my first. I tasted the test sample and it did seem thin and the alcohol was more than I expected. I am hoping that carbonation will help a bit with the body.

Try checking your thermometer calibration.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: redbeerman on October 22, 2010, 04:19:17 PM
It was an all grain batch, my first. I tasted the test sample and it did seem thin and the alcohol was more than I expected. I am hoping that carbonation will help a bit with the body.

Try checking your thermometer calibration.

Mash temp is critical and so is yeast strain.  WLP002 is very good for an ESB.  And maybe try brewing Ron's award winning ESB recipe.  It was quite good.  I brewed an EIPA using his recipe as a starting point at it turned out quite good, too.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: maxieboy on October 22, 2010, 09:14:20 PM

Try checking your thermometer calibration.

This. Could be you mashed low, giving greater fermentability.

Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: dano14041 on October 23, 2010, 05:00:40 AM
I took another gravity reading tonight and it is still at 1.011. I am pretty sure it is done fermenting, but I will take another reading tomorrow before I bottle.

I had two thermometers (one digital probe and one regular) when I was mashing and they both read the same temp. My mash temp was 152 falling to 150 over the hour. My mash out and sparge temps were low tho. I didn't ever reach more than 160 F.

I split the sample with a friend tonight and he could taste the alcohol, but could also taste the malty, fruitiness and goodness of an ESB. The bitterness might be a little low.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: tygo on October 23, 2010, 11:37:56 AM
I had two thermometers (one digital probe and one regular) when I was mashing and they both read the same temp. My mash temp was 152 falling to 150 over the hour. My mash out and sparge temps were low tho. I didn't ever reach more than 160 F.

At those mash temps I'm not surprised at all that you got around 81% attenuation.  As said above if you want less in the future bump the mash temp up.
Title: Re: Overshooting FG
Post by: redbeerman on October 25, 2010, 02:50:50 PM
I had two thermometers (one digital probe and one regular) when I was mashing and they both read the same temp. My mash temp was 152 falling to 150 over the hour. My mash out and sparge temps were low tho. I didn't ever reach more than 160 F.

At those mash temps I'm not surprised at all that you got around 81% attenuation.  As said above if you want less in the future bump the mash temp up.

This.